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“Victorian Summer”
“Red Music Box”
What is Assemblage Assemblage sculpture is the  bonding of shapes or objects by  gluing, soldering, pasting, nailing,  et...
“Red Planet”
“Thinking of Mahler”
Why is it important? Assemblage is an innovative  method of creating art. Many world famous artists have  used assemblag...
Reconstructed    Chair
Famous Artists that used          Assemblage   Marcel Duchamp   Bicycle Wheel was the first of a    class of objects tha...
Fountain    Duchamp’s most notorious     readymade was a manufactured     urinal entitled “Fountain”. Conceived     for a...
Box in a Valise   Box in a Valise is a    portable museum of    Duchamp’s works,    reproduced in    miniature, packed   ...
Louise Nevelson“I have made my world and it is a much better world than I                 ever saw outside”
Louise Nevelson (1899-1988) was a toweringfigure in postwar American art, exerting greatinfluence with her monumental inst...
“Rain Garden II”
Her autobiographical works symbolically address issues ofmarriage, motherhood, death, Jewish culture, memory and        (a...
   Nevelson was born in the Ukraine and immigrated to    the United States with her family six years later. Her life    e...
   Despite the size and drama of Nevelson’s sculptures,    they were at times overwhelmed by her larger-than-    life pub...
Robert Rauschenberg
“Monogram”
Rauschenberg   Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and his rejection of the angst    and seriousness of the Abs...
You tube Video aboutDeKooning/Rauschenberghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpCWh3IFtDQ
In Conclusion   Assemblage is a creative method of sculpture    incorporating everyday found objects into a    three-dime...
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
Assemblage sculpture
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Assemblage sculpture

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Assemblage sculpture

  1. 1. “Victorian Summer”
  2. 2. “Red Music Box”
  3. 3. What is Assemblage Assemblage sculpture is the bonding of shapes or objects by gluing, soldering, pasting, nailing, etc… These objects tend to be mainly found objects. Basically, assemblage is a three- dimensional collage.
  4. 4. “Red Planet”
  5. 5. “Thinking of Mahler”
  6. 6. Why is it important? Assemblage is an innovative method of creating art. Many world famous artists have used assemblage to create modern masterpieces. Assemblage allows us to give new meaning to everyday objects.
  7. 7. Reconstructed Chair
  8. 8. Famous Artists that used Assemblage Marcel Duchamp Bicycle Wheel was the first of a class of objects that Duchamp called his “readymades.” He created twenty-one of them, all between 1915 and 1923. The readymades are a varied collection of items, but there are several ideas that unite them. The readymades are experiments in provocation, the products of a conscious effort to break every rule of the artistic tradition, in order to create a new kind of art—one that engages the mind instead of the eye, in ways that provoke the observer to participate and think.
  9. 9. Fountain  Duchamp’s most notorious readymade was a manufactured urinal entitled “Fountain”. Conceived for a show promoting avant-garde art, “Fountain” took advantage of the show’s lack of juried panels, which invariably excluded forward- looking artists.  Under a pseudonym, “R.Mutt,” Duchamp submitted “Fountain”. It was a prank, meant to taunt his avant-garde peers. For some of the show’s organizers this was too much —was the artist equating modern art with a toilet fixture? –and “Fountain” as ‘misplaced’ for the duration of the exhibition. It disappeared soon thereafter.
  10. 10. Box in a Valise Box in a Valise is a portable museum of Duchamp’s works, reproduced in miniature, packed in a customized collapsible case, like a salesman’s valise. It debuted in a deluxe edition of twenty copies in 1940. Duchamp must have been concerned for his legacy. In 1934 he learned that a few of his works had been broken. More than half the readymades were lost. Box in a Valise is a mini-museum, a resume of Duchamp’s life in art, created with painstaking care in the face of a vanishing material legacy.
  11. 11. Louise Nevelson“I have made my world and it is a much better world than I ever saw outside”
  12. 12. Louise Nevelson (1899-1988) was a toweringfigure in postwar American art, exerting greatinfluence with her monumental installations,innovative sculptures made of found woodobjects, and celebrated public art. She wasrecognized during her lifetime as one ofAmerica’s most prominent and innovativesculptors, and her work continues to inspirecontemporary sculptors today.
  13. 13. “Rain Garden II”
  14. 14. Her autobiographical works symbolically address issues ofmarriage, motherhood, death, Jewish culture, memory and (although she resisted the label) feminism.
  15. 15.  Nevelson was born in the Ukraine and immigrated to the United States with her family six years later. Her life encompassed most of the 20th century, giving her exposure to Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, and installation art. Although linked to all of these movements, Nevelson formed a unique visual language that earned her recognition as one of America’s most distinguished artists. Her work continues to inform contemporary sculpture nearly 20 years after her death. Her groundbreaking technique involved assembling cast-off wood pieces and transforming them with coats of monochromatic black, white, and (more rarely) gold spray paint. Nevelson’s work started with tabletop scale objects, but quickly grew into human-scale and room- sized works. Her later, monumental public works stood their ground with the buildings that surrounded them.
  16. 16.  Despite the size and drama of Nevelson’s sculptures, they were at times overwhelmed by her larger-than- life public persona. She was known for wearing eye- catching assemblages of couture, ethnographic clothing, outsize jewelry and hats. A trademark look involved donning multiple layers of false eyelashes. “With the passage of time, Nevelson’s larger-than- life persona may be viewed in historical perspective, thus allowing viewers to focus on her extraordinary artistic legacy,” says Timothy Anglin Burgard, Ednah Root Curator-in-Charge of the American Art Department.
  17. 17. Robert Rauschenberg
  18. 18. “Monogram”
  19. 19. Rauschenberg Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. He found his signature mode by embracing materials traditionally outside of the artist’s reach. He would cover a canvas with house paint, or ink the wheel of a car and run it over paper to create a drawing, while demonstrating rigor and concern for formal painting. By 1958, at the time of his first solo exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery, his work had moved from abstract painting to drawings like “Erased De Kooning” (1953) (which was exactly as it sounds) to what he termed “combines.” These combines (meant to express both the finding and forming of combinations in three-dimensional collage) cemented his place in art history. One of Rauschenberg’s first and most famous combines was entitled “Monogram” (1959) and consisted of an unlikely set of materials: a stuffed angora goat, a tire, a police barrier, the heel of a shoe, a tennis ball, and paint. This pioneering altered the course of modern art. The idea of combining and of noticing combinations of objects and images has remained at the core of Rauschenberg’s work.
  20. 20. You tube Video aboutDeKooning/Rauschenberghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpCWh3IFtDQ
  21. 21. In Conclusion Assemblage is a creative method of sculpture incorporating everyday found objects into a three-dimensional sculpture and can be used to create dramatic, humorous, satirical, and emotional works of art.

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