PANEL 2CCS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIESTone Skogen – Government of NorwayAlice Gibson – Global CCS InstituteDr Carlos Serralde ...
CCS in IndiaAmit KumarTERI, India
CCS in IndiaAmit KumarTERI, India
Outline•   India’s energy scenario•   Challenges•   CCS economics•   Barriers•   Capacity development needs
Indias energy scenario
Total primary energy supply mix in India                     27%                                                          ...
Energy supply Coal   – Major energy source,   – 81% of total thermal generation Electricity   – Installed generating cap...
Sector wise energy consumption                              7%                   9%           8%                          ...
Sectoral break-up of India’s CO2 emissions                        7%         27%                                          ...
Electricity fuel mix (As on August 31,2012)250000                                               207,006200000150000   137,...
Break-up of emissions from energy sector                         7%                  7%       14%                         ...
Break-up of emissions from industrial sector               30%                        32%        7%                       ...
India’s Projected CO2 emissions in 2031-32
ChallengesConcerns of: Energy access   – Increasing energy supply for     sustained economic growth   – Energizing rural ...
ChallengesPoor electrification status    Over 289 million people     without access to electricity (~     74 million hous...
ChallengesUrban and peri-urban    Rapid pace of urbanisation    Use of commercial energy     increasing rapidly in resid...
Challenges India’s energy demand is growing Government’s endeavour for  “Electricity for all by 2012” Per capita electr...
Challenges Total commercial energy  consumption is estimated to  increases from 284 mtoe in 2001  to 1727 mtoe in 2031 T...
Challenges Community services e.g. health,  drinking water, education, and ICTs  suffer due to lack of energy  services
CCS in India
Levelized cost of electricity                                             Imported coal   Indian OilLCOE without capture (...
Barriers CCS has not yet been proven to be a viable option for  large scale GHG mitigation in the power sector. India to...
Barriers CCS deployment is held to run counter to India’s  ambitious goals for electrification, especially given the  pre...
Objective“To create anenablingenvironment forCCS deploymentin India.”
Needs Knowledge building and capacity  development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Knowledge building of policy makers andregulators Some knowledge regarding  CCS does exist at the  decision-making levels...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Capacity development on technical issues Assessment of potential storage sites is one of the  biggest hurdles to CCS depl...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Technology sharing and transfer Knowledge sharing is required to  understand complete value chain  of CCS. The areas of ...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Capacity development of FinancialInstitutions Norms and practices  differ in CCS plants from  those applied for normal  p...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Public Engagement Public acceptance is  vital, especially on the  storage side. Inclusion of civil society  groups in di...
Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of  policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical iss...
Knowledge sharing among different CCSgroups CCS being a cross  cutting activity involving  several components, it  is vit...
Thank You !www.teriin.org/akumar@teri.res.in
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Global CCS Institute - Day 1 - Panel 2 - CCS in Developing Countries

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Global CCS Institute - Day 1 - Panel 2 - CCS in Developing Countries

  1. 1. PANEL 2CCS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIESTone Skogen – Government of NorwayAlice Gibson – Global CCS InstituteDr Carlos Serralde – Mario Molina CentreAmit Kumar – TERI
  2. 2. CCS in IndiaAmit KumarTERI, India
  3. 3. CCS in IndiaAmit KumarTERI, India
  4. 4. Outline• India’s energy scenario• Challenges• CCS economics• Barriers• Capacity development needs
  5. 5. Indias energy scenario
  6. 6. Total primary energy supply mix in India 27% 40% 6% 2% 1% 24% Coal Oil Natural gas Nuclear Hydro Biomass and waste
  7. 7. Energy supply Coal – Major energy source, – 81% of total thermal generation Electricity – Installed generating capacity ~ 207006.04 MW (CEA, August 2012) – Suffering from huge shortages (2011-12) • 8.5% energy shortage (likely to increase to 9.3% in 2012-13) • 10.6% peak shortage Target: 15000 MW annually for next 7 years Captive power generation – Currently 30,000 MW using fossil fuels
  8. 8. Sector wise energy consumption 7% 9% 8% 48% 13% 15% Industry Transport Residential and Commercial Other energy users Non-energy users Agriculture
  9. 9. Sectoral break-up of India’s CO2 emissions 7% 27% 66% Energy Industry LULUCF
  10. 10. Electricity fuel mix (As on August 31,2012)250000 207,006200000150000 137,936100000 50000 39,291 34,444 24,998 4,780 0 Thermal Nuclear Hydro RES Total Captive
  11. 11. Break-up of emissions from energy sector 7% 7% 14% 72% Electricity Transport Residental Others
  12. 12. Break-up of emissions from industrial sector 30% 32% 7% 29% 2% Cement Ammonia Iron and steel Food processing Others
  13. 13. India’s Projected CO2 emissions in 2031-32
  14. 14. ChallengesConcerns of: Energy access – Increasing energy supply for sustained economic growth – Energizing rural areas – Socio-economic development Energy security – Energy import vulnerabilities Ensuring long-term sustainability of energy use Climate change
  15. 15. ChallengesPoor electrification status  Over 289 million people without access to electricity (~ 74 million households)  Over 31,000 villages are yet to be electrified  Electricity supply situation is generally poor even in electrified villagesOver 80% of rural India dependenton traditional fuels for cooking
  16. 16. ChallengesUrban and peri-urban  Rapid pace of urbanisation  Use of commercial energy increasing rapidly in residential and commercial sectors  Electricity supply plagued with black-outs and brown-outs
  17. 17. Challenges India’s energy demand is growing Government’s endeavour for “Electricity for all by 2012” Per capita electricity consumption: ~ 800 kWh/year – World average: 2596 (2005) – Target is to increase the availability to 1000 kWh/year by 2012.
  18. 18. Challenges Total commercial energy consumption is estimated to increases from 284 mtoe in 2001 to 1727 mtoe in 2031 The import dependency in 2031 could reach – Oil: 88% – Coal: 72%
  19. 19. Challenges Community services e.g. health, drinking water, education, and ICTs suffer due to lack of energy services
  20. 20. CCS in India
  21. 21. Levelized cost of electricity Imported coal Indian OilLCOE without capture (Rs/kWh) 3.97 3.50LCOE with capture (Rs/kWh) 5.52 4.90LCOE with CCS (Rs/ kWh) 5.58 4.95LCOE with CCS and monitoring (Rs/kWh) 5.61 4.99Increase in LCOE due to CCS and monitoring 41% 42%
  22. 22. Barriers CCS has not yet been proven to be a viable option for large scale GHG mitigation in the power sector. India to consider it once large-scale deployment is taken place internationally. One major barrier to CCS deployment in India is the lack of accurate geological storage site data. The cost of electricity increases in CCS power plants while reducing net power output.
  23. 23. Barriers CCS deployment is held to run counter to India’s ambitious goals for electrification, especially given the present electricity deficit and energy situation in the country. As far as enhanced oil recovery (EOR) route of CCS is concerned, India does not have many depleted oil fields. Requirement of specialised manpower and suitable infrastructure. Monitoring of the stored CO2 to assure against leakage. Legal issues related to land acquisition, ground water contamination, CO2 leakage, etc.
  24. 24. Objective“To create anenablingenvironment forCCS deploymentin India.”
  25. 25. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  26. 26. Knowledge building of policy makers andregulators Some knowledge regarding CCS does exist at the decision-making levels. However, there is a need to go deeper in to the nuances of different elements of CCS and the associated benefits and risks. Global regulations and policies, along with progress in CCS related activities in other parts of the world, may be highlighted.
  27. 27. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  28. 28. Capacity development on technical issues Assessment of potential storage sites is one of the biggest hurdles to CCS deployment in India. This may be addressed by: – Training of geologists in the advanced assessment techniques. – Involvement of Indian agencies in the potential assessment work being carried out elsewhere. Training in advanced drilling techniques.
  29. 29. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  30. 30. Technology sharing and transfer Knowledge sharing is required to understand complete value chain of CCS. The areas of include: – Better process integration of different elements of CCS equipment – Development of new adsorbents – Conversion of CO2 to useful products
  31. 31. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  32. 32. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  33. 33. Capacity development of FinancialInstitutions Norms and practices differ in CCS plants from those applied for normal power plants and industries. Therefore, informing Indian financial institutions about global best practices may be a step forward.
  34. 34. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  35. 35. Public Engagement Public acceptance is vital, especially on the storage side. Inclusion of civil society groups in discussions related to CCS at an early stage may facilitate better acceptability of CCS technologies.
  36. 36. Needs Knowledge building and capacity development of policy makers and regulators Capacity development on technical issues Technology sharing and transfer Capacity development of Financial Institutions Public Engagement Knowledge sharing
  37. 37. Knowledge sharing among different CCSgroups CCS being a cross cutting activity involving several components, it is vital that knowledge sharing between the different CCS groups is done on a regular basis. Web based `virtual’ platform could be one of the options for this.
  38. 38. Thank You !www.teriin.org/akumar@teri.res.in

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