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UKSG 2018 Breakout- Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries- Burke

UKSG 2018 Breakout- Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries- Burke

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Data is supporting strategic decision making in libraries,
and the increasing prevalence of visualisation tools
offers quicker, easier and more accessible routes to data
analysis. Jisc has been developing its library analytics
offering, visualising data using tools such as Tableau.
These visualisations can save staff time and enable data to
be shared with more people, more widely, in an engaging
format. The session will present case studies illustrating
how libraries have used the tools to communicate statistical
information and the value and impact they have delivered.
Siobhan Burke, Jisc

Data is supporting strategic decision making in libraries,
and the increasing prevalence of visualisation tools
offers quicker, easier and more accessible routes to data
analysis. Jisc has been developing its library analytics
offering, visualising data using tools such as Tableau.
These visualisations can save staff time and enable data to
be shared with more people, more widely, in an engaging
format. The session will present case studies illustrating
how libraries have used the tools to communicate statistical
information and the value and impact they have delivered.
Siobhan Burke, Jisc

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UKSG 2018 Breakout- Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries- Burke

  1. 1. Visualising the data How accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries Siobhán Burke By W.Rebel - Own work,CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11702269
  2. 2. Data visualisation 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  3. 3. What is it? "Data visualization is the presentation of data in a pictorial or graphical format.” Source: SAS https://www.sas.com/en_us/insights/big-data/data-visualization.html Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  4. 4. Data proliferation »“According to an estimate, the global annual rate of data production in the year 2015 was 5.6 Zettabytes.That was almost double the rate of growth just three years back in the year 2012.” 1 Zettabyte = 1 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 bytes Source:Visualr https://visualrsoftware.com/advantages-data-visualization/ Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  5. 5. Top 5 Advantages of DataVisualization 1. The Brain is programmed for visualisation 2. Data visualisations support visual learners 3. Spot insights that might be missed in traditional reports 4. Data visualisation can identify areas to take action 5. Data visualisation increases productivity Source: Salesforce https://www.salesforce.com/hub/analytics/data-visualization-advantages/ "Organizations that use visual data discovery tools are 28 percent more likely to find timely information than those who rely solely on managed reporting and dashboards.” (Source: https://www.tableau.com/sites/default/file s/media/8604-ra-business-intelligence- analytics.pdf) Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  6. 6. Raw data is hard to read Source: “Effective DataVisualisation” course from Understanding ModernGov How many threes? Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  7. 7. Raw data is hard to read Source: “Effective DataVisualisation” course from Understanding ModernGov Now how many threes? Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  8. 8. Benefits of visualising your data »Answers a question »Poses new questions »Explore and discover »Communicate information »Support decisions »Increase efficiency »Inspire Source: Jisc https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/data-visualisation/the-benefits-of-visualisation Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  9. 9. Libraries, JUSP and Library Data Labs 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  10. 10. Visualising data for libraries »Libraries are increasingly data-driven and need to evidence the value they bring to their institution »Wider dissemination of findings to new audiences e.g. senior staff in and beyond the library »Libraries both generate and consume large amounts of data Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  11. 11. Where does Jisc come in? Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  12. 12. HESA & Jisc Business Intelligence HESA Heidi HESA data: • Performance data on students • Destinations of leavers • Staff, finance and estates • Original delivery platform • Includes non- HESA data: e.g. o NSS o SCONUL • Jisc & HESA collaboration • Widening Business Intelligence capability • Interactive, visualisations Heidi Plus Analytics Labs • Agile project development • 12 week cycle • CPD opportunity • Access to Tableau, Alteryx & data Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  13. 13. Library Data Labs »Purpose › To derive library insights with library data and › Create interactive, visualised dashboards to be available via Heidi Plus »Labs took place July – October 2016 › 23 institutions › 29 participants › 5 teams + 1 Jisc team »Further library team April – July 2017 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  14. 14. The data »Data Catalogue: http://heidi-ckan.dev.jisc-betas.net/ Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  15. 15. The rationale for JUSP »Engaging more and new stakeholders in conversations around usage of e-resources »Can develop visualisations specific for the UK HE library community and in a national context »Avoid duplication of effort across the sector »JUSP team have expertise that might not be readily available in libraries »Previous JUSP visualisations had limited flexibility and functionality Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  16. 16. JUSP – previous visualisations 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  17. 17. JUSP: sample visualisations 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries Select years Switch publisher View detail
  18. 18. JUSP: sample visualisations 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  19. 19. Visualisations: IRUS-UK Select years Select item type Select Repository and/or Month View detail Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  20. 20. Outcomes & Impact 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  21. 21. Library feedback 6 Library Data Labs participants 30 minute telephone interviews 11 Fed back from JUSP CAG 9 Interviews post-launch of data visualisations JUSP Pilot study 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  22. 22. Reasons for taking part in Library Labs »Help to make evidence based decisions »Exploring what is possible with available data »CPD and opportunity to experiment »Opportunity to network Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  23. 23. Value of the Library Labs It was a really useful opportunity to meet with colleagues in other institutions, find out about what they're doing, what they're able to do in house and where we've got similar issues. It gave us a way to show the value and impact of academic libraries and explore that further. It felt like a once in a lifetime career opportunity. It was a massive step forward. It opened a lot of doors, a lot of eyes, and it's kick- started a lot of work. Overall how valuable was the Library Labs cohort that you took part in? Very valuable 5 interviewees Quite valuable 1 interviewee Neither Quite valuable Not very valuable 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries
  24. 24. Skills gained from participation 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries Tableau skills 5 interviewees Agile working methods 6 interviewees Data manipulation skills 6 interviewees Data visualisation skills 5 interviewees Alteryx skills 2 interviewees Collaborating with/learning from other institutions 6 interviewees Knowledge of the national data landscape for library purposes 5 interviewees
  25. 25. What impact did Library Labs have? »Realising the possibilities »Understanding the data »Working across the institution »Agile methods It’s led us to think about how we use data, not just in the library but across the directorate, in an entirely different way. It’s helped to improve our reporting and communication processes. Instead of long reports, we’re able to use infographics. We’re able to present information to the university in a way that staff can access. It's an improved awareness of what we could do with the data, and an underlying awareness of how important it is that data is accurate, properly structured and that you're comparing like with like… It's realising how important data is, and we need to be thinking right at the beginning what we want to do with it, knowing those questions we want to answer, to make sure that we are collecting the stuff that we need. Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  26. 26. Library Data Lab user story examples 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries As a Library manager/director Library manager Library manager When measuring success supporting theTEF return I am assessing research performance I want to identify comparable institutions link library performance data with NSS and HESA data to assess University, discipline and individual citation performance So I can benchmark my library facility by size, usage levels, budget, provision of different resource types and satisfaction with library facilities show how library resources and services contribute toTEF measure progress against citation KPIs and REF aspirations.
  27. 27. Value of the JUSP visualisations »Delivering new insights »Communicating with new audiences »Time saving »Access to data »More staff making use of JUSP “prompts me to ask other questions about the numbers that I possibly wouldn’t have seen when they appeared as tables of numbers alone." “The visual representation of data will improve liaising with schools over the usage of titles or packages as they succinctly deliver the point you want to share." “Having one resource that gathers data and converts it directly into graphs and charts is time and effort saving." Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  28. 28. Impact of the JUSP visualisations »Changed work practices »More meaningful approach to usage »Easier communication and wider use “The visualisations have changed work practices because they save time as the visualisation is already created and can be instantly revised to accommodate a change in date range, publisher or other criteria”. “The visualisation of comparison with other institutions will be valuable to assess usage of larger packages therefore aiding future investment decisions”. “saves the time and effort of becoming proficient inTableau." Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  29. 29. …and finally »Database and book visualisations available in JUSP › Further impact study will be carried out later in 2018 »For Analytics Labs, sign up to our mailing list for updates and future calls for participants: JISC-HESA-BUSINESS-INTEL@JISCMAIL.AC.UK Or visit: https://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/projects/business- intelligence-project Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries10/04/2018
  30. 30. jisc.ac.uk Keep in touch Contact me Siobhán Burke Library support services programme manager Siobhan.burke@jisc.ac.uk 24/04/2018 Visualising the data: how accessible insights can really deliver impact for libraries

Editor's Notes

  • The session will briefly explain and demonstrate how impactful visualising data can be, using 2 different initiatives from Jisc as our basis - Namely the JUSP service and the Library Data Labs project.

    I will briefly explain what these initiatives involved before focussing on the impact that they have had and are still having for the libraries involved.

    Although the initiatives are distinct, there are commonalities with the benefits of data visualising which they both demonstrate.
  • But firstly, I just want to explain a little about data visualisation, what it is and why it is important.
  • So is data visualisation just the next shiny new thing and it will soon be forgotten? Why is it important?

  • Or a billion terabytes
  • There is lots of information available on this topic. This is just one example, from Salesforce, explaining the advantages of visualisation.

    The key points are that we are able to process visual information much more quickly than text.
    We can also pick out patterns more easily this way.
    [Course quote - People remember 20% of what they read, but around 80% of what they see and do. ]

    Apparently, 65% of us are visual learners – so by using this method of communication, you’re already targeting a majority of people.


  • Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster that written text.
  • 9
  • Answers a question
    Visualisation can provide a quick, high level summary of the main information contained in the data.

    Poses new questions
    Quite often the initial data investigations can lead to more questions and further exploration.

    Explore and discover
    Sometimes the data shows some unexpected patterns and outliers – data points which are well outside the normal data range. Exploring these data points can lead to new discoveries.

    Communicate information
    Graphical representations of data are more effective as a means of communication than long textual files. A story can be told more efficiently, and the time to understand a picture is a fraction of the time that it takes to understand the textual data.

    Support decisions
    Visualisation can provide quick answers and can improve situational awareness. This in turn can lead to faster and timely decisions.

    Increase efficiency
    A well designed chart can save a lot of time otherwise needed to read pages of numbers and long textual reports. This time can be better spent on making sound business decisions.

    Inspire
    Sometimes you may come across a visualisation that really appeals to you or presents the data in a different and more effective way and challenges your own practice. It can be useful to use this inspiration to enhance the way you present the data.

    Using innovative data visualisations can make your audience more enthusiastic about what you are trying to communicate to them.  This in turn can inspire your audience to take action based on your more persuasive visualisation.
  • So where do libraries come in?
  • Why is this relevant for libraries?

    First point… indeed, this was one of the reasons behind Library Data Labs, as a follow-on from the Jisc-funded LAMP project.
  • Jisc has been involved in data services for libraries for many years, JUSP having started back in 2010 and IRUS-UK after that.

    More recently, Jisc has also been involved in wider analytics initiatives such as learning analytics and Business Intelligence. And it’s the Business Intelligence project, a partnership with HESA, the Higher Education Statistics Agency in the UK, from which the Library Data Labs project came from.
  • Jisc collaborated with HESA to redevelop their statistics platform Heidi launching the Heidi Plus service in 2015.

    Jisc also identified a further opportunity in partnership with HESA to offer an ‘analytics experimentation area’ for staff from Higher Education institutions to come together to explore the data and tools available from Jisc and HESA.

    As experienced Heidi users, it was University planners who were involved in the first 2 cohorts. These were successful in producing interactive, visualised dashboards addressing specific questions planners wanted answers to. Some of the dashboards are available to HESA users on the Heidi Plus platform.

    Following this initial success, we wondered if we could replicate the success for libraries and so we put out a call in 2016.
  • We had the same goal of wanting to produce dashboards that wold be of national interest and suitable for Heidi Plus. We didn’t know if it would be a success and if we would get interest, but we did and we produced a number of dashboards and it provided a unique opportunity for the participants to gain experience, knowledge and skills they otherwise wouldn’t have.

    We had 29 participants across 5 teams in the Library Data Labs cohort in 2016 and we also had a team from Jisc, which included staff from JUSP and IRUS-UK.
    In a later cohort of different university staff, we had a library team and they produced dashboards as well.
  • This is just “visualisation” of the data that was used by the Library Data Labs teams. It’s a mix of library-specific and national data sets such as the NSS and other HESA data, and also publication data and usage data.

    Many of the dashboards were exploratory and proof-of-concept dashboards only i.e. they weren’t scalable, but nonetheless interesting.

    The next slide will show one of the dashboards from the April cohort. I have to ask you NOT to take pictures of the screen. The reason is that access to the dashboards requires a licence agreement by each individual with HESA.
  • Data visualisation can facilitate discussions around usage, providing broader understanding and analysis with e.g.
    Senior management; Subject librarians while liaising with academics
    Clear opportunities to support HEI processes, create greater efficiencies
    Early feedback from the Community Advisory Groups agree with the above points about wider dissemination and use, the usefulness of the interactivity and the potential to spot trends just not possible with faced with columns of data.
  • Columns and numbers
    Data heavy
    Hard to read
    ----------------
    e.g. JUSP reports with cells of data – images
    Limitations (of existing charts & graphs)
    Not exportable
    Static – NOT interactive

    So the JUSP team took the experience of Library Data Labs and put it to use for the service.
  • For both the JUSP visualisations and Library Data Labs we sought feedback from users and participants. For JUSP, there was a pilot study and also several 1:1 interviews. And similarly, we interviewed 6 participants or alumni as we like to call them, from Library Data Labs.
    The institutions came from a range of institution types.
  • Interviewees had a range of reasons for taking part, but were mainly interested in understanding what might be possible with the data available to them, and how they might use data to make evidence based decisions.
    All agreed that their expectations had been met or exceeded.
    Libraries are under pressure to demonstrate impact and use data to inform their developments and decision making.
    They collect a lot of data but much of it remains un-used. Interviewees were keen to understand what they could achieve.
    Library Labs offered the chance to try out ideas in a safe environment, and allowed them to benefit from quality training.
    It also offered an opportunity to share experience and network in a creative and stimulating environment.




  • All interviewees found the experience valuable, both on a personal and institutional level. Interviewees welcomed the opportunity for professional development and appreciated that the skills learned had direct relevance to their institution.
  • Q Which of the following skills or knowledge do you feel you learnt or acquired as part of taking part in Library Labs>

    All interviewees agreed that they had developed transferable skills from the experience, and appreciated the opportunity for CPD. The acquisition of skills had given them confidence to start new work and present data in different ways.
  • All had taken inspiration and skills back to their institution. Interviewees agreed that Library Labs had given them an appreciation of the possibilities open to them, the skills to interrogate and present data in new ways, and the confidence to implement new ways of working.

    Library Labs allowed interviewees to see the possibilities of their data and realise their ideas. Participants had used their skills to think about data in new ways, create dashboards and visualisations using Tableau and other BI tools, improve reporting, respond to department and institutional level challenges, and influence senior management decisions.
    Participation in the project had given interviewees the skills to understand and to manipulate data. Coupled with the user story approach, they were equipped to understand what questions they wanted to answer, how data could help to answer those questions, and how BI visualisations could present that data in an accessible way.
    The acquisition of skills had given interviewees the confidence to get involved with projects both within the library and across the institution. Knowledge and understanding allowed them to ‘speak the right language’ and work with other departments such as strategic planning and IT.
    An introduction to Agile was an unexpected benefit of taking part, and interviewees had implemented user stories, Trello, and SCRUM principles in their institutions. This was seen as particularly relevant to keep focus on short projects and for cross team working.
  • The rationale for developing the JUSP visualisations has certainly been met as demonstrated by the feedback received.

    Responses show that they like the interactivity, the pre-created graphics that can be easily repeated for a variety of criteria really useful.
    Not spending all the time creating graphs enables time to spend on the more important task of analysis and communicating the results to initiate the converations that will help libraries to manage their collections.

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