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Introduction to Complete Streets

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This presentation provides an overview of Complete Streets. Please visit www.completestreets.org for more information.

This presentation is free for for non-commercial use. For-profit entities wishing to use our presentations and materials in working with clients should contact us at sseskin [at] completestreets [dot] org.

Published in: Technology, Real Estate

Introduction to Complete Streets

  1. 1. 1 Introduction to Complete Streets March 2015
  2. 2. What are Complete Streets? 2 Complete Streets are streets for everyone, no matter who they are or how they travel.
  3. 3. What are Complete Streets? 3 Safe Comfortable Convenient
  4. 4. What are Complete Streets? 4 Safe Comfortable Convenient
  5. 5. Americans want choices 5 of Americans want more transportation options so they have the freedom to choose how to get where they need to go. Future of Transportation National Survey (2010) 66% 73% 57% currently feel they have no choice but to drive as much as they do. would like to spend less time in the car.
  6. 6. Getting out of traffic 6 Future of Transportation National Survey (2010)
  7. 7. The tremendous potential 7 Of all trips: National Household Travel Survey (2009) 50% are less than 3 miles 28% are less than 1 mile 60% are driven of these trips…
  8. 8. The tremendous potential 8 Every trip starts and ends with walking.
  9. 9. People will walk 9 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012, newpublichealth.org
  10. 10. Who wants Complete Streets? 10 of older Americans say it is unsafe to cross a major street near their home. Planning Complete Streets for the Aging of America, AARP 47% 54% 56% of older Americans living in inhospitable neighborhoods say they would walk and bike more often if the built environment improved. express strong support for adoption of Complete Streets policies.
  11. 11. Who wants Complete Streets? Millennials are driving less and looking for other transportation options. 11
  12. 12. Incomplete streets are unsafe More than 40% of pedestrian deaths in 2007 and 2008 occurred where no crosswalk was available. 12 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Reporting System
  13. 13. Incomplete streets are unsafe Especially for: • People of color • Low-income communities • Older adults • Children 13
  14. 14. Streets are inadequate • No sidewalks • Too dangerous to cross on foot 14
  15. 15. Streets are inadequate • Unsafe for people on bicycles 15 Streets are inadequate
  16. 16. Streets are inadequate • Traffic jams on arterials • Too many crashes 16
  17. 17. Streets are inadequate • Uninviting for bus riders 17
  18. 18. Streets are inadequate • Inaccessible for wheelchair users 18
  19. 19. Streets are inadequate • No room for people! 19
  20. 20. We know how to build right 20
  21. 21. We know how to build right 21
  22. 22. We know how to build right 22
  23. 23. Yet too many roads still turn out like this: 23
  24. 24. or this: 24
  25. 25. or this: 25
  26. 26. The Solution: Complete Streets Policies 26
  27. 27. Complete Streets policies Ensure that the entire right-of-way is planned, designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to provide safe access for all users 27
  28. 28. Complete Streets: Is a high-level policy direction Changes the everyday decision-making processes and systems Represents an incremental approach Has long-term results 28
  29. 29. Complete Streets is not: • One “special” street project • A design prescription • A mandate for immediate retrofit • A silver bullet; other issues must be addressed: • Land use (proximity, mixed-use) • Environmental concerns • Transportation Demand Management 29
  30. 30. Rural roads with shared use trails 0 30
  31. 31. Paved shoulders on bridges 31
  32. 32. Low-traffic, low-speed skinny residential streets 3232
  33. 33. Skinny residential streets with sidewalks 3 33
  34. 34. Main streets 3434
  35. 35. Shared commercial streets 3535
  36. 36. Bus-only lanes 3636
  37. 37. Bus Rapid Transit 37
  38. 38. Traffic circles 38
  39. 39. Neighborhood greenways 39
  40. 40. Angled head-out parking 40
  41. 41. Protected bike lanes 41
  42. 42. Advisory bicycle lanes 42
  43. 43. Modern roundabouts 43
  44. 44. For more information • Model policies & reports • Best Complete Streets Policies • Local Policy Workbook • Implementation resources • Latest news www.completestreets.org www.smartgrowthamerica.org 44
  45. 45. National Complete Streets Coalition Steering Committee 45 AARP AECOM Alliance for Biking & Walking America Walks American Planning Association APTA American Society of Landscape Architects Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Institute of Transportation Engineers National Association of City Transportation Officials National Association of Realtors NelsonNygaard Smart Growth America SRAM Stantec SvR Design Company
  46. 46. Copyright & use This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial use with attribution. Any of these conditions may be waived with permission. For-profit organizations wishing to use this presentation should contact us at sseskin@completestreets.org or 773-270-3534. For more information about this license, please visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ 46
  47. 47. Smart Growth America is the only national organization dedicated to researching, advocating for and leading coalitions to bring smart growth practices to more communities nationwide. www.smartgrowthamerica.org 1707 L St. NW Suite 250, Washington, DC 20036 | 202-207-3355

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