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Published for the friends of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Fall/Winter 2014
The true meaning of the CSJ motto,“Together…we are more”
comes alive in the immigration crisis.
Chasing Hope, Finding Peace
fromtheleadershipteam
Dear Friends,
	 This entire issue of Connections is clearly about relationships. As Sisters of
St. Joseph and Associates, we are about right relationship in a variety of contexts:
with individuals, in small groups, and in larger gatherings.There is a passage in
Matthew’s Gospel, “For where two or three meet in my name, I shall be there with
them.” (Matt. 18:20) This passage is often misunderstood or misinterpreted. Jesus
is always with us! We don’t need two or three to create such a presence. What the
passage is really about is right relationship. In the section just prior to this passage
is the explanation of brotherly/sisterly connection. “…take one or two others along
with you…” (Matt. 18:16) The people in this issue of Connections are in right
relationship.They are dynamic, exciting, enthusiastic, and loving. How blessed we
are to treasure relationships, to deepen them, to cherish them, to feed them!
	 Let’s close with a bit of Cherokee Wisdom entitled “Two Wolves.” The story
goes like this:
One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that goes on inside people.
He said, “My son, the battle is between two ‘wolves’ inside us all.
One is Evil.
It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity,
guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego.
The other is Good.
It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence,
empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith.
The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather,
“Which wolf wins?” The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”
	 We invite each of you to feed the good wolf and starve the evil wolf inside.
	 Many blessings,
	 Province Leadership
Connections is printed on recycled
paper using earth-friendly, soy-based inks.
Back: Sisters Maureen Freeman and Rita Marie Schmitz. Front: Sisters Marilyn Lott, Linda Straub and Mary
Margaret Lazio
Sister Maureen Freeman, CSJ
Sister Mary Margaret Lazio, CSJ
Sister Marilyn Lott, CSJ
Sister Rita Marie Schmitz, CSJ
Sister Linda Straub, CSJ
Jenny Beatrice
Development Office
Sister Jane Behlmann, CSJ
Sister Mary Flick, CSJ
Sister Charline Sullivan, CSJ
Jenny Beatrice
Patty Cassens, CFRE, CSJA
Kathy Futhey
Sister Mary Flick, CSJ
Mary Lou Frank
Barbara Roberts
Barnes & Liston Creative
Sarah Baker
Jenny Beatrice
Province Leadership
Editor
Contributor
Proofreaders
Contributing Writers
Design
Photography
Connections is published twice a year for the friends
of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Louis
Province. Please send address changes and requests for
additional copies to Editor, Connections, at the address
above or to communications@csjsl.org.
Features
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 1
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014contents
Departments
Chasing Hope, Finding Peace
page 4
Follow Us:
Visit www.csjsl.org
for links to our social media sites.
Province Leadership
Team Affirmation
On June 28, the St. Louis province
affirmed its new leadership team in a
ceremony at the province motherhouse
in St. Louis. Read about the leaders and
their vision for the future.
Cover story: Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub bring the
CSJ spirit of hospitality to El Paso to be a pastoral presence during
this summer’s migrant crisis at the border.
10	A Sister’s Journey,
	 A Mother’s Love
	 As Sister Clare Bass makes her first 	
	 vows, her mother,Susie,shares her
	 challenges and joys of her daughter’s 	
	journey.
12	 Room for Transformation
	 Barbara Prosser celebrates 25 years
	 as a CSJ associate and tells of her
	 “remarkable journey of the heart
	 and of the home.”
14	 Q & A: Where One Of Us Is,
	 All Of Us Are.
	 St. Louis. Kansas City. Denver.These 	
	 are a few of the cities where many of
	 our sisters live in community. But 	
	 some of our sisters are serving across 	
	 the county alone or in smaller groups. 	
	 Read about Sisters Patricia Hix
	 and 	Gretchen Wagner who live in 	
	Montana.
2	 Around the Province
8	 Province Leadership
	Affirmation
9	 Peace and Justice
16	 Faith Matters
17	 Advancing the Mission
19	 Tributes and Memorials
22	Events and Happenings
2 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
aroundtheprovince
In Print
Sister Amy Hereford’s book, Religious Life
at the Crossroads: A School for Mystics and
Prophets (Orbis Books, 2013) has been
awarded the prestigious 2014 Catholic
Press Award, garnering first place in the
Gender Issues category. Sister Amy is an
attorney and canon lawyer. Her personal
and former professional experiences in education, adminis-
tration and communication give her a unique perspective on
examining women religious and religious life in the context
of church, culture and society.
Sister Joan Whittemore has published
Maestra: The Legacy of Fiora Corradetti
Contino, the story of a woman who came
from an illustrious operatic family to
achieve musical and theatrical wonders
on stage.The book provides a window
into Contino’s life and her renowned
career as a professional operatic and symphonic conductor
and university professor who has influenced legions of
students, professional singers and conductors.
CSJA Allen Grieve named
to Fontbonne’s Board
St. Louis: CSJ Associate Allen Grieve
has been named to Fontbonne University’s
Board of Trustees. Grieve has been in the
banking industry for 45 years and currently
serves as senior vice president and division
manager of correspondent banking and commercial services
division of the First National Bank of St. Louis, a position
he has held since 2002. “I’m really excited about joining
the Fontbonne University Board of Trustees,” Grieve says.
“This is another opportunity for me to help the Sisters of
St. Joseph of Carondelet continue their mission at a very
important institution.”
Sister Mary Charity Dalton receives
Fontbonne University’s Founders Award
St. Louis: Sister Mary Charity Dalton
received the Founders Award that
annually recognizes alumni and others
for their exemplary leadership and service
to society. Sister Mary Charity served
at Fontbonne for 29 years as a faculty
member, teaching speech and drama, and
later serving at Eckelkamp College of Global Business and
Professional Studies. She received the award at the annual
alumni reunion brunch on Oct. 12.
Two CSJs join Avila’s Board
Kansas City: Avila University welcomes two CSJs to
the Board of Trustees: Sisters Mary McKay, Ph.D., and
Irene O’Neill, Ed.D. Sister Mary, a member of the CSJ
congregational leadership team, is former provincial superior
in the Los Angeles province and professor of religious
studies at CSJ-sponsored Mount St. Mary’s College in Los
Angeles. Sister Irene of the St. Paul province is the principal
foundation officer of the Ministries Foundation, which
funds province programs that serve communities for the
poor. She has also gained attention and recognition as “The
Blogging Nun.” Also joining the board is Vercie Lark, chief
information and technology officer for DST Systems in
Kansas City, Missouri.
CCBF Honors CSJs’ Commitment
to Carondelet Neighborhood
St. Louis: The Carondelet Community
Betterment Federation (CCBF) extended
a public thank you to the Sisters of
St. Joseph of Carondelet for their long-
time commitment to their neighborhood
at a May 29 reception at The Bluffs on
Broadway.The evening also honored
Sisters Marie Charles Buford and Mary
Ann Nestel. Sister Marie Charles was
integral in the inception of CCBF in
1971 and served as its executive director
until 2007. Sister Mary Ann served as
executive director from 2007 until this
spring and recently resigned as its
fundraising director. CCBF Chairman
Tom Purcell, Alderman Tom Villa and Mayor Francis Slay
were on hand to applaud the visionary leadership of the
Sisters of St. Joseph.“The Sisters of St. Joseph have illustrated
tremendous dedication to the Carondelet neighborhood
through their actions and service,” says Mayor Slay.
“Their efforts not only better this particular community
but they, in turn, better the City of St. Louis.”
SJI Announces New Location, President
St. Louis: CSJ-sponsored St. Joseph Institute for the
Deaf (SJI) has moved to its new location, at 1300 Strassner,
in Brentwood, Missouri.The centralized location enables
children and families to more easily access the listening
and spoken language services for which SJI is nationally
recognized. SJI previously was located in Chesterfield.That
facility, which SJI had occupied since 1996, was sold to the
Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet earlier this year.The sale
enabled SJI to move to a new location that would better
accommodate the school’s early intervention services for
children from birth to age three, as well as SJI’s innovative
Internet-based therapy program called ihear. Other services
offered at the new site include an onsite toddler program
and pediatric audiology services for children ages infant
through age 18.The overwhelming majority of children
served by SJI are infants and toddlers.
The SJI Board of Directors named Teri
Ouellette, long-time deaf educator and
administrator at SJI, as its new president.
She has directed SJI’s Indianapolis loca-
tion for the past 13 years, and previously
taught at the St. Louis location.The
SJI Board of Directors also has merged
with the SJI-Indianapolis Advisory Board, creating a single
governing organization to oversee all strategic activity of
St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf. Ouellette will oversee all
of SJI’s programs and services from Indianapolis.
Sister Margaret Guzzardo receives
National Award
Sister Margaret Guzzardo was nationally recognized by her
peers with a 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing
Association Award. She received its Certificate of Recogni-
tion for Special Contributions in Multicultural Affairs.
Sister Margaret ministers at the Walker Scottish Rite Clinic
in St. Louis, offering services to children two to six years
of age at no charge to the parents. Fluent in Spanish, she
says, “I have been able to help our Hispanic children work
in their native language, as well as communicate with their
parents.”
Sisters Honored at Avila University
Kansas City: Sister Marie Joan
Harris and the late Sister Martha Smith
were honored at Avila University in
August. Avila celebrated the dedication
and grand opening of its new Learning
Commons and the Marie Joan Harris,
CSJ, Ph.D. Science & Health Complex,
inside O’Rielly Hall. It also celebrated
the establishment of the Martha Smith,
CSJ, Ph.D. Archives & Research Center,
located inside the Learning Commons.
The center houses the archives of the U.S.
Federation of the Sisters of St. Joseph,
Avila’s Women Religious Collections and
the official Avila University archives.
Nearly 15,000 square feet of O’Rielly Hall were refurbished
to establish the Science & Health Complex, named for Sis-
ter Marie Joan, Avila’s provost and vice president for
Academic Affairs, who began her career as a chemistry
professor at Avila 45 years ago. “This is the continuation
of what has been an unprecedented period of renovation
and expansion at Avila,” says Avila President Ron Slepitza,
Ph.D., CSJA. “With the completion of these projects, Avila
further positions itself as an inspirational beacon of higher
education in the Midwest.”
St. Joseph’s competes with St. Teresa’s
for state soccer championship
Kansas City: Even though they were “friendly foes,”
there was nothing easy about the June 7 MSHSAA Class
3 State Final Missouri State Soccer Championship game
between the St. Joseph Academy Angels and St.Teresa
Academy Stars. It took a double overtime before the Angels
knocked off St.Teresa’s, 3-2, for the title. It was the seventh
state championship for the Angels (23-1), but their first
since 2002. And they did it only after rallying from a
two-goal deficit in the second half against a team ranked
No. 1 nationally. St.Teresa’s (22-1) finished as Missouri’s
runner-up for the second consecutive season.
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 3
Visit www.csjsl.org to read the life stories
of our faithful sisters who have died.
Let Us Remember...
Sister Catherine Mary Boucher
November 23, 1927 - May 18, 2014
“Love and discipline were the hallmarks of her care.”
Sister Jean Meier
March 5, 1944 - May 21, 2014
“Thoughtful, generous, prayerful, poetic.”
Sister James Lorene Hogan
March 23, 1924 - June 5, 2014
“A woman of intelligence, quick wit and kindness.”
Sister Mary Loran Aubuchon
September 17, 1931 - August 16, 2014
“A generous, welcoming woman who always
had a twinkle in her eye.”
4 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub
bring the CSJ spirit of hospitality to
El Paso to be a pastoral presence
during this summer’s migrant crisis at
the border.
H
ow far would you chase hope? Would you endure a 1500+-mile
trek in the hope that your children will be safe from the gangs
that threaten to steal their lives? Would you walk with your
children, one foot in front of the other, through desert, mountains,
jungles and rivers? Would you hitch rides with drug traffickers
and risk being kidnapped, raped or murdered? Would you ride on the top of a train
so dangerous it is called “La Bestia”?
	 Would you send your children on to endure this journey without you?
	 And at the end of your ordeal, what would it mean to you to find a kind face, a
helping hand and a welcoming heart?
	 Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub were that loving presence for these
immigrants, responding with “eyes open, ears attentive, spirit alert and sleeves rolled
up,” all in the spirit of the Sisters of St. Joseph.
By Jenny Beatrice
Chasing Hope,
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 5
The Crisis
Child migrants from Central
America, primarily El Salvador,
Guatemala and Honduras, have been
steadily entering the United States and
other Central American countries since
2011.This year, an estimated 77,200
are expected to be apprehended at the
border, including 59,000 from Central
America. But a surge of 66,127 in an
eight-month period brought the
situation to a crisis point and to the
forefront.
	 This mass exodus was driven by escalating violence
against the youth in Central America by gangs and drug
traffickers who force the teens to join them. If they refuse,
they risk rape, kidnapping and murder, as well as threats
of retaliation to their families. But the cost is more than
just the danger. Drug cartels further exploited the situation
by starting rumors that entrance to the United States was
becoming easier, creating opportunities to collect outrageous
“tolls” from the refugees at various points along the journey.
	 Contrary to popular belief, a great number of these
children are not coming to the border unaccompanied or
with the intent of circumventing the system. Many travel
with a parent—mostly young, single mothers—and they are
hoping to connect with a relative or friend from their village
who has made a home in America. Apprehension at the
border is the threshold into the immigration process, which
typically begins with a 72-hour intake and court dates set
for the future.
	 But the process reached its breaking point this summer.
Children and families were being held in standing-room
only detention centers built for juvenile offenders or military
bases not meant for detention.They were used because the
facilities were large enough to accommodate the influx.The
military-trained border patrol officers may have been well
intentioned, but they were ill-equipped to address the social
work needs of tens of thousands of children.
	 That is when many organizations,
volunteers and religious communities
stepped up to fill the gaps for the
immigrants, providing care with dignity
in the name of the Gospel.
The Call
For Sister Ida Berresheim, it started
with an email, but her ministry of
working at the border in El Paso began
20 years earlier. Many of her years there
were served at Annunciation House, a
37-year old sanctuary program whose
Gospel mission is to accompany the migrant, homeless, and
economically vulnerable peoples of the border region through
hospitality, advocacy, and education. S. Ida returned to
St. Louis in 2011, worked as assistant mission coordinator
for the CSJ Congregation until she recently retired.
	 When the surge in El Paso and surrounding areas began,
Annunciation House founder and director Ruben Garcia
emailed the board members and friends of the house.
Without a second thought, S. Ida began planning her journey.
	 Unbeknownst to S. Ida, Sister Sandra Straub was
feeling the pull to be a presence at the border. She wanted to
work with the people and she wanted to do it as soon as
possible. “Having worked in Peru and southern Missouri,
I had first-hand experience of the poverty and hopelessness
of these brothers and sisters, and I simply wanted to alleviate
their suffering,” she says.
	 When she brought up the possibility with her blood-
sister and Province Leader Sister Linda Straub, S. Linda
said, “Are you in cahoots with Ida?” S. Ida connected
S. Sandra with Ruben Garcia and this duo was on its way.
	 “We had the freedom from our province. We were
blessed,”S. Sandra says.“We were gifted with the money and
the freedom to go. We were blessed by our leadership and by
many sisters and associates who were so happy we were going.
And that gives you energy. It gave me a lot of energy.”
Finding Peace
“We had the freedom
from our province.
We were blessed.
We were gifted with
the money and the
freedom to go.
We were blessed by
our leadership and by
many sisters and associates
who were so happy
we were going.”
Sister Sandy Straub, CSJ
The Work
Annunciation House was a
temporary safe haven, helping
people to get to the next steps on their
journey.The organization helped secure
five sites to accommodate the numbers
of people who needed assistance.
S. Sandra worked at one of those
sites—Nazareth Center, a senior living
facility founded by the Sisters of Loretto
and currently sponsored by Ascension
Health. Part of this 1960s building
did not meet code and so could not be
used for senior care. But it offered a
very large space to accommodate the
migrants—in S. Sandra’s estimate, the
size of four football fields.
	 “Some of the refugees had been on
the trek for a month and a half, carrying
babies, small children.” S. Sandra says.
“Their shoes did not fit, and often had
no laces.Their clothes were torn and
dirty. Many appeared to be just plain hungry.”
	 The center did not receive unaccompanied minors,
but cared for those who were with a parent or guardian.
The clients were brought to the center by vans run by the
Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
	 “To watch these teenage kids, mostly boys, get off that
ICE van looking like they’re scared…and the sisters would
say ‘Bienvenida. You are going to be safe here, you are
going to be safe,’ trying to assure them because they’ve
been through so much that nobody understands.”
	 Nazareth Center’s operation involved eight checkpoints
that guests passed through: intake, administration, clothing,
toiletries, shower, food, bed and phone calls/transportation
arrangements. S. Sandra worked at them all in one way or
another during the two weeks she was there. Much of the
work was in the “sleeves rolled up” department—cleaning
showers, mopping the long hallways and stripping beds.
But S. Sandra knows the true meaning of this hard work
that lie beneath the clean surfaces.
	 “They were met with such genuine kindness and with
what the Sisters of St. Joseph call hospitality. We welcomed
them to our space, to our hearts. And that’s very evident.
They can tell if you are welcoming them into your heart.
You do that by offering them clean
clothes and shavers—just to smell good
and have clean hair. And food in their
bellies.”
	 She says much of her work wasn’t
really in the “job description,” yet it was
one of the most important: listening.
“There’d be 30 people lined up against
the wall and I would go down and lis-
ten, talk story, ask them questions and
get them to laugh,” she says.
	 Some of the stories she heard
were heartbreaking. A 22-year-old
mother with three young girls ages
11, 12, and 13, who were chased by a
gang and a drug trafficker who tried to
rape her. A motherless woman whose
father sold her to a prostitution ring.
A mother with her preteen daughter
on their way to New York, who left her
17-year-old daughter back home with
her very sick mother. A 20-year-old
mother who carried her three-month-old baby through a
filthy river with 30 other refugees in order to reach her sister
in Houston.
	 Yet there were stories of hope, glimmering in even the
smallest of places. One of the young volunteers, who is a
wedding planner, brought some décor, including small glassy
beads. One immigrant mother decided to make jewelry, a
trend that caught on with all the young moms.
	 “It was priceless,” S. Sandra says. “One young woman,
who was very attractive with shiny black hair and simple
dress, was leaving in a few hours. She said to me, ‘Nita, look,’
showing me a bracelet she made. She hadn’t seen her hus-
band in over a year and she was meeting him at the airport
and she wanted to look beautiful for him. Her face, her face
was so happy.”
	 S. Ida’s role involved another kind of listening. She was
the housemother for the 18 sisters and two lay volunteers
who stayed at the convent that no longer had a community,
conveniently located near downtown El Paso. It was offered
by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas. S. Ida
provided the hospitality. “That was my job: cooking,
shopping, getting the rooms ready, receiving the sisters,
making sure they had a key, laundry, and driving,” says
S. Ida. “It was very important to me that when I went to
6 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
…that the mission of Jesus calls 	
	 us to collaboration with others 	
	 for justice.
…mutuality can only happen 		
	 when we share our stories and 	
	 listen empathically.
…partnering with new eyes
	 happens when we join with 		
	 others in working for systemic 	
	 change that will enable all to
	 live in right relationships.
~2013 CSJ Congregational
Acts of Chapter
We believe…
pick up the sisters each day, I often had a chance to go into
the shelters and wait.This gave me an opportunity to be
with the refugees, talk with them and receive their hugs of
deep gratitude.”
	 S. Sandra says S. Ida’s caregiving was the support
that kept the volunteers going physically and emotionally,
allowing them the space to unpack the day. “Because Ida was
stable, the volunteers were very free to go and do that other
work. We knew there’d be a hot supper ready,” she says.
“It really freed us up because the energy it took to speak in
Spanish, to do all that kind of cleaning, to listen with a good
heart—you came home really, really tired.”
	 “Yes, they came home so tired
and they would tell the stories of the
day,” says S. Ida. “And that was helpful
for them, but it was helpful for me
because I became a part of it in the way
that I could.”
	 The volunteers had this small
semblance of routine within the days
that were totally unpredictable.
“Families arrived at all times of day in
all numbers,” says S. Sandra. “I’d go to work with a perceived
thought of what the experience might be and finish the day
with, well, not what I thought might happen!”
	 Although S. Ida has years of experience working at the
border with the young people, the instability was palpable.
She says, “The difference was in the pressure that these
volunteers were under. It was a different kind of pressure
than the ‘normal crowd.’ But nothing is normal about people
crossing the border.”
The Community
The Sisters of St. Joseph charism of hospitality to the
dear neighbor offered by Sisters Ida and Sandra was
an expression that represented the entire CSJ community.
Yet like the loaves and fishes, it was a collaborative effort by
many, an organically created community of hospitality. The
Lorettos and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia offered
their spaces. Religious men and women from all over the
country came down without hesitation. Local parishioners
and youth groups came out in droves to lend a hand. It
showed the true meaning of the CSJ motto, “Together…we
are more.”
	 “We are now in the twilight of our lives, in a way. We
know this,” says S. Sandra. “And so we look around and say,
‘How can we be useful?’What can we do today? And then
you have this type of experience.”
	 Even the Border Patrol and the Immigration and
Customs officials are part of this community.They know
that more needs to be done and most are trying to work
effectively within a broken system. S. Sandra says, “They’re
protecting our borders. We want them to do that. So I put
myself in their place and I say, this isn’t very nice but at the
same time, how would I be?”
	 Today the situation has subsided and the surge has
declined.The rumors of easy entry have been dispelled.
People are once again being processed
within 72 hours. Hearings are being set.
Some are granted refugee status. Others
are being deported but have a foot in
the process. Still, this fast-moving crisis
has illuminated the need for action at
the systemic level—something that is
agreed upon across party lines.
	 Now that the crisis has ebbed and
Sisters Ida and Sandra are back home,
their passion for the issue has not been
left behind. S. Ida works with the Migrant & Immigrant
Community Action Project, and continues her work as an
Annunciation House board and committee member.
	 S. Sandra continues her work with immigrants and
refugees in the St. Louis area. Both sisters invite others to
take steps in their own communities to live out the same
hospitality that called them to the border.
	 S. Sandra says, “We are recommending that people try
to be involved with the centers and with immigrant peoples
in their locations. Get involved by dropping off toiletries,
diapers, feminine hygiene products, gift cards or bus passes.
Work with an organization to take up a collection. It’s a call
to be invited to share in the mission of the Church.”
	 It’s also a call to share in the mission of the Gospel.
“Pray. Welcome difference. Love your enemies,” says
S. Sandra. “Keep in mind those who are poor, different and
marginalized and walk in their shoes, showing kindness,
respect, love and openness.”
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 7
“Yes, they came home so
tired and they would
tell the stories of the day.
And that was helpful for
them, but it was helpful
for me because I became
a part of it in the way
that I could”
Sister Ida Berresheim, CSJ
S
urrounded by sisters,
associates, family and
friends, the new
leaders for the St. Louis
Province of the Sisters of
St. Joseph of Carondelet
were affirmed on June 28 at
a ceremony in the mother-
house chapel.They began
their five-year term July 1. 
The team members are:
Sisters Maureen Freeman,
Mary Margaret Lazio,
Marilyn Lott, Rita Marie
Schmitz and Linda Straub.
	 Before taking office,
four of the team members
served in ministries that are
well-known in the St. Louis
area.
	 S. Mary Margaret, originally from Grand Rapids,
Michigan, is a registered nurse, and served as night supervisor
at CSJ-sponsored Nazareth Living Center in Oakville since
2007. S. Marilyn, a St. Louis native, was the staff chaplain at
St. Louis University Hospital for the past 10 years.
	 Serving in education, S. Rita Marie, from St. Louis,
recently retired from CSJ-sponsored Fontbonne University
after 44 years. And, since 2000, S. Linda, also from St. Louis,
was the campus minister at the Catholic Student Center at
Washington University.
	 S. Maureen, a Chicago native, recently retired as director
at the White Violet Center
for Eco-Justice in Terre
Haute, Indiana. Hers was
a unique ministry that
provides opportunities for
people to participate in
creating just and sustainable
systems.
	 S. Marilyn looks to the
past to provide strength for
the future. “The challenges
ahead of us as a province
and in the congregation is
to look for ways in which
we can continue what was
begun in France 360 years
ago,” she says. “We are
called to have the courage,
freedom and valor of the
first six sisters [in America]
who listened to the Spirit and gave all they had as they jour-
neyed into the unknown.”
	 S.Linda looks to a future that moves toward collaboration
with the four provinces in the CSJ Congregation across the
country. “Aware that each generation has new challenges,
the question we must ask today is, how can we best use our
resources to meet the needs of the times?” she says.
	 “What we are about is bigger than any one of us,” says
S. Rita.“This time in history requires us to focus on creativity
rather than power. We need to create something new
together for our world.”
8 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
Province Leadership Affirmation
Province Leadership 2014-2019: Sisters Marilyn Lott, Linda Straub, Rita Marie
Schmitz, Maureen Freeman and Mary Margaret Lazio.
“The challenges ahead of us as a province
and in the congregation is to look for
ways in which we can continue what
was begun in France 360 years ago.”
Sister Marilyn Lott, CSJ
The 2008-2014 Province Leadership Team raise their hands in blessing of the new team. Sister Nancy Marsh, CSJ makes bobbin lace, a
tradition of the Sisters of St. Joseph.
One cannot turn on
the news these days
without seeing tragedy
upon tragedy—in Eastern
Europe, the Middle East,
the U.S. border and even in
our own home towns.
Policy makers seem to spend
more time and energy in
political arguments over
petty power struggles
instead of meaningful
problem solving. And it
seems we’ve been in this
holding pattern for some
time. It’s hard not to get
frustrated or discouraged.
It’s hard to imagine that
anything could shift us from
this pattern into something
more. Calls to action have
traditionally invited us to
marches, rallies, panel
discussions,letter campaigns,
e-mail campaigns, petitions,
phone calls, and when all else seems to
fail, civil disobedience.
	 For many, these tactics are fright-
ening, frustrating or perhaps even leave
a bad taste in our mouths. And for
others they are tried-and-true methods
that just don’t seem to have the impact
they once did. So we must do the same
thing with more people, right? It’s all
about the numbers? More people will
tip us over the threshold and we’ll see
meaningful change. Or will we?
	 What if we are missing something
important? What if we need another
way? It’s not to say that there aren’t
roles and places for those traditional
tactics, but what if those tactics aren’t
yielding the results we want and need?
Then what do we do? And when those
tactics focus on attention-seeking and
awareness-raising but leave little room
for relationship-building and problem-
solving, then how do we seek shared
solutions when there’s no mechanism
or opportunity to do so?
	 Over and over again, I hear people
lament that we are so divided, standing
on opposite sides of a widening chasm.
And who among us wants to step into
that space in between? Parker Palmer
calls it “standing in the tragic gap.”
Nancy Schreck, OSF calls it the “middle
place…in which we cannot assume
presence or straightforward resolution.”
It is an uncomfortable, often lonely and
even frightening place to be. In this
tragic gap or middle place we might be
asked to bear witness and
accompany pain and
suffering with no human
means to relieve it. We
may be asked to surrender
our need to fix and have
faith that the Holy Spirit
will heal. We have to be
willing to let go of expecta-
tions of seeing resolution
in our time and trust that
faithfulness will yield in
generations beyond us.
	 But we cannot do that
alone. It requires a commit-
ted and collective spiritual
community that holds one
another in that witness,
knowing that with such
weight and knowledge, we
need time to step out, rest
as others step into the gap.
It is a willingness to hold
this tension, this middle
place that allows us to move out of
crisis response into a partnership with
those impacted. With them, we seek
long-term solutions toward systemic
transformation, not just easy fixes that
relieve our discomfort but does little to
change things in the end.
	 And isn’t that what being in the
blessed community of the Church is
all about? Aren’t we here to love one
another and help carry one another’s
burdens? But how do we do that?
Over the next year, the sisters and
associates of St. Joseph of Carondelet
are going to intentionally look for
another way. We are going to meet one
another where we are, ask God to help
and see if we can stand in the tragic
gap, that middle place as a greater
global healing is revealed. I hope you’ll
join us, for together we are truly more.
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 9
peaceandjustice
We may be asked
to surrender our
need to fix and have
faith that the
Holy Spirit will heal.
Anna Sandidge,
Justice Coordinator
By Anna Sandidge, Justice Coordinator
10 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
A
growing majority of young
Catholic women today have
never met a woman religious,
much less considered becoming one.
So when Clare Bass professed her
first vows at the end of June, there was
ample reason to celebrate, both within
the Sisters of St. Joseph and among her
family, friends and parishoners at her
home parish, Our Lady of Fatima, in
Biloxi, Mississippi.
	 Sister Clare’s first vows gave her
and her mother, Susie Bass, an oppor-
tunity to reflect on the unusual—and
special—journey of a woman seeking
the life of a woman religious today.
	 “The entire process for me has
been intense and challenging,” S. Clare
says, “as well as exciting and profound.
As I have learned about being a CSJ,
I have learned about myself, and have
learned to love and accept myself.”
	 It’s a love a mother knows from
the very beginning. “Thirty years ago
as I was holding our first red-headed
baby girl, if someone would have told
me that she was going to be a religious,
I would have laughed and changed
churches,” Susie says. “Even though I
was a cradle Catholic and was one of
the faithful praying for more young
people to have vocations, I didn’t mean
my own child.”
	 It could be any mother’s child.
And not. Susie says Clare learned
during her earliest years under the
care of a family friend, lovingly called
Nanny “the joy of good eating (a
Croatian tradition) and how to love
and serve God joyfully.” She attended
First Baptist Church pre-school and
kindergarten in Biloxi, then attended
Catholic schools from first to 12th
grade, being educated by the Mercy
Sisters from Ireland. She served on the
campus ministry team at Mercy Cross
A Sister’s Journey,
As Sister Clare Bass makes her
first vows, her mother, Susie,
shares her challenges and joys
of her daughter’s journey.
“Thirty years ago as
I was holding our first
red-headed baby girl.
If someone would have
told me that she was
going to be a religious,
I would have laughed and
changed churches.”
Susie Bass
Sister Clare Bass recites her first vows.
high school. Despite a time where she
was a paid Methodist youth leader
because no Catholic group was active,
she found her way home at St. Joseph’s
Church while pursuing her degree at
Mississippi State University.
	 Five years ago, Clare announced
to her parents that she was discern-
ing religious life. “I cried for a month,
and my husband Mike smiled for a
month—no, for five years,” Susie says.
	 “I guess in today’s world, the call
to religious life only gets to one in a
million, and Clare answered it,” Susie
continues. “When I tell people about
Clare, many of them say, and I quote,
‘I’m not surprised. Clare was always
different!’ Different, maybe. But after
these five years of becoming familiar
and closer to the Sisters of St. Joseph,
I am changing ‘different’ to ‘special.’
For Clare has picked her community
wisely.”
	 Once she arrived in St. Louis,
Clare spent two years as a candi-
date, living with and getting to know
the community.The next two years,
she lived as a novice, growing in her
knowledge and understanding of CSJ
spirituality and history in the St. Louis
province and throughout the United
States. She remembers her feelings
as she formally requested first vows.
“As I wrote my letter to the leadership
council and my novice director, I was
filled with an inexplicable inner peace
and felt surrounded by the fruits of the
Holy Spirit.”
	 “Five months later when I
pronounced, ‘I am ready to make this
commitment’ on my annual retreat…it
was an ‘aha moment,’ unlike any other
moment in my life,” S. Clare says.
“I was ready to commit to sharing my
love, gifts and talents as a Sister of
St. Joseph of Carondelet.” S. Clare will
use her gifts and talents as an advocate
to help form policies and laws in
organizations and in governments
which promote the Common Good
and justice for all people and all of
creation.
	 Her mother couldn’t be more proud.
“The Sisters of St. Joseph are a super
dynamic community of spiritual ladies
with a rich history and love of God.”
	 Her mom is confident her daughter
is in good company. “If the work needs
to be done, one of these sisters can and
will do it,” Susie says. “And they do it
well.” She related the story of one of
her family’s visits to St. Louis. She and
her husband, Mike were shopping and
someone asked them why they were
in St. Louis. “When I told them about
Clare joining the CSJs, he replied,
‘Those sisters have hearts of gold!’”
	 There is much for the Bass family
to be proud of. S. Clare says, “I am
grateful to my family, my CSJ sisters,
and all of my friends who have helped
me become who I am today.The chal-
lenges, along with the joys and the love,
have all been worth it. I am excited
about the future as I and our community
continue to transform and evolve. I
believe God will continue to sustain us
as we move forward together.”
	 Her mother has her own way of
sharing her joy and pride and hope for
the future. “No matter what happens,
I know that Clare is dedicated and
committed to following her call to be
a Sister of St. Joseph. Her happiness
spills over into everyone she encounters.
In 2017 (the first year Clare can request
final vows), I will be proud to put a
bumper sticker on my car that reads,
‘A proud mother of a Sister of St.Joseph
of Carondelet!’”
	 It’s an uncommon pride in the
21st century, perhaps. But so is the
uncommon love of a Sister of
St. Joseph. And the uncommon love
of a mother for her daughter, vowed
as a CSJ.
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 11
A Mother’s Love
Susie, Clare and Mike after the vow ceremony..
“As I wrote my letter to
the leadership council and
my novice director, I was
filled with an inexplicable
inner peace and felt
surrounded by the fruits
of the Holy Spirit.”
Clare Bass
By Sister Mary Flick, CSJ
12 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
S
earch interior designer on a career
planning website, and you’ll
likely read something like this:
An interior designer enhances the
function, safety and aesthetics of
interior spaces by maximizing the
integration of a variety of colors,
textures, furniture, lighting and
space so that they work together
to meet occupants’ needs and desires.
	 With her newly-earned bachelor’s
degree in the discipline, Minnesota
native Barbara Prosser arrived in
St. Louis in 1979. She wouldn’t have
guessed at the time that 35 years later,
the primary “interior spaces” she has
worked to enhance have not been
found in office buildings or houses, but
rather in her own, and others’, hearts
and souls.
	 This year marks Barb’s 25th anni-
versary of serving as a lay associate of
the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
(CSJA). CSJAs commit themselves to
extending the mission and sharing the
spirit of the congregation in an active
way within their families, parishes,
occupations, and with other sisters and
associates.
	 During her seven years living and
working at the Catholic Worker House
in St. Louis City beginning in 1979,
Barb was introduced to several CSJ
sisters serving there as volunteers. But
it was when an acquaintance working
at Nazareth Living Center called her
one day and told her about a new
nursing facility opening up that Barb’s
eventual path began to take shape.
	 “That was Al Sprehe, Nazareth’s
maintenance man. He said Sister
Jeanne McGovern, CSJ, would be the
director,” Barb recounts. “He told me I
should apply there, and I said I’d think
about it.The phone rang a few minutes
later and it was Al again. He said, ‘You
Room for Transformation
Associate Barb Prosser Marks 25 Years of Association
By Mary Lou Frank
associatespotlight
“It has been a remarkable
journey of the heart and
of the home.”
Barb Prosser, CSJA
Barb Prosser surrounded by her family, sons Sam and Nathaniel and husband, The Hon. Philip Heagney.
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 13
have an interview at 10:15 tomorrow
morning’!”
	 Barb accepted the position of
administrative assistant for Sister
Jeanne and began to work alongside
numerous CSJ sisters at
Mary, Queen and Mother
Center in Shrewsbury. “I was
so impressed at how bright
and inclusive and progressive
thinking so many of the sisters
are. I was single, and so was
invited to weekends of
discernment. Sister Jeanne
and Associate Pat McGovern
encouraged me to consider
becoming an associate.”
	 After discovering how
the CSJ charism and mission
mirrored her own values and
direction that she had hoped
for the “interior design” of her
life, Barb Prosser began the
journey of candidacy, finaliz-
ing her commitment in 1989.
	 “There are six in our group, and
over the 25 years,our monthly gathering
has taken on different shapes. We’ve
helped move each other through raising
families, job transitions, vocations,
health challenges, and other difficult
life experiences,” Barb notes. “Each
time we meet, we try to address the
state of the heart and the state of the
house.”
	 Reflecting back, she finds herself
most enriched by learning and living
the value of hospitality. “I love that
about the CSJs, that when we open
our doors, our arms, ourselves to other
people, it is a way of affirming that we
see them. We feel them. We hear them.
Some might be inclined to minimize
that ... oh, it’s just cookies and coffee
... but just that gesture of welcoming
someone to your space—a dorm room,
your living room, your chapel—is a way
of demonstrating their worthiness and
value to you.”
	 Barb is especially grateful for one
friendship with fellow CSJA Pat
Sheridan, who is also celebrating her
silver jubilee of association. “Pat is a
woman who, for all of her life, has been
searching. She’s a learner, always
reading, always doing something new,
finding new ways to pray, to minister.
At nearly 90 years old, Pat is one of the
strongest witnesses to the charism of
the CSJs and social justice of anyone
I’ve known. Her amazing example has
meant as much to me as association
itself!” Barb joyfully asserts.
	 Much like the right mix of colors
and texture and furniture can enhance
an empty room, so the right mix of
people and circumstances in our lives
serves to enrich our inner selves.
	 The spirit of association dates
back to the congregation’s founding in
1650, but it wasn’t until 1974 that the
sisters of the St. Louis Province began
to formalize the process of spiritual
companionship and partnering in
service.
	 By the time Barb Prosser began her
journey fifteen years later, the number
of CSJAs had grown, and today, more
than 300 associates are spreading the
CSJ mission as they share their gifts in
words and works of justice and peace,
caring for the poor and for the earth.
	 “I don’t assume that
association was a concept
that was necessarily easy
to transition into,” Barb
observes. “But that’s what
I’ve always loved about the
CSJs ... their welcoming,
openness, honesty about
their fears and delights with
the whole process. I think
association is a courageous
and necessary arm of
religious communities.”
	 Barb sees how her
association has enriched the
“interior design” of her own
family. Her husband, St. Louis
City Circuit Court Judge
Philip Heagney, has long
supported CSJ ministries
related to restorative justice. Judge
Heagney was the first recipient of the
“Generosity of Joseph” award in 2007.
Barb says the couple’s sons, ages 20 and
17, “are softer, gentler men because of
the group of women I’ve introduced
them to.”
	 Barb says she is “blessed and
gifted” to be a CSJA. “Over and over
again I have been affirmed in my
decision. It has been a remarkable
journey of the heart and of the home.”
25-year Associates Pat Sheridan and Barb Prosser before the Association
Ceremony.
St. Louis. Kansas City. Denver. These are a few of the cities
where many of our sisters live in community. But some of
our sisters are serving across the country alone or in smaller
groups.
	 This new series of articles highlights these sisters, sharing
with us their ministries, how they minister to the people in
their areas.
	 In this issue…Sisters
Patricia Hix and Gretchen
Wagner of Cut Bank,
Montana.
Sisters Patricia Hix and Gretchen Wagner, CSJ
Where One of Us Is, All of Us Are
By Jenny Beatrice
14 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
&
How long have you both lived in Montana and what led
you there?
S. Gretchen: I moved from St. Louis a little over three
years ago. I sent resumes to all the northern states because
I missed the north—I’m originally from Wisconsin.
The Diocese of Helena responded and they asked me to
come up for an interview. And they hired me. I asked
Patricia if she would like to come along. It took her a whole
second to say yes!
S.Patricia: I am from Kansas City. I was living at Nazareth
Living Center in St. Louis for six years when Gretchen
invited me to come with her. I’d been retired, so this was
great.
What are your ministries?
S. Gretchen: I am a pastoral life coordinator for four
parishes. I coordinate religious education for kindergarteners
through adults. I also do RCIA and introduce new theology
for the adults.The reason I was hired is because there was
only one priest here for four parishes. Right now, we have
two. I also visit the homebound.
S. Patricia: I’m a volunteer. I help Gretchen in some ways,
visiting the homebound in the hospitals and the nursing
homes. We go together. It keeps me busy!
S. Gretchen: She brings joy and is a great listener. People
really do appreciate her. And she’s a great support to me.
How do your ministries meet the unique needs of the
people in your area?
S. Gretchen: We work with different people because there
are four different parishes as well as members of the Black-
feet Tribe.We are really accepting and loving people for who
they are.
What does the tenet of the Sisters of St. Joseph,
“Where one of us is, all of us are,” mean to you?
S. Gretchen: I feel like even though community is not
physically here, the spirit is here. And living with Patricia—
I’m just so happy she came because it gives me that touch
with community.
How do you stay connected to the greater CSJ
community?
S. Gretchen: Our community emails, website and publica-
tions keep me connected to what is happening. I also have
friends that keep in contact, so we do stay somewhat
connected.
S. Patricia: I do correspond with several of our sisters, many
at Nazareth Living Center. I love to keep in touch.
Canada
Cut Bank
Helena
Billings
Kalispell
Montana
Idaho Wyoming
North
Dakota
South
Dakota
Sisters Gretchen Wagner and Patricia Hix
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 15
How do you express your presence as a Sister of
St. Joseph to the people in your community?
S. Gretchen: They do know we’re Sisters of St. Joseph of
Carondelet St Louis province because we say we are. And
we talk about community with the people. It’s just like
talking about family. And I think we give our loving presence
to people and the loving presence of God. At least we try
our hardest!
S. Patricia: The people are very happy to have us here.
They haven’t had sisters here for many years—they did have
sisters in each of the parishes and
schools at one time. So they are very
happy to have sisters back up here
in the community.
What are some of the unique
features of your area and what
do you enjoy doing?
S. Gretchen: It’s a long ride to
places. And we are on the border of
Canada and the United States. We
travel on a road called Border Road.
When we go visit one couple, we
are in the United States. When we
come back, we are in Canada!
S. Patricia: Yes, we’re on what’s
called the highline. We are 40
minutes from Glacier National
Park, which we love to go up to see.
We always bring visitors there. We
do a lot of traveling and going from
place to place. It’s just beautiful.
S. Gretchen: We were involved in a
couple of cattle round ups. I pushed
the little calves along to make sure
they got in through the shoot.
Then we saw the old-fashioned way
where they rope the calf and bring
it in.
So you have some experience
with the local animal population.
S. Patricia: Just the other night on
the highway there were three horses
in front of us!
S. Gretchen: The funny thing is when we were first here
we’d tromp around all these places and every time we came
back people kept saying, “You know there’s rattlesnakes
there.”We said we didn’t see any. We kept saying St. Joseph
always takes care of us. But we do look for them now!
We are 40 minutes from
Glacier National Park,
which we love to go up to see.
We always bring visitors there.
We do a lot of traveling and
going from place to place.
It’s just beautiful.
Sister Patricia Hix, CSJ
16 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
St. Paul wrote that faith “is the realization of what is hoped
for and evidence of things not seen.”But how do we find
hope in a world brimming over with violence, death and pain?
How can we keep believing in goodness
and truth when the nightly news keeps
reporting all evidence to the contrary?
	 Job losses, illness and the death of
people we love, crime, abandonment,
betrayal by people and systems in which
we placed all our trust, war, terrorism,
hurricanes, fires, earthquakes and floods.
In what can we dare to trust? All the
insurance policies in the universe cannot
keep bad things from happening to good
people. Not unlike the people and prophets of the Hebrew
scriptures, the world and our prospects for happiness in it
can seem very scary. Some things never change.
	 When the presence of what is hoped for hasn’t material-
ized, when we cannot seem to find a shred of evidence of
God’s presence in our lives, why don’t we just give up? We
continue forward because of the gift of faith. Faith, even
when it is waning, even if we have almost none left, is the
powerful force that keeps us putting one foot in front of the
other. Faith is the urge to give our work and struggle one
more try. Faith is the confidence to continue on, even when
we cannot see what lies around the
corner for us.
	 Those of us who follow the example
of the life of St. Joseph know the plans
we imagined for our lives seldom unfold
the way we thought they would. Like
Joseph, we take each day we are given,
living the best life we can and placing
our faith and trust in God’s loving care.
Our patron, St. Joseph, did not know
what his future would hold. He simply lived his life with
integrity and compassion, caring for his family, surrounded
by a world filled with violence, oppression, pain and injustice.
	 Yes, Lord, we pray as St. Paul did to increase our faith.
We continue to pray for faith, in faith. Because our world
needs more than ever to believe that God’s healing presence
and creative Spirit are real and possible in our everyday lives
and in the world.
faithmatters
By Mary Kay Christian, CSJA,
Province Liturgist
O Lord, increase our faith.
“Not unlike the people
and prophets of the
Hebrew scriptures,
the world and our
prospects for happiness
in it can seem very scary.
Some things never change.”
Mary Kay Christian, CSJA
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 17
Faithful Friends and Much More
Tom and Cathy Cooney
By Barbara Roberts
advancingthemission
C
athy and Tom Cooney met while attending
St. Elizabeth’s elementary school in Kansas City.
While they now live in Colorado, their family
members still reside in Kansas City, many of whom are
members at St. Elizabeth and Visitation parishes. It was at
St. Elizabeth’s where Tom and Cathy first experienced the
charism of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.Taught
by a number of sisters, Sisters Mary Florita Vallero and
Kathleen Ann Eggleston are the ones they remember best.
	 S. Kathleen taught Tom, Cathy and Cathy’s siblings.
Tom remembers the sisters at St. Elizabeth as having “a
discipline, but the discipline was pretty fair and reinforced
in study habits.” He credits S. Kathleen as “inspirational to a
lot of my classmates for her interest in math.” Cathy’s father
passed away while she was at St. Elizabeth’s. She says, “The
sisters were extremely thoughtful and caring and supportive
of my mom during that time.”
	 While attending St.Teresa’s Academy for high school,
Cathy became close to her teachers Sisters Suzanne Giblin
and Mary Catherine O’Gorman. S. Suzanne had a great
influence on her and a friendship blossomed that continues
today. “We stayed friends after that and it has grown over
the years,” she says. “We click. I have been very lucky.” In
fact, the Cooney’s oldest daughter is named after S. Suzanne.
	 For Cathy, S. Suzanne and all the sisters are a big
influence on her values, as well as her perceptions of and her
respect for people. “I think the work they do is key. I support
them continuing to do what they do in healthcare, education
and social justice.They do what Jesus would do.”
	 The Cooney’s express this support by donating to the
sisters’ retirement needs and ministries, giving to the sisters
who continue to stay true to their advocacy for Catholic
women and for all women.
	 “I truly believe in their mission.They have done more
for their communities in health, in education and for the
sick than any other group,” Cathy says. “What they are
doing needs to continue and it needs to be funded. I believe
they need to be taken care of because of what they have done.
They need to be supported so their work can be continued.”
Tom Cooney, Sister Suzanne Giblin, CSJ and Cathy Cooney hiking at Maroon Bells, Colorado.
18 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
We know that you’re watching
your expenses in this challenging
economy. We are, too. But our com-
mitment to the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Carondelet’s mission just gets stronger
in tough times, and we look forward to
your continued support so that we can
keep meeting our goals.
	 Today especially, though, we want
every gift to benefit you as well as us. So
we recommend the following financially-
sensible giving techniques.These planned
gifts will allow you to give more, at less
cost, than you ever thought possible:
Bequests
You can make a generous commitment
to our financial future today, without
reducing your savings or your cash
flow. A charitable bequest will not
take effect until after your death. Plus
it’s revocable, so it can be amended
if your or your family’s needs change
over time.
Making a bequest is easy—you don’t
even have to alter your current will.
It can be as simple as adding a codicil
to your existing arrangements. You
can learn more about the process and
download codicil language at www.csjsl.org/gftpln.org
Gift of Life Insurance
Are you maintaining more life insurance than your family
still needs? If you no longer need the coverage, you can
give the Sisters of St. Joseph a paid-up life insurance
policy. You’ll receive a charitable deduction for the value
of the policy, simplify your portfolio, and make a substantial
gift to us without affecting your cash-flow in any way.
Remember that you must make us the irrevocable owner
as well as beneficiary of the policy in order for your gift to
be deductible. The insurance company can complete the
transfer of ownership.
Charitable Gift Annuity
Not only does a gift annuity return you a tax deduction
and a fixed income for life—it also freezes the current
value of the stock you contribute.That’s because your
annuity (the income) will be based on the value of the
stock at the time you donate it. Plus,
your returns on that gift annuity will
usually be higher than the dividends
that stock is paying you now.
As an example, say you own 200 shares
of ABC Corp., currently trading at $50
per share and paying you an annual
dividend of $1.50 per share. But you’re
concerned that ABC stock may soon
drop in value. So you donate the stock
to us in return for a charitable gift
annuity that will pay you a fixed income
for the rest of your life. Your annuity
will be set at 6 percent* of the value of
your contribution ($10,000, the current
value of your ABC shares).
*Rates for new gift annuities are periodi-
cally adjusted, and they vary according to
the age of the beneficiaries. Contact us for
details and latest rates.
Make the Gift That
Protects Your Estate for
Your Heirs
Did you know that your retirement plan
(IRA) can be the most heavily-taxed
asset in your estate? If you pass it on
to your heirs it can lose more than 60
percent of its value to income and estate
taxes. But if you give it to charity, there is no taxation at
all. By making such a gift to the CSJs, you avoid high tax
penalties, and can ensure your heirs receive more by leaving
them more favorably-taxed property.
• 	You can take a withdrawal from your retirement plan 	
	 to make an outright gift to us. For such outright gifts, 	
	 the net tax effect is often a “wash.”
• 	Designating the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
	 as the beneficiary of your retirement plan is easily 		
	 accomplished by using the plan’s beneficiary
	 designation form.
• 	It’s always a good idea to consult with your plan’s
	 administrator and a financial advisor before making 		
	 any changes in plan distribution.
Our organization is not qualified to provide specific legal, tax or
investment advice. Consult with your own legal and financial
advisors before making any gift.
These Four Gifts Make Giving Easier
Planned Giving is
Smarter Giving
We want to help you find the gift
plan that’s right for you, so you
benefit from it as much as we do.
Contact me to learn how
you can make a bigger, more
transformational difference for
the Sisters of St. Joseph
of Carondelet.
Patricia R. Cassens, CFRE, CSJA
Executive Director of
Mission Advancement
314.678.0329
pcassens@csjsl.org
By Patricia Cassens, CFRE, CSJA
advancingthemission
The 1964 reception
Janet M. Sullivan, CSJA
The 2014 Jubilarians
Ann Albrecht, CSJ
Rita Flaherty, CSJ
Joy Elaine Gilder, CSJ
Ms. Peggy M. Maguire, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Mareschal
Patricia Murphy, CSJ
Jean Paul Selissen, CSJ
Ms. Catherine A. Shinn, CSJA
Mary Carol Anth, CSJ and
	 Rita Marie Schmitz, CSJ
Ms. Eileen Stanley, CSJA
Michael White, CSJ
Teresa John Zilch, CSJ
The 50th Jubilarians
Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA
The 60th Jubilarians
Ms. Diane Calcaterra, CSJA
Ms. Frances K. Farraher 
Helen Alder, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Berra
Agnes Marie Baer, CSJ
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Mrs. Deborah D. Faust
Mrs. Myrtle L. Herwig
Roland and Marie Martir, CSJA
Mrs. Barbara Pat McDonnell
Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA
Janet M. Sullivan, CSJA
Mary Louise Basler, CSJ
Ms. Kathy Austin
Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Basler
Mr. and Mrs. Richard
W. Basler
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Basler
Ms. Jennifer W. Best
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Brown
Mrs. Linda Caul
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Greminger
Mr. Joseph C. Hafner and
Ms. Linda C. Hanna
Mr. Daniel Hafner
Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Hingle III
Ms. Diane M. Limmer
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Melia
Ms. Dianne M. Basler
Ms. Linda Roth
Ms. Monica J. Rozier
Mr. Robert E. Ruebsam
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry J. Scherer
Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Seibel
Ms. Catherine A. Shinn, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Winston
Clare Bass, CSJ
Ms. Sue Gasparrini 
Jane Behlmann, CSJ
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Rose Marie Boyanchek, CSJ
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA
Mary Josephine Breiner, CSJ
Ms. Mary Ellen Smith
Mary Teresita Browne
Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan
Rose Mary Brueggen, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. O’Blennis
Leo Ann Bub, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Terry G. Wall
Thomas Cameron
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ
Rose Stephen Cento, CSJ
Diane Blackwell, CSJA
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA
Deborah Marino, CSJA and
	 Robin Smitherman, CSJA
Ann Chamblin, CSJ
Ms. Josephine K. Lewis-Sattel
Patricia Ann Clement, CSJ
Ms. Kimberly A. Dodson 
Olive Louise Dallavis, CSJ
Ms. Rose Aylward Ferguson
Ms. Sheila K. Johnson
Mr. Jeremy Lillig, CSJA
Dorothy Dempsey
Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ
Teresa Maria Eagan, CSJ
Ms. Kathleen T. Eagan 
Mary Rebecca Eichhorn, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Fowler, Jr.
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA
Mrs. Cecelia K. Piekarski
Mr. Joseph Simon and
	 Mrs. Pat Hinton-Simon
Ann Everett, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Nordling 
Juliana Marie Feld, CSJ
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA
Laura Ann Gruber, CSJ
Ms. Rebecca McDermott
	 and Mr. Dennis Donnelly
Julie Guillot, CSJ
Deborah Marino, CSJA and
	 Robin Smitherman, CSJA
Mr. Jimmie T. Smitherman
Mary Kay Hadican, CSJ
Mrs. Rosemary M. Quigley
Sally Clare Harper, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bullock
Mrs. Rosemary M. Quigley
Patricia Marie Hix, CSJ
Ms. Rebecca McDermott and
	 Mr. Dennis Donnelly
Becky Holley, CSJ
Ms. Donna Jarvis
Shirley Howe
The Rheinnecker Family Fund
Jean Iadevito, CSJ
Mrs. Barbara Schweiger
The Jubilarians living or serving at
	 Nazareth Living Center
Ms. Lola J. Westhoff 
Patti Kelly
Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ 
Joan Lampton, CSJ
Mrs. Geraldine F. Stassi 
Mary Ann Lavin, CSJ
Mrs. Barbara Schweiger 
Mary Margaret Lazio, CSJ
Ms. Deborah Hays 
Fran Maher, CSJ
Ms. Susan Conrad
Mr. Richard H. Haber 
Rita McGovern, CSJ
Mr. James A. Smalley
Rose Marie McKenna, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Iezzi
Paula Patrice Michaud, CSJ
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Hogan
Dr. and Mrs. James J. Polkabla
Jean Marie Miller, CSJ
Peter T. Kachris, PhD
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA 
Marian Therese Muehlbauer, CSJ
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA
Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA
Mary Ann Mulligan, CSJ
Ms. Rebecca McDermott and
Mr. Dennis Donnelly
Ms. Barbara A. Peach
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 19
In Honor of…
Thank you for the following gifts received between February 1, 2014, through August 31, 2014.
Tribute donations of $25 or greater will be published. Thank you for your continued generosity in
paying tribute to your loved ones with a gift to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.
tributesandmemorials
20 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
In Honor of continued...
Barbara Prosser
Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ
Helene Purfield, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Felix L. Maes
Andrea Marie Rentmeester, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Craanen
Margaret Gregg, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. William C Peters
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald K. Rentmeester
Ida Robertine Berresheim, CSJ
Ms. Rose Mary Green
Kathleen Kevin Ryan, CSJ
Mr. James A. Smalley 
Ann Schorfheide, CSJ
Mrs. Helen R. McKee
Patricia Sheridan, CSJA
Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ 
Sisters of St. Joseph
Mrs. Carol T. Miller
Clara Vincent Slatinsky, CSJ
Mrs. Jane M. Eubanks
Dr. Ron Slepitza
Ms. Christine Ojile
Gabrielle Smits, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Jenkins, Jr.
Linda Straub, CSJ
Drs. Scott and Kendal Endicott
Mr. Arthur N. Straub 
Sandy Straub, CSJ
Mr. Arthur N. Straub 
Ruth Stuckel, CSJ
Ms. Teresa J. House
Daniel Vaughn
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Welko
Sister Fran Voivedich’s project in Gulu
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Lichstein
Gretchen Wagner, CSJ
Ms. Rebecca McDermott and
	 Mr. Dennis Donnelly
tributesandmemorials
In Memory of…
Jerry B. Abernathy
Mr. Richard C. Raupp 
Linda Marie Akers
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ricklefs
Paul W. Allaert
Mrs. Mary Joy Allaert Feeney
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Thompson 
Ruth Allaert
Mrs. Mary Joy Allaert Feeney 
Esther Aydlett
Carol F. Williams, M.D. 
Mildred Baldelli
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Zinselmeyer, Jr. 
Ethel V. Beck
Mrs. Marilyn A. Miles
Paul Beermen
Mrs. Marie M. Buttice 
John Berra
Mrs. Marie M. Buttice 
Jim Bono
Mrs. Virginia M. Bono 
Louis Bono
Mrs. Virginia M. Bono 
Kathryn Mary Brady, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dunlap, Jr. 
Dorothy Browne, CSJ
Ms. Barbara E. Laurie
Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan 
James Patrice Browne, CSJ
Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan  
Jennifer Noel Burton
Ms. Elizabeth A Donnelly 
Anne Ambrose Butkovich, CSJ
Ms. Barbara E. Laurie 
Josephine Carneghi
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Katelyn Clounch
Mr. Kenneth L. Clounch 
Jacqueline Conley
Ms. Mary F. Pfeiffer 
Lynne Cooper
Mr. Rudi J. Bertrand
The Jonas Co. 
Blanche Marie Corcoran, CSJ
Ms. Susan K. Haddock 
Raymond Joseph Cordes, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Saale 
Beloved Cousin
Mr. Richard T. Boughner 
Bernice Dallas
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hardebeck 
Milton P. Deithelm, Jr
Mrs. Audrey A. Behr
Elaine Ebeling
Mr. John J. Ebeling 
Steven A. Eckhardt
Mrs. Virginia R. Eckhardt 
Bob Edwards
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Thomas T. Evanoff
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Alfonsi 
Patricia Fagan
Joan Lacey, CSJ 
Mary Ann Fahey, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Fahey
Western Iowa Land Development, Llc 
Mary Aniceta Farrell, CSJ
Mrs. Ann W. Stuart
Miss Mary Jane Waldron 
Dr. Michael J. Feder
Mrs. Joyce M. Feder 
Nell Feise
Joan Lacey, CSJ 
John Flavin
Ms. Nancy A. Rayhawk 
Alex H. Flemington, Jr.
Helen Flemington, CSJ
Kathleen L. Grewe, CSJA, and
	 Diana Burnson
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Marino
Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA 
Lee Toland Flood
Mr. and Mrs. David J. Murnan 
Judith Fox
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn
Consuelo M. Garcia
Michael Therese Bauer, CSJ
Mary Jo Gelhaus
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn
Roxann George
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn
Catherine Gerrits
Mrs. Norbert Gerrits 
Ralph Gianino III
Mrs. Marie M. Buttice 
Louis Giblin
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Cooney
Margaret R Giblin, CSJA
Mrs. Carol T. Miller
Viola Glen
Dr. and Mrs. James Gilsinan
Aliceann E. Gruber
Ms. Margaret E. Allen
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Beck
Ms. Diane Calcaterra, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Tony H. Fults
Mr. and Mrs. T. Gregory Gross
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Herron
Ms. Mary Ann Kurowski
Mrs. Barbara W. La Vella
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Lange
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence J. LeGrand
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Mollerus
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. O’Blennis
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Pfeifer
Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Sauer
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Sinclair
Ms. Kathleen A. Stewart
Mrs. Geraldine N. Walsh
Ms. Betty J. Young 
Herb Gruber
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Lange
Rae Guzzardo
Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ 
Vera Guzzardo
Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ 
Alfred Haffner
Ms. Pamela Pedersen 
John Hamma
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ricklefs 
Alma Hammerschmidt, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dunlap, Jr. 
Kathy Hays
Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman 
Genevieve Hein
Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ
Agatha Joseph Hesse, CSJ
Mrs. Ann M. Reilly 
Michael Hoeing
Mrs. Mary D. Mann 
James Lorene Hogan, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Andrew
Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Barry
Mrs. Kathleen Bartnett
Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Bastean
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Broom
Mrs. Judy Childress
Mr. and Mrs. William Dewert
Mr. John J. Fisher
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Geary
Mr. and Mrs. Danny B. Glenzy
Ms. Diane Hogan
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Howe
Mr. Edward Ray Kiely
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Klinglesmith
Mr. and Mrs. Claude B. Martin
Mrs. Anna Marie McIntyre
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Nikolai
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Obertino
Mr. and Mrs. James Presswood
Mr. and Mrs. David Sliney
St Augustine Catholic Church
Wellston Center
Ms. Patricia A. Sullivan
Dr. Jenna Voss
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wagner
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Young 
Judith Hube
Ms. Carol A. Gruen 
Jack and Mary Jarose
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Charles Jokisch
Mrs. Janet R. Jokisch 
John Lewis Jones
Boys & Girls Club of South Alabama
Mr. Webster Burrage and
	 Mrs. Donna Voivedich Burrage
Chip Forstall Law Offices
Nathalie Forstall
Ms. Betsy D. Hearndon
Mrs. Judy Hicks
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 21
Ms. Evelyn J. Hyde
Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Jones
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Revere
Mrs. Nancy Saucer
UMS-Wright Preparatory School
“Kane” Daughters
Mrs. Marcia E. Bequette 
Clara and Vince Kerwin
Ms. C. Michele Kerwin 
Dot Koncki
Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman
Christine Kube
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani
Mary Alexandra Kuhn, CSJ
Ms. Joan Kuhn
Daniel Kusak
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn
Joan Kay Lickider
Michael Therese Bauer, CSJ
Dorothy E. Ludolph
Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ 
Linda Marie Lully, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Barrett, Jr.
Mrs. Jo Ellen Catto
Dr. Patricia Covey
Mrs. Jane M. Eubanks
Mr. and Mrs. Casimir Eubig
Ms. Janemarie Hennebelle
Ms. Priscilla P. Hollingsworth
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Johnson
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Kaller
Dr. Sylvia Littlejohn
Mr. and Mrs. Edouard J. Servy
St. John Vianney Vocations Ministry 	
	 of Augusta
USA Ret. Colonel and
	 Mrs. John O. Turnage
Mrs. Louise M. Wright
Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Zielinski 
Peggy Marshall
Mr. Raymond H. Beerman
Brian R. Mason
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Mary Brigid Massey, CSJ
Mr. James A. Smalley 
Virgina Palmer
Mr. Robert J. Palmer 
Biancha Mayer
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Joan McDevitt
Mrs. Jean F. Renshaw 
Jeanne McGovern, CSJ
Miss Mary Jane Waldron 
Anne Frances McMullan
Mr. E. Russell Epperson III 
Jean Meier, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Boyce
Mr. and Mrs. Ken B. Boyer
Mrs. Carol Z. Brescia
Ms. Joanne P. Buttice
Patricia Cassens, CSJA
Ms. Susan Conrad
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Di Salvo
Mrs. Suzanne E. Faletti, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Foerster
Mrs. Helen Friedman
Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Gaglio
Mrs. Ann M. Geraty
Mr. and Mrs. Danny B. Glenzy
Ms. A. Carolyn Henry, CSJA
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hillmeyer
Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Howard
Ms. Janice A. Hughes
Peter T. Kachris, PhD
Mr. Frank Kekeisen
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Knop
Mrs. George A. Koehler
L.C.W.R Boston Unit
Ms. Joan Maher
Staff at Mercy Conference and 		
	 Retreat Center
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Rebore
Mr. and Mrs. John Rychlewski
Saint Louis Behavioral Medicine 		
	Institute
Ms. Lisa Simon
Mr. Michael J. Toney
Wedge Capital Management
Zielinski Companies, Inc. 
Dorothy Meirink, CSJ
Mrs. Alice C. Twenhoefel 
Mary Merdian
Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ 
Joseph Merlo
Mrs. Marie M. Buttice 
Mary Alma Monaghan, CSJ
Ms. Shirley Sweney
Mrs. Angela F. Ottenlips 
Annette Moran, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Rush 
Mary Ursula Mott, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney P. Mott
Kay Naughton, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Dorsey 
Bob Nestel
AAS Restoration
Mr. and Mrs. Sean Farrington 
Charles Newman
Dr. and Mrs. James Gilsinan 
Maria Cabrini Oldani, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani 
Regina Frances Oldani, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani 
Virgina Palmer
Mr. Robert J. Palmer 
Peter Bob Peer
Mrs. Mary D. Mann 
Mary T. Pell
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Alice K. Rathheim
Ms. Jean E. Quigley 
William Reichelderfer
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Margaret Reinhart, CSJ
Mrs. Barbara Schweiger 
Joseph E. Renshaw
Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Anderson
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Barbeau
Ms. Elizabeth J. Bruckman
Mr. and Mrs. Joel R. Buckley
Ms. Muriel Cary
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Chapman
Community Foundation of
	 Northwest Mississippi
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Justice
Mr. Ralph W. Ketner
Ms. Anne C. Lee
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice W.
	 Mantha, Jr.
MassMutual Southeast
	Michigan
Michigan Warriors Hockey
	Team
Mr. and Mrs. John Mills
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Modjeski
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Ormerod
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Pedersen
Mr. Kevin Renshaw
Ms. Laura Renshaw
Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Scanlon
Mr. and Mrs. Lee E. Snell
Mr. and Mrs. Lance R. Szyhowski
Tappan Sunshine Fund
Mary Jane Ruoff, CSJ
Mrs. Peggy Cannon
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Harrington
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Ruoff
Mrs. Mary M. Starr 
Anna Ruzicka
Mr. Lawrence J. Ruzicka
Irwin Ruzicka
Mr. Lawrence J. Ruzicka
Margaret Schmidt, CSJ
Ms. Patricia Browne
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Marcus
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Wlodarczyk
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn S. Wolf 
Robert T. Schweiger
Mrs. Barbara Schweiger 
Billy Nolan Shekell
Mrs. Marie M. Buttice 
All the Sisters at St. Mary Magadelen 	
	School
Mr. John E. Wrobel, Jr. 
Mary Ann Smalley
Mr. James A. Smalley
Michael Joseph Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Fick
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crowell
Mr. Adam M. Dube
Ms. Francesca Ferrentelli
Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Green
Ms. Kathleen Hardt
Mr. A. Vincent Magee, Jr.
Mr. Larry Mrazek
	 and Ms. Doris Dieckgraefe
Ms. Elisa M. Mullins
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Ortbal
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Reckamp
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Smith
Ms. Patricia R. Smith 
Eileen Smits, CSJ
Mrs. Barbara Schweiger 
Russell Stahl
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Jim Stelloh
Mrs. Mary M. Stelloh 
Janice Szyhowski
Mrs. Jean F. Renshaw
Mr. and Mrs. Lance R. Szyhowski 
Bob Tegethoff
Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman 
Chuck Todt
Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ
Stephen Michael Turkek
Mr. Robert E. Eagleston 
Frank T. Walsh
Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn 
Lenly Weathers
Mr. and Mrs. James R. Conway 
Walter Whelan
Mr. and Mrs. David J. Murnan 
Evelyn White
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Ed Wilson
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Ruth Shy Wilson, CSJA
Bernard Meyer and
	 Barbara Meyer, CSJA 
Pauline Wlasuk
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Alfonsi
Catherine Rutte Zolnowski
Mrs. Ann DeMaria, CSJA
Ms. Mary Kay Farrow Ayres, CSJA
Ruth Heyenbrock
Mrs. Mary Kitchin
Ann Schorfheide, CSJ
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stefanov
The Province Development Office
has made every effort to ensure
the tributes are properly recognized
and correctly spelled. To make a
donation, request memorial envelopes
or report a correction on our tributes
listing, please contact our office at
314.678.0326.
Gifts received February 1, 2014, through
August 31, 2014.
eventsandhappenings
4
26th Annual CSJ Golf Tournament
St. Louis: Our 26th Annual CSJ Golf
Tournament was held on September 15
at the Westborough Country Club.
Proceeds from the golf tournament
benefited the sisters’ ministries including
their mission in Gulu, Uganda, where
they are finishing building a much
needed Maternity Clinic. Guests golfed
on beautiful greens, and enjoyed great
food and drinks as well as a silent auction.
1. Getting ready to tee off on the beautiful course
at Westborough Country Club. 2. Volunteers ready
to greet our guests. 3. Teams moving through the
course. 4. Teams preparing for the shotgun start.
5. Warming up on the putting green.
2 3
1
22 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
5
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 23
St. Louis: More than
100 guests enjoyed
the second annual
Wine and Chocolate
Tasting at the Moth-
erhouse on Thursday,
October 9.
	 Various wines
were offered by Director of Food,
Wine & Culinary Arts Education David
Birkenmeier of Schnucks Markets, Inc.,
and Anne Birkenmeier and Mike Ward,
state wine educators of Major Brands.
Music by Jim Manley/Chris Swan Duo.
The proceeds benefit the ministries
and retirement needs of the Sisters of
St. Joseph.
1. Wine experts David Birkenmeier, Ann Birkenmeier
and Mike Ward. 2. Joanne Buttice, host Patricia
Cassens, Sister Barbara Dreher, Cindy Rice and
Sister Marion Renkens.3. Deeds Bonham, Lisa
Marucci, Donna Garrett. 4. Scott Hark, director of
food service at the motherhouse. 5. Madeleine
Reilly, Rita Re Hagan, Kathy Hagan-Schmidt, Kelly
Lodes Hyde.
1
2 3
4 5
Wine & Chocolate
Society of Benefactors
Mass & Reception
Kansas City, Sunday, March 8 from
1 -4 p.m.
Visitation Parish, 5141 Main Street,
Kansas City, Missouri
Join us to honor our Kansas City area
benefactors who have donated $100 or
more in the past year and to celebrate
the sisters’ service in Kansas City.
Mass will be celebrated at 1 p.m., with a
reception immediately following.
For more information please contact
csjkc@csjsl.org  or 816-501-2944.
Generosity of Joseph
Honors Gala
Friday, April 24, 2015
Carondelet Motherhouse
Make your plans to
Party on the River
with the sisters. More
information
coming soon!
Come Catch
the Fire Event Series
for Young Adults ages 18-35
A series of four events with presentations,
contemplative prayer, music, praise and
worship led by young adults for young
adults to share their faith journeys.
Held at the Sisters of St. Joseph
of Carondelet Motherhouse
From 8–10 p.m. on the following
dates:
	 • November 13, 2014
	 • February 12, 2015
	 • June 11, 2015
	 • October 8, 2015
Sponsored by the Association of St.
Louis Vocation Directors. For more
information, visit www.csjsl.org.
24 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet
eventsandhappenings
Save the Dates
Treat yourself to an enriching
Saturday morning to feed your mind,
body and spirit with good company,
a hearty breakfast and a
dynamic program.
“A rewarding experience.”
SAVE THE DATES for our
upcoming Linger Over Breakfast
presentations. For more information,
and registration visit www.csjsl.org.
In St. Louis…
at the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Carondelet Motherhouse
January 31—Heart Speaks to Heart
with Sister Mary Flick, CSJ
	 Meet the mystic, St. Ignatius Loyola, 	
	 and sample his way of prayer, which 	
	 invites us to use our memories, 		
	 imaginations, emotions and life
	experiences.
May 9—Come and See Your
Brothers and Sisters
with Sister Paul Bernadette Bounk, CSJ
	 Explore mystical thinkers of past and 	
	 present and make the acquaintance 	
	 of our cosmic family.
In Kansas City…
at St. Teresa’s Academy,
Windmoor Center
March 28—From Retribution to
Restoration
with Sister Rose McLarney, CSJ
	 S. Rose shares the principles of 		
	 restorative justice and demonstrates 	
	 ways we can implement its practices 	
	 in our schools, businesses and neig-	
	 borhoods to transform systems and 	
	 restore lives.
Together in Faith Series
Go to Joseph with artist
Brother Michael “Mickey”
McGrath
Monday, December 15 at 6:00 p.m.
At the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Carondelet Motherhouse
Brother Michael “Mickey” McGrath,
Oblate of St. Francis de Sales and award-
winning artist, will present his latest
work around our patron, St. Joseph
as featured in his book Go to Joseph, 
exploring different aspects of
St. Joseph’s life as husband, father,
craftsman, traveler, guide, and much
more.
Admission is free. For more information
visit www.togetherinfaithseries.com.
Dining to Donate
Wednesday, March 25
Favazza’s Italian Restaurant on the
Hill, St. Louis
Enjoy a great meal and help the Sisters
of St. Joseph at the same time. Dine at
Favazza’s on the Hill and 20% of dinner
sales will be donated to benefit the
good works of the sisters.
Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 25
Non-profit Org.
U.S. Postage
PAID
St. Louis, MO
Permit No. 2829
wearemore
together…
We’ve
Gone
MobileCheck out our new site
formatted for smartphones
and keep up-to-date
with everything CSJSL!
www.csjsl.org

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247017477-Connections-Fall-Winter-2014

  • 1. Published for the friends of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Fall/Winter 2014 The true meaning of the CSJ motto,“Together…we are more” comes alive in the immigration crisis. Chasing Hope, Finding Peace
  • 2. fromtheleadershipteam Dear Friends, This entire issue of Connections is clearly about relationships. As Sisters of St. Joseph and Associates, we are about right relationship in a variety of contexts: with individuals, in small groups, and in larger gatherings.There is a passage in Matthew’s Gospel, “For where two or three meet in my name, I shall be there with them.” (Matt. 18:20) This passage is often misunderstood or misinterpreted. Jesus is always with us! We don’t need two or three to create such a presence. What the passage is really about is right relationship. In the section just prior to this passage is the explanation of brotherly/sisterly connection. “…take one or two others along with you…” (Matt. 18:16) The people in this issue of Connections are in right relationship.They are dynamic, exciting, enthusiastic, and loving. How blessed we are to treasure relationships, to deepen them, to cherish them, to feed them! Let’s close with a bit of Cherokee Wisdom entitled “Two Wolves.” The story goes like this: One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that goes on inside people. He said, “My son, the battle is between two ‘wolves’ inside us all. One is Evil. It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego. The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith. The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf wins?” The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.” We invite each of you to feed the good wolf and starve the evil wolf inside. Many blessings, Province Leadership Connections is printed on recycled paper using earth-friendly, soy-based inks. Back: Sisters Maureen Freeman and Rita Marie Schmitz. Front: Sisters Marilyn Lott, Linda Straub and Mary Margaret Lazio Sister Maureen Freeman, CSJ Sister Mary Margaret Lazio, CSJ Sister Marilyn Lott, CSJ Sister Rita Marie Schmitz, CSJ Sister Linda Straub, CSJ Jenny Beatrice Development Office Sister Jane Behlmann, CSJ Sister Mary Flick, CSJ Sister Charline Sullivan, CSJ Jenny Beatrice Patty Cassens, CFRE, CSJA Kathy Futhey Sister Mary Flick, CSJ Mary Lou Frank Barbara Roberts Barnes & Liston Creative Sarah Baker Jenny Beatrice Province Leadership Editor Contributor Proofreaders Contributing Writers Design Photography Connections is published twice a year for the friends of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Louis Province. Please send address changes and requests for additional copies to Editor, Connections, at the address above or to communications@csjsl.org.
  • 3. Features Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 1 Connections | Fall/Winter 2014contents Departments Chasing Hope, Finding Peace page 4 Follow Us: Visit www.csjsl.org for links to our social media sites. Province Leadership Team Affirmation On June 28, the St. Louis province affirmed its new leadership team in a ceremony at the province motherhouse in St. Louis. Read about the leaders and their vision for the future. Cover story: Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub bring the CSJ spirit of hospitality to El Paso to be a pastoral presence during this summer’s migrant crisis at the border. 10 A Sister’s Journey, A Mother’s Love As Sister Clare Bass makes her first vows, her mother,Susie,shares her challenges and joys of her daughter’s journey. 12 Room for Transformation Barbara Prosser celebrates 25 years as a CSJ associate and tells of her “remarkable journey of the heart and of the home.” 14 Q & A: Where One Of Us Is, All Of Us Are. St. Louis. Kansas City. Denver.These are a few of the cities where many of our sisters live in community. But some of our sisters are serving across the county alone or in smaller groups. Read about Sisters Patricia Hix and Gretchen Wagner who live in Montana. 2 Around the Province 8 Province Leadership Affirmation 9 Peace and Justice 16 Faith Matters 17 Advancing the Mission 19 Tributes and Memorials 22 Events and Happenings
  • 4. 2 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet aroundtheprovince In Print Sister Amy Hereford’s book, Religious Life at the Crossroads: A School for Mystics and Prophets (Orbis Books, 2013) has been awarded the prestigious 2014 Catholic Press Award, garnering first place in the Gender Issues category. Sister Amy is an attorney and canon lawyer. Her personal and former professional experiences in education, adminis- tration and communication give her a unique perspective on examining women religious and religious life in the context of church, culture and society. Sister Joan Whittemore has published Maestra: The Legacy of Fiora Corradetti Contino, the story of a woman who came from an illustrious operatic family to achieve musical and theatrical wonders on stage.The book provides a window into Contino’s life and her renowned career as a professional operatic and symphonic conductor and university professor who has influenced legions of students, professional singers and conductors. CSJA Allen Grieve named to Fontbonne’s Board St. Louis: CSJ Associate Allen Grieve has been named to Fontbonne University’s Board of Trustees. Grieve has been in the banking industry for 45 years and currently serves as senior vice president and division manager of correspondent banking and commercial services division of the First National Bank of St. Louis, a position he has held since 2002. “I’m really excited about joining the Fontbonne University Board of Trustees,” Grieve says. “This is another opportunity for me to help the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet continue their mission at a very important institution.” Sister Mary Charity Dalton receives Fontbonne University’s Founders Award St. Louis: Sister Mary Charity Dalton received the Founders Award that annually recognizes alumni and others for their exemplary leadership and service to society. Sister Mary Charity served at Fontbonne for 29 years as a faculty member, teaching speech and drama, and later serving at Eckelkamp College of Global Business and Professional Studies. She received the award at the annual alumni reunion brunch on Oct. 12. Two CSJs join Avila’s Board Kansas City: Avila University welcomes two CSJs to the Board of Trustees: Sisters Mary McKay, Ph.D., and Irene O’Neill, Ed.D. Sister Mary, a member of the CSJ congregational leadership team, is former provincial superior in the Los Angeles province and professor of religious studies at CSJ-sponsored Mount St. Mary’s College in Los Angeles. Sister Irene of the St. Paul province is the principal foundation officer of the Ministries Foundation, which funds province programs that serve communities for the poor. She has also gained attention and recognition as “The Blogging Nun.” Also joining the board is Vercie Lark, chief information and technology officer for DST Systems in Kansas City, Missouri. CCBF Honors CSJs’ Commitment to Carondelet Neighborhood St. Louis: The Carondelet Community Betterment Federation (CCBF) extended a public thank you to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet for their long- time commitment to their neighborhood at a May 29 reception at The Bluffs on Broadway.The evening also honored Sisters Marie Charles Buford and Mary Ann Nestel. Sister Marie Charles was integral in the inception of CCBF in 1971 and served as its executive director until 2007. Sister Mary Ann served as executive director from 2007 until this spring and recently resigned as its fundraising director. CCBF Chairman Tom Purcell, Alderman Tom Villa and Mayor Francis Slay were on hand to applaud the visionary leadership of the Sisters of St. Joseph.“The Sisters of St. Joseph have illustrated tremendous dedication to the Carondelet neighborhood through their actions and service,” says Mayor Slay. “Their efforts not only better this particular community but they, in turn, better the City of St. Louis.” SJI Announces New Location, President St. Louis: CSJ-sponsored St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (SJI) has moved to its new location, at 1300 Strassner, in Brentwood, Missouri.The centralized location enables children and families to more easily access the listening and spoken language services for which SJI is nationally recognized. SJI previously was located in Chesterfield.That facility, which SJI had occupied since 1996, was sold to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet earlier this year.The sale enabled SJI to move to a new location that would better
  • 5. accommodate the school’s early intervention services for children from birth to age three, as well as SJI’s innovative Internet-based therapy program called ihear. Other services offered at the new site include an onsite toddler program and pediatric audiology services for children ages infant through age 18.The overwhelming majority of children served by SJI are infants and toddlers. The SJI Board of Directors named Teri Ouellette, long-time deaf educator and administrator at SJI, as its new president. She has directed SJI’s Indianapolis loca- tion for the past 13 years, and previously taught at the St. Louis location.The SJI Board of Directors also has merged with the SJI-Indianapolis Advisory Board, creating a single governing organization to oversee all strategic activity of St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf. Ouellette will oversee all of SJI’s programs and services from Indianapolis. Sister Margaret Guzzardo receives National Award Sister Margaret Guzzardo was nationally recognized by her peers with a 2014 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Award. She received its Certificate of Recogni- tion for Special Contributions in Multicultural Affairs. Sister Margaret ministers at the Walker Scottish Rite Clinic in St. Louis, offering services to children two to six years of age at no charge to the parents. Fluent in Spanish, she says, “I have been able to help our Hispanic children work in their native language, as well as communicate with their parents.” Sisters Honored at Avila University Kansas City: Sister Marie Joan Harris and the late Sister Martha Smith were honored at Avila University in August. Avila celebrated the dedication and grand opening of its new Learning Commons and the Marie Joan Harris, CSJ, Ph.D. Science & Health Complex, inside O’Rielly Hall. It also celebrated the establishment of the Martha Smith, CSJ, Ph.D. Archives & Research Center, located inside the Learning Commons. The center houses the archives of the U.S. Federation of the Sisters of St. Joseph, Avila’s Women Religious Collections and the official Avila University archives. Nearly 15,000 square feet of O’Rielly Hall were refurbished to establish the Science & Health Complex, named for Sis- ter Marie Joan, Avila’s provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, who began her career as a chemistry professor at Avila 45 years ago. “This is the continuation of what has been an unprecedented period of renovation and expansion at Avila,” says Avila President Ron Slepitza, Ph.D., CSJA. “With the completion of these projects, Avila further positions itself as an inspirational beacon of higher education in the Midwest.” St. Joseph’s competes with St. Teresa’s for state soccer championship Kansas City: Even though they were “friendly foes,” there was nothing easy about the June 7 MSHSAA Class 3 State Final Missouri State Soccer Championship game between the St. Joseph Academy Angels and St.Teresa Academy Stars. It took a double overtime before the Angels knocked off St.Teresa’s, 3-2, for the title. It was the seventh state championship for the Angels (23-1), but their first since 2002. And they did it only after rallying from a two-goal deficit in the second half against a team ranked No. 1 nationally. St.Teresa’s (22-1) finished as Missouri’s runner-up for the second consecutive season. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 3 Visit www.csjsl.org to read the life stories of our faithful sisters who have died. Let Us Remember... Sister Catherine Mary Boucher November 23, 1927 - May 18, 2014 “Love and discipline were the hallmarks of her care.” Sister Jean Meier March 5, 1944 - May 21, 2014 “Thoughtful, generous, prayerful, poetic.” Sister James Lorene Hogan March 23, 1924 - June 5, 2014 “A woman of intelligence, quick wit and kindness.” Sister Mary Loran Aubuchon September 17, 1931 - August 16, 2014 “A generous, welcoming woman who always had a twinkle in her eye.”
  • 6. 4 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub bring the CSJ spirit of hospitality to El Paso to be a pastoral presence during this summer’s migrant crisis at the border. H ow far would you chase hope? Would you endure a 1500+-mile trek in the hope that your children will be safe from the gangs that threaten to steal their lives? Would you walk with your children, one foot in front of the other, through desert, mountains, jungles and rivers? Would you hitch rides with drug traffickers and risk being kidnapped, raped or murdered? Would you ride on the top of a train so dangerous it is called “La Bestia”? Would you send your children on to endure this journey without you? And at the end of your ordeal, what would it mean to you to find a kind face, a helping hand and a welcoming heart? Sisters Ida Berresheim and Sandra Straub were that loving presence for these immigrants, responding with “eyes open, ears attentive, spirit alert and sleeves rolled up,” all in the spirit of the Sisters of St. Joseph. By Jenny Beatrice Chasing Hope,
  • 7. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 5 The Crisis Child migrants from Central America, primarily El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, have been steadily entering the United States and other Central American countries since 2011.This year, an estimated 77,200 are expected to be apprehended at the border, including 59,000 from Central America. But a surge of 66,127 in an eight-month period brought the situation to a crisis point and to the forefront. This mass exodus was driven by escalating violence against the youth in Central America by gangs and drug traffickers who force the teens to join them. If they refuse, they risk rape, kidnapping and murder, as well as threats of retaliation to their families. But the cost is more than just the danger. Drug cartels further exploited the situation by starting rumors that entrance to the United States was becoming easier, creating opportunities to collect outrageous “tolls” from the refugees at various points along the journey. Contrary to popular belief, a great number of these children are not coming to the border unaccompanied or with the intent of circumventing the system. Many travel with a parent—mostly young, single mothers—and they are hoping to connect with a relative or friend from their village who has made a home in America. Apprehension at the border is the threshold into the immigration process, which typically begins with a 72-hour intake and court dates set for the future. But the process reached its breaking point this summer. Children and families were being held in standing-room only detention centers built for juvenile offenders or military bases not meant for detention.They were used because the facilities were large enough to accommodate the influx.The military-trained border patrol officers may have been well intentioned, but they were ill-equipped to address the social work needs of tens of thousands of children. That is when many organizations, volunteers and religious communities stepped up to fill the gaps for the immigrants, providing care with dignity in the name of the Gospel. The Call For Sister Ida Berresheim, it started with an email, but her ministry of working at the border in El Paso began 20 years earlier. Many of her years there were served at Annunciation House, a 37-year old sanctuary program whose Gospel mission is to accompany the migrant, homeless, and economically vulnerable peoples of the border region through hospitality, advocacy, and education. S. Ida returned to St. Louis in 2011, worked as assistant mission coordinator for the CSJ Congregation until she recently retired. When the surge in El Paso and surrounding areas began, Annunciation House founder and director Ruben Garcia emailed the board members and friends of the house. Without a second thought, S. Ida began planning her journey. Unbeknownst to S. Ida, Sister Sandra Straub was feeling the pull to be a presence at the border. She wanted to work with the people and she wanted to do it as soon as possible. “Having worked in Peru and southern Missouri, I had first-hand experience of the poverty and hopelessness of these brothers and sisters, and I simply wanted to alleviate their suffering,” she says. When she brought up the possibility with her blood- sister and Province Leader Sister Linda Straub, S. Linda said, “Are you in cahoots with Ida?” S. Ida connected S. Sandra with Ruben Garcia and this duo was on its way. “We had the freedom from our province. We were blessed,”S. Sandra says.“We were gifted with the money and the freedom to go. We were blessed by our leadership and by many sisters and associates who were so happy we were going. And that gives you energy. It gave me a lot of energy.” Finding Peace “We had the freedom from our province. We were blessed. We were gifted with the money and the freedom to go. We were blessed by our leadership and by many sisters and associates who were so happy we were going.” Sister Sandy Straub, CSJ
  • 8. The Work Annunciation House was a temporary safe haven, helping people to get to the next steps on their journey.The organization helped secure five sites to accommodate the numbers of people who needed assistance. S. Sandra worked at one of those sites—Nazareth Center, a senior living facility founded by the Sisters of Loretto and currently sponsored by Ascension Health. Part of this 1960s building did not meet code and so could not be used for senior care. But it offered a very large space to accommodate the migrants—in S. Sandra’s estimate, the size of four football fields. “Some of the refugees had been on the trek for a month and a half, carrying babies, small children.” S. Sandra says. “Their shoes did not fit, and often had no laces.Their clothes were torn and dirty. Many appeared to be just plain hungry.” The center did not receive unaccompanied minors, but cared for those who were with a parent or guardian. The clients were brought to the center by vans run by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “To watch these teenage kids, mostly boys, get off that ICE van looking like they’re scared…and the sisters would say ‘Bienvenida. You are going to be safe here, you are going to be safe,’ trying to assure them because they’ve been through so much that nobody understands.” Nazareth Center’s operation involved eight checkpoints that guests passed through: intake, administration, clothing, toiletries, shower, food, bed and phone calls/transportation arrangements. S. Sandra worked at them all in one way or another during the two weeks she was there. Much of the work was in the “sleeves rolled up” department—cleaning showers, mopping the long hallways and stripping beds. But S. Sandra knows the true meaning of this hard work that lie beneath the clean surfaces. “They were met with such genuine kindness and with what the Sisters of St. Joseph call hospitality. We welcomed them to our space, to our hearts. And that’s very evident. They can tell if you are welcoming them into your heart. You do that by offering them clean clothes and shavers—just to smell good and have clean hair. And food in their bellies.” She says much of her work wasn’t really in the “job description,” yet it was one of the most important: listening. “There’d be 30 people lined up against the wall and I would go down and lis- ten, talk story, ask them questions and get them to laugh,” she says. Some of the stories she heard were heartbreaking. A 22-year-old mother with three young girls ages 11, 12, and 13, who were chased by a gang and a drug trafficker who tried to rape her. A motherless woman whose father sold her to a prostitution ring. A mother with her preteen daughter on their way to New York, who left her 17-year-old daughter back home with her very sick mother. A 20-year-old mother who carried her three-month-old baby through a filthy river with 30 other refugees in order to reach her sister in Houston. Yet there were stories of hope, glimmering in even the smallest of places. One of the young volunteers, who is a wedding planner, brought some décor, including small glassy beads. One immigrant mother decided to make jewelry, a trend that caught on with all the young moms. “It was priceless,” S. Sandra says. “One young woman, who was very attractive with shiny black hair and simple dress, was leaving in a few hours. She said to me, ‘Nita, look,’ showing me a bracelet she made. She hadn’t seen her hus- band in over a year and she was meeting him at the airport and she wanted to look beautiful for him. Her face, her face was so happy.” S. Ida’s role involved another kind of listening. She was the housemother for the 18 sisters and two lay volunteers who stayed at the convent that no longer had a community, conveniently located near downtown El Paso. It was offered by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia, Kansas. S. Ida provided the hospitality. “That was my job: cooking, shopping, getting the rooms ready, receiving the sisters, making sure they had a key, laundry, and driving,” says S. Ida. “It was very important to me that when I went to 6 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet …that the mission of Jesus calls us to collaboration with others for justice. …mutuality can only happen when we share our stories and listen empathically. …partnering with new eyes happens when we join with others in working for systemic change that will enable all to live in right relationships. ~2013 CSJ Congregational Acts of Chapter We believe…
  • 9. pick up the sisters each day, I often had a chance to go into the shelters and wait.This gave me an opportunity to be with the refugees, talk with them and receive their hugs of deep gratitude.” S. Sandra says S. Ida’s caregiving was the support that kept the volunteers going physically and emotionally, allowing them the space to unpack the day. “Because Ida was stable, the volunteers were very free to go and do that other work. We knew there’d be a hot supper ready,” she says. “It really freed us up because the energy it took to speak in Spanish, to do all that kind of cleaning, to listen with a good heart—you came home really, really tired.” “Yes, they came home so tired and they would tell the stories of the day,” says S. Ida. “And that was helpful for them, but it was helpful for me because I became a part of it in the way that I could.” The volunteers had this small semblance of routine within the days that were totally unpredictable. “Families arrived at all times of day in all numbers,” says S. Sandra. “I’d go to work with a perceived thought of what the experience might be and finish the day with, well, not what I thought might happen!” Although S. Ida has years of experience working at the border with the young people, the instability was palpable. She says, “The difference was in the pressure that these volunteers were under. It was a different kind of pressure than the ‘normal crowd.’ But nothing is normal about people crossing the border.” The Community The Sisters of St. Joseph charism of hospitality to the dear neighbor offered by Sisters Ida and Sandra was an expression that represented the entire CSJ community. Yet like the loaves and fishes, it was a collaborative effort by many, an organically created community of hospitality. The Lorettos and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Concordia offered their spaces. Religious men and women from all over the country came down without hesitation. Local parishioners and youth groups came out in droves to lend a hand. It showed the true meaning of the CSJ motto, “Together…we are more.” “We are now in the twilight of our lives, in a way. We know this,” says S. Sandra. “And so we look around and say, ‘How can we be useful?’What can we do today? And then you have this type of experience.” Even the Border Patrol and the Immigration and Customs officials are part of this community.They know that more needs to be done and most are trying to work effectively within a broken system. S. Sandra says, “They’re protecting our borders. We want them to do that. So I put myself in their place and I say, this isn’t very nice but at the same time, how would I be?” Today the situation has subsided and the surge has declined.The rumors of easy entry have been dispelled. People are once again being processed within 72 hours. Hearings are being set. Some are granted refugee status. Others are being deported but have a foot in the process. Still, this fast-moving crisis has illuminated the need for action at the systemic level—something that is agreed upon across party lines. Now that the crisis has ebbed and Sisters Ida and Sandra are back home, their passion for the issue has not been left behind. S. Ida works with the Migrant & Immigrant Community Action Project, and continues her work as an Annunciation House board and committee member. S. Sandra continues her work with immigrants and refugees in the St. Louis area. Both sisters invite others to take steps in their own communities to live out the same hospitality that called them to the border. S. Sandra says, “We are recommending that people try to be involved with the centers and with immigrant peoples in their locations. Get involved by dropping off toiletries, diapers, feminine hygiene products, gift cards or bus passes. Work with an organization to take up a collection. It’s a call to be invited to share in the mission of the Church.” It’s also a call to share in the mission of the Gospel. “Pray. Welcome difference. Love your enemies,” says S. Sandra. “Keep in mind those who are poor, different and marginalized and walk in their shoes, showing kindness, respect, love and openness.” Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 7 “Yes, they came home so tired and they would tell the stories of the day. And that was helpful for them, but it was helpful for me because I became a part of it in the way that I could” Sister Ida Berresheim, CSJ
  • 10. S urrounded by sisters, associates, family and friends, the new leaders for the St. Louis Province of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet were affirmed on June 28 at a ceremony in the mother- house chapel.They began their five-year term July 1.  The team members are: Sisters Maureen Freeman, Mary Margaret Lazio, Marilyn Lott, Rita Marie Schmitz and Linda Straub. Before taking office, four of the team members served in ministries that are well-known in the St. Louis area. S. Mary Margaret, originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan, is a registered nurse, and served as night supervisor at CSJ-sponsored Nazareth Living Center in Oakville since 2007. S. Marilyn, a St. Louis native, was the staff chaplain at St. Louis University Hospital for the past 10 years. Serving in education, S. Rita Marie, from St. Louis, recently retired from CSJ-sponsored Fontbonne University after 44 years. And, since 2000, S. Linda, also from St. Louis, was the campus minister at the Catholic Student Center at Washington University. S. Maureen, a Chicago native, recently retired as director at the White Violet Center for Eco-Justice in Terre Haute, Indiana. Hers was a unique ministry that provides opportunities for people to participate in creating just and sustainable systems. S. Marilyn looks to the past to provide strength for the future. “The challenges ahead of us as a province and in the congregation is to look for ways in which we can continue what was begun in France 360 years ago,” she says. “We are called to have the courage, freedom and valor of the first six sisters [in America] who listened to the Spirit and gave all they had as they jour- neyed into the unknown.” S.Linda looks to a future that moves toward collaboration with the four provinces in the CSJ Congregation across the country. “Aware that each generation has new challenges, the question we must ask today is, how can we best use our resources to meet the needs of the times?” she says. “What we are about is bigger than any one of us,” says S. Rita.“This time in history requires us to focus on creativity rather than power. We need to create something new together for our world.” 8 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Province Leadership Affirmation Province Leadership 2014-2019: Sisters Marilyn Lott, Linda Straub, Rita Marie Schmitz, Maureen Freeman and Mary Margaret Lazio. “The challenges ahead of us as a province and in the congregation is to look for ways in which we can continue what was begun in France 360 years ago.” Sister Marilyn Lott, CSJ The 2008-2014 Province Leadership Team raise their hands in blessing of the new team. Sister Nancy Marsh, CSJ makes bobbin lace, a tradition of the Sisters of St. Joseph.
  • 11. One cannot turn on the news these days without seeing tragedy upon tragedy—in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, the U.S. border and even in our own home towns. Policy makers seem to spend more time and energy in political arguments over petty power struggles instead of meaningful problem solving. And it seems we’ve been in this holding pattern for some time. It’s hard not to get frustrated or discouraged. It’s hard to imagine that anything could shift us from this pattern into something more. Calls to action have traditionally invited us to marches, rallies, panel discussions,letter campaigns, e-mail campaigns, petitions, phone calls, and when all else seems to fail, civil disobedience. For many, these tactics are fright- ening, frustrating or perhaps even leave a bad taste in our mouths. And for others they are tried-and-true methods that just don’t seem to have the impact they once did. So we must do the same thing with more people, right? It’s all about the numbers? More people will tip us over the threshold and we’ll see meaningful change. Or will we? What if we are missing something important? What if we need another way? It’s not to say that there aren’t roles and places for those traditional tactics, but what if those tactics aren’t yielding the results we want and need? Then what do we do? And when those tactics focus on attention-seeking and awareness-raising but leave little room for relationship-building and problem- solving, then how do we seek shared solutions when there’s no mechanism or opportunity to do so? Over and over again, I hear people lament that we are so divided, standing on opposite sides of a widening chasm. And who among us wants to step into that space in between? Parker Palmer calls it “standing in the tragic gap.” Nancy Schreck, OSF calls it the “middle place…in which we cannot assume presence or straightforward resolution.” It is an uncomfortable, often lonely and even frightening place to be. In this tragic gap or middle place we might be asked to bear witness and accompany pain and suffering with no human means to relieve it. We may be asked to surrender our need to fix and have faith that the Holy Spirit will heal. We have to be willing to let go of expecta- tions of seeing resolution in our time and trust that faithfulness will yield in generations beyond us. But we cannot do that alone. It requires a commit- ted and collective spiritual community that holds one another in that witness, knowing that with such weight and knowledge, we need time to step out, rest as others step into the gap. It is a willingness to hold this tension, this middle place that allows us to move out of crisis response into a partnership with those impacted. With them, we seek long-term solutions toward systemic transformation, not just easy fixes that relieve our discomfort but does little to change things in the end. And isn’t that what being in the blessed community of the Church is all about? Aren’t we here to love one another and help carry one another’s burdens? But how do we do that? Over the next year, the sisters and associates of St. Joseph of Carondelet are going to intentionally look for another way. We are going to meet one another where we are, ask God to help and see if we can stand in the tragic gap, that middle place as a greater global healing is revealed. I hope you’ll join us, for together we are truly more. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 9 peaceandjustice We may be asked to surrender our need to fix and have faith that the Holy Spirit will heal. Anna Sandidge, Justice Coordinator By Anna Sandidge, Justice Coordinator
  • 12. 10 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet A growing majority of young Catholic women today have never met a woman religious, much less considered becoming one. So when Clare Bass professed her first vows at the end of June, there was ample reason to celebrate, both within the Sisters of St. Joseph and among her family, friends and parishoners at her home parish, Our Lady of Fatima, in Biloxi, Mississippi. Sister Clare’s first vows gave her and her mother, Susie Bass, an oppor- tunity to reflect on the unusual—and special—journey of a woman seeking the life of a woman religious today. “The entire process for me has been intense and challenging,” S. Clare says, “as well as exciting and profound. As I have learned about being a CSJ, I have learned about myself, and have learned to love and accept myself.” It’s a love a mother knows from the very beginning. “Thirty years ago as I was holding our first red-headed baby girl, if someone would have told me that she was going to be a religious, I would have laughed and changed churches,” Susie says. “Even though I was a cradle Catholic and was one of the faithful praying for more young people to have vocations, I didn’t mean my own child.” It could be any mother’s child. And not. Susie says Clare learned during her earliest years under the care of a family friend, lovingly called Nanny “the joy of good eating (a Croatian tradition) and how to love and serve God joyfully.” She attended First Baptist Church pre-school and kindergarten in Biloxi, then attended Catholic schools from first to 12th grade, being educated by the Mercy Sisters from Ireland. She served on the campus ministry team at Mercy Cross A Sister’s Journey, As Sister Clare Bass makes her first vows, her mother, Susie, shares her challenges and joys of her daughter’s journey. “Thirty years ago as I was holding our first red-headed baby girl. If someone would have told me that she was going to be a religious, I would have laughed and changed churches.” Susie Bass Sister Clare Bass recites her first vows.
  • 13. high school. Despite a time where she was a paid Methodist youth leader because no Catholic group was active, she found her way home at St. Joseph’s Church while pursuing her degree at Mississippi State University. Five years ago, Clare announced to her parents that she was discern- ing religious life. “I cried for a month, and my husband Mike smiled for a month—no, for five years,” Susie says. “I guess in today’s world, the call to religious life only gets to one in a million, and Clare answered it,” Susie continues. “When I tell people about Clare, many of them say, and I quote, ‘I’m not surprised. Clare was always different!’ Different, maybe. But after these five years of becoming familiar and closer to the Sisters of St. Joseph, I am changing ‘different’ to ‘special.’ For Clare has picked her community wisely.” Once she arrived in St. Louis, Clare spent two years as a candi- date, living with and getting to know the community.The next two years, she lived as a novice, growing in her knowledge and understanding of CSJ spirituality and history in the St. Louis province and throughout the United States. She remembers her feelings as she formally requested first vows. “As I wrote my letter to the leadership council and my novice director, I was filled with an inexplicable inner peace and felt surrounded by the fruits of the Holy Spirit.” “Five months later when I pronounced, ‘I am ready to make this commitment’ on my annual retreat…it was an ‘aha moment,’ unlike any other moment in my life,” S. Clare says. “I was ready to commit to sharing my love, gifts and talents as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet.” S. Clare will use her gifts and talents as an advocate to help form policies and laws in organizations and in governments which promote the Common Good and justice for all people and all of creation. Her mother couldn’t be more proud. “The Sisters of St. Joseph are a super dynamic community of spiritual ladies with a rich history and love of God.” Her mom is confident her daughter is in good company. “If the work needs to be done, one of these sisters can and will do it,” Susie says. “And they do it well.” She related the story of one of her family’s visits to St. Louis. She and her husband, Mike were shopping and someone asked them why they were in St. Louis. “When I told them about Clare joining the CSJs, he replied, ‘Those sisters have hearts of gold!’” There is much for the Bass family to be proud of. S. Clare says, “I am grateful to my family, my CSJ sisters, and all of my friends who have helped me become who I am today.The chal- lenges, along with the joys and the love, have all been worth it. I am excited about the future as I and our community continue to transform and evolve. I believe God will continue to sustain us as we move forward together.” Her mother has her own way of sharing her joy and pride and hope for the future. “No matter what happens, I know that Clare is dedicated and committed to following her call to be a Sister of St. Joseph. Her happiness spills over into everyone she encounters. In 2017 (the first year Clare can request final vows), I will be proud to put a bumper sticker on my car that reads, ‘A proud mother of a Sister of St.Joseph of Carondelet!’” It’s an uncommon pride in the 21st century, perhaps. But so is the uncommon love of a Sister of St. Joseph. And the uncommon love of a mother for her daughter, vowed as a CSJ. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 11 A Mother’s Love Susie, Clare and Mike after the vow ceremony.. “As I wrote my letter to the leadership council and my novice director, I was filled with an inexplicable inner peace and felt surrounded by the fruits of the Holy Spirit.” Clare Bass By Sister Mary Flick, CSJ
  • 14. 12 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet S earch interior designer on a career planning website, and you’ll likely read something like this: An interior designer enhances the function, safety and aesthetics of interior spaces by maximizing the integration of a variety of colors, textures, furniture, lighting and space so that they work together to meet occupants’ needs and desires. With her newly-earned bachelor’s degree in the discipline, Minnesota native Barbara Prosser arrived in St. Louis in 1979. She wouldn’t have guessed at the time that 35 years later, the primary “interior spaces” she has worked to enhance have not been found in office buildings or houses, but rather in her own, and others’, hearts and souls. This year marks Barb’s 25th anni- versary of serving as a lay associate of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet (CSJA). CSJAs commit themselves to extending the mission and sharing the spirit of the congregation in an active way within their families, parishes, occupations, and with other sisters and associates. During her seven years living and working at the Catholic Worker House in St. Louis City beginning in 1979, Barb was introduced to several CSJ sisters serving there as volunteers. But it was when an acquaintance working at Nazareth Living Center called her one day and told her about a new nursing facility opening up that Barb’s eventual path began to take shape. “That was Al Sprehe, Nazareth’s maintenance man. He said Sister Jeanne McGovern, CSJ, would be the director,” Barb recounts. “He told me I should apply there, and I said I’d think about it.The phone rang a few minutes later and it was Al again. He said, ‘You Room for Transformation Associate Barb Prosser Marks 25 Years of Association By Mary Lou Frank associatespotlight “It has been a remarkable journey of the heart and of the home.” Barb Prosser, CSJA Barb Prosser surrounded by her family, sons Sam and Nathaniel and husband, The Hon. Philip Heagney.
  • 15. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 13 have an interview at 10:15 tomorrow morning’!” Barb accepted the position of administrative assistant for Sister Jeanne and began to work alongside numerous CSJ sisters at Mary, Queen and Mother Center in Shrewsbury. “I was so impressed at how bright and inclusive and progressive thinking so many of the sisters are. I was single, and so was invited to weekends of discernment. Sister Jeanne and Associate Pat McGovern encouraged me to consider becoming an associate.” After discovering how the CSJ charism and mission mirrored her own values and direction that she had hoped for the “interior design” of her life, Barb Prosser began the journey of candidacy, finaliz- ing her commitment in 1989. “There are six in our group, and over the 25 years,our monthly gathering has taken on different shapes. We’ve helped move each other through raising families, job transitions, vocations, health challenges, and other difficult life experiences,” Barb notes. “Each time we meet, we try to address the state of the heart and the state of the house.” Reflecting back, she finds herself most enriched by learning and living the value of hospitality. “I love that about the CSJs, that when we open our doors, our arms, ourselves to other people, it is a way of affirming that we see them. We feel them. We hear them. Some might be inclined to minimize that ... oh, it’s just cookies and coffee ... but just that gesture of welcoming someone to your space—a dorm room, your living room, your chapel—is a way of demonstrating their worthiness and value to you.” Barb is especially grateful for one friendship with fellow CSJA Pat Sheridan, who is also celebrating her silver jubilee of association. “Pat is a woman who, for all of her life, has been searching. She’s a learner, always reading, always doing something new, finding new ways to pray, to minister. At nearly 90 years old, Pat is one of the strongest witnesses to the charism of the CSJs and social justice of anyone I’ve known. Her amazing example has meant as much to me as association itself!” Barb joyfully asserts. Much like the right mix of colors and texture and furniture can enhance an empty room, so the right mix of people and circumstances in our lives serves to enrich our inner selves. The spirit of association dates back to the congregation’s founding in 1650, but it wasn’t until 1974 that the sisters of the St. Louis Province began to formalize the process of spiritual companionship and partnering in service. By the time Barb Prosser began her journey fifteen years later, the number of CSJAs had grown, and today, more than 300 associates are spreading the CSJ mission as they share their gifts in words and works of justice and peace, caring for the poor and for the earth. “I don’t assume that association was a concept that was necessarily easy to transition into,” Barb observes. “But that’s what I’ve always loved about the CSJs ... their welcoming, openness, honesty about their fears and delights with the whole process. I think association is a courageous and necessary arm of religious communities.” Barb sees how her association has enriched the “interior design” of her own family. Her husband, St. Louis City Circuit Court Judge Philip Heagney, has long supported CSJ ministries related to restorative justice. Judge Heagney was the first recipient of the “Generosity of Joseph” award in 2007. Barb says the couple’s sons, ages 20 and 17, “are softer, gentler men because of the group of women I’ve introduced them to.” Barb says she is “blessed and gifted” to be a CSJA. “Over and over again I have been affirmed in my decision. It has been a remarkable journey of the heart and of the home.” 25-year Associates Pat Sheridan and Barb Prosser before the Association Ceremony.
  • 16. St. Louis. Kansas City. Denver. These are a few of the cities where many of our sisters live in community. But some of our sisters are serving across the country alone or in smaller groups. This new series of articles highlights these sisters, sharing with us their ministries, how they minister to the people in their areas. In this issue…Sisters Patricia Hix and Gretchen Wagner of Cut Bank, Montana. Sisters Patricia Hix and Gretchen Wagner, CSJ Where One of Us Is, All of Us Are By Jenny Beatrice 14 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet & How long have you both lived in Montana and what led you there? S. Gretchen: I moved from St. Louis a little over three years ago. I sent resumes to all the northern states because I missed the north—I’m originally from Wisconsin. The Diocese of Helena responded and they asked me to come up for an interview. And they hired me. I asked Patricia if she would like to come along. It took her a whole second to say yes! S.Patricia: I am from Kansas City. I was living at Nazareth Living Center in St. Louis for six years when Gretchen invited me to come with her. I’d been retired, so this was great. What are your ministries? S. Gretchen: I am a pastoral life coordinator for four parishes. I coordinate religious education for kindergarteners through adults. I also do RCIA and introduce new theology for the adults.The reason I was hired is because there was only one priest here for four parishes. Right now, we have two. I also visit the homebound. S. Patricia: I’m a volunteer. I help Gretchen in some ways, visiting the homebound in the hospitals and the nursing homes. We go together. It keeps me busy! S. Gretchen: She brings joy and is a great listener. People really do appreciate her. And she’s a great support to me. How do your ministries meet the unique needs of the people in your area? S. Gretchen: We work with different people because there are four different parishes as well as members of the Black- feet Tribe.We are really accepting and loving people for who they are. What does the tenet of the Sisters of St. Joseph, “Where one of us is, all of us are,” mean to you? S. Gretchen: I feel like even though community is not physically here, the spirit is here. And living with Patricia— I’m just so happy she came because it gives me that touch with community. How do you stay connected to the greater CSJ community? S. Gretchen: Our community emails, website and publica- tions keep me connected to what is happening. I also have friends that keep in contact, so we do stay somewhat connected. S. Patricia: I do correspond with several of our sisters, many at Nazareth Living Center. I love to keep in touch. Canada Cut Bank Helena Billings Kalispell Montana Idaho Wyoming North Dakota South Dakota Sisters Gretchen Wagner and Patricia Hix
  • 17. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 15 How do you express your presence as a Sister of St. Joseph to the people in your community? S. Gretchen: They do know we’re Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet St Louis province because we say we are. And we talk about community with the people. It’s just like talking about family. And I think we give our loving presence to people and the loving presence of God. At least we try our hardest! S. Patricia: The people are very happy to have us here. They haven’t had sisters here for many years—they did have sisters in each of the parishes and schools at one time. So they are very happy to have sisters back up here in the community. What are some of the unique features of your area and what do you enjoy doing? S. Gretchen: It’s a long ride to places. And we are on the border of Canada and the United States. We travel on a road called Border Road. When we go visit one couple, we are in the United States. When we come back, we are in Canada! S. Patricia: Yes, we’re on what’s called the highline. We are 40 minutes from Glacier National Park, which we love to go up to see. We always bring visitors there. We do a lot of traveling and going from place to place. It’s just beautiful. S. Gretchen: We were involved in a couple of cattle round ups. I pushed the little calves along to make sure they got in through the shoot. Then we saw the old-fashioned way where they rope the calf and bring it in. So you have some experience with the local animal population. S. Patricia: Just the other night on the highway there were three horses in front of us! S. Gretchen: The funny thing is when we were first here we’d tromp around all these places and every time we came back people kept saying, “You know there’s rattlesnakes there.”We said we didn’t see any. We kept saying St. Joseph always takes care of us. But we do look for them now! We are 40 minutes from Glacier National Park, which we love to go up to see. We always bring visitors there. We do a lot of traveling and going from place to place. It’s just beautiful. Sister Patricia Hix, CSJ
  • 18. 16 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet St. Paul wrote that faith “is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.”But how do we find hope in a world brimming over with violence, death and pain? How can we keep believing in goodness and truth when the nightly news keeps reporting all evidence to the contrary? Job losses, illness and the death of people we love, crime, abandonment, betrayal by people and systems in which we placed all our trust, war, terrorism, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes and floods. In what can we dare to trust? All the insurance policies in the universe cannot keep bad things from happening to good people. Not unlike the people and prophets of the Hebrew scriptures, the world and our prospects for happiness in it can seem very scary. Some things never change. When the presence of what is hoped for hasn’t material- ized, when we cannot seem to find a shred of evidence of God’s presence in our lives, why don’t we just give up? We continue forward because of the gift of faith. Faith, even when it is waning, even if we have almost none left, is the powerful force that keeps us putting one foot in front of the other. Faith is the urge to give our work and struggle one more try. Faith is the confidence to continue on, even when we cannot see what lies around the corner for us. Those of us who follow the example of the life of St. Joseph know the plans we imagined for our lives seldom unfold the way we thought they would. Like Joseph, we take each day we are given, living the best life we can and placing our faith and trust in God’s loving care. Our patron, St. Joseph, did not know what his future would hold. He simply lived his life with integrity and compassion, caring for his family, surrounded by a world filled with violence, oppression, pain and injustice. Yes, Lord, we pray as St. Paul did to increase our faith. We continue to pray for faith, in faith. Because our world needs more than ever to believe that God’s healing presence and creative Spirit are real and possible in our everyday lives and in the world. faithmatters By Mary Kay Christian, CSJA, Province Liturgist O Lord, increase our faith. “Not unlike the people and prophets of the Hebrew scriptures, the world and our prospects for happiness in it can seem very scary. Some things never change.” Mary Kay Christian, CSJA
  • 19. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 17 Faithful Friends and Much More Tom and Cathy Cooney By Barbara Roberts advancingthemission C athy and Tom Cooney met while attending St. Elizabeth’s elementary school in Kansas City. While they now live in Colorado, their family members still reside in Kansas City, many of whom are members at St. Elizabeth and Visitation parishes. It was at St. Elizabeth’s where Tom and Cathy first experienced the charism of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.Taught by a number of sisters, Sisters Mary Florita Vallero and Kathleen Ann Eggleston are the ones they remember best. S. Kathleen taught Tom, Cathy and Cathy’s siblings. Tom remembers the sisters at St. Elizabeth as having “a discipline, but the discipline was pretty fair and reinforced in study habits.” He credits S. Kathleen as “inspirational to a lot of my classmates for her interest in math.” Cathy’s father passed away while she was at St. Elizabeth’s. She says, “The sisters were extremely thoughtful and caring and supportive of my mom during that time.” While attending St.Teresa’s Academy for high school, Cathy became close to her teachers Sisters Suzanne Giblin and Mary Catherine O’Gorman. S. Suzanne had a great influence on her and a friendship blossomed that continues today. “We stayed friends after that and it has grown over the years,” she says. “We click. I have been very lucky.” In fact, the Cooney’s oldest daughter is named after S. Suzanne. For Cathy, S. Suzanne and all the sisters are a big influence on her values, as well as her perceptions of and her respect for people. “I think the work they do is key. I support them continuing to do what they do in healthcare, education and social justice.They do what Jesus would do.” The Cooney’s express this support by donating to the sisters’ retirement needs and ministries, giving to the sisters who continue to stay true to their advocacy for Catholic women and for all women. “I truly believe in their mission.They have done more for their communities in health, in education and for the sick than any other group,” Cathy says. “What they are doing needs to continue and it needs to be funded. I believe they need to be taken care of because of what they have done. They need to be supported so their work can be continued.” Tom Cooney, Sister Suzanne Giblin, CSJ and Cathy Cooney hiking at Maroon Bells, Colorado.
  • 20. 18 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet We know that you’re watching your expenses in this challenging economy. We are, too. But our com- mitment to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet’s mission just gets stronger in tough times, and we look forward to your continued support so that we can keep meeting our goals. Today especially, though, we want every gift to benefit you as well as us. So we recommend the following financially- sensible giving techniques.These planned gifts will allow you to give more, at less cost, than you ever thought possible: Bequests You can make a generous commitment to our financial future today, without reducing your savings or your cash flow. A charitable bequest will not take effect until after your death. Plus it’s revocable, so it can be amended if your or your family’s needs change over time. Making a bequest is easy—you don’t even have to alter your current will. It can be as simple as adding a codicil to your existing arrangements. You can learn more about the process and download codicil language at www.csjsl.org/gftpln.org Gift of Life Insurance Are you maintaining more life insurance than your family still needs? If you no longer need the coverage, you can give the Sisters of St. Joseph a paid-up life insurance policy. You’ll receive a charitable deduction for the value of the policy, simplify your portfolio, and make a substantial gift to us without affecting your cash-flow in any way. Remember that you must make us the irrevocable owner as well as beneficiary of the policy in order for your gift to be deductible. The insurance company can complete the transfer of ownership. Charitable Gift Annuity Not only does a gift annuity return you a tax deduction and a fixed income for life—it also freezes the current value of the stock you contribute.That’s because your annuity (the income) will be based on the value of the stock at the time you donate it. Plus, your returns on that gift annuity will usually be higher than the dividends that stock is paying you now. As an example, say you own 200 shares of ABC Corp., currently trading at $50 per share and paying you an annual dividend of $1.50 per share. But you’re concerned that ABC stock may soon drop in value. So you donate the stock to us in return for a charitable gift annuity that will pay you a fixed income for the rest of your life. Your annuity will be set at 6 percent* of the value of your contribution ($10,000, the current value of your ABC shares). *Rates for new gift annuities are periodi- cally adjusted, and they vary according to the age of the beneficiaries. Contact us for details and latest rates. Make the Gift That Protects Your Estate for Your Heirs Did you know that your retirement plan (IRA) can be the most heavily-taxed asset in your estate? If you pass it on to your heirs it can lose more than 60 percent of its value to income and estate taxes. But if you give it to charity, there is no taxation at all. By making such a gift to the CSJs, you avoid high tax penalties, and can ensure your heirs receive more by leaving them more favorably-taxed property. • You can take a withdrawal from your retirement plan to make an outright gift to us. For such outright gifts, the net tax effect is often a “wash.” • Designating the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet as the beneficiary of your retirement plan is easily accomplished by using the plan’s beneficiary designation form. • It’s always a good idea to consult with your plan’s administrator and a financial advisor before making any changes in plan distribution. Our organization is not qualified to provide specific legal, tax or investment advice. Consult with your own legal and financial advisors before making any gift. These Four Gifts Make Giving Easier Planned Giving is Smarter Giving We want to help you find the gift plan that’s right for you, so you benefit from it as much as we do. Contact me to learn how you can make a bigger, more transformational difference for the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Patricia R. Cassens, CFRE, CSJA Executive Director of Mission Advancement 314.678.0329 pcassens@csjsl.org By Patricia Cassens, CFRE, CSJA advancingthemission
  • 21. The 1964 reception Janet M. Sullivan, CSJA The 2014 Jubilarians Ann Albrecht, CSJ Rita Flaherty, CSJ Joy Elaine Gilder, CSJ Ms. Peggy M. Maguire, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Mareschal Patricia Murphy, CSJ Jean Paul Selissen, CSJ Ms. Catherine A. Shinn, CSJA Mary Carol Anth, CSJ and Rita Marie Schmitz, CSJ Ms. Eileen Stanley, CSJA Michael White, CSJ Teresa John Zilch, CSJ The 50th Jubilarians Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA The 60th Jubilarians Ms. Diane Calcaterra, CSJA Ms. Frances K. Farraher  Helen Alder, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Berra Agnes Marie Baer, CSJ Patricia Cassens, CSJA Mrs. Deborah D. Faust Mrs. Myrtle L. Herwig Roland and Marie Martir, CSJA Mrs. Barbara Pat McDonnell Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA Janet M. Sullivan, CSJA Mary Louise Basler, CSJ Ms. Kathy Austin Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Basler Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Basler Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Basler Ms. Jennifer W. Best Mr. and Mrs. Edward Brown Mrs. Linda Caul Mr. and Mrs. Allan Greminger Mr. Joseph C. Hafner and Ms. Linda C. Hanna Mr. Daniel Hafner Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Hingle III Ms. Diane M. Limmer Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Melia Ms. Dianne M. Basler Ms. Linda Roth Ms. Monica J. Rozier Mr. Robert E. Ruebsam Mr. and Mrs. Jerry J. Scherer Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Seibel Ms. Catherine A. Shinn, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Donald Winston Clare Bass, CSJ Ms. Sue Gasparrini  Jane Behlmann, CSJ Patricia Cassens, CSJA Rose Marie Boyanchek, CSJ Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA Mary Josephine Breiner, CSJ Ms. Mary Ellen Smith Mary Teresita Browne Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan Rose Mary Brueggen, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. O’Blennis Leo Ann Bub, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Terry G. Wall Thomas Cameron Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn Patricia Cassens, CSJA Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ Rose Stephen Cento, CSJ Diane Blackwell, CSJA Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA Deborah Marino, CSJA and Robin Smitherman, CSJA Ann Chamblin, CSJ Ms. Josephine K. Lewis-Sattel Patricia Ann Clement, CSJ Ms. Kimberly A. Dodson  Olive Louise Dallavis, CSJ Ms. Rose Aylward Ferguson Ms. Sheila K. Johnson Mr. Jeremy Lillig, CSJA Dorothy Dempsey Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ Teresa Maria Eagan, CSJ Ms. Kathleen T. Eagan  Mary Rebecca Eichhorn, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Fowler, Jr. Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA Mrs. Cecelia K. Piekarski Mr. Joseph Simon and Mrs. Pat Hinton-Simon Ann Everett, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Larry Nordling  Juliana Marie Feld, CSJ Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA Laura Ann Gruber, CSJ Ms. Rebecca McDermott and Mr. Dennis Donnelly Julie Guillot, CSJ Deborah Marino, CSJA and Robin Smitherman, CSJA Mr. Jimmie T. Smitherman Mary Kay Hadican, CSJ Mrs. Rosemary M. Quigley Sally Clare Harper, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bullock Mrs. Rosemary M. Quigley Patricia Marie Hix, CSJ Ms. Rebecca McDermott and Mr. Dennis Donnelly Becky Holley, CSJ Ms. Donna Jarvis Shirley Howe The Rheinnecker Family Fund Jean Iadevito, CSJ Mrs. Barbara Schweiger The Jubilarians living or serving at Nazareth Living Center Ms. Lola J. Westhoff  Patti Kelly Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ  Joan Lampton, CSJ Mrs. Geraldine F. Stassi  Mary Ann Lavin, CSJ Mrs. Barbara Schweiger  Mary Margaret Lazio, CSJ Ms. Deborah Hays  Fran Maher, CSJ Ms. Susan Conrad Mr. Richard H. Haber  Rita McGovern, CSJ Mr. James A. Smalley Rose Marie McKenna, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Iezzi Paula Patrice Michaud, CSJ Patricia Cassens, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Hogan Dr. and Mrs. James J. Polkabla Jean Marie Miller, CSJ Peter T. Kachris, PhD Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA  Marian Therese Muehlbauer, CSJ Patricia Cassens, CSJA Mrs. Marilyn F. Koncen, CSJA Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA Mary Ann Mulligan, CSJ Ms. Rebecca McDermott and Mr. Dennis Donnelly Ms. Barbara A. Peach Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 19 In Honor of… Thank you for the following gifts received between February 1, 2014, through August 31, 2014. Tribute donations of $25 or greater will be published. Thank you for your continued generosity in paying tribute to your loved ones with a gift to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. tributesandmemorials
  • 22. 20 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet In Honor of continued... Barbara Prosser Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ Helene Purfield, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Felix L. Maes Andrea Marie Rentmeester, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Craanen Margaret Gregg, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. William C Peters Mr. and Mrs. Gerald K. Rentmeester Ida Robertine Berresheim, CSJ Ms. Rose Mary Green Kathleen Kevin Ryan, CSJ Mr. James A. Smalley  Ann Schorfheide, CSJ Mrs. Helen R. McKee Patricia Sheridan, CSJA Mary Lillian Baumann, CSJ  Sisters of St. Joseph Mrs. Carol T. Miller Clara Vincent Slatinsky, CSJ Mrs. Jane M. Eubanks Dr. Ron Slepitza Ms. Christine Ojile Gabrielle Smits, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Jenkins, Jr. Linda Straub, CSJ Drs. Scott and Kendal Endicott Mr. Arthur N. Straub  Sandy Straub, CSJ Mr. Arthur N. Straub  Ruth Stuckel, CSJ Ms. Teresa J. House Daniel Vaughn Mr. and Mrs. Steven Welko Sister Fran Voivedich’s project in Gulu Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Lichstein Gretchen Wagner, CSJ Ms. Rebecca McDermott and Mr. Dennis Donnelly tributesandmemorials In Memory of… Jerry B. Abernathy Mr. Richard C. Raupp  Linda Marie Akers Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ricklefs Paul W. Allaert Mrs. Mary Joy Allaert Feeney Mr. and Mrs. Michael Thompson  Ruth Allaert Mrs. Mary Joy Allaert Feeney  Esther Aydlett Carol F. Williams, M.D.  Mildred Baldelli Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Zinselmeyer, Jr.  Ethel V. Beck Mrs. Marilyn A. Miles Paul Beermen Mrs. Marie M. Buttice  John Berra Mrs. Marie M. Buttice  Jim Bono Mrs. Virginia M. Bono  Louis Bono Mrs. Virginia M. Bono  Kathryn Mary Brady, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dunlap, Jr.  Dorothy Browne, CSJ Ms. Barbara E. Laurie Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan  James Patrice Browne, CSJ Mrs. Patricia Browne Sullivan   Jennifer Noel Burton Ms. Elizabeth A Donnelly  Anne Ambrose Butkovich, CSJ Ms. Barbara E. Laurie  Josephine Carneghi Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Katelyn Clounch Mr. Kenneth L. Clounch  Jacqueline Conley Ms. Mary F. Pfeiffer  Lynne Cooper Mr. Rudi J. Bertrand The Jonas Co.  Blanche Marie Corcoran, CSJ Ms. Susan K. Haddock  Raymond Joseph Cordes, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Saale  Beloved Cousin Mr. Richard T. Boughner  Bernice Dallas Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hardebeck  Milton P. Deithelm, Jr Mrs. Audrey A. Behr Elaine Ebeling Mr. John J. Ebeling  Steven A. Eckhardt Mrs. Virginia R. Eckhardt  Bob Edwards Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan  Thomas T. Evanoff Mr. and Mrs. Gary Alfonsi  Patricia Fagan Joan Lacey, CSJ  Mary Ann Fahey, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. John P. Fahey Western Iowa Land Development, Llc  Mary Aniceta Farrell, CSJ Mrs. Ann W. Stuart Miss Mary Jane Waldron  Dr. Michael J. Feder Mrs. Joyce M. Feder  Nell Feise Joan Lacey, CSJ  John Flavin Ms. Nancy A. Rayhawk  Alex H. Flemington, Jr. Helen Flemington, CSJ Kathleen L. Grewe, CSJA, and Diana Burnson Mr. and Mrs. Tony Marino Ms. Mary G. Sheppard, CSJA  Lee Toland Flood Mr. and Mrs. David J. Murnan  Judith Fox Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn Consuelo M. Garcia Michael Therese Bauer, CSJ Mary Jo Gelhaus Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn Roxann George Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn Catherine Gerrits Mrs. Norbert Gerrits  Ralph Gianino III Mrs. Marie M. Buttice  Louis Giblin Mr. and Mrs. Tom Cooney Margaret R Giblin, CSJA Mrs. Carol T. Miller Viola Glen Dr. and Mrs. James Gilsinan Aliceann E. Gruber Ms. Margaret E. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Mark Beck Ms. Diane Calcaterra, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Tony H. Fults Mr. and Mrs. T. Gregory Gross Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Herron Ms. Mary Ann Kurowski Mrs. Barbara W. La Vella Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Lange Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence J. LeGrand Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Mollerus Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. O’Blennis Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Pfeifer Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Sauer Mr. and Mrs. John T. Sinclair Ms. Kathleen A. Stewart Mrs. Geraldine N. Walsh Ms. Betty J. Young  Herb Gruber Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Lange Rae Guzzardo Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ  Vera Guzzardo Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ  Alfred Haffner Ms. Pamela Pedersen  John Hamma Mr. and Mrs. James E. Ricklefs  Alma Hammerschmidt, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dunlap, Jr.  Kathy Hays Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman  Genevieve Hein Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ Agatha Joseph Hesse, CSJ Mrs. Ann M. Reilly  Michael Hoeing Mrs. Mary D. Mann  James Lorene Hogan, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Andrew Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Barry Mrs. Kathleen Bartnett Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Bastean Mr. and Mrs. James E. Broom Mrs. Judy Childress Mr. and Mrs. William Dewert Mr. John J. Fisher Mr. and Mrs. Robert Geary Mr. and Mrs. Danny B. Glenzy Ms. Diane Hogan Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Howe Mr. Edward Ray Kiely Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Klinglesmith Mr. and Mrs. Claude B. Martin Mrs. Anna Marie McIntyre Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Nikolai Mr. and Mrs. Richard Obertino Mr. and Mrs. James Presswood Mr. and Mrs. David Sliney St Augustine Catholic Church Wellston Center Ms. Patricia A. Sullivan Dr. Jenna Voss Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wagner Mr. and Mrs. Paul Young  Judith Hube Ms. Carol A. Gruen  Jack and Mary Jarose Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan  Charles Jokisch Mrs. Janet R. Jokisch  John Lewis Jones Boys & Girls Club of South Alabama Mr. Webster Burrage and Mrs. Donna Voivedich Burrage Chip Forstall Law Offices Nathalie Forstall Ms. Betsy D. Hearndon Mrs. Judy Hicks
  • 23. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 21 Ms. Evelyn J. Hyde Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Jones Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Revere Mrs. Nancy Saucer UMS-Wright Preparatory School “Kane” Daughters Mrs. Marcia E. Bequette  Clara and Vince Kerwin Ms. C. Michele Kerwin  Dot Koncki Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman Christine Kube Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani Mary Alexandra Kuhn, CSJ Ms. Joan Kuhn Daniel Kusak Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn Joan Kay Lickider Michael Therese Bauer, CSJ Dorothy E. Ludolph Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ  Linda Marie Lully, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. William M. Barrett, Jr. Mrs. Jo Ellen Catto Dr. Patricia Covey Mrs. Jane M. Eubanks Mr. and Mrs. Casimir Eubig Ms. Janemarie Hennebelle Ms. Priscilla P. Hollingsworth Dr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Kaller Dr. Sylvia Littlejohn Mr. and Mrs. Edouard J. Servy St. John Vianney Vocations Ministry of Augusta USA Ret. Colonel and Mrs. John O. Turnage Mrs. Louise M. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Zielinski  Peggy Marshall Mr. Raymond H. Beerman Brian R. Mason Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Mary Brigid Massey, CSJ Mr. James A. Smalley  Virgina Palmer Mr. Robert J. Palmer  Biancha Mayer Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Joan McDevitt Mrs. Jean F. Renshaw  Jeanne McGovern, CSJ Miss Mary Jane Waldron  Anne Frances McMullan Mr. E. Russell Epperson III  Jean Meier, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Donald Boyce Mr. and Mrs. Ken B. Boyer Mrs. Carol Z. Brescia Ms. Joanne P. Buttice Patricia Cassens, CSJA Ms. Susan Conrad Mr. and Mrs. Michael Di Salvo Mrs. Suzanne E. Faletti, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Foerster Mrs. Helen Friedman Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Gaglio Mrs. Ann M. Geraty Mr. and Mrs. Danny B. Glenzy Ms. A. Carolyn Henry, CSJA Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hillmeyer Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Howard Ms. Janice A. Hughes Peter T. Kachris, PhD Mr. Frank Kekeisen Mr. and Mrs. James C. Knop Mrs. George A. Koehler L.C.W.R Boston Unit Ms. Joan Maher Staff at Mercy Conference and Retreat Center Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Rebore Mr. and Mrs. John Rychlewski Saint Louis Behavioral Medicine Institute Ms. Lisa Simon Mr. Michael J. Toney Wedge Capital Management Zielinski Companies, Inc.  Dorothy Meirink, CSJ Mrs. Alice C. Twenhoefel  Mary Merdian Mary Annette Schorman, CSJ  Joseph Merlo Mrs. Marie M. Buttice  Mary Alma Monaghan, CSJ Ms. Shirley Sweney Mrs. Angela F. Ottenlips  Annette Moran, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Rush  Mary Ursula Mott, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Sidney P. Mott Kay Naughton, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Dorsey  Bob Nestel AAS Restoration Mr. and Mrs. Sean Farrington  Charles Newman Dr. and Mrs. James Gilsinan  Maria Cabrini Oldani, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani  Regina Frances Oldani, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Oldani  Virgina Palmer Mr. Robert J. Palmer  Peter Bob Peer Mrs. Mary D. Mann  Mary T. Pell Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan  Alice K. Rathheim Ms. Jean E. Quigley  William Reichelderfer Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Margaret Reinhart, CSJ Mrs. Barbara Schweiger  Joseph E. Renshaw Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Barbeau Ms. Elizabeth J. Bruckman Mr. and Mrs. Joel R. Buckley Ms. Muriel Cary Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Chapman Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Justice Mr. Ralph W. Ketner Ms. Anne C. Lee Mr. and Mrs. Maurice W. Mantha, Jr. MassMutual Southeast Michigan Michigan Warriors Hockey Team Mr. and Mrs. John Mills Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Modjeski Mr. and Mrs. Ken Ormerod Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Pedersen Mr. Kevin Renshaw Ms. Laura Renshaw Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Scanlon Mr. and Mrs. Lee E. Snell Mr. and Mrs. Lance R. Szyhowski Tappan Sunshine Fund Mary Jane Ruoff, CSJ Mrs. Peggy Cannon Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Harrington Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Ruoff Mrs. Mary M. Starr  Anna Ruzicka Mr. Lawrence J. Ruzicka Irwin Ruzicka Mr. Lawrence J. Ruzicka Margaret Schmidt, CSJ Ms. Patricia Browne Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Marcus Mr. and Mrs. William R. Wlodarczyk Mr. and Mrs. Glenn S. Wolf  Robert T. Schweiger Mrs. Barbara Schweiger  Billy Nolan Shekell Mrs. Marie M. Buttice  All the Sisters at St. Mary Magadelen School Mr. John E. Wrobel, Jr.  Mary Ann Smalley Mr. James A. Smalley Michael Joseph Smith Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Fick Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crowell Mr. Adam M. Dube Ms. Francesca Ferrentelli Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Green Ms. Kathleen Hardt Mr. A. Vincent Magee, Jr. Mr. Larry Mrazek and Ms. Doris Dieckgraefe Ms. Elisa M. Mullins Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Ortbal Mr. and Mrs. Ray Reckamp Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Smith Ms. Patricia R. Smith  Eileen Smits, CSJ Mrs. Barbara Schweiger  Russell Stahl Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Jim Stelloh Mrs. Mary M. Stelloh  Janice Szyhowski Mrs. Jean F. Renshaw Mr. and Mrs. Lance R. Szyhowski  Bob Tegethoff Mrs. Geraldine J. Bergman  Chuck Todt Margaret Guzzardo, CSJ Stephen Michael Turkek Mr. Robert E. Eagleston  Frank T. Walsh Mrs. Patricia Ann Dunn  Lenly Weathers Mr. and Mrs. James R. Conway  Walter Whelan Mr. and Mrs. David J. Murnan  Evelyn White Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan  Ed Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Egan  Ruth Shy Wilson, CSJA Bernard Meyer and Barbara Meyer, CSJA  Pauline Wlasuk Mr. and Mrs. Gary Alfonsi Catherine Rutte Zolnowski Mrs. Ann DeMaria, CSJA Ms. Mary Kay Farrow Ayres, CSJA Ruth Heyenbrock Mrs. Mary Kitchin Ann Schorfheide, CSJ Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stefanov The Province Development Office has made every effort to ensure the tributes are properly recognized and correctly spelled. To make a donation, request memorial envelopes or report a correction on our tributes listing, please contact our office at 314.678.0326. Gifts received February 1, 2014, through August 31, 2014.
  • 24. eventsandhappenings 4 26th Annual CSJ Golf Tournament St. Louis: Our 26th Annual CSJ Golf Tournament was held on September 15 at the Westborough Country Club. Proceeds from the golf tournament benefited the sisters’ ministries including their mission in Gulu, Uganda, where they are finishing building a much needed Maternity Clinic. Guests golfed on beautiful greens, and enjoyed great food and drinks as well as a silent auction. 1. Getting ready to tee off on the beautiful course at Westborough Country Club. 2. Volunteers ready to greet our guests. 3. Teams moving through the course. 4. Teams preparing for the shotgun start. 5. Warming up on the putting green. 2 3 1 22 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet 5
  • 25. Connections | Fall/Winter 2014 23 St. Louis: More than 100 guests enjoyed the second annual Wine and Chocolate Tasting at the Moth- erhouse on Thursday, October 9. Various wines were offered by Director of Food, Wine & Culinary Arts Education David Birkenmeier of Schnucks Markets, Inc., and Anne Birkenmeier and Mike Ward, state wine educators of Major Brands. Music by Jim Manley/Chris Swan Duo. The proceeds benefit the ministries and retirement needs of the Sisters of St. Joseph. 1. Wine experts David Birkenmeier, Ann Birkenmeier and Mike Ward. 2. Joanne Buttice, host Patricia Cassens, Sister Barbara Dreher, Cindy Rice and Sister Marion Renkens.3. Deeds Bonham, Lisa Marucci, Donna Garrett. 4. Scott Hark, director of food service at the motherhouse. 5. Madeleine Reilly, Rita Re Hagan, Kathy Hagan-Schmidt, Kelly Lodes Hyde. 1 2 3 4 5 Wine & Chocolate
  • 26. Society of Benefactors Mass & Reception Kansas City, Sunday, March 8 from 1 -4 p.m. Visitation Parish, 5141 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri Join us to honor our Kansas City area benefactors who have donated $100 or more in the past year and to celebrate the sisters’ service in Kansas City. Mass will be celebrated at 1 p.m., with a reception immediately following. For more information please contact csjkc@csjsl.org  or 816-501-2944. Generosity of Joseph Honors Gala Friday, April 24, 2015 Carondelet Motherhouse Make your plans to Party on the River with the sisters. More information coming soon! Come Catch the Fire Event Series for Young Adults ages 18-35 A series of four events with presentations, contemplative prayer, music, praise and worship led by young adults for young adults to share their faith journeys. Held at the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Motherhouse From 8–10 p.m. on the following dates: • November 13, 2014 • February 12, 2015 • June 11, 2015 • October 8, 2015 Sponsored by the Association of St. Louis Vocation Directors. For more information, visit www.csjsl.org. 24 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet eventsandhappenings Save the Dates Treat yourself to an enriching Saturday morning to feed your mind, body and spirit with good company, a hearty breakfast and a dynamic program. “A rewarding experience.” SAVE THE DATES for our upcoming Linger Over Breakfast presentations. For more information, and registration visit www.csjsl.org. In St. Louis… at the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Motherhouse January 31—Heart Speaks to Heart with Sister Mary Flick, CSJ Meet the mystic, St. Ignatius Loyola, and sample his way of prayer, which invites us to use our memories, imaginations, emotions and life experiences. May 9—Come and See Your Brothers and Sisters with Sister Paul Bernadette Bounk, CSJ Explore mystical thinkers of past and present and make the acquaintance of our cosmic family. In Kansas City… at St. Teresa’s Academy, Windmoor Center March 28—From Retribution to Restoration with Sister Rose McLarney, CSJ S. Rose shares the principles of restorative justice and demonstrates ways we can implement its practices in our schools, businesses and neig- borhoods to transform systems and restore lives. Together in Faith Series Go to Joseph with artist Brother Michael “Mickey” McGrath Monday, December 15 at 6:00 p.m. At the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Motherhouse Brother Michael “Mickey” McGrath, Oblate of St. Francis de Sales and award- winning artist, will present his latest work around our patron, St. Joseph as featured in his book Go to Joseph,  exploring different aspects of St. Joseph’s life as husband, father, craftsman, traveler, guide, and much more. Admission is free. For more information visit www.togetherinfaithseries.com. Dining to Donate Wednesday, March 25 Favazza’s Italian Restaurant on the Hill, St. Louis Enjoy a great meal and help the Sisters of St. Joseph at the same time. Dine at Favazza’s on the Hill and 20% of dinner sales will be donated to benefit the good works of the sisters.
  • 28. Non-profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID St. Louis, MO Permit No. 2829 wearemore together… We’ve Gone MobileCheck out our new site formatted for smartphones and keep up-to-date with everything CSJSL! www.csjsl.org