Covert and Obscured Unit 2 Fine Art pdf

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Resources to support teachers and students on the AS Fine Art Edexcel exam paper 2013.

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Covert and Obscured Unit 2 Fine Art pdf

  1. 1. AS FINE ART 2013 UNIT 2 COVERT AND OBSCURED
  2. 2. ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVESAO1Develop their ideas through sustained and focused investigationsinformed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analyticaland critical understanding.AO2Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials,techniques and processes, reviewing and refining their ideas as theirwork develops.AO3Record in visual and/or other forms ideas, observations and insightsrelevant to their intentions, demonstrating an ability to reflect on theirwork and progress.AO4Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstratingcritical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate,making connections between visual, oral or other elements.
  3. 3. COVERT coverADJECTIVESnot openly acknowledged ordisplayed: covert operationsagainst the dictatorship.ORIGIN Middle English (in thegeneral senses ‘covered’ and‘a cover’): from Old French,‘covered’.
  4. 4. OBSCUREDADJECTIVES( obscurer, obscurest )1 not discovered or known about; uncertain: his origins and parentageare obscure.• not important or well known: a relatively obscure actor.2 not clearly expressed or easily understood: obscure references toProust.• hard to make out or define; vague: grey and obscure on the horizonrose a low island | I feel an obscure resentment.verb [ with obj. ]keep from being seen; conceal: grey clouds obscure the sun.• make unclear and difficult to understand: the debate has becomeobscured by conflicting ideological perspectives.• keep from being known: none of this should obscure the skill andperseverance of the workers.DERIVATIVESobscuration nounobscurely adverbORIGIN late Middle English: from Old French obscur, from Latinobscurus ‘dark’, from an Indo-European root meaning ‘cover’.
  5. 5. USE THIS AS A STARTING POINT THEN ADD MANY MORE...THE MORE YOU ADD THE MORE IDEAS YOU CAN GENERATE.
  6. 6. Use this sheet to help you respond to art work.
  7. 7. This is also agreat sheet tohelp you think and write about others’ art work.
  8. 8. INTERIORS/ EXTERIORS
  9. 9. DANIELA GULLOTTA (b.1974)Her work depicts large emptyinteriors, often of an industrialnature. Her intention is to drawthe viewers attention to thedramatic nature of space.Sometimes individual objectsare emphasised and humanpresence is always suggestedthough never depicted.http://www.marlboroughfineart.com/artist-Daniela- Gullotta-97.html
  10. 10. CASPER DAVID FRIEDERICH A painter and draughtsman, Friedrich is best known for his later allegorical landscapes, which feature contemplative figures silhouetted against night skies, morning mists, barren trees, and Gothic ruins. His primary interest as an artist was the contemplation of nature, and his often symbolic and anti-classical work seeks to convey the spiritual experiences of life. http://www.caspardavidfriedrich.orgThe Cemetery Gates 1825-30
  11. 11. CAROLINE WALKERwww.carolinewalker.org
  12. 12. NINA MURDOCH Corridors, steps, wedges of light and otherworldly colour, Nina Murdoch’s paintings evoke an uninhabited but haunting world in which the sun and moon seem to rise and set in chambers indoors. Although some of these images may in fact be street subjects, the sense of enclosure is strong, partly because the focus has been taken inwards, and instead of wider views of architecture (as appeared in her earlier work), we are offered broad yet confined spaces. This contradiction goes to the heart of her work: she engages with macro as well as micro, with the inner world as much as with external reality. Her paintings were never especially descriptive of place, more evocative of mood, and now they are increasingly about emotional states.From a series of works www.ninamurdoch.co.uk titled ‘Concrete Fields’
  13. 13. Other possible artists to studyADRIANA VAREJAO http://www.adrianavarejao.net/home/DAVID HEPHER www.flowersgallery.comEDWARD HOPPER www.edwardhopper.netANDREW WYETH http://www.andrewwyeth.com
  14. 14. SCULPTUREFIGURATIVE AND NON-FIGURATIVE
  15. 15. CHRISTO AND JEANNE- CLAUDE http://www.christojeanneclaude.net Art critic David Bourdon has described Christos wrappings as a "revelation throughconcealment." To his critics Christo replies, "I am an artist, and I have to have courage ... Doyou know that I dont have any artworks that exist? They all go away when theyre finished.Only the preparatory drawings, and collages are left, giving my works an almost legendarycharacter. I think it takes much greater courage to create things to be gone than to create things that will remain."
  16. 16. JOSEPH BEUYS Coming to terms with his involvement in the war was a long process and figures, at least obliquely, in much of his artwork. Beuys often said that his interest in fat and felt as sculptural materials grew out of a wartime experience--a plane crash in the Crimea, after which he was rescued by nomadic Tartars who rubbed him with fat and wrapped him in felt to heal and warm his body. While the story appears to have little grounding in real events (Beuys himself downplayed its importance in a 1980 interview), its poetics are strong enough to have made the story one of the most enduring aspects of his mythic biography.http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/joseph-beuys-747
  17. 17. ANTHONY GORMLEY http://www.antonygormley.comAntony Gormley has over the past 30 years revitalised the human form in sculpture through aradical investigation of the body as a place of memory and transformation. “I am interestedin the body”, he says, “because it is the place where emotions are most directly registered.When you feel frightened, when you feel excited, happy, depressed somehow the bodyregisters it.”
  18. 18. ABSTRACT PAINTING AND COLLAGE
  19. 19. ROBERTRAUSCHENBERG American painter, sculptor, printmaker, photographer and performance artist. While too much of an individualist ever to be fully a part of any movement, he acted as an important bridge between Abstract Expressionism and Pop art and can be credited as one of the major influences in the return to favour of representational art in the USA. As iconoclastic in his invention of new techniques as in his wide-ranging iconography of modern life, he suggested new possibilities that continued to be exploited by younger artists throughout the latter decades of the 20th century.http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/robert-rauschenberg-1815
  20. 20. KURT SCHWITTERS http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/kurt-schwitters-1912Schwitters worked in several genres andmedia, including Dada, Constructivism,Surrealism, poetry, sound, painting,sculpture, graphic design, typographyand what came to be known asinstallation art. He is most famous for hiscollages, called Merz Pictures.
  21. 21. RICHARDDIEBENKORN Richard Diebenkorn achieved a rare feat in the life of an artist, which is to approach painting from many different angles and to take earnest inspiration from other artists while maintaining originality. Although Diebenkorn did not reach the level of fame of Abstract Expressionists of the New York School, his influence on artists of the latter half of the twentieth century is undeniable. latimesblogs.latimes.com
  22. 22. FIGURATIVE PAINTINGTRADITIONAL, MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY
  23. 23. CARAVAGGIO http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ culture/art/art-news/Layers of traditional paintings 8376970/Caravaggio-reveal the story and history of exhibition-gives-fresh- how paintings were made. insight-into-painters- Revealing secrets and technique.html unknown facts.
  24. 24. FRANCIS BACONhttp://www.francis-bacon.comFrancis Bacon (28 October 1909   – 28April 1992) was an Irish-born Britishfigurative painter known for his bold,graphic and emotionally rawimagery.[1] Bacons painterly butabstracted figures typically appearisolated in glass or steel geometricalcages set against flat, nondescriptbackgrounds.
  25. 25. These pictures are characterized by depictions of the human figure isolated in landscapes or interior JUSTIN chambers and surrounded by medical apparatus, machinery and in several works acid colouredMORTIMER balloons which hover around these anonymous figures. While the justinmortimer.co.uk specific subject or location of the paintings remains mysterious, they suggest an underworld of
  26. 26. STILL LIFETHE HUMDRUM OF EVERYDAY LIFE
  27. 27. http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/jan/13/morandi- lines-poetry-review-giorgioGiorgio Morandi (1890-1964) is not known for his MORANDIlines. Rather the opposite: in the hazy world ofhis painted still lifes, everything appears muzzyand soft. The famous objects appearing on theminiature stage of his table – the bottles, bowls,decanters   and jugs – do so in something ashazy as limelight. You would not expect to lookdeep into these masterpieces of 20th-centuryart and see a sharp edge, an outline oranything as concise as a dot.
  28. 28. http://www.winifrednicholson.com Flowers mean different things to different people - to some they are trophies to decorate their dwellings (for this plastic flowers will do as well as real ones) - to some they are buttonholes for their conceit - to botanists they are species and tabulated categories - to bees of course they are honey - to me they are the secret of the cosmos. This secret cannot be put into image, far less into the smallness of words - but I try to. Their silence says to me - My rootlets are moving in the dark, in the wet, cold, damp mud - My leaflets are moving in the brightness of the sky - My flowerface has seen the darkness which cannot be seen, and the brightness that is too bright to see - has seen earth to sun and sun to earth.  WINIFREDNICHOLSON
  29. 29. JANET FISHKnown for large stilllifes of commonobjects with brightcolors--lime green,pink, yellow--, JanetFish works from a loft inthe SoHo section ofNew York City andtakes pride in the factthat she paints"forbidden subjects,"realistic still lifes. Herwork, expressive of herhighly independentspirit, is a reactionagainst the pureabstraction that hasbeen prevalent for somany years in theAmerican art world,especially in NewYork.
  30. 30. PHOTOGRAPHYPORTRAITS, FIGURES AND ABSTRACT
  31. 31. CINDY SHERMAN http://www.cindysherman.comBy turning the camera on herself, CindySherman has built a name as one of themost respected photographers of the latetwentieth century. Although, the majority ofher photographs are pictures of her,however, these photographs are mostdefinitely not self-portraits. Rather,Sherman uses herself as a vehicle forcommentary on a variety of issues of themodern world: the role of the woman, therole of the artist and many more. It isthrough these ambiguous and eclecticphotographs that Sherman has developed adistinct signature style. Through a numberof different series of works, Sherman hasraised challenging and important questionsabout the role and representation of womenin society, the media and the nature of thecreation of art.
  32. 32. BILL BRANDThttp://www.vam.ac.uk/page/b/bill-brandt/ Perspective of NudesInstead of photographingwhat I saw, Iphotographed what thecamera was seeing. Iinterfered very little, andthe lens producedanatomical images andshapes which my eyes hadnever observed.Bill Brandt
  33. 33. AARON SISKINDSiskinds work focuses on thedetails of nature andarchitecture. He presents themas flat surfaces to create a newimage out of them, which, heclaimed, stands independent ofthe original subject. http://www.aaronsiskind.org

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