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Bristol Community College
Tahais Real-Martins M.Ed.
Coordinator of Academic Computing/Instructional Designer
Ceit De Vitto...
Bristol Community College
Demographics:
Students
• 60% Female
• 40% Male
• Average age 26 to 32
• 3% Veterans
• 2% ESL
• 2...
How can Instructional Designers be
Change Agents?
Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A., & Kenny, R. F. (2009). The critical, relat...
Interpersonal
• Learner Advocacy
• Faculty Development
• Building trust
• Community Building
Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A.,...
Professional
• Ethical manner
• Act Professional
• Providing instructional advice
Institutional
• Culture
• Designer status to effect change
• Cultural Conflict
Societal
• Ethical Challenges
• Core values
Universal Instructional Design
1. Equitable Use
2. Flexibility in Use
3. Simple and intuitive use
4. Perceptible informati...
Social Justice
“I believe that education is the civil rights issue of our generation. And if you care about
promoting oppo...
“Justice and equal rights require fair process that offer equal
opportunities for successful purist of life, liberty, and ...
https://twitter.com/wwpinc/status/439524703913267200/photo/1
http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
Created
with
Wordle
Case Study
Hi Tahais,
Please HELP! Here are some things that I do in my
classes I don’t know where to start.
• My students say that t...
So… how can you help Fred make his
course more accessible?
Break-out Session
• Groups of 5
• Each group will be provide wi...
References
2014 NEASC Self-Study Report Bristol Community College. (2014, January). Retrieved March 25, 2014, from
http://...
Understanding social justice through instructional design
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Understanding social justice through instructional design

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https://sites.google.com/site/necctlsd/
Northern Essex Community College is pleased to host the
2014 Massachusetts Community College Conference on Teaching, Learning & Student Development


on Friday, March 28, 2014, from 8:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
on the theme of "Social Justice and the Community College."

In this session, the instructional design team at Bristol Community College will share their project experience and engage participants in helping further define how the practice of instructional design can enhance the principles of social justice by examining the role of the instructional designers as a change agent

Published in: Education
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Understanding social justice through instructional design

  1. 1. Bristol Community College Tahais Real-Martins M.Ed. Coordinator of Academic Computing/Instructional Designer Ceit De Vitto M.Ed. Instructional Designer
  2. 2. Bristol Community College Demographics: Students • 60% Female • 40% Male • Average age 26 to 32 • 3% Veterans • 2% ESL • 2% Dual Enrolled 2014 NEASC Self-Study Report Bristol Community College. (2014, January). Retrieved March 25, 2014, from http://www.bristolcc.edu/events/selfstudy/ Full Time Faculty • 68% Female • 32% Male • 21% Doctoral Degrees Adjunct Faculty • 52% Female • 48% Male • 11% Doctoral Degrees
  3. 3. How can Instructional Designers be Change Agents? Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A., & Kenny, R. F. (2009). The critical, relational practice of instructional design in higher education: An emerging model of change agency. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(5), 645-663. doi: 10.1007/s11423-007-9061-6
  4. 4. Interpersonal • Learner Advocacy • Faculty Development • Building trust • Community Building Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A., & Kenny, R. F. (2009). The critical, relational practice of instructional design in higher education: An emerging model of change agency. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(5), 645-663. doi: 10.1007/s11423-007-9061-6
  5. 5. Professional • Ethical manner • Act Professional • Providing instructional advice
  6. 6. Institutional • Culture • Designer status to effect change • Cultural Conflict
  7. 7. Societal • Ethical Challenges • Core values
  8. 8. Universal Instructional Design 1. Equitable Use 2. Flexibility in Use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use Burgstahler, S., & Cory, R. (2008). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  9. 9. Social Justice “I believe that education is the civil rights issue of our generation. And if you care about promoting opportunity and reducing inequality, the classroom is the place to start. Great teaching is about so much more than education; it is a daily fight for social justice.” ~ Secretary Arne Duncan, October 9, 2009 Mullenholz, G. (n.d.). Education Is social justice. Retrieved March 26, 2014, from https://www.ed.gov/blog/2011/08/education-is-social-justice
  10. 10. “Justice and equal rights require fair process that offer equal opportunities for successful purist of life, liberty, and happiness.” (p.19) • Equity v. Equality • Historical disadvantages • Human diversities • Unique needs Davis, T., & Harrison, L. M. (2013). Advancing social justice: Tools, pedagogies, and strategies to transform your campus.
  11. 11. https://twitter.com/wwpinc/status/439524703913267200/photo/1 http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
  12. 12. Created with Wordle
  13. 13. Case Study
  14. 14. Hi Tahais, Please HELP! Here are some things that I do in my classes I don’t know where to start. • My students say that they cannot afford my text books, I didn’t realize they total over $400. • I still use a chalkboard and whiteboard • I tend to talk throughout the whole class and I notice that students use their cellphones, and look bored • I don’t know how to use the Internet or help my students to find other online resources • Students don’t ask questions • I am concerned about cheating For quizzes I tend to use the same quiz with a hundred questions • I have no make up test nor do I give extra time • I give standard Feedback for all students • I am also guilty of assuming that my students have the same educational level, cultural knowledge, language, and learning style.
  15. 15. So… how can you help Fred make his course more accessible? Break-out Session • Groups of 5 • Each group will be provide with paper and markers • Pick a group leader/recorder/presenter • Create different ways to help Fred
  16. 16. References 2014 NEASC Self-Study Report Bristol Community College. (2014, January). Retrieved March 25, 2014, from http://www.bristolcc.edu/events/selfstudy/ Bowe, F. (2000). Universal design in education: Teaching nontraditional students. Westport,, CT: Bergin & Garvey. Burgstahler, S., & Cory, R. (2008). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A., & Kenny, R. F. (2009). The critical, relational practice of instructional design in higher education: An emerging model of change agency. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(5), 645-663. doi: 10.1007/s11423-007-9061-6 Davis, T., & Harrison, L. M. (2013). Advancing social justice: Tools, pedagogies, and strategies to transform your campus. Mullenholz, G. (n.d.). Education Is social justice. Retrieved March 26, 2014, from https://www.ed.gov/blog/2011/08/education- is-social-justice Ouellett, M. L. (2004). Faculty development and universal instructional design. Equity & Excellence in Education, 37(2), 135-144. doi: 10.1080/10665680490453977 Zimmer, M. A. (2012). Universal Design in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice - Edited by Sheryl E. Burgstahler and Rebecca C. Cory. Teaching Theology & Religion, 15(1), 89-91. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9647.2011.00769.x

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