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heroes
Friends
New
president
takes
helm
Odds & ends
Volunteer makes
art from unusual
materials
Globally minded
ULPA partner Holy
Cross makes a
difference at home
and abroad
Honorable
mention
Award
named after
volunteer
in disguise
Donors are
	Fall/Winter 2014 | VOLUME 23 	 a publication for donors volunteers and friends of Luther Manor
On the cover
Bob Otzelberger, a
Luther Manor Terrace
resident and donor,
shares his story.
Read more on pg. 6.
Dear donors, volunteers,
friends and partners,
When we think about heroes, the temptation is to first
think of ‘superheroes’ the likes of which one might
find in a comic book or on the silver screen. If we
think about everyday heroes, those who live and work
among us, we might think of firefighters, police officers,
the members of our armed services, and the veterans
who selflessly served our country. The truth is there are
many heroes in this world. They come in all shapes and
sizes, ages and ethnic backgrounds.
This edition of The Messenger focuses on Luther
Manor’s heroes – our donors, volunteers, friends and
partners – or, in a word, you. Our cover feature is about
one of our faithful donors, Bob Otzelberger. Bob is a
the perfect example of the type of heroes who make a
difference at Luther Manor. We rely on donors like Bob
to support important ministries, such as the Resident
Support Fund, which provides financial support to our
most vulnerable residents.
Our heroes don’t have super powers. They cannot
fly and they don’t have X-ray vision. But they have
the power to bring joy to residents, like pet partner
volunteer Meghann Chenery and her 13-year-old boxer
Oscar. Meghann is the granddaughter of the Rev.
William Downey, one of the founders of the United
Lutheran Program for the Aging (ULPA).
Each issue of The Messenger lifts up one of our
ULPA partners. In this issue, we feature our valued
relationship with Holy Cross Lutheran Church in
Menomonee Falls. Holy Cross is the home congregation
of Friends of Luther Manor President and Luther
Manor employee Sandy Wals, and many other faithful
friends and employees. The impact of our partner
congregations is felt year-round.
The future of Luther Manor depends on continued
support from you – our donors, volunteers, friends and
partners: our heroes. That being said, Luther Manor
staff members are also striving to be heroes to those
we serve – our residents and program participants.
Together, there is nothing that we cannot do.
Thank you for your continued support through gifts of
time, treasure and talent.
Sincerely,
David Beinlich
“A mother holds her child’s hand
for just a short time, but holds
their heart forever.”
This statement rings true to all of those who
responded to our second Mother’s Day appeal in
May. We were so happy with the response and to
our Mother Day’s appeal in 2013, we decided to
focus on mothers again this year. The wonderful
news is that we raised more than $26,000 for the
Luther Manor Foundation-Resident Support Fund,
which is an increase over 2013.
Our annual appeals are a vital part of growing and
sustaining the Luther Manor Foundation-Resident
Support Fund. Last year alone we were able to offer
over $600,000 in support to those residents who have
outlived their financial resources. Luther Manor has
a long-established commitment to our residents and
has never asked anyone to leave because of inability
to pay. This is why you are so valuable to Luther
Manor and your gifts are so important to us! Your
donations help us to continue to share God’s love by
enriching the lives of older adults through excellent
housing, care and services.
Thank you to all who gave in honor or memory
of their mother and thank you for your continued
support of Luther Manor’s mission and ministry.
-Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer
- 2 -
The Friends of Luther Manor has
a new leader with a familiar face.
This spring, Luther Manor employee
Sandy Wals was named president
of the all-volunteer advocacy and
fundraising organization.
Wals, who lives in Menomonee Falls
with her husband, Dick, is well-
connected to Luther Manor. She
has worked as a Life Enrichment
Specialist in the Luther Manor
Health Care Center for seven years
and is a Friends of Luther Manor
keyperson at Holy Cross Lutheran
Church, where she has been a
member for more than 25 years.
“Sandy brings so much to the table,”
said Resource Development Officer
Mary Kanavas. “She is very familiar
with Luther Manor and is already a
huge advocate. Her experience and
in-depth knowledge of the Luther
Manor community will serve her
well as she takes on this new role.”
Wals succeeds Kathy Conrad, who
concluded her term as president in
December.
“I only started as a keyperson in
September,” Sandy said. “But as
they were talking about their needs
for a president and some other
officers— I know it sounds hokey
but I felt the spirit calling.”
Wals met with the Luther Manor
Resource Development department
to discuss her leadership
qualifications. At Holy Cross, Wals
has served in a number of ways,
including as a worship team leader
and as a representative on the church
council. She is currently a member of
the Holy Cross choir, the Celebration
Singers. In her role as a keyperson for
the Friends of Luther Manor, Wals
promotes Luther Manor at Holy
Cross and is responsible for holding
the annual membership drive.
“Membership drives typically take
place in the fall,” said Kanavas. “We
currently have 283 members.”
Wals also has a strong connection
to Luther Manor beyond her
employment and volunteerism: her
parents, Dick and Betty Mattson, are
Terrace residents and her mother
served as President of the Friends of
Luther Manor in 1984-85. Back then
the group was known as the Luther
Manor Auxiliary.
Formed in 1958, the Luther Manor
Auxiliary serves as a link between
Luther Manor and its partner
congregations. Although the name
has changed, the group’s purpose
remains the same: to support the
mission and ministries of Luther
Manor through gifts, membership
dues and fundraising events.
“The Friends are important because
they help to put Luther Manor in the
spotlight and to facilitate the needs,
wants, and wishes of the community
for items that might not easily be
acquired,” Wals said.
These items include the glider swing
now in the Findley Courtyards of
the Health Care Center and the
new tents recently purchased for
outdoor events. The Friends are
also responsible for sponsoring the
coffee and cookie carts that weave
their way through the Health Care
and Rehabilitation Center hallways
weekday mornings.
Although their work remains as vital
now as it was 56 years ago, Friends
of Luther Manor memberships has
been waning, according to Wals.
“We are struggling a little bit,”
she said. “We are always looking
for keypersons. Some of our
congregations don’t have any. And
of course we are always looking for
volunteers who would like to give of
their time.”
Wals said as president she hopes to
rise to meet these challenges.
“I would like to help grow the
Friends of Luther Manor by
recruiting new members to help
revitalize the programs and the
interests that the Friends have been
involved in over the years,” she said.
For more information about the
Friends of Luther Manor, contact
Resource Development Officer
Mary Kanavas at ext. 462. g
Sandy Wals
steps up to lead
- 3 -
LoveLove
lightslights
Friends of
Luther Manor
The Friends of Luther Manor is
excited to be hosting the fifth annual
Love Lights Tree Lighting ceremony
on Thursday, Dec. 11 at 4:30 p.m. in
the Welcome Center.
Love Lights is the major fundraiser
for the Friends of Luther Manor.
The sale of Love Lights that decorate
the Luther Manor Christmas tree
raise money to support programs
and services that benefit residents
and participants throughout the
Luther Manor community. Last year
the Friends of Luther Manor raised
more than $9,000 from this event.
Be a part of this special holiday
tradition by purchasing an
individual light or a strand of lights
to honor or memorialize someone
What’s cooking?
River Oaks kitchen
gets a facelift
The Friends of Luther Manor pledged
$10,000 to remodel the River Oaks
kitchen. The project included new
counters, two stoves, a dishwasher,
cabinets, and tile work.
“The biggest change I noticed was in
the residents. They are so proud of the
updates,” said Kristy Johnson-Fofanah,
who oversees River Oaks. “And why
shouldn’t they be? It’s their home.”
Brighten
the holiday
season
Honor those who
are dear to you
with Love Lights
special. Individual lights are $5 and
a strand of lights is $100.
The twinkling lights are turned
on during a special tree lighting
ceremony. An evening filled with
music, prayer, refreshments and
celebration, it’s the perfect way to
enjoy the Advent season.
For more information about
Love Lights, contact Resource
Development Officer Mary
Kanavas, at ext. 462. g
- 4 -
Tamika McMath, Luther Manor CNA,
shows off the new EZ Lift that was
acquired through a grant in May.
City Block grant
In May of 2014, Luther Manor was
named the recipient of the 2014
Wauwatosa City Block Grant. The
grant award was $150,000 from
the United States Government,
under Title 1 of the Housing and
Community Development Act of
1974. The funds from this grant
will be used to update two existing
elevators located in the Health
Care Center of Luther Manor to
better serve Luther Manor’s most
vulnerable residents and meet ADA
requirements.
“Luther Manor is grateful to the
City of Wauwatosa for awarding
us this grant because it enables us
to continue to live our mission of
enriching the lives of older adults
through excellent housing, care
and services,” said Mary Kanavas,
Resource Development Officer.
The timing of the grant could not be
better.
“Luther Manor has seen its
uncompensated care totals rise each
year as health care costs increase
and reimbursement decrease,” said
Kanavas.
“By receiving this wonderful
support from the City of
Wauwatosa, Luther Manor is
able to make important, quality
improvements to our facility and
focus on our charitable care.”
Sacred Space grant
In the fall of 2013, Luther Manor
was the recipient of a $40,000 grant
from the Lutheran Service for the
Elderly Endowment at the ELCA
Foundation. That, in addition with
a private donation, will make it
possible for Luther Manor to create
a hospice-specific space in Luther
Manor.
“Since many of our resident and
client families are located outside
the Milwaukee area, a hospice-
specific space will provide families
a place to reconnect with loved ones
as they journey through the end
of life experience,” said Kanavas.
“Families can be a part of the entire
process without the stress of outside
factors such as where will we eat,
sleep and congregate.”
The space will be designed to
support both patient and family
while providing access to the
information and expertise of the
Luther Manor Hospice staff.
Luther Manor’s Hospice
Program has been operating for
seven years, giving patients and
their loved ones the opportunity
to make decisions about end
of life care while being
supported by a
dedicated, compassionate staff.
“The Sacred Space will be a
wonderful addition to our evolving
services under the Hospice
program,” said Luther Manor
Administrator and Vice President
David Beinlich.
LeadingAge grant
In May of 2014, Luther Manor
received a grant from the
West Bend Safe Resident
Assistance Endowment,
established by LeadingAge
Wisconsin, West Bend Mutual
Insurance, and EZ Way Inc.,
to purchase a lift chair.
Tamika McMath, a CNA,
had this to say about the new
equipment:
“The new EZ Lift is a
wonderful addition in our
department. I love using this
model because it is so smooth
to operate. The residents feel
even safer because of the ease
of use.”
Enriching the lives of older adults
Community grants make a difference at Luther Manor
- 5 -
supporters
Luther Manor
The world has two kinds of heroes.
There are the heroes of books and
movies who wear colorful costumes
and soar through the sky—in some
cases faster than a speeding bullet.
Then there are the other kind of
heroes. They don’t wear masks or
capes, and you will not find them
on the glossy pages of comic books
or flying over buildings, suspended
mid-air. They make a difference in
the world quietly, through the little
things they do every day.
At Luther Manor, these heroes
are our faithful donors—the
individuals, families, and partner
congregations, who, through their
generosity, enhance the Luther
Manor community with programs
and amenities and through
contributions to the Resident
Support Fund, provide a financial
safety net for residents who have
outlived their resources.
One of these heroes is Bob
Otzelberger. Otzelberger, a retired
Menomonee Falls Postmaster and
World War II navy veteran, has
been a consistent Luther Manor
donor since 1994.
“Bob
utilizes
all of the
different
ways that
people
can donate,” said Resource
Development Officer Mary
Kanavas. “He responds to our
annual appeals, he gives memorial
gifts, he gives gifts in honor of loved
ones, he purchases Love Lights and
he was one of the golf cart sponsors
for the Milwaukee Senior Open.”
A member of the all-volunteer
fundraising and advocacy group,
the Friends of Luther Manor,
Otzelberger is quick to downplay
his contributions.
“I’m no big donor,” he said.
But a person doesn’t have to be a
“big donor”
to make a big
difference.
“If everyone
gives just a
little—the
overall impact is large and far-
reaching,” Kanavas said.
Otzelberger is a Terrace resident. He
and his wife, Cora, moved into the
Terrace in July of 2000. Cora passed
away in 2003 but Bob continues to
make the most of everything Luther
Manor has to offer.
Bob Otzelberger
A Luther Manor
HERO
”“I love Luther Manor-
I really do.
- 6 -
A meeting of Heritage Partners
Retired Luther Manor CEO and President
Rev. David Keller addresses legacy donors group
Donors who have committed to the future of Luther Manor through
planned giving are members of a special group known as the Heritage
Partner Society.
Members of the Heritage Partner Society have included Luther Manor
in their estate planning to create a lasting legacy that will serve well
beyond their lifetimes. They were honored for this generosity at a special
luncheon in June.
Retired Luther Manor President and CEO Pastor David Keller, who is
a member of the Heritage Partner Society, spoke to the group about the
importance of planned giving and offered his thanks.
“You are important members of the Luther Manor family and we thank
you for this expression of your gratitude and generosity.”
About 25 of the 86 Heritage Partner Society members attended
the event, which took place in the Linden Room.
“Heritage Partners are vital to Luther Manor,”
said Mary Kanavas, Luther Manor Resource
Development Officer.
Donors are able to choose how their gift is used or leave
it unrestricted so Luther Manor can use it to meet the
most urgent needs of the community.
“Besides leaving a lasting legacy that will have a
meaningful impact on Luther Manor residents,
there are other benefits to planned giving such as
reducing the estate tax burden on loved ones,”
Kanavas said.
For more information about planned giving or to
become a member of the Heritage Partner Society,
contact Resource Development Officer Mary
Kanavas at ext. 462. g
“I
exercise
four times
a week
and I am in
two exercise
classes,” he
said. “I attend
service by
watching the
weekly broadcast
of the Sunday
service in the
Lippold Faith and
Education Center.
I also play Wii
bowling.”
Otzelberger also shares
his time with others, participating
in clinical visits with nursing
students from the Milwaukee
School of Engineering. He was a
volunteer in the Terrace mentor
program, helping new residents get
acclimated.
Of Luther Manor’s different
ministries, Otzelberger is most
passionate about the Resident
Support Fund, an allocation
of dollars that ensures that no
resident is ever asked to leave
Luther Manor because of the
inability to pay for services.
“I donate to the Resident
Support Fund for a few reasons,”
Otzelberger said. “First, I can afford
it; second, I am helping people; and
the third reason is maybe a selfish
reason, but I figure maybe someday
I could be in that situation.”
Otzelberger also recently joined the
Heritage Partner Society, a planned
giving program whose members
have included Luther Manor in their
estate planning. Heritage Partners
can leave an unrestricted gift to the
United Lutheran Program for the
Aging (ULPA), choose to assign a
gift to the ULPA to a designated
program area or a capital project,
or designate the gift to the Luther
Manor Foundation-Resident
Support Fund.
Otzelberger designated his gift to
provide financial support to Luther
Manor’s most vulnerable residents.
His motivation is simple:
“I love Luther Manor,” Otzelberger
said. “I really do.”
For information on opportunities to
become a donor, call (414) 464-3880
and ask for Resource Development,
or visit www.luthermanor.org and
click on “Support Our Ministry.” g
- 7 -- 7 -
supporters
Luther Manor
In the Book of James we read, “Faith without works is dead.” Luther
Manor is a special place where God’s love is faithfully shared by staff,
volunteers, residents and family members who work as partners to enrich
the lives of those who call Luther Manor home.
Five ways to show your faith
Notes from Pastor Dave Patterson
1
God’s love is shared through
kind words - warm greetings;
expressions of “please” and
“thank you”; intercessory
prayers; addressing each other by
name; respectful instruction and
guidance.
2
The love of Jesus is felt
through compassionate
touch - a pat on the back;
soothing care; a warm hug; a
hand quietly held at a bedside.
3
God’s love enriches the lives
of the residents here when
people spend quality time
together - a visit from a loved
one; an adventurous outing; sitting
with others in one of the many
beautiful courtyards or lounge
areas; unhurried time to gather with
others for meals, worship and other
meaningful activities.
In Galatians, St Paul gives us good
advice, “Let us not become weary in
doing good.” g
4
Faith is put into action
through service - staff ,
volunteers, congregations,
family members and friends
achieve excellence as they give their
time and talents to provide holistic,
compassionate and dignified care.
5
God’s love is passed on
through generous gifts - a
hand drawn card from a
Sunday School student; a
Love Light; flowers that brighten
up the room; a donation given by
congregations, Friends of Luther
Manor, residents and their loved
ones to help ensure that this sacred
place will continue to be a ministry
where God’s love is shared by
enriching the lives of older adults
through excellent housing, care and
services.
- 8 -
Holy Cross Lutheran Church, located just south of the crossroads of Pilgrim
Road, Appleton Avenue and Menomonee Avenue in Menomonee Falls, has
a rich and interesting history that begins in an American Legion Hall.
“That’s where the first service was held,” said Parish Administrator Beth
Dorsey.
From that initial service on
Sunday, Nov. 4, 1951, with 98
people in attendance, Holy Cross
Lutheran Church has grown
significantly. Today the church
is housed in a 41,000 square foot
building that offers four services
each weekend attended by an
average of 600 people. In total,
Holy Cross has 2,800 baptized and
2,100 confirmed members.
Pastor Ben Groth, who recently
joined the Holy Cross congregation
as an associate pastor, shared his
initial impressions of the church.
“A welcoming attitude, wonderful
worship, and a sense of connection
to God’s work in the world locally
and globally make Holy Cross a
special community to be a part of,”
Groth said.
Globally, Holy Cross is connected
through the Meru Diocese of
Tanzania to the Seela Parish of
that diocese. Locally, Holy Cross is
partnered with two congregations
in Milwaukee – Florist Avenue
and Hephatha Lutheran. Holy
Cross is also a strong supporter of
the Menomonee Falls Food Pantry.
Over the years, Holy Cross
has been a dedicated partner
congregation to Luther Manor.
“Holy Cross has a strong tradition
Marked with the cross
ULPA partner congregation Holy Cross
Lutheran Church makes a difference at
home and in the global community
- 8 -
and commitment of supporting
Luther Manor’s ministry to older
adults through financial gifts,
Auxiliary/Friends of Luther Manor
memberships, as well as donations
of home baked or purchased cookies
for the Health Care Center coffee
carts,” said Luther Manor Director
of Volunteer Services Cheryl
Schmitz.
Schmitz is one of several Holy
Cross members who can be found
working at Luther Manor. Holy
Cross members are also among
Luther Manor residents and
volunteers.
Holy Cross spearheaded what is one
of the longest-standing volunteer
traditions at Luther Manor: the
annual Holy Cross Bingo Party.
Eunice Koehler, a Terrace resident
and a keyperson for Holy Cross,
said the congregation aimed to
organize a special activity each year
for Luther Manor residents. Initially,
that activity was a sing-a-long. Over
the years the activity evolved into a
bingo party with prizes that church
members spend all year collecting.
Holy Cross volunteers also sign up
to bake apple kuchen, a German
treat they share with residents who
attend the bingo party.
“The residents always seemed to
really enjoy it,” Koehler said.
The bingo party has been going on
for close to 30 years.
In addition to their older adults
ministry, Holy Cross has a strong
youth ministry.
“Our congregation is made up
predominantly of families with
children, so many of our programs
are driven by the children,” said
Dorsey.
Youth ministries
and faith education
opportunities include
cross-generational
mission trips, The
Crossing – a high school
youth group, Vacation
Bible Study, Affirmation
of Baptism/Confirmation, Preschool
and Faith Development (Sunday
School).
One of the church’s biggest events
each year is the annual Block Party,
which takes place the Saturday after
Labor Day.
“It’s a weekend that our church
community really comes together,”
Dorsey said.
The future looks bright for Holy
Cross, and Luther Manor looks
forward to a continued partnership.
Visit the congregation website at
www.holycrosslutheran.org. g
- 9 -- 9 -
supporters
Luther Manor
Jolene Hansen joins Luther Manor
Adult Day Services participants in
a session of TimeSlips. Jolene has
blessed Luther Manor with over
590 volunteer service hours.
There aren’t too many people
who can say that a scholarship
was created in their honor. Luther
Manor volunteer Jolene Hansen is
one of the few.
Students seeking certification in
the TimeSlips Creative Storytelling
program (as offered through
TimeSlips Creative Storytelling,
Inc. based in Milwaukee) are able
to apply for the Jolene Hansen
Student Fellowship to help fund
their training.
The fellowship was named after
Hansen, who lives in Waukesha
with her husband, Don, for her
long-time involvement with the
TimeSlips program offered at the
Luther Manor Adult Day Services.
Hansen first became interested
in TimeSlips 15 years ago when
she read an article about it in the
newspaper. TimeSlips is geared
toward adults with dementia and
Alzheimer’s. The idea behind it is to
“replace the pressure to remember
with the freedom to imagine” and
enable those with memory loss to
connect with others.
“I called the Alzheimer’s
Association and told them I was
interested in being a part of a
program like that,” Hansen said.
“They directed me to Luther
Manor. I’ve been volunteering here
ever since.”
TimeSlips sessions typically take
place in the Adult Day Center at
Honoring a Luther Manor volunteer
Scholarship created in Jolene Hansen’s name
- 10 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
Luther Manor. A group of Adult
Day Service participants and a
handful of volunteers gather in
a circle to discuss a pre-selected
black and white photo. Leading
the group is a TimeSlips-trained
facilitator who invites those
gathered to imagine aloud what is
happening in the picture. The ideas
are jotted down on an oversized
tablet and a story unfolds.
As a former English teacher, the
idea of storytelling appealed to
Hansen. But at Luther Manor
Hansen has also found herself in
the role of student.
“I’ve learned so much about
dementia and Alzheimer’s,” she
said. “I’ve learned a lot about aging
– how to do it with humor, grace
and patience. And I’ve learned a lot
from watching staff and their ways
of compassion and care.”
Hansen was surprised to learn that
fellowships are being offered in
her name.
“I got an email from Anne
Bastings (founder and president
of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling,
Inc.) notifying me of the
fellowships,” Hansen said. “It was
pretty exciting, and an honor.”
Bastings offers high praise of
Hansen in the award letter sent to
fellowship recipients:
“(Jolene) was there at the
beginning (1998) and she continues
to this day at Luther Manor…Her
dedication, patience, and insights
are truly remarkable.”
The Jolene Hansen Student
Fellowships enable two of the
TimeSlips interns to receive
free TimeSlips training and
certification, along with
mentorship by a certified
facilitator.
“The fact that it was students
who would be benefiting from
the fellowship circled back to my
first love: teaching and students,”
Hansen said.
Over the years, Hansen has
assisted Luther Manor staff
in TimeSlips training and in
statewide trainings for the
Wisconsin Adult Day Services
Association on the value of
creativity programming for Adult
Day Services.
Hansen’s volunteerism in Adult
Day Services was recognized in
2007, when Beth Meyer-Arnold
nominated
her for the
Luther Manor
Volunteer
Services
Annual Good
Samaritan
Award.
“I commend Jolene for her tireless
work at Luther Manor, and in the
Adult Day Center with persons
with dementia,” Meyer-Arnold
wrote in her nomination letter.
For information about
volunteering in the Adult Day
Services, contact Cheryl Schmitz
at ext. 600. g
”“I’ve learned a lot about aging
– how to do it with humor,
grace and patience.
A Luther Manor
volunteer was
recently recognized
for her service.
Direct Supply
employee Robin
Malek received
the company’s
Volunteer of the Year Award on
April 23.
“Robin was one of our initial
contacts for recruiting Direct
Supply volunteers,” said Luther
Manor Director of Volunteer
Services Cheryl Schmitz.
The partnership between Direct
Supply volunteers and Luther
Manor began in July of 2007.
Robin came onboard as an official
Luther Manor volunteer shortly
thereafter. Robin volunteers in
the Ice Cream Parlor. In addition
she has recruited Direct Supply
volunteers to help out for a
number of Luther Manor Life
Enrichment activities and special
events, including:
•	Adult Day Service tailgate
parties
•	Casino Royale gaming events
•	Fat Tuesday Pancake
Breakfast
•	Holiday decorating and un-
decorating
•	Luther Manor Employee/
Family celebrations
•	State Fair fieldtrips, and
•	Tapestry of Life art show
“These events directly enhance
the quality of life for the resident
who call Luther Manor home and
for the program participants,”
Schmitz said.
Congratulations, Robin! g
Volunteer of the Year
Robin Malek
- 11 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
Dare to create
Scribbled in red marker on a
piece of paper tacked to the
door of Luther Manor’s Adult
Day Services art studio are the
following words:
“Enter if you dare… to create…
to create words, thoughts,
movements, song, ideas, kindness,
empathy and of course art!”
The foundation of everything that
happens inside of the art studio,
where Luther Manor volunteer
and sculptor Michael Savic spends
his Thursday mornings, is simply
that — to create.
The artists who attend Savic’s
weekly sessions are Adult Day
Services participants, many of
whom have been diagnosed with
a cognitive impairment, such as
dementia. The art studio offers
participants an opportunity to
express themselves without
using words or memory, in a safe
community of other creators.
“There is a joy in creating
something,” Savic said. “I feel that
same joy when I see Adult Day
Service participants creating.”
Savic started volunteering as
an art studio facilitator in the
Luther Manor Adult Day Services
of Wauwatosa in June of 2013.
Although he doesn’t have a
degree in art, his creative talent for
making sculptures from recycled
material made Savic uniquely
qualified to lead the Thursday
morning sessions. The art supplies
Adult Day Services participants
work with are mostly donated
items, many odds and ends.
Savic’s challenge is to determine
how to best use them.
“The first thing I do when I
walk into the art studio is take
Michael Savic finds joy with ADS participants
- 12 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
volunteers
Luther Manor
inventory,” Savic said. “The
project we make that day depends
in part on what types of materials
we have on hand.”
Savic is able to see the limitless
creative potential of ordinary
objects. Adult Day Center
participants have made
multimedia art from a variety
of unlikely everyday items:
blank invitations, wax-coated
wicks, cutup magazines, buttons,
wrapping paper, fabric — even
empty prescription bottles.
“We make art out of whatever is
available,” Savic said.
While materials may be limited,
inspiration is never in short
supply.
“It comes from all over. Last
winter we took a fieldtrip to the
Milwaukee Art Museum and we
saw the Andy Warhol exhibit,”
Savic said. “That inspired us to do
our own Warhol exhibit, just using
black and white photo copies of
famous people.”
Much of the art participants create
starts out as an individual piece,
Savic said, and then the individual
Adult Day Services is currently
in need of supplies for the art
studio. Water-based paints,
crayons, chalk and water-
based glue, are a few items
that are used regularly. Is there
something else you’d like
to donate to the art studio?
Contact Kath Vandenberg at
ext. 315 to see if it’s something
the art studio can use.
pieces are combined to create a
larger work of art.
“It’s usually abstract,” he said. “If
you can’t see the beauty in it, it’s
really your loss.”
The Adult Day Service participants
who join Savic on Thursday
mornings are a diverse cross
section.
“Some people come every week,”
he said. “Others come in just to
try it out, thinking they can’t do
anything creative. I try to guide
them and help when necessary.
They usually surprise themselves.
Each artist is different and I try to
get to know everyone. ”
He noted that one participant,
Flosine, always wears “the coolest
hats” while another, Sr. Alice,
sings while she works. Savic,
whose day job is grocery store
produce manager, said spending
time with Adult Day Services
participants is the highlight of his
week.
“I love seeing them smiling,” he
said. “They are so appreciative of
everything.”
The Adult Day Services staff is
similarly appreciative of Savic.
“Michael is such a wonderful
asset to the Adult Day Center,”
said Adult Day Services Person-
Centered Care Specialist Kath
Vandenberg. “He has built
really great relationships with
many of the participants and has
encouraged them to create art
using their personal style while
also teaching them new skills and
techniques.”
For information about volunteer
opportunities in Adult Day
Services, contact Cheryl Schmitz,
Director of Volunteer Services, at
ext. 600. g
- 13 -
Sculptor and
Luther Manor
volunteer
Michael Savic,
far left, spends
his Thursday
mornings creating
art with Adult
Day Center
participants like
Bob Z., Deanna E.,
and Sr. Alice G.
Furry
four-legged
visitors are
not strangers
to Luther
Manor. Well-
mannered
pooches and
friendly felines
are frequent pet
therapy guests
to the retirement
community.
But one of these
guests, a 13-year-old
boxer named Oscar,
holds an extra-
special place in the
hearts of River Oaks
residents.
Oscar, like many of
the residents he visits,
needs an assistive
device to get around
because of a medical
condition. In Oscar’s
case, that condition is a
degenerative inflammation
of the spinal column characterized
by the production of bone spurs. As
a result, Oscar is paralyzed from the
hips down.
“It’s just something that can happen
because of aging,” said Meghann
Chenery, a Luther Manor Pet
Partner volunteer and Oscar’s
owner.
Pet Partners are special volunteers
who bring their dogs or cats to visit
with Luther Manor residents. The
program started more than a decade
ago, and now provides pet visits to
nearly 200 residents a week.
The difference between Oscar
and other pets is that he uses a
Walkin’ Wheels Chair to move
around, his front legs propelling
him forward. He’s had the chair
for about a year now.
Chenery adopted Oscar from a
boxer rescue organization when he
was 3 years old. As a Pet Partner
dog, he sparks a lot of conversation
among residents who recall
memories of their own pets.
“People see him and they can
relate,” Chenery said. “Many of
them had a dog or another pet when
they were growing up.”
He also gets a certain amount of
sympathy.
“It’s so sad to see him like that,”
said Pauline Lacey, a River Oaks
resident. “But I guess they have to
go through life the way that we
do. I guess we all go
through
things; animals and
people.”
Oscar and Chenery are
new Luther Manor
volunteers, but they are
very familiar with the
community: Chenery
is the granddaughter
of the Rev. William
and Gladys Downey.
The Downeys were
Terrace residents
and Rev. Downey,
who was pastor
at Fox Point
Lutheran Church,
was one of the
founders of
the United
Lutheran
Program for
the Aging,
which created
Luther Manor.
“I always used to bring Oscar to
visit my Grandma,” Chenery said.
“She loved him. But he was too wild
to be a therapy dog. He’s calmed
down a lot in his old age.”
Chenery and Oscar mostly visit
River Oaks because Chenery’s great
aunt, Phyllis Gauger, is a resident
there and it’s closer to Chenery’s
Grafton home. But they have also
visited the Health Care Center at
Luther Manor in Wauwatosa.
“I like interacting with people and
hearing their stories,” Chenery said.
For more information about
becoming a Pet Partner, contact
Cheryl Schmitz, Director of
Volunteer Services at ext. 600.
Update: Since this article was written
Oscar has passed away. We would like
to thank Meghann for sharing Oscar
with us. He brought great joy to the
residents he met. g
Oscar
& Meghann
- 14 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
70%
M
ilwaukee
County
24% WaukeshaCounty
1% Illinois
2% Walworth
County
3% Washington
County
Student
Volunteers
WHO
140
Where are
they from?
- 15 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
{Just a small handful of our
wonderful student volunteers
Student volunteers
Margaret Radske and
Jessica Olson help
in the Health Care
Center garden.
Student volunteers
Gabby Procopis and
Bobby Cranfield help
in the ice cream parlor.
{
{
It is fall, quieter here at Luther Manor than just a few weeks ago. Quieter since the many students have once again
left Luther Manor to return to their schools after a summer immersed in volunteering. We thank them for making a
difference in the lives of Luther Manor’s older adults.
Who are our approximate 140 student volunteers? They are largely from the neighborhood, from the Luther Manor
family (students of staff, adult volunteers, and residents) and they are from our ULPA congregations. As well,
they are young people who have heard about a positive volunteer experience at Luther Manor from an existing
volunteer. They are students coming from education institutions requiring volunteer service (largely nearby high
schools, and colleges and universities.) They are young people considering health care careers who are using their
time at Luther Manor as a launching pad. They are families choosing to volunteer together. Seventy percent of our
student volunteers reside in Milwaukee County, 24 percent in Waukesha County, three percent in Washington
County, and two percent in Walworth County. One student comes from Illinois!
What did these young people do? Well, a lot, including: creative engagement in our Adult Day Services, Popcorn,
Ice Cream Parlor, Life Enrichment activities in the Health Care Center, gardening, therapy and Beauty Shop
transporting, arts groups, Wii groups, manicuring, Bingo, trip volunteers and more.
We extend thanks and gratitude to the young people who have served at Luther Manor this summer and will
continue to serve older adults. Thanks for making a world of difference! If you
or someone you know would like to make a difference
at Luther Manor, please contact Luther Manor
Volunteer Services (414) 464-3880 ext. 577/600
or email volunteer@luthermanor.org. g
Cheryl Schmitz, Director of
Volunteer Services
Lori Schultz, Youth and Family
Volunteer Specialist
Congratulations to Kaitlyn Williams on her graduation from Purdue
University. Kaitlyn is accepted into the Physician Assistant’s program
at Carroll University this fall. Kaitlyn volunteered in the Luther Manor
HealthReach Therapy Department as a student volunteer, and Adult Day
Services.
Congratulations to Kellen Lasky for her acceptance into Xavier University
this fall. Her major will be Occupational Therapy. Kellen volunteers in the
Luther Manor HealthReach Therapy Department as a student volunteer.
Congratulations to student volunteers Sabrina Black, Annalise
Ho, Abhishek Janardan, Juhi Mody and Lydia Wehrley from
Wauwatosa West High School who were involved in the 30 member
student team that competed in the “We the People” competition held in
Washington D.C. April 25. Wauwatosa West High School placed 16th.
Congratulations to Rev. Dr. Wolf Knappe who was recognized
and presented with the Living Loehe Award at a special ceremony at
Wartburg Theological Seminary May 18, 2014. The Living Loehe Award
was established by Wartburg Theological Seminary as a way of honoring
people who have given distinguished service to and through the church,
people who exemplify “Christ’s call to be disciples in the context of their
own daily lives and professional commitments.”
Congratulation to Luther Manor volunteer Harvin Abrahamson,
WWII Eighth Air Force Veteran, who participated in the B-17 Bomber
flight at the EAA in Oshkosh April 14.
Congratulations to hospital volunteers Bob Richter and Dennis
Schindler who were recognized by Froedtert Hospital, Wauwatosa, for
their volunteer service. Bob was recognized for 15 years and 3,000 hours
of volunteer service and Dennis was recognized for 673 hours of service.
Congratulations to Alice Wagner who was recognized for her volunteer
service at Froedtert Community Memorial Hospital in Menomonee Falls.
Alice was recognized for 7,000 hours of service. She has been a volunteer
at the hospital for 48 years serving in various departments!
Congratulations to Glenn and Lois Port who were both recognized
for their volunteer service at Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital. Glenn was
recognized for over 15 years of service
and Lois was recognized for 12,070
volunteer service hours. g
A round of applause
for our volunteers
Luther Manor
volunteers have
all the right
ingredients
It goes without saying that if
we cook or bake and omit an
important ingredient, that recipe
could be seriously altered, not
usually for the better! Yet, often if
we add an ingredient to a recipe,
we find that dish is even more
scrumptious.
Same is true at Luther Manor
regarding our wonderful mix of
volunteers – what a great recipe
for success in caring for older
adults when the ingredients of
volunteers are added to delightful
residents/participants, caring
staff and committed family
members. Volunteers bring
important ingredients of energy,
time, companionship, care,
humor, a listening ear, patience,
and commitment to complete
the recipe for a successful senior
living community. If we omit any
of these important ingredients,
our successful recipe would be
severely altered.
And who doesn’t love a great
recipe? Our kind thanks to all of
our many volunteers for providing
just the right ingredients! g
- 16 -
volunteers
Luther Manor
volunteers
Luther Manor
Volunteers take the cake
Luther Manor honors volunteers
for service milestones
A special group of people were recognized for their
contributions of time and talent in the Luther Manor
community. From Luther Manor’s main campus in
Wauwatosa to River Oaks in Mequon and Lakefield
Adult Day Services in Grafton, volunteers play an
important role in fulfilling Luther Manor’s mission of
sharing God’s love.
Volunteers were honored for their many hours of
service during a special banquet April 10. The theme
for the annual event was “Luther Manor Volunteers
Have All the Right Ingredients.”
“Volunteers are one of the main staples of Luther
Manor’s mission and that is no secret ingredient,”
said Director of Volunteer Service Cheryl Schmitz.
Almost 600 volunteers give of their time and talent
to Luther Manor annually. Those approaching
significant milestones upwards of 500 hours in their
service careers received special acknowledgment at
the banquet.
Those honored included: Loretta Braun and Marilyn
Bub, who reached service milestones of 15,000-plus
hours; Lois Port, who achieved 10,000 hours; and
student volunteer Emily Olson, 13, who achieved 500
hours.
Good Samaritan awards were also presented to
volunteers who were nominated by staff for their
volunteerism. Among the recipients were Harding
Bond, who volunteers in the Hospice program and
the Terrace Model Railroad volunteer team, which
consists of David Hoag, Rev. Dr. Keith Jones, Norman
Kraatz, David Myers, Gary Payne, John Schneble,
Gilbert Steffen and Carl Wisler.
Keeping in the theme of the evening’s event, Schmitz
said:
“Volunteers take the cake. You are the chocolate chips
in the cookies of life. You are the apple of our eye and
you add a good measure to our mission of enriching
the lives of the older adults we serve.”
Special guests at the event included Luther Manor
Vice President and Administrator Dave Beinlich,
ULPA Board member and director Kathy Czarniak
and retired Executive Director Rev. William Truby.
For information about becoming a Luther Manor
volunteer, contact Director of Volunteer Services
Cheryl Schmitz at ext. 600. g
- 17 -
Lakefield Adult Day
Services staff and
volunteers.
2014 Good
Samaritan Award
recipients
Marilyn Bub, Loretta Braun, and Lois Port
(with husband Glenn) were honored for
10,000+ service hours
Automated External Defibrillator: The Courtyards
($1,500)
This lifesaving equipment will be strategically placed in
The Courtyards.
Vital Signs Monitor $2,360 each
These monitors measure a resident’s blood pressure,
pulse, oxygen level in the blood and temperature.
Wider Beds for Safety (4) $2,450 per bed
The Rehabilitation Center and Health Care Centers are
looking to add wider beds in their units. These beds are
a practical solution for better patient care. Safety for the
patient and staff is addressed with the updated features
found on these wider beds. Wider beds allow for easier
movement for the residents and are easier for staff to
assist in daily activities such as changing linens, patient
movement, sitting up and getting out of the bed.
Rehabilitation and Therapy Equipment
The Rehabilitation Center in Luther Manor is a special
place for those who require complex medical care,
therapy or just a little extra time to rest and recuperate
after hospitalization for surgery, illness or injury. Guided
by Luther Manor’s mission, Christian heritage and
values, the Rehabilitation Center focuses on the need for
compassionate care during vulnerable times.
A few of the needs for Luther Manor’s Rehabilitation
Center include:
• Continuous Passive Motion Machine-used for the
purpose of knee motion- $2,150
• Sequential Compression Device-for the prevention of
blood clots-$950(per machine)
• Alternating pressure/low air loss mattress-for
prevention of bed sores- $3,275
Reading Machine for the Courtyard Residents
$2,400-$3,000
The Courtyards Life Enrichment program is in need of a
new reading machine that magnifies print for residents
with low vision. These machines are a wonderful piece
of assistive technology to help our residents regain their
visual independence. It enables residents to keep reading
even though they might be limited by sight problems.
There are many more opportunities to give beyond what is listed above, please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource
Development Officer, at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462, to find out more about any of the current funding needs, or discuss
how you might contribute to one of these worthwhile causes. Thank you for your prayerful consideration.
Garden Maintenance and Beautification Projects
($500)
The outdoor spaces at Luther Manor provide peaceful,
secure sanctuaries where residents and their guests can
enjoy the outdoors and connect with nature. Donor gifts
enable enhancement of the grounds and landscaping
surrounding Luther Manor, as well as the purchase of
outdoor furniture.
Elevated Garden Beds: Luther Manor Terrace
($300 each)
There are many benefits of raised bed gardening. These
elevated beds enable residents to grow small plots of
flowers and vegetables, they are space conscious, visually
attractive and reduces back strain when tending to the bed.
Lakefield Adult Day Center
Housed in St. John’s Lutheran Church in Grafton,
Lakefield Adult Day Center offers programs and activities
for older adults that promote health, independent living
and social interaction. A few of the needs for Lakefield
Adult Day Center include:
• Outdoor Gas Grill- $500
• Kitchen Aid Mixer-$225
• New Microwave- $150
Hospice Care ($500)
When medical treatment intervention is no longer
concentrated on aggressive measures to cure disease,
combat an illness or remedy a condition, those facing
their final months, weeks and days of life, can benefit
from hospice care. At Luther Manor, we believe all people
are created in the image of God, and we honor Him by
surrounding those nearing the end of their lives, as well
as their loved ones, with compassion and understanding.
Spa Tubs: Health Care Center $6,500 each
The Luther Manor Health Care Center is seeking two
new spa tubs to replace aged and inoperable tubs that are
currently in place. The new tubs will enable easy entrance
and exit ensuring a safer bath, along with various
whirlpool settings. Spa tubs allow our residents to enjoy
and experience the healing effects of water on joints,
muscles and other chronic conditions.
Opportunities to giveOpportunities to give
- 18 -
Memorial Gifts
Many individuals choose to memorialize their loved ones by making contributions to the Luther Manor Foundation.
We recognize and celebrate those in whose memory gifts to Luther Manor have been given. Those who have been
memorialized are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following memorial
gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource Development at (414) 464-3880 ext 572, email to
give@luthermanor.org, or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger.
Marvel Alex
Penny Bellin
Lorraine Arndt
Marjorie Jothen
Finnette Augat
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Janet Beltman
Liz Bender
Mr.  Mrs. Paul A. Deneson, Jr.
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Missy Garrett
Chris Haymen
Mrs. Ken Jansen
Marlene E. Johnson
Jordan Kofroth
Joshua Kofroth
Mr.  Mrs. Steve Miller
Mr.  Mrs. Farhad Mohsenian
Mr.  Mrs. Alan Najmabadi
Mr.  Mrs. Bob Rusch
Bea Steffes
Betty Volmer
Leonard Wanta
Mr.  Mrs. Edwin O. Werdermann
Sam Wilcox
Mr.  Mrs. Kenneth L. Zinkgraf
Our mothers
Mr.  Mrs. William J. Bagemihl
Bud  Diana Baker
Dr.  Mrs. Stephen Baker
Elsie Bassel
Eunice Baumgart
Joseph Bausch
Lori Carter
Marie M. Biffel
Mr.  Mrs. Ronald Biffel
Ginny Gribble
Richard J. Mathews
Frances C. Bond
Harding B. Bond
Kenneth Bonde
Eleanor Ciurro
Donald Brindel
Rose Brindel
Irma Bruss
Naomi R. Knoll
Claudia Druschke Buening
Betty-Lynne Tazbier
Almira Buscher
Mary  Charles Buscher
Leah Caldwell
Pat Mitschrich
Mildred “Millie” Cap
Nancy Matton
Joyce Caskey
Delores M. Nix
Russ Chambers
Gerry  Judy Beuk  T2
Catherine Chaney
Ann Tunak
Lillian Conto
Delores M. Nix
Loraine  James Davies
Loraine D.  Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr.
Max Dietze, Jr.
Orville Treptow
Helmut Doenges
Rosel D. Gruen
Vida C. Stanton
Monetta Dorau
Mary  Charles Buscher
Alda Dowdle
Rick Dowdle
Elsie Duemmel
Nancy Stern
Elizabeth Eckl
Jean M. Rosier
Virginia Einem
Richard  Shirley Behrendt
Lucille Englert
Janet Beltman
Eleanor Ciurro
Mr.  Mrs. Daniel R. Dordel
Mr.  Mrs. David W. Eggebrecht
Dale  Mary Ann Guenther
Mr.  Mrs. James Scherkenbach
Cheryl Schmitz
Rozanne Schwarz
Dulice Evans
Gloria Larson
LaVerne C. Evert
Mr.  Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr.
Michael  Diane Evert
Harold E.  Margaret F. Fahning
Donald R.  Sandra L. Fahning
Eleanore K. Fealey
Mr.  Mrs. Frank Wallner
Jim  Joyce Fischer
Paula Knox
Shirley Fischer
Martha Andeen
Mr.  Mrs. Donald P. Baket
Janet Beltman
Eleanor Ciurro
Frank Coogan
Inga  Warren Harwick
Joan G. Heyne
Mr.  Mrs. Donald Koehler
Joanne Krause
Doris B. Lemke
Robert  Audrey Richter
Jean M. Rosier
Gloria Schmeling
Lily A. Schmidt
Cheryl Schmitz
Marian Q. Thielke
Arline J. Thoss
Jim Thunes
Orville Treptow
Thomas A. Floryance
Sharon Floryance
Gerald “Jerry” Franzen
Mr.  Mrs. David M. Bruder
Elaine Franzen
- 19 -
Memorial Gifts
Mr.  Mrs. Paul H. Leu
Northwestern Mutual
Open Door Bible Church
Honey Reneau
Ruth Windbeil
Norma  Edwin Frederickson
David  Lenore Frederickson
Donald “Don” Freitag
Violet Baumgart
Nancy Becher  Miloudi Elafess
Mr.  Mrs. C. Bergquist
Ann Brady
Gerald R. Brauns
Mr.  Mrs. Thomas F. Cannariato
Regina C. Dombeck
Delores Dumke
Lois Freitag
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Chuck Gressle
Mr.  Mrs. Phillip R. Hazelquist
Arline G. Henkel
Bernice Herman
Joan G. Heyne
Kathy, Greg  Harley Jastromski
Lucille V. Johnson
Lois Kehres
Betty Lissack
Nancy Matton
Mr.  Mrs. Michael Miller
Bernadine Mullihan
Rev. David Patterson
Mr.  Mrs. Robert Peterson
Glenn  Lois Port
Bob  Ann Rantanen
Patricia A. Reynolds
Kraig R. Rodenbeck
Mary Rozella
Cheryl Schmitz
Junella L. Skokan
Bonnie Vick
Mr.  Mrs. G. Weber
Mr.  Mrs. M. Zielke
Judith A. Froehlich
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Jean C. Abriola
Mr.  Mrs. Tom Armour
Mr.  Mrs. Jeff Boardman
Harding B. Bond
Mr.  Mrs. Dale Boyce
Marlyn J. Brandt
Susan Bruckman
Mr.  Mrs. Reinhard Dahm
Dorothy DeVed
Kathryn Dubin
Mr.  Mrs. Richard W. Eden
Norbert Engebrecht
Theresa Erato
Mr.  Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr.
Lois Freitag
John  Sandi Froehlich
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Inga  Warren Harwick
Joan G. Heyne
Mr.  Mrs. Erik Huth
Rev.  Mrs. James B. Ilten
Matilda Jacobs
Yvonne M. Jahn
Mr.  Mrs. Russell W. John
Marjorie Jothen
Lois Kehres  Roland Miller
Kilpatrick Insurance Agency
Constance Y. Kling
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Ele Lindgren
Betty Lissack
Bob  Shirley Mathison
Dick  Betty Mattson
Mr.  Mrs. Blake McDuffie
Sherry J. Meisenheimer
Barbara Mohr
Carol D. Mueller
Pastor  Mrs. David Patterson
Mr.  Mrs. Harold D. Peterson
Mr.  Mrs. Mark S. Picard
Joseph  Kathleen Potts
Roberta J. Pratt
Alice M. Putzier
Joyce Rades
Mr.  Mrs. Richard Retzer
Jeanne Sawicki
Luanne M. Schmidt
Cheryl Schmitz
Cliff  Mary Schrock
Alan C. Severin
Rev. David Shelstad  Dr. Lorri Lobeck
Evelyn Sherwonit
Mr.  Mrs. Andrew Shirpke
Cindy Simon
Vida G. Stanton
Judy Thompson
Jacqueline Thomson
Jerry, Nancy  Jennifer Treis
Mr.  Mrs. Richard L. Tushaus
Rosemary Wakefield
Mr.  Mrs. Kenneth L. Wiesner
Alice Gaalaas
Linda Gaalaas
Betty Genz
Jean M. Rosier
Rev. Ernie Gilberts
Dick  Kathy Adix
Agnes Gilberts
Lori Gorham
Sarah Gorham
Dorothy Graf
Christine Layne
Margaret Graf
Christine Layne
Robert Graf
Christine Layne
Ida Grantz
Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich
Tyran G. Green
Roberta J. Pratt
Pastor Al Grender  Carol Grender
Lois Freitag
Edna Gula
Kathleen Conrad
Dorothy Haas
Donald Haas
Alex L. Hamala
Anonymous
Jim Hamala
Roger C. Laesch
Mary Olson
Terry Pasbrig
Southeastern Data Corp.
Michael C. Stupich, M.S.
Elizabeth  Fred Hart
Jane Karis
Martin  Fern Heck
Paul M. Heck
Myrtle Held
John  Chris Kosma
Verna Held
Marie E. Weiss
Henrietta Heumann
Mr.  Mrs. Thomas C. Heumann
Ruth M. Heup
Anonymous
Larry Heup
Grace M. Higgins
Mary Ellen Kiesner
Our moms, Amy  Evelyn
Jim  Kris Hildebrand
- 20 -
Nellie Anderson Hoag
Patricia H. Warth
Roger  Ethel Hoffman
Betty E. Kannal
Audrey Holmes
David  Judith Holmes
Clarence “Bud” Holtze
Carol Hoefner
William “Bill” Humphrey
Norbert Engebrecht
Mr.  Mrs. Donald Koehler
Nancy Matton
Arline J. Thoss
Ruth Jaeger
Helen Jaeger
Hazel I. Jarchow
Mr.  Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr.
Henry  Viola Jensen
Steve Jensen
Genevieve Johnson
Ginni Verthein
Lydia C. Judd
Judy M. Judd
Darlene Katt
L. Lee Katt
Virginia R. “Ginny” Kelly
William Kelly
Danielle T. Kreitzer
Mary  Dave Shanahan
Karole Klind
Harvey C. Klind
Elmer Knickelbine
Mr.  Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher
Alma Knippel
Nancy Ploetz
Lauretta Koepp
Elaine Cary
Rita Ann Korth
Marie E. Korth
Ilma Kraatz
Michael Arndt
Mr.  Mrs. Richard Diehl
Susan Kaul
Leslie H. Krause
Germaine Krause
Carol Krenz
Rose J. Lucas
Lillian Krenzke
Helen M. Davis
Anna Meyer Kroeger
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Raymond J.  Bonnie Krueger
Kent K. Krueger
Lisa Kuchta
Margaret M. Fandre
Mr.  Mrs. Brian E. Johanson
Blaine Kunkel
Bob  Ann Borowski
R. K.  Ursula Wollenberg
Margaret Lang
Barbara J. Haessly
Margaret Laun
Daniel F. Ring
Violet LePage
Marie LePage
Lillian Leverenz
Elmer E. Schultz
Norma C. Lillie
Adeline Amberg
Olga Lyneis
Barbara Sontag
Charles C. Macleod
Tom Lavers
Floyd Mann
Jim Thunes
Aunt of Mr.  Mrs. Abe Martin
Martha Andeen
Mary, dear friend of Terri Bartlett
Nancy Becher  Miloudi Elafess
Helen Mattson
Dick  Betty Mattson
Esther G. May
Howard  Beverly Reoch
Ruth Milhans
Susan Milhans
Mr.  Mrs. Fred Z. Miller
Mr.  Mrs. Edward C. Maly
Mothers, May  Katherine
Anonymous
Ardell “Art” Mueller
Florence Kriehn
Harriot Nehmer
Violet Baumgart
Violet Nelson
Carol Hoefner
Glen Neustedter
Mr.  Mrs. James Baumgartner
Joan Norville
B. H. Lohr
Maria Oberneder
Mary Rose Schroeder
Dorothy O’Brien
Daniel F. Ring
Marilynn Ring
Ruth Odahl
Dick  Betty Mattson
Yoshiko “Yo” Okabayashi
Helen M. Davis
Sandy Paulson
Martha Andeen
Olga Pautz
Katherine M. Jastromski
Jean Keough
Daniel Pautz
Family of Olga Pautz
Janice Peter
William A. Peter
Les Pfeffer
Tom  Sharon Tradewell
Marion Radspinner
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Martha Andeen
Eleanor Ciurro
Marjorie Davis
John  Doris Keller
Joanne Krause
Ele Lindgren
Dick  Betty Mattson
Robert A. Otzelberger
Al  Edna Peterson
Glenn  Lois Port
Jean M. Rosier
Gloria Schmeling
Lori J. Schultz
Joyce M. Stibbe
Marian Q. Thielke
Arline J. Thoss
Jim Thunes
Rev.  Mrs. Jack E. Trethewey
Orville Treptow
Rev. William H. Truby
Lois Van Derven
Jim  Sandy Wrangell
- 21 -
Memorial Gifts
Your generosity
will result in
God
Your generosity
will result in
God2 Corinthians 9:11
thanksgiving
to
Memorial Gifts
Helen Reich
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Alice L. Richter
Anonymous (2)
Joan G. Heyne
Florence Kriehn
Gladys M. Larson
Dick  Betty Mattson
Delores M. Nix
Carl  Kay Richter
Ruth D. Ruenzel
Cheryl Schmitz
Vera Silseth
Wendy E. Stolt
Ron Treptow
Linda Trotter
Rev. Wm. H.  Nancy Truby
Joan Wintersberger
Virginia Ruplinger
Mary E. Vettel
Mr.  Mrs. Walter Schiefelbein
Dolores A. Schiefelbein
Virginia Schmidt
Stephen Grau
Hans Schneider
Rev.  Mrs. Ronald W. Albers
James Schneider
Jan Bruskewitz
Mary Oberneder Schroeder
Mary Rose Schneider
Gloria E. Schultz
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Janet Beltman
Heidi Giencke
Lois Goerlinger
Joyce Heinrich
Alice Knickelbine
Marilyn Kugler
Dorothy M. Schaefer
Jim Thunes
Mr.  Mrs. Erwin G. Wegner
Tom Shanahan
Mary Ann Abrahamson
Peg Carlson  Carla Draper
Mr.  Mrs. Richard P. Cattey
Mary  Dick Cywinski
Scott Dragan  Jean Berens
Mr.  Mrs. Jack W. Green
Katherine M. Grogan
Susan F. Grogan
Nancy C. Herrell
John  Janis Hovel
Mr.  Mrs. Thomas L. Kirchen
Jane C. Lazynski
Bernadette Meagher
Terri Miller
Patricia A. Monroe
Mr.  Mrs. David K. Nelson
Marilee Muente Nord
Rev. David Patterson
Dennis  Mary Pat Pfeil
James G. Phillips
Mr.  Mrs. Thomas A. Rave
Mr.  Mrs. Dennis G. Russell
Carlen Schenk
Children of Tom  Jeanne Shanahan
Dan  Eileen Shanahan
Roger  Corine Sherman
Rose Spang
Peggy Storniolo
Patricia Strassburger
Mr.  Mrs. James A. Tomasello
Martha Valerio
Larry Jay  Greg Zajac
Harriet A. Shumway
Alfred E. Shumway
Martha Simmons
Deb Heilman
Gwenn Simonson
Linda Kautz
Bonnie Lyons
Our mothers, Theresa  Angelina 
step-mom Lucile
Ron  Kathy Sonntag
Edward Stanek
Marjorie Jothen
Hazel S. Stoller
Mr.  Mrs. Gordon Fritsche
Erna Throndson
Louise T. Peterson
Gladys Timple
Sandy Everts
Laurence  Wanda Tischner
Hollis Tischner
Wanda Tischner
Jill Lindberg
Marcus “Marty” Tremble
Rev. David Patterson
Alfred Tucholke
Ingrid Tucholke Finnan
Kenneth “Ken” Twinem
Marilyn A. Bauer
Larry  Eleanor Beckman
Mr.  Mrs. David T. Hervey
Lyn Holcomb
Mr.  Mrs. Donald Koehler
Joanne Krause
Ralph D. Malicki
Nancy Matton
Rosalyn Parker
PWOA, Inc.
Mr.  Mrs. John R. Radtke
Shelley Saxe
Lori J. Schultz
Arline J. Thoss
Robert W. Ziebell
Erna  Herbert Van Eerden
Loraine D.  Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr.
Hannah Warmie
Norma Warmie
Betty Weisel
Pam Weisel
Marjorie Wiedeman
Harding B. Bond
Hildegard Wiedenhoeft
Anonymous
Janet Beltman
Marilyn Bub
David  Judy DeBruine
Mr.  Mrs. James N. Dieringer
Bonnie Eggert
Emily S. FitzRandolph
John  Doris Keller
Mr.  Mrs. Karl G. Kieckbusch
Patricia A. Reynolds
Cheryl Schmitz
Alice H. Wagner
Theresa Zarling
Joellen Schei
- 22 -
- 23 -
ribute GiftsTThe following individuals were honored by their families and friends. Tribute gifts serve to commemorate birthdays,
wedding anniversaries or other special occasions or simply to show appreciation for a friendship or act of kindness.
Those who have been honored through a gift to Luther Manor are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by
the names of the donor(s). The following tribute gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource Development at Luther Manor,
at (414) 464-3880, ext. 572 or give@luthermanor.org or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger
Audrey Arndt
Joyce Heinrich
Esther Bauers’ 100th Birthday
Carla A. Claussen
Ron  Dolores Blust
Tom Lavers
Agnes Gilberts
Mr.  Mrs. Wayne Reiche
Mary E. Hofmann
Henry Hofmann
Virginia R. Kelly
William J. Kelly
Harvey  Hazel Klind
Harvey C. Klind
Alice Knickelbine
Mr.  Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher
Alice Knudsen
Regina C. Dombeck
Marianne Koehler’s Birthday
Chris  Lori Schultz
Beverly Thompson
Kathleen Korth
Marie E. Korth
Joanne Krause
Mark  Cheryl Schmitz
Gloria Larson
Timothy J. Larson
Luther Manor Health Care Center
Nurses
Robert A. Otzelberger
Betty Mattson’s Birthday
Sharon D. Odahl
Jean Moberg’s Birthday
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Ann Towell
Edna Muehrer
Anonymous (2)
Patricia Reynolds
Kathy  Jeff Czarniak
Helen Sceales
Mr.  Mrs. Larry D. Mahr
Beverly Schenk
Susan  Al Lewis
Ruth Tamms
Naomi Bauman
Ann Towell’s Birthday
Sr. Rose Kroeger
Rev. Dan Thurmer
Warren R. Stumpe
Joan Van Ryzin
Gladys M. Larson
Donna Woleben
Linda L. Dailey
he Hope Society GiftsTThe Hope Society is a program that offers friends and family a way to
remember their loved one(s) with a gift to the Luther Manor Hospice
program. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold-
faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following
Hope Society gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014.
If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource
Development at (414) 464-3880 ext. 572, or give@luthermanor.org.
Catherine Chaney
Ann Tunak
Judith A. Froehlich
Mr.  Mrs. Tom Armour
Marilyn J. Brandt
Mr.  Mrs. Richard W. Eden
Mr.  Mrs. Russel W. John
Marjorie Jothen
Kilpatrick Insurance Agency
Evelyn Sherwood
Mr.  Mrs. Kenneth L. Wiesner
Leslie H. Krause
Germaine Krause
*Correction from Spring and Summer
2014: In memory of Josephine Grant
should have been in honor of Josephine
Grant from Delores Nix, Sister Rose
Kroeger, and Helen Towell.
The Luther Manor Foundation
was created in 1985 as a charitable
nonprofit organization to provide
financial support for Luther Manor’s
ministry. The 2014/2015 Luther
Manor Foundation Board of Directors
include:
Fred Anderson, Treasurer
Thomas Buck
Gwen Jackson
William Pickering, Secretary
Amy Sarles
John Silseth, Chair
The Messenger is published periodically
by Luther Manor, a ministry of the
United Lutheran Program for the Aging.
Comments and suggestions regarding
this publication are always welcome.
Contact the Luther Manor Resource
Development office at:
4545 N. 92nd
Street
Wauwatosa, WI 53225
(414) 464-3880
give@luthermanor.org
www.luthermanor.org
The content provided in The Messenger
is intended only to be informational.
The Luther Manor Foundation does
not render legal, tax or other financial
advisory services. For assistance with
your specific situation, professional
services should be sought.
A ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging
4545 N. 92nd Street • Wauwatosa, WI 53225
As a nonprofit, faith-based organization and one of the finest senior living communities in Southeastern
Wisconsin, Luther Manor has been caring and advocating for seniors for more than 50 years. Our
mission is to share God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care
and services. In addition to retirement housing, assisted living and long-term care options, we offer
rehabilitation services, adult day services, hospice care and community outreach programs.
Guided by our Christian heritage and values, we consistently strive to exceed the expectations of those
we serve. You can count on our commitment and reputation when selecting housing or healthcare services
for yourself or someone you love.
If you would like to make a contribution to help support any of the programs or services the Luther
Manor community offers, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, ext. 447 or
give@luthermanor.org.

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Luther Manor Heroes

  • 1. heroes Friends New president takes helm Odds & ends Volunteer makes art from unusual materials Globally minded ULPA partner Holy Cross makes a difference at home and abroad Honorable mention Award named after volunteer in disguise Donors are Fall/Winter 2014 | VOLUME 23 a publication for donors volunteers and friends of Luther Manor
  • 2. On the cover Bob Otzelberger, a Luther Manor Terrace resident and donor, shares his story. Read more on pg. 6. Dear donors, volunteers, friends and partners, When we think about heroes, the temptation is to first think of ‘superheroes’ the likes of which one might find in a comic book or on the silver screen. If we think about everyday heroes, those who live and work among us, we might think of firefighters, police officers, the members of our armed services, and the veterans who selflessly served our country. The truth is there are many heroes in this world. They come in all shapes and sizes, ages and ethnic backgrounds. This edition of The Messenger focuses on Luther Manor’s heroes – our donors, volunteers, friends and partners – or, in a word, you. Our cover feature is about one of our faithful donors, Bob Otzelberger. Bob is a the perfect example of the type of heroes who make a difference at Luther Manor. We rely on donors like Bob to support important ministries, such as the Resident Support Fund, which provides financial support to our most vulnerable residents. Our heroes don’t have super powers. They cannot fly and they don’t have X-ray vision. But they have the power to bring joy to residents, like pet partner volunteer Meghann Chenery and her 13-year-old boxer Oscar. Meghann is the granddaughter of the Rev. William Downey, one of the founders of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging (ULPA). Each issue of The Messenger lifts up one of our ULPA partners. In this issue, we feature our valued relationship with Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Menomonee Falls. Holy Cross is the home congregation of Friends of Luther Manor President and Luther Manor employee Sandy Wals, and many other faithful friends and employees. The impact of our partner congregations is felt year-round. The future of Luther Manor depends on continued support from you – our donors, volunteers, friends and partners: our heroes. That being said, Luther Manor staff members are also striving to be heroes to those we serve – our residents and program participants. Together, there is nothing that we cannot do. Thank you for your continued support through gifts of time, treasure and talent. Sincerely, David Beinlich “A mother holds her child’s hand for just a short time, but holds their heart forever.” This statement rings true to all of those who responded to our second Mother’s Day appeal in May. We were so happy with the response and to our Mother Day’s appeal in 2013, we decided to focus on mothers again this year. The wonderful news is that we raised more than $26,000 for the Luther Manor Foundation-Resident Support Fund, which is an increase over 2013. Our annual appeals are a vital part of growing and sustaining the Luther Manor Foundation-Resident Support Fund. Last year alone we were able to offer over $600,000 in support to those residents who have outlived their financial resources. Luther Manor has a long-established commitment to our residents and has never asked anyone to leave because of inability to pay. This is why you are so valuable to Luther Manor and your gifts are so important to us! Your donations help us to continue to share God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. Thank you to all who gave in honor or memory of their mother and thank you for your continued support of Luther Manor’s mission and ministry. -Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer - 2 -
  • 3. The Friends of Luther Manor has a new leader with a familiar face. This spring, Luther Manor employee Sandy Wals was named president of the all-volunteer advocacy and fundraising organization. Wals, who lives in Menomonee Falls with her husband, Dick, is well- connected to Luther Manor. She has worked as a Life Enrichment Specialist in the Luther Manor Health Care Center for seven years and is a Friends of Luther Manor keyperson at Holy Cross Lutheran Church, where she has been a member for more than 25 years. “Sandy brings so much to the table,” said Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas. “She is very familiar with Luther Manor and is already a huge advocate. Her experience and in-depth knowledge of the Luther Manor community will serve her well as she takes on this new role.” Wals succeeds Kathy Conrad, who concluded her term as president in December. “I only started as a keyperson in September,” Sandy said. “But as they were talking about their needs for a president and some other officers— I know it sounds hokey but I felt the spirit calling.” Wals met with the Luther Manor Resource Development department to discuss her leadership qualifications. At Holy Cross, Wals has served in a number of ways, including as a worship team leader and as a representative on the church council. She is currently a member of the Holy Cross choir, the Celebration Singers. In her role as a keyperson for the Friends of Luther Manor, Wals promotes Luther Manor at Holy Cross and is responsible for holding the annual membership drive. “Membership drives typically take place in the fall,” said Kanavas. “We currently have 283 members.” Wals also has a strong connection to Luther Manor beyond her employment and volunteerism: her parents, Dick and Betty Mattson, are Terrace residents and her mother served as President of the Friends of Luther Manor in 1984-85. Back then the group was known as the Luther Manor Auxiliary. Formed in 1958, the Luther Manor Auxiliary serves as a link between Luther Manor and its partner congregations. Although the name has changed, the group’s purpose remains the same: to support the mission and ministries of Luther Manor through gifts, membership dues and fundraising events. “The Friends are important because they help to put Luther Manor in the spotlight and to facilitate the needs, wants, and wishes of the community for items that might not easily be acquired,” Wals said. These items include the glider swing now in the Findley Courtyards of the Health Care Center and the new tents recently purchased for outdoor events. The Friends are also responsible for sponsoring the coffee and cookie carts that weave their way through the Health Care and Rehabilitation Center hallways weekday mornings. Although their work remains as vital now as it was 56 years ago, Friends of Luther Manor memberships has been waning, according to Wals. “We are struggling a little bit,” she said. “We are always looking for keypersons. Some of our congregations don’t have any. And of course we are always looking for volunteers who would like to give of their time.” Wals said as president she hopes to rise to meet these challenges. “I would like to help grow the Friends of Luther Manor by recruiting new members to help revitalize the programs and the interests that the Friends have been involved in over the years,” she said. For more information about the Friends of Luther Manor, contact Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas at ext. 462. g Sandy Wals steps up to lead - 3 -
  • 4. LoveLove lightslights Friends of Luther Manor The Friends of Luther Manor is excited to be hosting the fifth annual Love Lights Tree Lighting ceremony on Thursday, Dec. 11 at 4:30 p.m. in the Welcome Center. Love Lights is the major fundraiser for the Friends of Luther Manor. The sale of Love Lights that decorate the Luther Manor Christmas tree raise money to support programs and services that benefit residents and participants throughout the Luther Manor community. Last year the Friends of Luther Manor raised more than $9,000 from this event. Be a part of this special holiday tradition by purchasing an individual light or a strand of lights to honor or memorialize someone What’s cooking? River Oaks kitchen gets a facelift The Friends of Luther Manor pledged $10,000 to remodel the River Oaks kitchen. The project included new counters, two stoves, a dishwasher, cabinets, and tile work. “The biggest change I noticed was in the residents. They are so proud of the updates,” said Kristy Johnson-Fofanah, who oversees River Oaks. “And why shouldn’t they be? It’s their home.” Brighten the holiday season Honor those who are dear to you with Love Lights special. Individual lights are $5 and a strand of lights is $100. The twinkling lights are turned on during a special tree lighting ceremony. An evening filled with music, prayer, refreshments and celebration, it’s the perfect way to enjoy the Advent season. For more information about Love Lights, contact Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas, at ext. 462. g - 4 -
  • 5. Tamika McMath, Luther Manor CNA, shows off the new EZ Lift that was acquired through a grant in May. City Block grant In May of 2014, Luther Manor was named the recipient of the 2014 Wauwatosa City Block Grant. The grant award was $150,000 from the United States Government, under Title 1 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The funds from this grant will be used to update two existing elevators located in the Health Care Center of Luther Manor to better serve Luther Manor’s most vulnerable residents and meet ADA requirements. “Luther Manor is grateful to the City of Wauwatosa for awarding us this grant because it enables us to continue to live our mission of enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services,” said Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer. The timing of the grant could not be better. “Luther Manor has seen its uncompensated care totals rise each year as health care costs increase and reimbursement decrease,” said Kanavas. “By receiving this wonderful support from the City of Wauwatosa, Luther Manor is able to make important, quality improvements to our facility and focus on our charitable care.” Sacred Space grant In the fall of 2013, Luther Manor was the recipient of a $40,000 grant from the Lutheran Service for the Elderly Endowment at the ELCA Foundation. That, in addition with a private donation, will make it possible for Luther Manor to create a hospice-specific space in Luther Manor. “Since many of our resident and client families are located outside the Milwaukee area, a hospice- specific space will provide families a place to reconnect with loved ones as they journey through the end of life experience,” said Kanavas. “Families can be a part of the entire process without the stress of outside factors such as where will we eat, sleep and congregate.” The space will be designed to support both patient and family while providing access to the information and expertise of the Luther Manor Hospice staff. Luther Manor’s Hospice Program has been operating for seven years, giving patients and their loved ones the opportunity to make decisions about end of life care while being supported by a dedicated, compassionate staff. “The Sacred Space will be a wonderful addition to our evolving services under the Hospice program,” said Luther Manor Administrator and Vice President David Beinlich. LeadingAge grant In May of 2014, Luther Manor received a grant from the West Bend Safe Resident Assistance Endowment, established by LeadingAge Wisconsin, West Bend Mutual Insurance, and EZ Way Inc., to purchase a lift chair. Tamika McMath, a CNA, had this to say about the new equipment: “The new EZ Lift is a wonderful addition in our department. I love using this model because it is so smooth to operate. The residents feel even safer because of the ease of use.” Enriching the lives of older adults Community grants make a difference at Luther Manor - 5 - supporters Luther Manor
  • 6. The world has two kinds of heroes. There are the heroes of books and movies who wear colorful costumes and soar through the sky—in some cases faster than a speeding bullet. Then there are the other kind of heroes. They don’t wear masks or capes, and you will not find them on the glossy pages of comic books or flying over buildings, suspended mid-air. They make a difference in the world quietly, through the little things they do every day. At Luther Manor, these heroes are our faithful donors—the individuals, families, and partner congregations, who, through their generosity, enhance the Luther Manor community with programs and amenities and through contributions to the Resident Support Fund, provide a financial safety net for residents who have outlived their resources. One of these heroes is Bob Otzelberger. Otzelberger, a retired Menomonee Falls Postmaster and World War II navy veteran, has been a consistent Luther Manor donor since 1994. “Bob utilizes all of the different ways that people can donate,” said Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas. “He responds to our annual appeals, he gives memorial gifts, he gives gifts in honor of loved ones, he purchases Love Lights and he was one of the golf cart sponsors for the Milwaukee Senior Open.” A member of the all-volunteer fundraising and advocacy group, the Friends of Luther Manor, Otzelberger is quick to downplay his contributions. “I’m no big donor,” he said. But a person doesn’t have to be a “big donor” to make a big difference. “If everyone gives just a little—the overall impact is large and far- reaching,” Kanavas said. Otzelberger is a Terrace resident. He and his wife, Cora, moved into the Terrace in July of 2000. Cora passed away in 2003 but Bob continues to make the most of everything Luther Manor has to offer. Bob Otzelberger A Luther Manor HERO ”“I love Luther Manor- I really do. - 6 -
  • 7. A meeting of Heritage Partners Retired Luther Manor CEO and President Rev. David Keller addresses legacy donors group Donors who have committed to the future of Luther Manor through planned giving are members of a special group known as the Heritage Partner Society. Members of the Heritage Partner Society have included Luther Manor in their estate planning to create a lasting legacy that will serve well beyond their lifetimes. They were honored for this generosity at a special luncheon in June. Retired Luther Manor President and CEO Pastor David Keller, who is a member of the Heritage Partner Society, spoke to the group about the importance of planned giving and offered his thanks. “You are important members of the Luther Manor family and we thank you for this expression of your gratitude and generosity.” About 25 of the 86 Heritage Partner Society members attended the event, which took place in the Linden Room. “Heritage Partners are vital to Luther Manor,” said Mary Kanavas, Luther Manor Resource Development Officer. Donors are able to choose how their gift is used or leave it unrestricted so Luther Manor can use it to meet the most urgent needs of the community. “Besides leaving a lasting legacy that will have a meaningful impact on Luther Manor residents, there are other benefits to planned giving such as reducing the estate tax burden on loved ones,” Kanavas said. For more information about planned giving or to become a member of the Heritage Partner Society, contact Resource Development Officer Mary Kanavas at ext. 462. g “I exercise four times a week and I am in two exercise classes,” he said. “I attend service by watching the weekly broadcast of the Sunday service in the Lippold Faith and Education Center. I also play Wii bowling.” Otzelberger also shares his time with others, participating in clinical visits with nursing students from the Milwaukee School of Engineering. He was a volunteer in the Terrace mentor program, helping new residents get acclimated. Of Luther Manor’s different ministries, Otzelberger is most passionate about the Resident Support Fund, an allocation of dollars that ensures that no resident is ever asked to leave Luther Manor because of the inability to pay for services. “I donate to the Resident Support Fund for a few reasons,” Otzelberger said. “First, I can afford it; second, I am helping people; and the third reason is maybe a selfish reason, but I figure maybe someday I could be in that situation.” Otzelberger also recently joined the Heritage Partner Society, a planned giving program whose members have included Luther Manor in their estate planning. Heritage Partners can leave an unrestricted gift to the United Lutheran Program for the Aging (ULPA), choose to assign a gift to the ULPA to a designated program area or a capital project, or designate the gift to the Luther Manor Foundation-Resident Support Fund. Otzelberger designated his gift to provide financial support to Luther Manor’s most vulnerable residents. His motivation is simple: “I love Luther Manor,” Otzelberger said. “I really do.” For information on opportunities to become a donor, call (414) 464-3880 and ask for Resource Development, or visit www.luthermanor.org and click on “Support Our Ministry.” g - 7 -- 7 - supporters Luther Manor
  • 8. In the Book of James we read, “Faith without works is dead.” Luther Manor is a special place where God’s love is faithfully shared by staff, volunteers, residents and family members who work as partners to enrich the lives of those who call Luther Manor home. Five ways to show your faith Notes from Pastor Dave Patterson 1 God’s love is shared through kind words - warm greetings; expressions of “please” and “thank you”; intercessory prayers; addressing each other by name; respectful instruction and guidance. 2 The love of Jesus is felt through compassionate touch - a pat on the back; soothing care; a warm hug; a hand quietly held at a bedside. 3 God’s love enriches the lives of the residents here when people spend quality time together - a visit from a loved one; an adventurous outing; sitting with others in one of the many beautiful courtyards or lounge areas; unhurried time to gather with others for meals, worship and other meaningful activities. In Galatians, St Paul gives us good advice, “Let us not become weary in doing good.” g 4 Faith is put into action through service - staff , volunteers, congregations, family members and friends achieve excellence as they give their time and talents to provide holistic, compassionate and dignified care. 5 God’s love is passed on through generous gifts - a hand drawn card from a Sunday School student; a Love Light; flowers that brighten up the room; a donation given by congregations, Friends of Luther Manor, residents and their loved ones to help ensure that this sacred place will continue to be a ministry where God’s love is shared by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. - 8 - Holy Cross Lutheran Church, located just south of the crossroads of Pilgrim Road, Appleton Avenue and Menomonee Avenue in Menomonee Falls, has a rich and interesting history that begins in an American Legion Hall. “That’s where the first service was held,” said Parish Administrator Beth Dorsey. From that initial service on Sunday, Nov. 4, 1951, with 98 people in attendance, Holy Cross Lutheran Church has grown significantly. Today the church is housed in a 41,000 square foot building that offers four services each weekend attended by an average of 600 people. In total, Holy Cross has 2,800 baptized and 2,100 confirmed members. Pastor Ben Groth, who recently joined the Holy Cross congregation as an associate pastor, shared his initial impressions of the church. “A welcoming attitude, wonderful worship, and a sense of connection to God’s work in the world locally and globally make Holy Cross a special community to be a part of,” Groth said. Globally, Holy Cross is connected through the Meru Diocese of Tanzania to the Seela Parish of that diocese. Locally, Holy Cross is partnered with two congregations in Milwaukee – Florist Avenue and Hephatha Lutheran. Holy Cross is also a strong supporter of the Menomonee Falls Food Pantry. Over the years, Holy Cross has been a dedicated partner congregation to Luther Manor. “Holy Cross has a strong tradition Marked with the cross ULPA partner congregation Holy Cross Lutheran Church makes a difference at home and in the global community - 8 -
  • 9. and commitment of supporting Luther Manor’s ministry to older adults through financial gifts, Auxiliary/Friends of Luther Manor memberships, as well as donations of home baked or purchased cookies for the Health Care Center coffee carts,” said Luther Manor Director of Volunteer Services Cheryl Schmitz. Schmitz is one of several Holy Cross members who can be found working at Luther Manor. Holy Cross members are also among Luther Manor residents and volunteers. Holy Cross spearheaded what is one of the longest-standing volunteer traditions at Luther Manor: the annual Holy Cross Bingo Party. Eunice Koehler, a Terrace resident and a keyperson for Holy Cross, said the congregation aimed to organize a special activity each year for Luther Manor residents. Initially, that activity was a sing-a-long. Over the years the activity evolved into a bingo party with prizes that church members spend all year collecting. Holy Cross volunteers also sign up to bake apple kuchen, a German treat they share with residents who attend the bingo party. “The residents always seemed to really enjoy it,” Koehler said. The bingo party has been going on for close to 30 years. In addition to their older adults ministry, Holy Cross has a strong youth ministry. “Our congregation is made up predominantly of families with children, so many of our programs are driven by the children,” said Dorsey. Youth ministries and faith education opportunities include cross-generational mission trips, The Crossing – a high school youth group, Vacation Bible Study, Affirmation of Baptism/Confirmation, Preschool and Faith Development (Sunday School). One of the church’s biggest events each year is the annual Block Party, which takes place the Saturday after Labor Day. “It’s a weekend that our church community really comes together,” Dorsey said. The future looks bright for Holy Cross, and Luther Manor looks forward to a continued partnership. Visit the congregation website at www.holycrosslutheran.org. g - 9 -- 9 - supporters Luther Manor
  • 10. Jolene Hansen joins Luther Manor Adult Day Services participants in a session of TimeSlips. Jolene has blessed Luther Manor with over 590 volunteer service hours. There aren’t too many people who can say that a scholarship was created in their honor. Luther Manor volunteer Jolene Hansen is one of the few. Students seeking certification in the TimeSlips Creative Storytelling program (as offered through TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, Inc. based in Milwaukee) are able to apply for the Jolene Hansen Student Fellowship to help fund their training. The fellowship was named after Hansen, who lives in Waukesha with her husband, Don, for her long-time involvement with the TimeSlips program offered at the Luther Manor Adult Day Services. Hansen first became interested in TimeSlips 15 years ago when she read an article about it in the newspaper. TimeSlips is geared toward adults with dementia and Alzheimer’s. The idea behind it is to “replace the pressure to remember with the freedom to imagine” and enable those with memory loss to connect with others. “I called the Alzheimer’s Association and told them I was interested in being a part of a program like that,” Hansen said. “They directed me to Luther Manor. I’ve been volunteering here ever since.” TimeSlips sessions typically take place in the Adult Day Center at Honoring a Luther Manor volunteer Scholarship created in Jolene Hansen’s name - 10 - volunteers Luther Manor
  • 11. Luther Manor. A group of Adult Day Service participants and a handful of volunteers gather in a circle to discuss a pre-selected black and white photo. Leading the group is a TimeSlips-trained facilitator who invites those gathered to imagine aloud what is happening in the picture. The ideas are jotted down on an oversized tablet and a story unfolds. As a former English teacher, the idea of storytelling appealed to Hansen. But at Luther Manor Hansen has also found herself in the role of student. “I’ve learned so much about dementia and Alzheimer’s,” she said. “I’ve learned a lot about aging – how to do it with humor, grace and patience. And I’ve learned a lot from watching staff and their ways of compassion and care.” Hansen was surprised to learn that fellowships are being offered in her name. “I got an email from Anne Bastings (founder and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, Inc.) notifying me of the fellowships,” Hansen said. “It was pretty exciting, and an honor.” Bastings offers high praise of Hansen in the award letter sent to fellowship recipients: “(Jolene) was there at the beginning (1998) and she continues to this day at Luther Manor…Her dedication, patience, and insights are truly remarkable.” The Jolene Hansen Student Fellowships enable two of the TimeSlips interns to receive free TimeSlips training and certification, along with mentorship by a certified facilitator. “The fact that it was students who would be benefiting from the fellowship circled back to my first love: teaching and students,” Hansen said. Over the years, Hansen has assisted Luther Manor staff in TimeSlips training and in statewide trainings for the Wisconsin Adult Day Services Association on the value of creativity programming for Adult Day Services. Hansen’s volunteerism in Adult Day Services was recognized in 2007, when Beth Meyer-Arnold nominated her for the Luther Manor Volunteer Services Annual Good Samaritan Award. “I commend Jolene for her tireless work at Luther Manor, and in the Adult Day Center with persons with dementia,” Meyer-Arnold wrote in her nomination letter. For information about volunteering in the Adult Day Services, contact Cheryl Schmitz at ext. 600. g ”“I’ve learned a lot about aging – how to do it with humor, grace and patience. A Luther Manor volunteer was recently recognized for her service. Direct Supply employee Robin Malek received the company’s Volunteer of the Year Award on April 23. “Robin was one of our initial contacts for recruiting Direct Supply volunteers,” said Luther Manor Director of Volunteer Services Cheryl Schmitz. The partnership between Direct Supply volunteers and Luther Manor began in July of 2007. Robin came onboard as an official Luther Manor volunteer shortly thereafter. Robin volunteers in the Ice Cream Parlor. In addition she has recruited Direct Supply volunteers to help out for a number of Luther Manor Life Enrichment activities and special events, including: • Adult Day Service tailgate parties • Casino Royale gaming events • Fat Tuesday Pancake Breakfast • Holiday decorating and un- decorating • Luther Manor Employee/ Family celebrations • State Fair fieldtrips, and • Tapestry of Life art show “These events directly enhance the quality of life for the resident who call Luther Manor home and for the program participants,” Schmitz said. Congratulations, Robin! g Volunteer of the Year Robin Malek - 11 - volunteers Luther Manor
  • 12. Dare to create Scribbled in red marker on a piece of paper tacked to the door of Luther Manor’s Adult Day Services art studio are the following words: “Enter if you dare… to create… to create words, thoughts, movements, song, ideas, kindness, empathy and of course art!” The foundation of everything that happens inside of the art studio, where Luther Manor volunteer and sculptor Michael Savic spends his Thursday mornings, is simply that — to create. The artists who attend Savic’s weekly sessions are Adult Day Services participants, many of whom have been diagnosed with a cognitive impairment, such as dementia. The art studio offers participants an opportunity to express themselves without using words or memory, in a safe community of other creators. “There is a joy in creating something,” Savic said. “I feel that same joy when I see Adult Day Service participants creating.” Savic started volunteering as an art studio facilitator in the Luther Manor Adult Day Services of Wauwatosa in June of 2013. Although he doesn’t have a degree in art, his creative talent for making sculptures from recycled material made Savic uniquely qualified to lead the Thursday morning sessions. The art supplies Adult Day Services participants work with are mostly donated items, many odds and ends. Savic’s challenge is to determine how to best use them. “The first thing I do when I walk into the art studio is take Michael Savic finds joy with ADS participants - 12 - volunteers Luther Manor
  • 13. volunteers Luther Manor inventory,” Savic said. “The project we make that day depends in part on what types of materials we have on hand.” Savic is able to see the limitless creative potential of ordinary objects. Adult Day Center participants have made multimedia art from a variety of unlikely everyday items: blank invitations, wax-coated wicks, cutup magazines, buttons, wrapping paper, fabric — even empty prescription bottles. “We make art out of whatever is available,” Savic said. While materials may be limited, inspiration is never in short supply. “It comes from all over. Last winter we took a fieldtrip to the Milwaukee Art Museum and we saw the Andy Warhol exhibit,” Savic said. “That inspired us to do our own Warhol exhibit, just using black and white photo copies of famous people.” Much of the art participants create starts out as an individual piece, Savic said, and then the individual Adult Day Services is currently in need of supplies for the art studio. Water-based paints, crayons, chalk and water- based glue, are a few items that are used regularly. Is there something else you’d like to donate to the art studio? Contact Kath Vandenberg at ext. 315 to see if it’s something the art studio can use. pieces are combined to create a larger work of art. “It’s usually abstract,” he said. “If you can’t see the beauty in it, it’s really your loss.” The Adult Day Service participants who join Savic on Thursday mornings are a diverse cross section. “Some people come every week,” he said. “Others come in just to try it out, thinking they can’t do anything creative. I try to guide them and help when necessary. They usually surprise themselves. Each artist is different and I try to get to know everyone. ” He noted that one participant, Flosine, always wears “the coolest hats” while another, Sr. Alice, sings while she works. Savic, whose day job is grocery store produce manager, said spending time with Adult Day Services participants is the highlight of his week. “I love seeing them smiling,” he said. “They are so appreciative of everything.” The Adult Day Services staff is similarly appreciative of Savic. “Michael is such a wonderful asset to the Adult Day Center,” said Adult Day Services Person- Centered Care Specialist Kath Vandenberg. “He has built really great relationships with many of the participants and has encouraged them to create art using their personal style while also teaching them new skills and techniques.” For information about volunteer opportunities in Adult Day Services, contact Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services, at ext. 600. g - 13 - Sculptor and Luther Manor volunteer Michael Savic, far left, spends his Thursday mornings creating art with Adult Day Center participants like Bob Z., Deanna E., and Sr. Alice G.
  • 14. Furry four-legged visitors are not strangers to Luther Manor. Well- mannered pooches and friendly felines are frequent pet therapy guests to the retirement community. But one of these guests, a 13-year-old boxer named Oscar, holds an extra- special place in the hearts of River Oaks residents. Oscar, like many of the residents he visits, needs an assistive device to get around because of a medical condition. In Oscar’s case, that condition is a degenerative inflammation of the spinal column characterized by the production of bone spurs. As a result, Oscar is paralyzed from the hips down. “It’s just something that can happen because of aging,” said Meghann Chenery, a Luther Manor Pet Partner volunteer and Oscar’s owner. Pet Partners are special volunteers who bring their dogs or cats to visit with Luther Manor residents. The program started more than a decade ago, and now provides pet visits to nearly 200 residents a week. The difference between Oscar and other pets is that he uses a Walkin’ Wheels Chair to move around, his front legs propelling him forward. He’s had the chair for about a year now. Chenery adopted Oscar from a boxer rescue organization when he was 3 years old. As a Pet Partner dog, he sparks a lot of conversation among residents who recall memories of their own pets. “People see him and they can relate,” Chenery said. “Many of them had a dog or another pet when they were growing up.” He also gets a certain amount of sympathy. “It’s so sad to see him like that,” said Pauline Lacey, a River Oaks resident. “But I guess they have to go through life the way that we do. I guess we all go through things; animals and people.” Oscar and Chenery are new Luther Manor volunteers, but they are very familiar with the community: Chenery is the granddaughter of the Rev. William and Gladys Downey. The Downeys were Terrace residents and Rev. Downey, who was pastor at Fox Point Lutheran Church, was one of the founders of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging, which created Luther Manor. “I always used to bring Oscar to visit my Grandma,” Chenery said. “She loved him. But he was too wild to be a therapy dog. He’s calmed down a lot in his old age.” Chenery and Oscar mostly visit River Oaks because Chenery’s great aunt, Phyllis Gauger, is a resident there and it’s closer to Chenery’s Grafton home. But they have also visited the Health Care Center at Luther Manor in Wauwatosa. “I like interacting with people and hearing their stories,” Chenery said. For more information about becoming a Pet Partner, contact Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services at ext. 600. Update: Since this article was written Oscar has passed away. We would like to thank Meghann for sharing Oscar with us. He brought great joy to the residents he met. g Oscar & Meghann - 14 - volunteers Luther Manor
  • 15. 70% M ilwaukee County 24% WaukeshaCounty 1% Illinois 2% Walworth County 3% Washington County Student Volunteers WHO 140 Where are they from? - 15 - volunteers Luther Manor {Just a small handful of our wonderful student volunteers Student volunteers Margaret Radske and Jessica Olson help in the Health Care Center garden. Student volunteers Gabby Procopis and Bobby Cranfield help in the ice cream parlor. { { It is fall, quieter here at Luther Manor than just a few weeks ago. Quieter since the many students have once again left Luther Manor to return to their schools after a summer immersed in volunteering. We thank them for making a difference in the lives of Luther Manor’s older adults. Who are our approximate 140 student volunteers? They are largely from the neighborhood, from the Luther Manor family (students of staff, adult volunteers, and residents) and they are from our ULPA congregations. As well, they are young people who have heard about a positive volunteer experience at Luther Manor from an existing volunteer. They are students coming from education institutions requiring volunteer service (largely nearby high schools, and colleges and universities.) They are young people considering health care careers who are using their time at Luther Manor as a launching pad. They are families choosing to volunteer together. Seventy percent of our student volunteers reside in Milwaukee County, 24 percent in Waukesha County, three percent in Washington County, and two percent in Walworth County. One student comes from Illinois! What did these young people do? Well, a lot, including: creative engagement in our Adult Day Services, Popcorn, Ice Cream Parlor, Life Enrichment activities in the Health Care Center, gardening, therapy and Beauty Shop transporting, arts groups, Wii groups, manicuring, Bingo, trip volunteers and more. We extend thanks and gratitude to the young people who have served at Luther Manor this summer and will continue to serve older adults. Thanks for making a world of difference! If you or someone you know would like to make a difference at Luther Manor, please contact Luther Manor Volunteer Services (414) 464-3880 ext. 577/600 or email volunteer@luthermanor.org. g
  • 16. Cheryl Schmitz, Director of Volunteer Services Lori Schultz, Youth and Family Volunteer Specialist Congratulations to Kaitlyn Williams on her graduation from Purdue University. Kaitlyn is accepted into the Physician Assistant’s program at Carroll University this fall. Kaitlyn volunteered in the Luther Manor HealthReach Therapy Department as a student volunteer, and Adult Day Services. Congratulations to Kellen Lasky for her acceptance into Xavier University this fall. Her major will be Occupational Therapy. Kellen volunteers in the Luther Manor HealthReach Therapy Department as a student volunteer. Congratulations to student volunteers Sabrina Black, Annalise Ho, Abhishek Janardan, Juhi Mody and Lydia Wehrley from Wauwatosa West High School who were involved in the 30 member student team that competed in the “We the People” competition held in Washington D.C. April 25. Wauwatosa West High School placed 16th. Congratulations to Rev. Dr. Wolf Knappe who was recognized and presented with the Living Loehe Award at a special ceremony at Wartburg Theological Seminary May 18, 2014. The Living Loehe Award was established by Wartburg Theological Seminary as a way of honoring people who have given distinguished service to and through the church, people who exemplify “Christ’s call to be disciples in the context of their own daily lives and professional commitments.” Congratulation to Luther Manor volunteer Harvin Abrahamson, WWII Eighth Air Force Veteran, who participated in the B-17 Bomber flight at the EAA in Oshkosh April 14. Congratulations to hospital volunteers Bob Richter and Dennis Schindler who were recognized by Froedtert Hospital, Wauwatosa, for their volunteer service. Bob was recognized for 15 years and 3,000 hours of volunteer service and Dennis was recognized for 673 hours of service. Congratulations to Alice Wagner who was recognized for her volunteer service at Froedtert Community Memorial Hospital in Menomonee Falls. Alice was recognized for 7,000 hours of service. She has been a volunteer at the hospital for 48 years serving in various departments! Congratulations to Glenn and Lois Port who were both recognized for their volunteer service at Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital. Glenn was recognized for over 15 years of service and Lois was recognized for 12,070 volunteer service hours. g A round of applause for our volunteers Luther Manor volunteers have all the right ingredients It goes without saying that if we cook or bake and omit an important ingredient, that recipe could be seriously altered, not usually for the better! Yet, often if we add an ingredient to a recipe, we find that dish is even more scrumptious. Same is true at Luther Manor regarding our wonderful mix of volunteers – what a great recipe for success in caring for older adults when the ingredients of volunteers are added to delightful residents/participants, caring staff and committed family members. Volunteers bring important ingredients of energy, time, companionship, care, humor, a listening ear, patience, and commitment to complete the recipe for a successful senior living community. If we omit any of these important ingredients, our successful recipe would be severely altered. And who doesn’t love a great recipe? Our kind thanks to all of our many volunteers for providing just the right ingredients! g - 16 - volunteers Luther Manor
  • 17. volunteers Luther Manor Volunteers take the cake Luther Manor honors volunteers for service milestones A special group of people were recognized for their contributions of time and talent in the Luther Manor community. From Luther Manor’s main campus in Wauwatosa to River Oaks in Mequon and Lakefield Adult Day Services in Grafton, volunteers play an important role in fulfilling Luther Manor’s mission of sharing God’s love. Volunteers were honored for their many hours of service during a special banquet April 10. The theme for the annual event was “Luther Manor Volunteers Have All the Right Ingredients.” “Volunteers are one of the main staples of Luther Manor’s mission and that is no secret ingredient,” said Director of Volunteer Service Cheryl Schmitz. Almost 600 volunteers give of their time and talent to Luther Manor annually. Those approaching significant milestones upwards of 500 hours in their service careers received special acknowledgment at the banquet. Those honored included: Loretta Braun and Marilyn Bub, who reached service milestones of 15,000-plus hours; Lois Port, who achieved 10,000 hours; and student volunteer Emily Olson, 13, who achieved 500 hours. Good Samaritan awards were also presented to volunteers who were nominated by staff for their volunteerism. Among the recipients were Harding Bond, who volunteers in the Hospice program and the Terrace Model Railroad volunteer team, which consists of David Hoag, Rev. Dr. Keith Jones, Norman Kraatz, David Myers, Gary Payne, John Schneble, Gilbert Steffen and Carl Wisler. Keeping in the theme of the evening’s event, Schmitz said: “Volunteers take the cake. You are the chocolate chips in the cookies of life. You are the apple of our eye and you add a good measure to our mission of enriching the lives of the older adults we serve.” Special guests at the event included Luther Manor Vice President and Administrator Dave Beinlich, ULPA Board member and director Kathy Czarniak and retired Executive Director Rev. William Truby. For information about becoming a Luther Manor volunteer, contact Director of Volunteer Services Cheryl Schmitz at ext. 600. g - 17 - Lakefield Adult Day Services staff and volunteers. 2014 Good Samaritan Award recipients Marilyn Bub, Loretta Braun, and Lois Port (with husband Glenn) were honored for 10,000+ service hours
  • 18. Automated External Defibrillator: The Courtyards ($1,500) This lifesaving equipment will be strategically placed in The Courtyards. Vital Signs Monitor $2,360 each These monitors measure a resident’s blood pressure, pulse, oxygen level in the blood and temperature. Wider Beds for Safety (4) $2,450 per bed The Rehabilitation Center and Health Care Centers are looking to add wider beds in their units. These beds are a practical solution for better patient care. Safety for the patient and staff is addressed with the updated features found on these wider beds. Wider beds allow for easier movement for the residents and are easier for staff to assist in daily activities such as changing linens, patient movement, sitting up and getting out of the bed. Rehabilitation and Therapy Equipment The Rehabilitation Center in Luther Manor is a special place for those who require complex medical care, therapy or just a little extra time to rest and recuperate after hospitalization for surgery, illness or injury. Guided by Luther Manor’s mission, Christian heritage and values, the Rehabilitation Center focuses on the need for compassionate care during vulnerable times. A few of the needs for Luther Manor’s Rehabilitation Center include: • Continuous Passive Motion Machine-used for the purpose of knee motion- $2,150 • Sequential Compression Device-for the prevention of blood clots-$950(per machine) • Alternating pressure/low air loss mattress-for prevention of bed sores- $3,275 Reading Machine for the Courtyard Residents $2,400-$3,000 The Courtyards Life Enrichment program is in need of a new reading machine that magnifies print for residents with low vision. These machines are a wonderful piece of assistive technology to help our residents regain their visual independence. It enables residents to keep reading even though they might be limited by sight problems. There are many more opportunities to give beyond what is listed above, please contact Mary Kanavas, Resource Development Officer, at (414) 464-3880, ext. 462, to find out more about any of the current funding needs, or discuss how you might contribute to one of these worthwhile causes. Thank you for your prayerful consideration. Garden Maintenance and Beautification Projects ($500) The outdoor spaces at Luther Manor provide peaceful, secure sanctuaries where residents and their guests can enjoy the outdoors and connect with nature. Donor gifts enable enhancement of the grounds and landscaping surrounding Luther Manor, as well as the purchase of outdoor furniture. Elevated Garden Beds: Luther Manor Terrace ($300 each) There are many benefits of raised bed gardening. These elevated beds enable residents to grow small plots of flowers and vegetables, they are space conscious, visually attractive and reduces back strain when tending to the bed. Lakefield Adult Day Center Housed in St. John’s Lutheran Church in Grafton, Lakefield Adult Day Center offers programs and activities for older adults that promote health, independent living and social interaction. A few of the needs for Lakefield Adult Day Center include: • Outdoor Gas Grill- $500 • Kitchen Aid Mixer-$225 • New Microwave- $150 Hospice Care ($500) When medical treatment intervention is no longer concentrated on aggressive measures to cure disease, combat an illness or remedy a condition, those facing their final months, weeks and days of life, can benefit from hospice care. At Luther Manor, we believe all people are created in the image of God, and we honor Him by surrounding those nearing the end of their lives, as well as their loved ones, with compassion and understanding. Spa Tubs: Health Care Center $6,500 each The Luther Manor Health Care Center is seeking two new spa tubs to replace aged and inoperable tubs that are currently in place. The new tubs will enable easy entrance and exit ensuring a safer bath, along with various whirlpool settings. Spa tubs allow our residents to enjoy and experience the healing effects of water on joints, muscles and other chronic conditions. Opportunities to giveOpportunities to give - 18 -
  • 19. Memorial Gifts Many individuals choose to memorialize their loved ones by making contributions to the Luther Manor Foundation. We recognize and celebrate those in whose memory gifts to Luther Manor have been given. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following memorial gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource Development at (414) 464-3880 ext 572, email to give@luthermanor.org, or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger. Marvel Alex Penny Bellin Lorraine Arndt Marjorie Jothen Finnette Augat Mary Ann Abrahamson Janet Beltman Liz Bender Mr. Mrs. Paul A. Deneson, Jr. Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Missy Garrett Chris Haymen Mrs. Ken Jansen Marlene E. Johnson Jordan Kofroth Joshua Kofroth Mr. Mrs. Steve Miller Mr. Mrs. Farhad Mohsenian Mr. Mrs. Alan Najmabadi Mr. Mrs. Bob Rusch Bea Steffes Betty Volmer Leonard Wanta Mr. Mrs. Edwin O. Werdermann Sam Wilcox Mr. Mrs. Kenneth L. Zinkgraf Our mothers Mr. Mrs. William J. Bagemihl Bud Diana Baker Dr. Mrs. Stephen Baker Elsie Bassel Eunice Baumgart Joseph Bausch Lori Carter Marie M. Biffel Mr. Mrs. Ronald Biffel Ginny Gribble Richard J. Mathews Frances C. Bond Harding B. Bond Kenneth Bonde Eleanor Ciurro Donald Brindel Rose Brindel Irma Bruss Naomi R. Knoll Claudia Druschke Buening Betty-Lynne Tazbier Almira Buscher Mary Charles Buscher Leah Caldwell Pat Mitschrich Mildred “Millie” Cap Nancy Matton Joyce Caskey Delores M. Nix Russ Chambers Gerry Judy Beuk T2 Catherine Chaney Ann Tunak Lillian Conto Delores M. Nix Loraine James Davies Loraine D. Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr. Max Dietze, Jr. Orville Treptow Helmut Doenges Rosel D. Gruen Vida C. Stanton Monetta Dorau Mary Charles Buscher Alda Dowdle Rick Dowdle Elsie Duemmel Nancy Stern Elizabeth Eckl Jean M. Rosier Virginia Einem Richard Shirley Behrendt Lucille Englert Janet Beltman Eleanor Ciurro Mr. Mrs. Daniel R. Dordel Mr. Mrs. David W. Eggebrecht Dale Mary Ann Guenther Mr. Mrs. James Scherkenbach Cheryl Schmitz Rozanne Schwarz Dulice Evans Gloria Larson LaVerne C. Evert Mr. Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr. Michael Diane Evert Harold E. Margaret F. Fahning Donald R. Sandra L. Fahning Eleanore K. Fealey Mr. Mrs. Frank Wallner Jim Joyce Fischer Paula Knox Shirley Fischer Martha Andeen Mr. Mrs. Donald P. Baket Janet Beltman Eleanor Ciurro Frank Coogan Inga Warren Harwick Joan G. Heyne Mr. Mrs. Donald Koehler Joanne Krause Doris B. Lemke Robert Audrey Richter Jean M. Rosier Gloria Schmeling Lily A. Schmidt Cheryl Schmitz Marian Q. Thielke Arline J. Thoss Jim Thunes Orville Treptow Thomas A. Floryance Sharon Floryance Gerald “Jerry” Franzen Mr. Mrs. David M. Bruder Elaine Franzen - 19 -
  • 20. Memorial Gifts Mr. Mrs. Paul H. Leu Northwestern Mutual Open Door Bible Church Honey Reneau Ruth Windbeil Norma Edwin Frederickson David Lenore Frederickson Donald “Don” Freitag Violet Baumgart Nancy Becher Miloudi Elafess Mr. Mrs. C. Bergquist Ann Brady Gerald R. Brauns Mr. Mrs. Thomas F. Cannariato Regina C. Dombeck Delores Dumke Lois Freitag Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Chuck Gressle Mr. Mrs. Phillip R. Hazelquist Arline G. Henkel Bernice Herman Joan G. Heyne Kathy, Greg Harley Jastromski Lucille V. Johnson Lois Kehres Betty Lissack Nancy Matton Mr. Mrs. Michael Miller Bernadine Mullihan Rev. David Patterson Mr. Mrs. Robert Peterson Glenn Lois Port Bob Ann Rantanen Patricia A. Reynolds Kraig R. Rodenbeck Mary Rozella Cheryl Schmitz Junella L. Skokan Bonnie Vick Mr. Mrs. G. Weber Mr. Mrs. M. Zielke Judith A. Froehlich Mary Ann Abrahamson Jean C. Abriola Mr. Mrs. Tom Armour Mr. Mrs. Jeff Boardman Harding B. Bond Mr. Mrs. Dale Boyce Marlyn J. Brandt Susan Bruckman Mr. Mrs. Reinhard Dahm Dorothy DeVed Kathryn Dubin Mr. Mrs. Richard W. Eden Norbert Engebrecht Theresa Erato Mr. Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr. Lois Freitag John Sandi Froehlich Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Inga Warren Harwick Joan G. Heyne Mr. Mrs. Erik Huth Rev. Mrs. James B. Ilten Matilda Jacobs Yvonne M. Jahn Mr. Mrs. Russell W. John Marjorie Jothen Lois Kehres Roland Miller Kilpatrick Insurance Agency Constance Y. Kling Sr. Rose Kroeger Ele Lindgren Betty Lissack Bob Shirley Mathison Dick Betty Mattson Mr. Mrs. Blake McDuffie Sherry J. Meisenheimer Barbara Mohr Carol D. Mueller Pastor Mrs. David Patterson Mr. Mrs. Harold D. Peterson Mr. Mrs. Mark S. Picard Joseph Kathleen Potts Roberta J. Pratt Alice M. Putzier Joyce Rades Mr. Mrs. Richard Retzer Jeanne Sawicki Luanne M. Schmidt Cheryl Schmitz Cliff Mary Schrock Alan C. Severin Rev. David Shelstad Dr. Lorri Lobeck Evelyn Sherwonit Mr. Mrs. Andrew Shirpke Cindy Simon Vida G. Stanton Judy Thompson Jacqueline Thomson Jerry, Nancy Jennifer Treis Mr. Mrs. Richard L. Tushaus Rosemary Wakefield Mr. Mrs. Kenneth L. Wiesner Alice Gaalaas Linda Gaalaas Betty Genz Jean M. Rosier Rev. Ernie Gilberts Dick Kathy Adix Agnes Gilberts Lori Gorham Sarah Gorham Dorothy Graf Christine Layne Margaret Graf Christine Layne Robert Graf Christine Layne Ida Grantz Rev. Ronald G. Froehlich Tyran G. Green Roberta J. Pratt Pastor Al Grender Carol Grender Lois Freitag Edna Gula Kathleen Conrad Dorothy Haas Donald Haas Alex L. Hamala Anonymous Jim Hamala Roger C. Laesch Mary Olson Terry Pasbrig Southeastern Data Corp. Michael C. Stupich, M.S. Elizabeth Fred Hart Jane Karis Martin Fern Heck Paul M. Heck Myrtle Held John Chris Kosma Verna Held Marie E. Weiss Henrietta Heumann Mr. Mrs. Thomas C. Heumann Ruth M. Heup Anonymous Larry Heup Grace M. Higgins Mary Ellen Kiesner Our moms, Amy Evelyn Jim Kris Hildebrand - 20 -
  • 21. Nellie Anderson Hoag Patricia H. Warth Roger Ethel Hoffman Betty E. Kannal Audrey Holmes David Judith Holmes Clarence “Bud” Holtze Carol Hoefner William “Bill” Humphrey Norbert Engebrecht Mr. Mrs. Donald Koehler Nancy Matton Arline J. Thoss Ruth Jaeger Helen Jaeger Hazel I. Jarchow Mr. Mrs. F. John Evert, Jr. Henry Viola Jensen Steve Jensen Genevieve Johnson Ginni Verthein Lydia C. Judd Judy M. Judd Darlene Katt L. Lee Katt Virginia R. “Ginny” Kelly William Kelly Danielle T. Kreitzer Mary Dave Shanahan Karole Klind Harvey C. Klind Elmer Knickelbine Mr. Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher Alma Knippel Nancy Ploetz Lauretta Koepp Elaine Cary Rita Ann Korth Marie E. Korth Ilma Kraatz Michael Arndt Mr. Mrs. Richard Diehl Susan Kaul Leslie H. Krause Germaine Krause Carol Krenz Rose J. Lucas Lillian Krenzke Helen M. Davis Anna Meyer Kroeger Sr. Rose Kroeger Raymond J. Bonnie Krueger Kent K. Krueger Lisa Kuchta Margaret M. Fandre Mr. Mrs. Brian E. Johanson Blaine Kunkel Bob Ann Borowski R. K. Ursula Wollenberg Margaret Lang Barbara J. Haessly Margaret Laun Daniel F. Ring Violet LePage Marie LePage Lillian Leverenz Elmer E. Schultz Norma C. Lillie Adeline Amberg Olga Lyneis Barbara Sontag Charles C. Macleod Tom Lavers Floyd Mann Jim Thunes Aunt of Mr. Mrs. Abe Martin Martha Andeen Mary, dear friend of Terri Bartlett Nancy Becher Miloudi Elafess Helen Mattson Dick Betty Mattson Esther G. May Howard Beverly Reoch Ruth Milhans Susan Milhans Mr. Mrs. Fred Z. Miller Mr. Mrs. Edward C. Maly Mothers, May Katherine Anonymous Ardell “Art” Mueller Florence Kriehn Harriot Nehmer Violet Baumgart Violet Nelson Carol Hoefner Glen Neustedter Mr. Mrs. James Baumgartner Joan Norville B. H. Lohr Maria Oberneder Mary Rose Schroeder Dorothy O’Brien Daniel F. Ring Marilynn Ring Ruth Odahl Dick Betty Mattson Yoshiko “Yo” Okabayashi Helen M. Davis Sandy Paulson Martha Andeen Olga Pautz Katherine M. Jastromski Jean Keough Daniel Pautz Family of Olga Pautz Janice Peter William A. Peter Les Pfeffer Tom Sharon Tradewell Marion Radspinner Mary Ann Abrahamson Martha Andeen Eleanor Ciurro Marjorie Davis John Doris Keller Joanne Krause Ele Lindgren Dick Betty Mattson Robert A. Otzelberger Al Edna Peterson Glenn Lois Port Jean M. Rosier Gloria Schmeling Lori J. Schultz Joyce M. Stibbe Marian Q. Thielke Arline J. Thoss Jim Thunes Rev. Mrs. Jack E. Trethewey Orville Treptow Rev. William H. Truby Lois Van Derven Jim Sandy Wrangell - 21 - Memorial Gifts
  • 22. Your generosity will result in God Your generosity will result in God2 Corinthians 9:11 thanksgiving to Memorial Gifts Helen Reich Mary Ann Abrahamson Alice L. Richter Anonymous (2) Joan G. Heyne Florence Kriehn Gladys M. Larson Dick Betty Mattson Delores M. Nix Carl Kay Richter Ruth D. Ruenzel Cheryl Schmitz Vera Silseth Wendy E. Stolt Ron Treptow Linda Trotter Rev. Wm. H. Nancy Truby Joan Wintersberger Virginia Ruplinger Mary E. Vettel Mr. Mrs. Walter Schiefelbein Dolores A. Schiefelbein Virginia Schmidt Stephen Grau Hans Schneider Rev. Mrs. Ronald W. Albers James Schneider Jan Bruskewitz Mary Oberneder Schroeder Mary Rose Schneider Gloria E. Schultz Mary Ann Abrahamson Janet Beltman Heidi Giencke Lois Goerlinger Joyce Heinrich Alice Knickelbine Marilyn Kugler Dorothy M. Schaefer Jim Thunes Mr. Mrs. Erwin G. Wegner Tom Shanahan Mary Ann Abrahamson Peg Carlson Carla Draper Mr. Mrs. Richard P. Cattey Mary Dick Cywinski Scott Dragan Jean Berens Mr. Mrs. Jack W. Green Katherine M. Grogan Susan F. Grogan Nancy C. Herrell John Janis Hovel Mr. Mrs. Thomas L. Kirchen Jane C. Lazynski Bernadette Meagher Terri Miller Patricia A. Monroe Mr. Mrs. David K. Nelson Marilee Muente Nord Rev. David Patterson Dennis Mary Pat Pfeil James G. Phillips Mr. Mrs. Thomas A. Rave Mr. Mrs. Dennis G. Russell Carlen Schenk Children of Tom Jeanne Shanahan Dan Eileen Shanahan Roger Corine Sherman Rose Spang Peggy Storniolo Patricia Strassburger Mr. Mrs. James A. Tomasello Martha Valerio Larry Jay Greg Zajac Harriet A. Shumway Alfred E. Shumway Martha Simmons Deb Heilman Gwenn Simonson Linda Kautz Bonnie Lyons Our mothers, Theresa Angelina step-mom Lucile Ron Kathy Sonntag Edward Stanek Marjorie Jothen Hazel S. Stoller Mr. Mrs. Gordon Fritsche Erna Throndson Louise T. Peterson Gladys Timple Sandy Everts Laurence Wanda Tischner Hollis Tischner Wanda Tischner Jill Lindberg Marcus “Marty” Tremble Rev. David Patterson Alfred Tucholke Ingrid Tucholke Finnan Kenneth “Ken” Twinem Marilyn A. Bauer Larry Eleanor Beckman Mr. Mrs. David T. Hervey Lyn Holcomb Mr. Mrs. Donald Koehler Joanne Krause Ralph D. Malicki Nancy Matton Rosalyn Parker PWOA, Inc. Mr. Mrs. John R. Radtke Shelley Saxe Lori J. Schultz Arline J. Thoss Robert W. Ziebell Erna Herbert Van Eerden Loraine D. Robert J. Van Eerden, Sr. Hannah Warmie Norma Warmie Betty Weisel Pam Weisel Marjorie Wiedeman Harding B. Bond Hildegard Wiedenhoeft Anonymous Janet Beltman Marilyn Bub David Judy DeBruine Mr. Mrs. James N. Dieringer Bonnie Eggert Emily S. FitzRandolph John Doris Keller Mr. Mrs. Karl G. Kieckbusch Patricia A. Reynolds Cheryl Schmitz Alice H. Wagner Theresa Zarling Joellen Schei - 22 -
  • 23. - 23 - ribute GiftsTThe following individuals were honored by their families and friends. Tribute gifts serve to commemorate birthdays, wedding anniversaries or other special occasions or simply to show appreciation for a friendship or act of kindness. Those who have been honored through a gift to Luther Manor are listed below in bold-faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following tribute gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource Development at Luther Manor, at (414) 464-3880, ext. 572 or give@luthermanor.org or use the gift envelope included in this issue of The Messenger Audrey Arndt Joyce Heinrich Esther Bauers’ 100th Birthday Carla A. Claussen Ron Dolores Blust Tom Lavers Agnes Gilberts Mr. Mrs. Wayne Reiche Mary E. Hofmann Henry Hofmann Virginia R. Kelly William J. Kelly Harvey Hazel Klind Harvey C. Klind Alice Knickelbine Mr. Mrs. Gordon A. Hatcher Alice Knudsen Regina C. Dombeck Marianne Koehler’s Birthday Chris Lori Schultz Beverly Thompson Kathleen Korth Marie E. Korth Joanne Krause Mark Cheryl Schmitz Gloria Larson Timothy J. Larson Luther Manor Health Care Center Nurses Robert A. Otzelberger Betty Mattson’s Birthday Sharon D. Odahl Jean Moberg’s Birthday Sr. Rose Kroeger Ann Towell Edna Muehrer Anonymous (2) Patricia Reynolds Kathy Jeff Czarniak Helen Sceales Mr. Mrs. Larry D. Mahr Beverly Schenk Susan Al Lewis Ruth Tamms Naomi Bauman Ann Towell’s Birthday Sr. Rose Kroeger Rev. Dan Thurmer Warren R. Stumpe Joan Van Ryzin Gladys M. Larson Donna Woleben Linda L. Dailey he Hope Society GiftsTThe Hope Society is a program that offers friends and family a way to remember their loved one(s) with a gift to the Luther Manor Hospice program. Those who have been memorialized are listed below in bold- faced type and are followed by the names of the donor(s). The following Hope Society gifts were received between Feb. 1, 2014 and July 31, 2014. If you would like to pay tribute to a loved one, please contact Resource Development at (414) 464-3880 ext. 572, or give@luthermanor.org. Catherine Chaney Ann Tunak Judith A. Froehlich Mr. Mrs. Tom Armour Marilyn J. Brandt Mr. Mrs. Richard W. Eden Mr. Mrs. Russel W. John Marjorie Jothen Kilpatrick Insurance Agency Evelyn Sherwood Mr. Mrs. Kenneth L. Wiesner Leslie H. Krause Germaine Krause *Correction from Spring and Summer 2014: In memory of Josephine Grant should have been in honor of Josephine Grant from Delores Nix, Sister Rose Kroeger, and Helen Towell. The Luther Manor Foundation was created in 1985 as a charitable nonprofit organization to provide financial support for Luther Manor’s ministry. The 2014/2015 Luther Manor Foundation Board of Directors include: Fred Anderson, Treasurer Thomas Buck Gwen Jackson William Pickering, Secretary Amy Sarles John Silseth, Chair The Messenger is published periodically by Luther Manor, a ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging. Comments and suggestions regarding this publication are always welcome. Contact the Luther Manor Resource Development office at: 4545 N. 92nd Street Wauwatosa, WI 53225 (414) 464-3880 give@luthermanor.org www.luthermanor.org The content provided in The Messenger is intended only to be informational. The Luther Manor Foundation does not render legal, tax or other financial advisory services. For assistance with your specific situation, professional services should be sought.
  • 24. A ministry of the United Lutheran Program for the Aging 4545 N. 92nd Street • Wauwatosa, WI 53225 As a nonprofit, faith-based organization and one of the finest senior living communities in Southeastern Wisconsin, Luther Manor has been caring and advocating for seniors for more than 50 years. Our mission is to share God’s love by enriching the lives of older adults through excellent housing, care and services. In addition to retirement housing, assisted living and long-term care options, we offer rehabilitation services, adult day services, hospice care and community outreach programs. Guided by our Christian heritage and values, we consistently strive to exceed the expectations of those we serve. You can count on our commitment and reputation when selecting housing or healthcare services for yourself or someone you love. If you would like to make a contribution to help support any of the programs or services the Luther Manor community offers, please contact the Resource Development Office at (414) 464-3880, ext. 447 or give@luthermanor.org.