Kamishibai

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Kamishibai

  1. 1. Kamishibai “Paper Drama”
  2. 2. History <ul><li>Originated in Japanese Buddhist temples in the 12 th century </li></ul><ul><li>Monks used picture scrolls (e-maki) </li></ul><ul><li>to convey stories with moral lessons to a mostly illiterate audience </li></ul><ul><li>Revived in the 1920s through the 1950s </li></ul><ul><li>Revival tied to the global depression of the late 1920s </li></ul>
  3. 3. History <ul><li>When World War II broke out, the Japanese government began to use kamishibai as propaganda </li></ul><ul><li>With the advent of television in 1953, the itinerant storyteller gradually disappeared from Japan’s streets </li></ul>
  4. 4. Description <ul><li>Kamishibai storyteller rode from village to village on a bicycle equipped with a small stage </li></ul><ul><li>The storyteller used two wood clappers, called hyoshigi, to announce his arrival </li></ul><ul><li>Children who bought candy from the storyteller got the best seats in front of the stage </li></ul>
  5. 5. Procedure <ul><li>The storyteller told several stories using a set of illustrated boards inserted into the stage </li></ul><ul><li>The boards were withdrawn one by one as the story was told </li></ul><ul><li>The stories were told as continuing serials, and would stop at an exciting moment, leaving the children impatient for the next visit </li></ul>
  6. 6. Kamishibai Today <ul><li>In recent years, kamishibai has had a revival in Japanese libraries and elementary schools </li></ul><ul><li>Stories today are used to promote good morals and academic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Kamishibai has also influenced manga and anime </li></ul>
  7. 7. Kamishibai Men
  8. 8. Kamishibai Project <ul><li>Select a simple Japanese fable from the resource folder on the English portal </li></ul><ul><li>Divide the story into major sections </li></ul><ul><li>Re-write the story with each scene ending on a cliffhanger </li></ul><ul><li>Rough sketch the scenes on the storyboard template </li></ul>
  9. 9. Kamishibai Project <ul><li>Transfer scenes and text onto large, posterboard cards about 14 inches by 10 inches </li></ul><ul><li>Follow the pattern on page 25 of your handout for the text and illustration organization </li></ul><ul><li>Practice the story </li></ul>
  10. 10. Performance Tips and Ideas <ul><li>Emphasize dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Use bright colors and clear pictures without excessive detail </li></ul><ul><li>Make eye contact with your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Vary the way you change cards based upon their content </li></ul><ul><li>Add musical instruments as sound effects </li></ul>
  11. 11. Performance Notes <ul><li>Japanese folktales often begin with the phrase, Mukashi, mukashi , freely translated as: Once upon a time, long, long ago </li></ul><ul><li>They often end with the word, Oshimai , freely translated as “The End” </li></ul>

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