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(Anthro)pause for thought

  1. 1. Alan Parkinson Head of Geography, King’s Ely Junior CGeog, FRGS
  2. 2. What is the anthropause? the global-scale, temporary slowdown in human activity, which is likely to have a profound impact on other species.
  3. 3. June 2020: “the great human pause”
  4. 4. The term emerged during the first lockdown Prof Christian Rutz et al https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-020-1237-z There will be unforeseen opportunities to reinvent the way we live our lives, and to forge a mutually beneficial coexistence with other species. It would be wonderful if careful research during this period of crisis helped us to find innovative ways of reining in our increasingly expansive lifestyles, to rediscover how important a healthy environment is for our own well-being, and to replace a sense of owning with a sense of belonging. We hope that people will choose to hear the wake-up call.
  5. 5. http://trends.google.com
  6. 6. https://languages.oup.com/word-of- the-year/2020/
  7. 7. Google Mobility reports https://www.google.com/covid19/mobility / Free Access
  8. 8. Emergence Magazine Podcast Naturalist Michael McCarthy “Spring in the time of Coronavirus” https://emergencemagazine.org/essay/the-consolation-of- nature/ Free Access
  9. 9. Appreciating the local 1km from home Create your own map with different diameters using: https://2kmfromhome.com/
  10. 10. The temporal experience of the current anthropause is universally framed as a slowing‐down of everyday life; at odds with the general accelerationism of globalised extractive economies. https://rgs- ibg.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12373 https://emergencemagazine.org/op_ed/desire-paths/ The time we’re living through feels borrowed against a future which is no longer guaranteed. There are glimpses of what the new world could be like—slower, quieter, more given to care— but much of this strange time looks like the old world of inequality and neglect asserting itself with a vengeance. The transition from old to new seems far from clear. This is why, I think, I keep looking for new ways to get lost, even briefly, in places that are most familiar to me. David Farrier
  11. 11. https://www.centreforcities.org/data/high-streets-recovery- tracker/
  12. 12. https://www.centreforcities.org/data/high-streets-recovery- tracker/
  13. 13. Pauses to keep... “...the resultant fall in global emissions of carbon dioxide: in the first six months of this year, the total was an 8.8 percent decrease from the same period in 2019, a drop of more than 1.5 billion tonnes of CO2” https://lithub.com/covid-19s-anthropause-has-made-nature- visible-again-at-least-for-now/
  14. 14. “Essential”
  15. 15. “Human buzz” Traditionally, seismology has focused on measuring seismic waves, resulting after earthquakes. Seismic records from natural sources, however, are contaminated by high-frequency vibrations ("buzz") from humans on the surface — walking around, driving cars, and catching the train. subsurface. Heavy industry and construction also generate seismic waves that are recorded on seismographs.
  16. 16. A pause to stop Send my Friend to School campaign 800 million children still out of school... https://sendmyfriend.org
  17. 17. https://rgs- ibg.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geoj.12373 Free Access
  18. 18. https://rgs- ibg.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 111/geoj.12373
  19. 19. Animals “Goats in the streets in Wales” “Heard the birds more clearly…” Animals indirectly dependent on human activity fared worse during the anthropause due, for example, to the absence of roadkill carrion (Garlick, 2020). Those dependent on human waste for food, such as synurbic rats, pigeons, and foxes, were forced to alter their rhythms and topographic patterns. Rats in cities around the world, for example, became more visible during the day and expanded their geographic ranges in search of food as restaurants closed and stopped leaving discards on the street (Parsons et al., 2020).
  20. 20. https://blog.geographydirections.com/2021/02/10/what-can- geographers-learn-from-the-2020-anthropause Free Access
  21. 21. New PC Geographies - over a year in the writing V11.0 About 200 pages https://docs.google.com/document/d/1WEuZiEy dbcxmBOs0lfs0_2_vzwIX-OLGljw-SS- M4UU/edit?usp=sharing
  22. 22. Thanks - stay safe a.parkinson@gmail.com @GeoBlogs

(Anthro)pause for thought

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