Creating a Workplace Culture of Respect Brad Baso   cell: 651-214-0109  [email_address] Candalee Hill cell: 651-592-5411 [...
Seminar Objectives <ul><li>Develop an understanding of the consequences of incivility unchecked (Article #1) </li></ul><ul...
Notes about this PowerPoint <ul><li>Icons: </li></ul>This slide is describing an assignment – make sure to follow the inst...
How’s it goin’ Frank? <ul><li>How is  this  relevant to our conversation? </li></ul>
Activity #1: Article #1 <ul><li>Directions:  </li></ul><ul><li>As you are reading the article about  Workplace Incivility ...
The Cost of Workplace Incivility <ul><li>Half of U.S. nurses bullied on the job </li></ul><ul><li>COLUMBUS, Ohio, March 24...
When the Bully Sits in the Next Cubicle  <ul><li>An eye roll, a glare, a dismissive snort — these are the tactics of the w...
Activity #2: Digital Collage:  + <ul><li>This exercise is a creative beginning to our process of identifying what we consi...
Activity #3: Beyond the Golden Rule <ul><li>Read the following 4 slides on the Golden Rule </li></ul><ul><li>Return to Bla...
The Golden Rule <ul><li>The Golden Rule –  “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”  --   is valid in many situ...
When the Rule breaks down <ul><li>Cultural competency and a general sensitivity to others’ wants and needs calls for a rew...
Platinum Rule <ul><li>Applying the Platinum Rule™ is much more valuable and useful to other people.  &quot;Do unto others ...
From Golden to Platinum <ul><li>Apply the Golden Rule to avoid harming others, but also apply the Platinum Rule to provide...
Activity #4: Helpful emotions in the workplace <ul><li>Core Concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciation  Affiliation  Autonomy...
Core Concern: Appreciation <ul><li>Appreciation  – Feeling unappreciated puts people down.  We can appreciate others by  u...
Core Concern: Affiliation <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation  – Rather than having each person feel alone ...
Core Concern: Autonomy <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy  – Recognize that eve...
Core Concern: Status <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Statu...
Core Concern: Role <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Status ...
Activity #4: Helpful emotions in the workplace You’ve learned about the Core Concerns. Now think of a time when you’ve had...
Activity #5: Conflict Management <ul><li>Assess your personal preferences in dealing with conflict with the Thomas-Killman...
Activity #6: Article #2 and LinkedIn  <ul><li>Fostering relationships is an essential strategy in creating a respectful cu...
Real-world examples of respectful workplaces <ul><li>St. Kate’s FACES program </li></ul><ul><li>Regions RESPECT program </...
FACES *  Initiative at CSC F ocus on  A cademic and  C linical/Field  E xperience s Patricia M. Schoon, MPH, RN Cynthia L....
Incivility, Bulling in the Workplace and Nurses’ Shame Response: JOGNN 2008
Regions: Promises to Each Other <ul><li>Printed on “RESPECT” card </li></ul><ul><li>Created by Healthy Workplace Steering ...
Regions: Promises to Each Other <ul><li>R eliable - Be dependable & follow through on my responsibilities. </li></ul><ul><...
Summary of Web Tools Used <ul><li>www.linkedin.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.writeboard.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com ...
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Creating A Workplace Culture Of Respect And Trust

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Creating A Workplace Culture Of Respect And Trust

  1. 1. Creating a Workplace Culture of Respect Brad Baso cell: 651-214-0109 [email_address] Candalee Hill cell: 651-592-5411 [email_address] ORLD 8880: Leadership Seminar (#2, Virtual) Spring 2008, Professor Louise Miner
  2. 2. Seminar Objectives <ul><li>Develop an understanding of the consequences of incivility unchecked (Article #1) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify characteristics and behaviors of a healthy abuse-free workplace (Writeboard & Youtube-digital collage) </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize ways to facilitate mutual respect (Golden rule/Platinum rule Discussion board) </li></ul><ul><li>Core concerns for stimulating helpful emotions in the workplace (“Beyond Reason” exercise) </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize one’s own preferred method of conflict resolution (SurveyMonkey tool) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify successful strategies to build and sustain healthy interpersonal relationships at work (LinkedIn & article #2) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Notes about this PowerPoint <ul><li>Icons: </li></ul>This slide is describing an assignment – make sure to follow the instructions! This slide is conveying information. It is meant to provide context. This slide is part of the Golden Rule activity. This slide is part of the Helpful Emotions activity.
  4. 4. How’s it goin’ Frank? <ul><li>How is this relevant to our conversation? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Activity #1: Article #1 <ul><li>Directions: </li></ul><ul><li>As you are reading the article about Workplace Incivility think about tactics you can employ to stop the incivility spiral. </li></ul>Note from Brad & Candalee Our goal is to use an appreciative inquiry-style approach and focus on positive changes, but we are having you first read this article to gain an appreciation of the potential problems.
  6. 6. The Cost of Workplace Incivility <ul><li>Half of U.S. nurses bullied on the job </li></ul><ul><li>COLUMBUS, Ohio, March 24, 2008 (UPI) – More than half of U.S. nurses have been bullied at work and where nurses are bullied, the quality of patient care declines , a study found. </li></ul><ul><li>A survey by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations found more than 50 percent of nurses had been bullied at work and more than 90 percent said they had witnessed abusive behavior. Most verbal abuse to nurses is instigated by physicians, yet abuse from fellow nurses is the second most common type. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: United Press International </li></ul>
  7. 7. When the Bully Sits in the Next Cubicle <ul><li>An eye roll, a glare, a dismissive snort — these are the tactics of the workplace bully. They don’t sound like much, but that’s why they are so insidious. How do you complain to human resources that your boss is picking on you? Who cares that a co-worker won’t return your phone calls? </li></ul>Source: The New York Times article March 25, 2008 by Tara Parker-Pope
  8. 8. Activity #2: Digital Collage: + <ul><li>This exercise is a creative beginning to our process of identifying what we consider to be respectful. </li></ul><ul><li>Click here to access Writeboard (the password is “leadon”) or go back to Blackboard under the virtual seminar and access the link </li></ul>ABOUT THE TOOLS USED: Writeboard is used to collaboratively create and edit a text document. We will use this tool like Louise's post-it note exercise to collect examples of a characteristic or behavior that you think are important for a culture of respect. YouTube is a searchable database of user-generated video content. You will use this site to find a video that represents one of your attributes of a respectful culture.
  9. 9. Activity #3: Beyond the Golden Rule <ul><li>Read the following 4 slides on the Golden Rule </li></ul><ul><li>Return to Blackboard; click on communication and discussion board forum for the virtual seminar and answer the question: </li></ul>How do you identify others’ needs and wants at work?
  10. 10. The Golden Rule <ul><li>The Golden Rule – “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” -- is valid in many situations. For example, if you don't like to be interrupted, don't interrupt other people. </li></ul><ul><li>The Rule really concerns realizing that if you don't like something to happen to you, other people probably also would not like it happening to them either. It is being considerate of other peoples' feelings. </li></ul>
  11. 11. When the Rule breaks down <ul><li>Cultural competency and a general sensitivity to others’ wants and needs calls for a reworking of the Golden Rule. Simply put: People may not like what you like , and assuming they do may do more harm than good. </li></ul>For example: You may love chocolates and be happy if someone gave you some as a gift. But to give a box of chocolates to a person who is on a diet may not be as appreciated. Also, think of the Boy Scout who firmly takes the arm of an old lady and helps her across the street, only to find that she didn't want to cross the street.
  12. 12. Platinum Rule <ul><li>Applying the Platinum Rule™ is much more valuable and useful to other people. &quot;Do unto others as they would do unto themselves&quot; means you have listened and observed what the other person wants or needs, and you then try to satisfy those needs. </li></ul><ul><li>People know what they want or need. If you can determine those desires and satisfy them, you do a much greater service than giving them what you care about. </li></ul><ul><li>The &quot;Platinum Rule&quot; expression was coined by and is a trademark of Dr. Tony Alessandra ( www.platinumrule.com ) </li></ul>
  13. 13. From Golden to Platinum <ul><li>Apply the Golden Rule to avoid harming others, but also apply the Platinum Rule to provide them things that they value or that are important to them. </li></ul>Remember to go to Blackboard to contribute to the discussion on this topic! How do you identify others’ needs and wants at work?
  14. 14. Activity #4: Helpful emotions in the workplace <ul><li>Core Concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciation Affiliation Autonomy Status Role </li></ul><ul><li>First, take the initiative - don’t wait for emotions to happen and then react. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, address the concern, not the emotion. </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group If we disagree with someone, how can we interact in ways that stimulate positive emotions in both of us? www.beyond-reason.net
  15. 15. Core Concern: Appreciation <ul><li>Appreciation – Feeling unappreciated puts people down. We can appreciate others by understanding their point of view; finding merit in what they think, feel, or do; and communicating our understanding through words or action. We can appreciate ourselves too. </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group
  16. 16. Core Concern: Affiliation <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation – Rather than having each person feel alone and disconnected, we can try to build structural connections as colleagues and personal connections as confidantes. </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group
  17. 17. Core Concern: Autonomy <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy – Recognize that everyone wants freedom to affect or make a great many decisions. We can expand our autonomy and avoid impinging upon theirs. </li></ul><ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group
  18. 18. Core Concern: Status <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Status – No one likes to feel demeaned. Rather than compete with others over who has the higher social status, we can acknowledge everyone's areas of particular status, including our own. </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group
  19. 19. Core Concern: Role <ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Status </li></ul><ul><li>Role – An unfulfilling role leaves us feeling trivialized and unengaged. Yet we are free to choose the roles that help us and others work together. And we can expand the activities within any role to make them fulfilling. </li></ul>SOURCE: Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate by Roger Fisher and Daniel Shapiro. 2006. Penguin Group
  20. 20. Activity #4: Helpful emotions in the workplace You’ve learned about the Core Concerns. Now think of a time when you’ve had a disagreement with someone and emotions were involved. Click on the image of the Core Concerns Preparation Form below and complete it. Do you think the outcome of your disagreement would have been different? beyond- reason.net/teaching/shortform.html
  21. 21. Activity #5: Conflict Management <ul><li>Assess your personal preferences in dealing with conflict with the Thomas-Killman Conflict Mode Inventory (TKI) </li></ul><ul><li>Download the TKI from Blackboard and complete the assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>Then review this site from MIT to help you interpret your scores. </li></ul>How do you think this information is useful when thinking about a respectful workplace environment?
  22. 22. Activity #6: Article #2 and LinkedIn <ul><li>Fostering relationships is an essential strategy in creating a respectful culture. When reading the article on Organizational Humanizing Culture , think about how you can build authentic relationships at work. </li></ul><ul><li>Sign on to LinkedIn , create a profile, and connect to your other classmates. Join the MAOL group. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Real-world examples of respectful workplaces <ul><li>St. Kate’s FACES program </li></ul><ul><li>Regions RESPECT program </li></ul>
  24. 24. FACES * Initiative at CSC F ocus on A cademic and C linical/Field E xperience s Patricia M. Schoon, MPH, RN Cynthia L. Dols, MS, RN
  25. 25. Incivility, Bulling in the Workplace and Nurses’ Shame Response: JOGNN 2008
  26. 26. Regions: Promises to Each Other <ul><li>Printed on “RESPECT” card </li></ul><ul><li>Created by Healthy Workplace Steering Team, directly from feedback provided by Regions Hospital employees </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on healthy working relationships between and among co-workers </li></ul>
  27. 27. Regions: Promises to Each Other <ul><li>R eliable - Be dependable & follow through on my responsibilities. </li></ul><ul><li>E xcellence - Go above and beyond to make a positive difference each day. </li></ul><ul><li>S how Appreciation - Value and acknowledge your contributions. </li></ul><ul><li>P ositive Attitude - Be friendly, optimistic & helpful. </li></ul><ul><li>E mbrace Differences - Honor & learn from your uniqueness & experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>C ommunication - Listen, seek to understand and share information. </li></ul><ul><li>T eamwork - Support you, and together we will succeed. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Summary of Web Tools Used <ul><li>www.linkedin.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.writeboard.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com </li></ul>

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