Engaging Men inPhysical ActivitySandra GordonManAlive Project Co-ordinatorCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 A...
ManAlive - a key part of Cancer Focus’Cancer Prevention Strategyis funded by Big Lottery FundCopyright © Cancer Focus Nort...
OverviewManAlive ProjectPhysical Activity inputKey Factors to engaging with men:• ‘Windows’ and ‘Hooks’• Holding on to you...
ManAlive ProjectAim: The ManAlive Project aims to improve thephysical and mental health of disadvantaged menliving in one ...
Partnership Working• Existing partnership• GAA New Social Initiative 2010 – ‘To use theGAA Club network as a vehicle to en...
Engaging Men in Physical ActivityAim: To introduce a group of older men tophysical activity in order to support improvedph...
Marketing and Making Contact• Use ‘gatekeepers’ to encourage other men toattend.• Contact via one-to-one.• Word-of-mouth r...
Finding ‘Hooks’• Take an opportunistic approach - find the best‘window’.• Use incentives e.g. provision of lunch / breakfa...
‘Hook’ - Health Checks• Blood pressure• Pulse• Blood sugar (random sample)• Cholesterol (random sample)• BMI• Body composi...
Consult with Men in ProgrammeDevelopment and Delivery• Involve men in shaping and determining the mosteffective strategies...
Create Male-Friendly Environments• Creation of an open, friendly environment - overcomeany discomfort, mistrust or suspici...
Access• Try to have easy access (car parking and localvenue).• Outside normal working hours or a choice oftimes if possibl...
Plan Small and Realistically• Expect to start small, think short term andbuild slowly.• Focus on quality.• Don’t be put of...
ManAlive: A positive Approach ToMen’s Health Work• Men work best with those who believe they arepeople of worth rather tha...
Engaging Men in Physical Activity, Sandra Gordon, Cancer Focus Northern Ireland. EWAC 2013
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Engaging Men in Physical Activity, Sandra Gordon, Cancer Focus Northern Ireland. EWAC 2013

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  • We were the first local cancer charitiy, set up in 1970, with the principal aim of reducing the impact of cancer within the local community
  • Focus on Marketing and Making Initial Contact Where possible contact men in person; focus on engaging male service users via one to one out reach e.g. telephone contact or contact in person. This is often good in conjunction with or as a follow up to an advertising campaign. Use “snowball” or word of mouth recruitment to overcome what for many men can be an inherent suspicion of engaging with programmes. The use of ‘cold advertising’ or parachuting-in experts from outside the community is very often not as successful as simple word-of-mouth recruitment. Learning from other men’s experiences may support others to engage (“if he can do it so can I”). Use ‘gatekeepers’ in workplace or community settings to encourage other men to attend. People who hold local credibility and respect need to actively promote the project, which is likely to allay fears that some men might have of getting involved. One of the strongest forms of marketing is when someone, whom a man trusts, a) recommends a specific service or programme; and b) provides a telephone number and a specific name of a contact person. Use local newspapers, tap into existing local networks, local workplaces, other health service entry gates, pubs, clubs, sports centres etc. to advertise and create an interest in programmes. Use opportunistic and conversational ways to engage men at the initial stages of contact. Use positive images of men and respectful, solution focused language in any medium advertising a service. Give a clear outline of the service or programme and details of tangible outcomes.
  • Find a ‘Hook’; Provide Innovative Services that will Appeal to Men. Adopt an opportunistic approach to service provision for men; we know that there are “window periods” when men do access services. Men are more likely to seek out and to accept help and support during times of crises. Ensure that this ‘window of opportunity’ is not lost, by for example, returning phone calls promptly and using a solution focused approach to counselling. Men are also more open to engage health services when they become a father. Try and appeal to men’s desire to feel useful, to help others or to be the ‘fixer’. This means they can safely engage in and enjoy the activity and still be able to say ‘it wasn’t for me, it was for my child’. Engage men by issuing them with a challenge. Present issues in terms of fitness and good health may paradoxically allow men to admit to ill health. While an opportunistic health check e.g. in the community, may be a service in itself, it may also act as an initial hook to engage men in other services. Use incentives e.g. provision of lunch, can also appeal to men and support them to attend a service. 
  • Consult and involve men in programme development and programme delivery Service providers should involve male clients in shaping and determining the most effective strategies in achieving programme outcomes. Local reference groups should also be established that involve the target group of men, and that provide important feedback about programme direction The manner in which services are delivered should be determined locally Men should also be included in all aspects of service delivery (as well as seeking their advice in needs analysis)
  • Create Male-Friendly Environments The creation of an open, friendly environment on initial contact helps men to overcome any mistrust or suspicions they may have about the service, and creates safety and enables men to relax. Men quickly access the ‘comfort level’ of new environments, and whether these places will meet their particular needs. Use positive images of men in posters and provide appropriate reading materials in waiting rooms that may interest men. In certain circumstances, ensuring anonymity and privacy are important in terms of protecting men from 'losing face'
  • Make Services Easily Accessible Use premises, where possible, that are easily accessible with car parking spaces and easy access to public transport. Provide services outside normal working hours. Consider also men’s other likely commitments – work, family and caring responsibilities, other interests and hobbies and local issues/events – there is generally no perfect time, but a locally assessed best estimate. Offer a choice of times if possible. Consider if it is possible to bring the programme to the men. Long waiting lists or complicated referral procedures are likely to cause men to get frustrated and to give up trying to access services. Where possible remove cost barriers; otherwise keep costs to a minimum.
  • Plan small and realistically Long-term strategic planning may be restrictive in moving into uncharted territory or getting smaller initiatives off the ground for men. Expect to start small, think short-term and build slowly. Focus on quality rather than quantity, and don’t be put off by small numbers particularly at the start– “three’s a starting point and five’s almost a crowd” Ensure that you have adequate resources to follow through and where possible to provide more sustainable initiatives for men. Try to provide the widest range of programmes possible that budgetary considerations will allow The issue or resource requirements need to be considered from a time and energy point of view as well as a financial one. Partnerships with local voluntary groups, social services and other healthcare workers might assist in sharing these burdens See Partnership paper from CMHP  
  • Adopt a Positive Approach to Men’s Health Work Men work best with those who believe they are people of worth rather than a problem to be solved. Strive to adopt solution focused activities that develop a non-deficit approach to working with men. As a service or programme provider, consider your own motivation and value base for working with men - do you subscribe to a ‘deficit model’ of men’s health that instinctively apportions blame to men for their own problems or ill-health? Men are likely to see through and to be quickly turned off by such an approach.
  • Engaging Men in Physical Activity, Sandra Gordon, Cancer Focus Northern Ireland. EWAC 2013

    1. 1. Engaging Men inPhysical ActivitySandra GordonManAlive Project Co-ordinatorCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    2. 2. ManAlive - a key part of Cancer Focus’Cancer Prevention Strategyis funded by Big Lottery FundCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    3. 3. OverviewManAlive ProjectPhysical Activity inputKey Factors to engaging with men:• ‘Windows’ and ‘Hooks’• Holding on to your men• Approach• The men’s voicesCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    4. 4. ManAlive ProjectAim: The ManAlive Project aims to improve thephysical and mental health of disadvantaged menliving in one of the most deprived rural areas inNorthern Ireland.• Health checks• Health awareness sessions• Self-development courses• Retailers health information sharing• Information Sharing seminars• VolunteeringCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    5. 5. Partnership Working• Existing partnership• GAA New Social Initiative 2010 – ‘To use theGAA Club network as a vehicle to engage oldermen who are not currently participating in localcommunity life’• Networking / exploring further developmentCancer Focus Northern Ireland / Gaelic Athletic AssociationCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    6. 6. Engaging Men in Physical ActivityAim: To introduce a group of older men tophysical activity in order to support improvedphysical and mental health and socialinteraction.Self-development courses:Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    7. 7. Marketing and Making Contact• Use ‘gatekeepers’ to encourage other men toattend.• Contact via one-to-one.• Word-of-mouth recruitment.• Local newspapers, existing local networks.• Opportunistic conversational ways to engagemen.• Use positive images of men.• Clear outline of the service and programme anddetails of outcomes.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    8. 8. Finding ‘Hooks’• Take an opportunistic approach - find the best‘window’.• Use incentives e.g. provision of lunch / breakfast.• The ManAlive health check is a service in itselfbut it is also a ‘hook’ to engage men in otherservices.• Issue an invitation and set a challenge.• Presenting issues in terms of fitness and goodhealth.• Appeal to men’s desire to feel useful.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    9. 9. ‘Hook’ - Health Checks• Blood pressure• Pulse• Blood sugar (random sample)• Cholesterol (random sample)• BMI• Body composition ………• Height / weight• Lifestyle assessment / adviceCopyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    10. 10. Consult with Men in ProgrammeDevelopment and Delivery• Involve men in shaping and determining the mosteffective strategies to achieve outcomes.• The manner in which activity programmes aredelivered - determined by the men.• Men should be included in all aspects of servicedelivery.• Gain agreement: what is expected of the men at theoutset, regularly review achievements, and get feedbackfrom users.• Give a clear focus on what will be gained.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    11. 11. Create Male-Friendly Environments• Creation of an open, friendly environment - overcomeany discomfort, mistrust or suspicions, create safety, andenable men to relax.• Use positive images and attitude.• Ensuring anonymity and privacy.• Provide a skilled facilitator to promote inclusiveness,create a safe environment and helps to sustainparticipation.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    12. 12. Access• Try to have easy access (car parking and localvenue).• Outside normal working hours or a choice oftimes if possible.• Bring the programme to the men.• Make referral and participation easy and flexible- avoids frustration and stay away.• Remove cost barriers or keep costs to aminimum.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    13. 13. Plan Small and Realistically• Expect to start small, think short term andbuild slowly.• Focus on quality.• Don’t be put off by small numbers.• Where possible, provide options.• Develop strategic partnerships.Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved
    14. 14. ManAlive: A positive Approach ToMen’s Health Work• Men work best with those who believe they arepeople of worth rather than a problem to besolved.• Adopt solution focused activities that developa non-deficit approach.• NO deficit NO blame – perfect as you are!Copyright © Cancer Focus Northern Ireland 2013 All rights reserved

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