Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

3

Share

Download to read offline

Content Design for Behavior Change

Download to read offline

When you're trying to change your user's behavior, you can't just create any old kind of content. You need to understand how people make decisions, how we build [and unbuild] habits, and what shortcuts our brain uses that sometimes trip us up.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Content Design for Behavior Change

  1. 1. Laura Creekmore @lauracreekmore content design for behavior change
  2. 2. ?
  3. 3. Healthy choices https://www.flickr.com/photos/adoseofshipboy/
  4. 4. ? Now…A few questions for you
  5. 5. congratulations https://www.flickr.com/photos/adoseofshipboy/
  6. 6. Maybe not.
  7. 7. Welcome new members I’m actually a member. 7
  8. 8. ?
  9. 9. behavior change is hard
  10. 10. Content can help
  11. 11. people are funny
  12. 12. Decisionmaking 12
  13. 13. Decisionmaking Dual process theory Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. 12
  14. 14. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. 12
  15. 15. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. choice overload We are overwhelmed by too much information or too many choices. 12
  16. 16. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. context No one decides anything in a vacuum. choice overload We are overwhelmed by too much information or too many choices. 12
  17. 17. book recommendation 1 Designing for Behavior change by Steven Wendel 13
  18. 18. book recommendation 2 switch by Chip Heath and Dan Heath 14
  19. 19. education≠Step one (Not necessarily, anyway) Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  20. 20. RIGHT?
  21. 21. my rider is going nuts https://www.flickr.com/photos/adoseofshipboy/
  22. 22. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. context No one decides anything in a vacuum. choice overload We are overwhelmed by too much information or too many choices. 18
  23. 23. Shaping the path https://www.flickr.com/photos/88642337@N02/
  24. 24. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. context No one decides anything in a vacuum. choice overload We are overwhelmed by too much information or too many choices. 20
  25. 25. too much is too hard
  26. 26. too much is too hard
  27. 27. Decisionmaking Dual process theory cognitive bias Our decision making process can be described in a couple of main ways: Deliberative or intuitive. Our brain uses shortcuts to help us make decisions. They work — mostly. context No one decides anything in a vacuum. choice overload We are overwhelmed by too much information or too many choices. 24
  28. 28. confirmation bias Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  29. 29. curse of knowledge Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  30. 30. normalcy bias Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  31. 31. optimism bias Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  32. 32. behavior change 29
  33. 33. behavior change stages of change triggers shaping the content Understanding when the If this, then that time is right Communicating for effectiveness 29
  34. 34. Transtheoretical model 30
  35. 35. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30
  36. 36. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30 Pre-contemplation
  37. 37. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30 Pre-contemplation contemplation
  38. 38. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30 Pre-contemplation contemplation preparation
  39. 39. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30 Pre-contemplation contemplation preparation action
  40. 40. Transtheoretical model stages of change 30 Pre-contemplation contemplation preparation action maintenance
  41. 41. Tiny habits 31 stages of triggers change
  42. 42. how we make a difference stages of change triggers shaping the content 32
  43. 43. book recommendation 3 how to get people to do stuff by Susan Weinschenk 33
  44. 44. Designing content Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  45. 45. Understand your audience
  46. 46. design content for user context stages of change 36 Pre-contemplation contemplation preparation action maintenance
  47. 47. Tiny habits 37 stages of triggers change
  48. 48. let the elephant do the work
  49. 49. compassion Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  50. 50. compassion Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  51. 51. It’s hard to fit exercise into a busy schedule, but you can do it! We’ll help.
  52. 52. Take a 10-minute walk after dinner tonight.
  53. 53. park in the farthest row.
  54. 54. Congrats! You find ways to move more every day.
  55. 55. Seamless early, thoughtful later Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  56. 56. change the experience to inspire thought Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  57. 57. maybe never?
  58. 58. match your messages and channels Creative Commons 3.0 by Freepik
  59. 59. ?
  60. 60. book recommendation 4 design for care by Peter Jones 50
  61. 61. THANK YOU HOW TO CONTACT ME Changing behavior? Content strategy? Health care? Cards baseball? I’m your woman. EMAIL: laura@creekcontent.com TWITTER: @lauracreekmore 51
  • LamprosRoussos

    Aug. 14, 2017
  • usablelearning

    Aug. 26, 2016
  • janepathomporn

    Dec. 15, 2015

When you're trying to change your user's behavior, you can't just create any old kind of content. You need to understand how people make decisions, how we build [and unbuild] habits, and what shortcuts our brain uses that sometimes trip us up.

Views

Total views

1,077

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

6

Actions

Downloads

24

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

3

×