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About ERS

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Our new way of telling the story of what we do and how we do it. This presentation also unveils our updated framework: The Strategic System for Strong Schools, formerly known as School System 20/20.

Published in: Education
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About ERS

  1. 1. Every School. Every Child. Ready for Tomorrow.
  2. 2. 2 Every School. Every Child. Ready for Tomorrow. ERS is a national non-profit that partners with district, school, and state leaders to transform how they use resources (people, time, and money) so that every school prepares every child for tomorrow, no matter their race or income.
  3. 3. 3 Let’s start with the students
  4. 4. 4 Meet Adrian, a 6th grader at Status Quo Middle School, who wants to be an engineer but is behind in math.
  5. 5. 5 Meet Adrian, a 6th grader at Status Quo Middle School, who wants to be an engineer but is behind in math. My Typical Day I have 1 period of math and 1 of ELA with no additional time for help. I’m one of 120 students that my teacher is responsible for, and most classes are 25-27 students. Most of my classmates are also struggling. 2 of my 6 teachers are novice, and only 1 was rated highly effective.
  6. 6. Now let’s consider the teachers
  7. 7. 7 Meet Adrian’s Teacher, Ms. Andrews, a novice ELA teacher in Status Quo Middle School.
  8. 8. 8 My Typical Day I teach 5 out of 6 periods a day and only get 1 period to plan. I have 120 students to get to know. My students have significant skill gaps. My PLC team meets weekly to review curriculum, but we rarely look at student work. No one is helping us to guide planning or provide lesson feedback.
  9. 9. 9 Districts face a triple squeeze: A higher bar for student learning and greater needs Unsustainable cost structures Flat or decreasing revenue
  10. 10. 10 What if we could radically change Adrian and Ms. Andrews’ experience without spending more money?
  11. 11. 11 What if Ms. Andrews could… Spend 90 min/ week planning with her team Work with < 50 students Be paired with a co-teacher What if Adrian could… Spend 1 hour/ day in targeted intervention Be in a class of < 10 students Be taught by highly effective teachers
  12. 12. 12 Impossible, you say?Impossible, you say? It is hard but it is possible.
  13. 13. 13 For example, schools can… ADJUST CLASS SIZE ADD TEACHER COLLABORATION TIME Decrease classes in math by increasing size of non-core classes Avg. class size Status Quo Strategic School Math Other core Non-core 23 23 23 16 23 30 A 7-period schedule can increase collaboration from 65 to 110 minutes/week Status Quo Strategic School Teach 5 of 6 Periods 4 days/week: Teach 6 of 7 periods 1 day/week: Teach 5 of 7 periods
  14. 14. 14 Some schools beat the odds. Queens Metropolitan New York Regents Exam rose from 76% to 83% in Algebra I and from 27% to 40% in Algebra II Jeremiah E. Burke Massachusetts Math & ELA proficiency rates have more than doubled since 2010 Ridge Road North Carolina Suspension rates decreased 50%, and end of grade test scores increased by 14%
  15. 15. 15 They beat the odds by “doing school” in new ways. STRATEGIC SCHOOL DESIGN
  16. 16. 16 ERS supports school system leaders to change the odds so that every school and every child can thrive. THE STRATEGIC SYSTEM for strong schools
  17. 17. 17 We focus on five resource-intensive areas of system design. THE STRATEGIC SYSTEM for strong schools
  18. 18. 18 What could districts do to change the odds? Human Capital
  19. 19. 19 Connect professional learning to curriculum, team planning, and feedback Support principals with talent management Compensate teachers for their contributions For example... What could districts do to change the odds? Human Capital
  20. 20. 20 What could districts do to change the odds?
  21. 21. 21 For example... What could districts do to change the odds? Allocate resources equitably— adjusted for student need Offer schools flexibility and support to use people, time, and money strategically Make resource levels and use transparent
  22. 22. 22 What could districts do to change the odds?
  23. 23. 23 Redesign school planning, staffing, and budget processes Differentiate principal support Maximize service quality and efficiency For example... What could districts do to change the odds?
  24. 24. 24 We support system leaders to make shifts in these five areas through:
  25. 25. 25 Data: Analysis & Benchmarking Implementation: Planning & Monitoring Design: Prototypes, trade-offs, & consensus building
  26. 26. 26 We offer three forms of support Workshops, webinars, and events Do-it-yourself tools and research Partnerships with districts and states
  27. 27. 27 We partner with districts across the country to transform resource use so that every school succeeds for every student. Current State Work Past State Work Current District Work Past District Work CLICK FOR CITY DETAIL
  28. 28. 28 Partnership Service Offerings Strategic System Snapshot Targeted Implementation and Design Strategic Resource Map
  29. 29. 29 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Cleveland Metropolitan School District Situation: The “Cleveland Plan” is launched ERS: Strategic Resource Snapshot; budgeting model design and implementation; central office redesign; school design training Outcome: All four sections of 2015 Nation’s Report Card improved, enrollment increased, school leaders control 71% of spending vs. 2%, high- needs schools receive 6% more Cleveland
  30. 30. 30 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Cleveland Metropolitan School District Cleveland “Our work with ERS has empowered us to truly own our strategy as district leaders and become better partners to the schools we serve. ”— John Scanlan, former Chief Financial Officer, CMSD MORE ON CLEVELAND
  31. 31. 31 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Baltimore City Public Schools Situation: $130 million deficit ERS: Strategic Resource Snapshot; detailed budget analysis; resource reallocations Outcome: $180 million in additional funding from city and state over three years Baltimore
  32. 32. 32 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Baltimore City Public Schools Baltimore “I’ve been inundated with so much information, and this is by far the most strategic, easiest to understand and most useful. ”— Dr. Sonja Santelises, Superintendent of Baltimore City Public Schools
  33. 33. 33 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Oakland Unified School District Oakland Situation: Improve student performance and graduation rate, which was under 65% ERS: Analysis revealed schools had schedule structures that prevented a typical student from taking the courses he or she needed to graduate Outcome: All students in Oakland today can access the courses required for graduation
  34. 34. 34 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: Oakland Unified School District “ERS has the scheduling tools that are applicable, helpful and reflect best practices in scheduling. ”— Preston Thomas, OUSD Network Superintendent Oakland
  35. 35. 35 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: New York State Situation: New York designated a cohort of eight districts to identify opportunities to realign resources ERS: Strategic Resource Mapping; district workshops; state-level analysis with policy recommendations Outcome: Identified $24 billion available to reallocate for greater student achievement and each district in the cohort had a final action plan to realize these opportunities
  36. 36. 36 Our track record in multi-year partnerships: New York State “When we first started with ERS, we were a little bit skeptical, but as we began the work, we saw real areas that we can address… (this process) provided an opportunity to challenge our thinking, to challenge the way that we do things, in an effort to move our student achievement to a higher level. ”— Dawn Mirand, Superintendent, Kenmore-Town of Tonawanda School District (approx. 7,000 students)
  37. 37. 37 We facilitate workshops, webinars, and events to build skills in resource transformation
  38. 38. 38 In partnership with many other organizations that support district and state leaders and policymakers, like: • Achievement Network • Advance Illinois • American Institutes for Research (AIR) • The Annenberg Institute on School Reform • The Aspen Institute • Association of School Business Officials (ASBO) • The Center for American Progress • Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) • Chiefs for Change • The Council of the Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) • Ed Build • Education Counsel • Education First • The Education Trust • GO Oakland • Large Countywide and Suburban District Consortium • Leading Educators • Learning Forward • The Learning Policy Institute • National Association of State Boards of Education • New Leaders • New Teacher Center • The Policy Innovators in Education (PIE) Network • Public Impact • Relay Graduate School of Education • Strategic Data Project • Student Achievement Partners • TNTP • UnBoundEd • The Urban Schools Human Capital Academy • WestEd
  39. 39. 39 Our track record in workshops, webinars and events: Tennessee Dept. of Education Situation: Incorporate a performance component into teacher pay schedule ERS: Held workshops on redesigning teacher compensation systems Outcome: 83% of districts now offer differentiated roles and pay for teachers, 60% offer differentiated pay for hard-to-staff positions, 49% offer modified teacher salary schedules, 40% offer bonuses
  40. 40. 40 Our track record in workshops, webinars and events: Tennessee Dept. of Education “This is doable! ”— Tennessee school district leader after an ERS workshop on redesigning teacher compensation
  41. 41. 41 Our track record in workshops, webinars and events: School District of Philadelphia Philadelphia Situation: Reimagine the budget team’s role from transactional to strategic ERS: Held a “budget partner” retreat Outcome: Updated their school budgeting tool to emphasize connection between spending and academic goals
  42. 42. 42 Our track record in workshops, webinars and events: School District of Philadelphia Philadelphia “This retreat will help me engage with site administration in a different way, to truly partner and think through investment strategies in a better way. ”— Budget Partner Retreat Philadelphia participant
  43. 43. 43 We create DIY tools and research, based on years of experience, to scale lessons learned
  44. 44. 44 We create DIY tools based on years of experience, which help leaders scale lessons learned School Designer
  45. 45. 45 We create DIY tools based on years of experience, which help leaders scale lessons learned
  46. 46. 46 Our track record in DIY tools: Marysville, Michigan Marysville ERS: Resource Check, our web- based tool, allows groups to rate practice across strategies and analyze responses Situation: Lagging student performance and lack of unified vision Outcome: Created a group for cabinet to use tool and published plan, US News & Report ranked Marysville top 6% in 2017
  47. 47. 47 Our track record in DIY tools: Marysville, Michigan Marysville “ERS’ tool gave us an effective way to gauge our strengths and misalignments against best practices. ”— Shawn Wightman, Superintendent
  48. 48. 48 Nationally recognized team Why are we uniquely positioned to play this role? Unrivaled data systems Non-profit status enables collaboration
  49. 49. 49 We strive to incorporate our core values into everything we do. Impact Teamwork Candor Learning Work-Life Balance Service
  50. 50. Cleveland What does our work look like on the ground?
  51. 51. In 2012-2014, we partnered with Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) Fall 2012 Summer 2014 Resource Map Summer 2013 - Summer 2014Fall 2012 - Summer 2013 Central Office Redesign Student-Based Budgeting Design School Design Training
  52. 52. First, we used the Strategic Resource Map analysis to paint a picture of CMSD’s current resource use Interviews with District Leadership Interviews with Department Heads HR and Evaluation Data Student Performance Expenditure Detail Course Schedules Student Enrollment Payroll Detail School Data ANALYS IS ANALYS IS Strategic Resource Map
  53. 53. The Strategic Resource Map revealed structures that needed to change for SBB to succeed Teacher compensation, effectiveness, and engagement: • High spending on experience pay and education credits, rather than responsibility and results • 37% rated below average; 30% absent more than 14 days a year School portfolio and spending: • High Special Ed identification rates and high spending on the program • Over half of schools are “small schools”—not deliberately Strategic School Design and school support from Central: • School leaders lack flexibility, expertise, and time to use people, time, and money to meet student needs and school goals • Central office is not transparent or collaborative in how they distribute resources to schools
  54. 54. Teaching effectiveness, compensation, and career path We supported CMSD to… define priorities to address teaching effectiveness, and analyze collective bargaining options CMSD took steps by… Signing teachers’ contract in 2013 with 71% approval • Differentiated compensation with raises based on responsibility and results • More scheduling flexibility for schools, to fit longer day and more collaborative planning time • Hiring and assignment done by school-based teams Offering early retirement incentive to teachers Managing out ~100 low-performing teachers
  55. 55. We supported CMSD to… design and implement a student- based budgeting funding model Now, in CMSD… School leaders control 71% of school spending, as opposed to 2% under the old model The model includes weights for high and low achievement, attendance, and mobility as well as special education and ELL High-needs schools received nearly 6% more on average in total dollars per pupil under SBB Student-Based Budgeting (SBB)
  56. 56. School Support redesign and culture shift at Central Office We supported CMSD to… create “Network Support Teams” made up of representatives from finance, HR, special education, and academics to coach schools as they create strategic school plans Now, in CMSD… The Central Office is shifting from compliance monitor to strategic partner, working with schools to “get to yes” on ideas 90% of school leaders reported that clinics with “Network Support Team” clinics were helpful
  57. 57. Strategic School Design training and roll-out We supported CMSD to… offer resource flexibility and training in strategic school design to a pilot cohort of schools; train all CMSD schools in strategic school design; Now, in CMSD… School leaders have more flexibility and support to use their people, time, and money strategically. 8 of 10 pilot schools plan to increase collaborative planning time or implement targeted or flexible student groupings
  58. 58. Strategic School Design training and roll-out Allow math interventionist (who is highly effective in Reading and Math) to push-in to support flexible grouping and intervention in lower grades Implement WIN (what I need) block (intervention/enrichment); students regrouped every 3 weeks Reorganize schedule to ensure that teachers have significant and meaningful time to plan in teams (including for WIN block) Utilize 5 extended year days for teaching professional development and collaboration Start an orientation program for new students and parents Implement a buddy/tutoring program and “responsive classroom” model Combined and increased PE class sizes to support common planning time Reduced .5 non-core teachers Reduced substitute spending KEY CHANGES NOTABLE TRADE-OFFS
  59. 59. Strategic School Design training and roll-out Allow math interventionist (who is highly effective in Reading and Math) to push-in to support flexible grouping and intervention in lower grades Implement WIN (what I need) block (intervention/enrichment); students regrouped every 3 weeks Reorganize schedule to ensure that teachers have significant and meaningful time to plan in teams (including for WIN block) Utilize 5 extended year days for teaching professional development and collaboration Start an orientation program for new students and parents Implement a buddy/tutoring program and “responsive classroom” model Combined and increased PE class sizes to support common planning time Reduced .5 non-core teachers Reduced substitute spending KEY CHANGES NOTABLE TRADE-OFFS
  60. 60. 61 We partner with districts across the country to transform resource use so that every school succeeds for every student. WEST COAST California Sacramento, Oakland, Los Angeles Colorado Denver SOUTHWEST 15 Arizona Arizona Community Foundation New Mexico Santa Fe, Albuquerque Oklahoma Tulsa Texas El Paso, Austin, Aldine, Spring Branch MIDWEST Minnesota St. Paul Illinois Chicago Indiana Indianapolis Ohio Cleveland, Cincinnati Michigan Michigan State University SOUTH Tennessee Memphis, Nashville, Knox County, TN Dept. of Education Georgia Atlanta, GA Dept. of Education Florida Duval County, Lake County, Palm Beach County North Carolina Charlotte-Mecklenburg Louisiana Avoyelles Parish, LA Dept. of Education NORTHEAST Massachusetts Boston, Cambridge, Holyoke Rhode Island Providence Connecticut Hartford, Waterbury, New Haven, Connecticut Council for Education Reform New York Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, New York City, NY State Dept. of Education Pennsylvania Philadelphia New Jersey Newark Maryland Baltimore, Prince George’s County Washington, D.C. D.C. Public Schools Current State Work Past State Work Current District Work Past District Work
  61. 61. 62 We partner with districts across the country to transform resource use so that every school succeeds for every student. WEST COAST California Sacramento, Oakland, Los Angeles Colorado Denver SOUTHWEST 15 Arizona Arizona Community Foundation New Mexico Santa Fe, Albuquerque Oklahoma Tulsa Texas El Paso, Austin, Aldine, Spring Branch MIDWEST Minnesota St. Paul Illinois Chicago Indiana Indianapolis Ohio Cleveland, Cincinnati Michigan Michigan State University SOUTH Tennessee Memphis, Nashville, Knox County, TN Dept. of Education Georgia Atlanta, GA Dept. of Education Florida Duval County, Lake County, Palm Beach County North Carolina Charlotte-Mecklenburg Louisiana Avoyelles Parish, LA Dept. of Education NORTHEAST Massachusetts Boston, Cambridge, Holyoke Rhode Island Providence Connecticut Hartford, Waterbury, New Haven, Connecticut Council for Education Reform New York Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, New York City, NY State Dept. of Education Pennsylvania Philadelphia New Jersey Newark Maryland Baltimore, Prince George’s County Washington, D.C. D.C. Public Schools Current State Work Past State Work Current District Work Past District Work

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