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<ul><li>Complete Streets Activists Call  3.1.12 </li></ul><ul><li>http://sierraclub.org/transportation </li></ul>
The Sierra Club is the nation’s oldest, largest, and most influential grassroots environmental organization. photos: Sierr...
Transportation in the U.S. <ul><li>Since the 1950s,   national transportation policy has almost exclusively focused on bui...
Advancing Complete Streets in Your Community Stefanie Seskin National Complete Streets Coalition March 1, 2012
We know how to build right
We know how to build right
Yet too many roads still turn out like this:
or this:
or this:
<ul><li>One Solution: </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets Policies </li></ul>
Complete Streets Policies <ul><li>A Complete Streets policy ensures that the entire right of way is planned, designed, and...
Communities Adopting Policies
Policy Adoption Over Time Total New
Types of Jurisdictions through 2/22/12
Policies by Type through 2/22/12
Check the Complete Streets Atlas
<ul><li>Policies are now built around providing automobile access (privilege) </li></ul><ul><li>Funding structure is set u...
<ul><li>Policies can be built around serving everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets changes the funding structure to ...
<ul><li>Transportation planners and engineers can become our allies! </li></ul><ul><li>Changing the tide means changing th...
State DOT Federal funding State programs  Projects selected MPO Formal plans Policies & practices Projects selected Local ...
<ul><li>Change our cultural and practical expectations. </li></ul>Our Role <ul><li>Don’t be stymied by technical arguments...
<ul><li>Sets a  vision . </li></ul><ul><li>Includes  all users  and  all modes . </li></ul><ul><li>Applies to  all phases ...
Policy Development Guidance
Policy Development Guidance
Policy Development Guidance <ul><li>www.completestreets.org/policyanalysis </li></ul>
Assessing Policy Strength <ul><li>200+ policies adopted through 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluated against ‘ideal’ policy la...
Policy Analysis 2010 <ul><li>Look up your policy & policies in similar communities </li></ul><ul><li>Understand how to bes...
<ul><li>Be persistent </li></ul><ul><li>Be a resource </li></ul><ul><li>Appeal to varied interests </li></ul><ul><li>Work ...
<ul><li>Do your homework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Find out what policies already exist in your state & region – you can build...
<ul><li>Decide where you want to focus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City – can be easiest, most focused </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Find your best insider advocate(s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City Council member, County Commissioner, Mayor, local pl...
National Steering Committee
<ul><li>“ You are not alone”  OR  “Be a leader” </li></ul><ul><li>Significant support from U.S. DOT; growing national move...
<ul><li>Improving roadways safety for everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Providing choices where none/few currently exist </li></u...
<ul><li>A design prescription </li></ul><ul><li>A mandate for immediate retrofit </li></ul><ul><li>A silver bullet; other ...
<ul><li>There is  no singular design prescription  for Complete Streets; each one is unique and responds to its community ...
The Many Types of Complete Streets Rural route with a shared use path
The Many Types of Complete Streets Rural route with a wide shoulder
The Many Types of Complete Streets Low traffic shared street
The Many Types of Complete Streets Residential skinny street
The Many Types of Complete Streets Low-traffic residential street
The Many Types of Complete Streets High visibility crossings
The Many Types of Complete Streets Small town Main Street
The Many Types of Complete Streets Historic downtown
The Many Types of Complete Streets Urban neighborhood street
The Many Types of Complete Streets Transit routes
The Many Types of Complete Streets Urban arterials
<ul><li>Need to provide for existing users. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets is meant to be achieved within  existing  b...
<ul><li>Complete streets is about using  existing resources  differently: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>STP, Equity Bonus, CMAQ, T...
<ul><li>Avoid costly retrofits </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal additional funding </li></ul><ul><li>Save money with better desig...
Simple, Low-Cost, High-Impact
<ul><li>Complete streets can save money. </li></ul><ul><li>Narrower travel lanes require less land, less pavement </li></u...
<ul><li>Needed to replace road after necessary sewer work </li></ul><ul><li>Priced at  $6 million to replace road as is </...
Getting Out of Traffic Most Americans feel providing more transportation options will reduce congestion, not building or e...
<ul><li>A majority of Missourians support spending 25% of transportation $ on biking and walking facilities, </li></ul><ul...
<ul><li>In 2006, Seattle voters passed a nine-year, $365 million levy for transportation maintenance and improvements. </l...
<ul><li>Mayor Karl Dean’s 2010-2011 transportation budget: </li></ul><ul><li>$12.5 million dollars for sidewalks </li></ul...
Streets Can Benefit Communities <ul><li>Increase capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Improve safety </li></ul><ul><li>Better health...
Incomplete Streets are Unsafe <ul><li>More than 40% of pedestrian deaths in 2007 and 2008 occurred where  no crosswalk was...
<ul><li>Tool to reduce incidence of obesity and chronic disease </li></ul><ul><li>“ Active Transportation” = part of every...
<ul><li>20% of Americans have a disability that limits their daily activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets feature ...
<ul><li>By 2025, nearly 1/5 of Americans will be 65 or older. </li></ul><ul><li>About ½ of all non-drivers over the age of...
<ul><li>Americans spent 18 cents of every dollar on transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Working families in 17 of 28 regions ...
Enhance Economic Competitiveness <ul><li>$8 milllion  public investment  in streetscape improvement 2003-2004 </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Complete streets policies ‘pave the way’ for future Smart Growth development </li></ul><ul><li>They invest traditi...
<ul><li>Residents are 65% more likely to walk in a neighborhood with sidewalks. </li></ul><ul><li>Cities with more bike la...
<ul><li>Transportation accounts for  nearly 1/3  of all greenhouse gas emissions. </li></ul><ul><li>Switching from driving...
<ul><li>Rain gardens and bioswales can be built into traffic calming elements such as refuge islands and curb extensions. ...
Quality of Life <ul><li>Walkable communities = happier communities </li></ul><ul><li>Residents of walkable communities: </...
<ul><li>Full-day, interactive, customized workshops with two nationally-known instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Engages planne...
For more information <ul><li>Fact sheets, photos, brochures </li></ul><ul><li>Information on changing policy </li></ul><ul...
[email_address]
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Complete streets activists call presentation - part 1

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Complete streets activists call presentation - part 1

  1. 1. <ul><li>Complete Streets Activists Call 3.1.12 </li></ul><ul><li>http://sierraclub.org/transportation </li></ul>
  2. 2. The Sierra Club is the nation’s oldest, largest, and most influential grassroots environmental organization. photos: Sierra Club
  3. 3. Transportation in the U.S. <ul><li>Since the 1950s, national transportation policy has almost exclusively focused on building roads . </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation accounts for 70% of oil use in U.S. and 30% of greenhouse gas pollution. </li></ul><ul><li>According to the Federal Highway Administration, 25% of U.S. roads and bridges are in disrepair. </li></ul><ul><li>Only 54% of Americans have access to public transportation , according to the US Census Bureau. </li></ul><ul><li>Each year, Americans spend 4.2 billion hours stuck in traffic. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Advancing Complete Streets in Your Community Stefanie Seskin National Complete Streets Coalition March 1, 2012
  5. 5. We know how to build right
  6. 6. We know how to build right
  7. 7. Yet too many roads still turn out like this:
  8. 8. or this:
  9. 9. or this:
  10. 10. <ul><li>One Solution: </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets Policies </li></ul>
  11. 11. Complete Streets Policies <ul><li>A Complete Streets policy ensures that the entire right of way is planned, designed, and operated to provide safe access for all users. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Communities Adopting Policies
  13. 13. Policy Adoption Over Time Total New
  14. 14. Types of Jurisdictions through 2/22/12
  15. 15. Policies by Type through 2/22/12
  16. 16. Check the Complete Streets Atlas
  17. 17. <ul><li>Policies are now built around providing automobile access (privilege) </li></ul><ul><li>Funding structure is set up for car-oriented roads </li></ul><ul><li>Land owners and developers seeking automobile access have the ear of decision makers </li></ul>Why a policy approach?
  18. 18. <ul><li>Policies can be built around serving everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets changes the funding structure to benefit all modes </li></ul><ul><li>Community leaders and public health advocates seeking Complete Streets can gain the ear of decision makers </li></ul>Why a policy approach?
  19. 19. <ul><li>Transportation planners and engineers can become our allies! </li></ul><ul><li>Changing the tide means changing the culture inside transportation agencies </li></ul>Relationships
  20. 20. State DOT Federal funding State programs Projects selected MPO Formal plans Policies & practices Projects selected Local Governments Goals & Interests Policies & practices Projects proposed Transportation Improvement Program projects in the region Advocacy Groups
  21. 21. <ul><li>Change our cultural and practical expectations. </li></ul>Our Role <ul><li>Don’t be stymied by technical arguments </li></ul><ul><li>Bring them along </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Sets a vision . </li></ul><ul><li>Includes all users and all modes . </li></ul><ul><li>Applies to all phases of all applicable projects. </li></ul><ul><li>Specifies and limits exceptions , with management approval required. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasizes connectivity . </li></ul><ul><li>Is understood by all agencies to cover all roads. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses the best and latest design standards and is flexible . </li></ul><ul><li>Complements the community’s context . </li></ul><ul><li>Sets performance standards . </li></ul><ul><li>Includes implementation steps. </li></ul>Elements of a Policy
  23. 23. Policy Development Guidance
  24. 24. Policy Development Guidance
  25. 25. Policy Development Guidance <ul><li>www.completestreets.org/policyanalysis </li></ul>
  26. 26. Assessing Policy Strength <ul><li>200+ policies adopted through 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluated against ‘ideal’ policy language, scored 1-100 </li></ul><ul><li>Only analyzes written language, not impact </li></ul>
  27. 27. Policy Analysis 2010 <ul><li>Look up your policy & policies in similar communities </li></ul><ul><li>Understand how to best fulfill intent of each policy element, with examples </li></ul><ul><li>Find highly-rated policies to serve as models </li></ul>
  28. 28. <ul><li>Be persistent </li></ul><ul><li>Be a resource </li></ul><ul><li>Appeal to varied interests </li></ul><ul><li>Work with agency staff </li></ul><ul><li>Get on relevant committees </li></ul><ul><li>Help write the policy </li></ul>Advocacy Basics
  29. 29. <ul><li>Do your homework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Find out what policies already exist in your state & region – you can build on this! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National Complete Streets Coalition maintains database, analyzes policies. Visit the Complete Streets Atlas! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find out how transportation decisions are made: talk to planners, engineers, project mangers and advocates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Policies, processes, and roles of involved agencies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Most important decision points </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How many projects are in the pipeline and how much do they cost? </li></ul></ul></ul>Where do you start?
  30. 30. <ul><li>Decide where you want to focus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City – can be easiest, most focused </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>County – may control more roads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MPO – can influence federal spending, but has less power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State – usually more entrenched road-building interests but controls significant funding </li></ul></ul>Where do you start?
  31. 31. <ul><li>Find your best insider advocate(s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City Council member, County Commissioner, Mayor, local planner or engineer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Make connections & build coalitions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community groups, advocacy groups, neighborhood associations, Chamber of Commerce, task forces, the DOT! </li></ul></ul>Where do you start?
  32. 32. National Steering Committee
  33. 33. <ul><li>“ You are not alone” OR “Be a leader” </li></ul><ul><li>Significant support from U.S. DOT; growing national movement and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the topics that are most important to your community: Safety? Choices? Environment? Health? Quality of Life? </li></ul><ul><li>Frame policy as changes to planning/design process </li></ul>Complete Streets Messages
  34. 34. <ul><li>Improving roadways safety for everyone </li></ul><ul><li>Providing choices where none/few currently exist </li></ul><ul><li>Saving $$ for families </li></ul><ul><li>Fiscally responsible use of community funds </li></ul><ul><li>Perfection not a requirement </li></ul><ul><li>Every street is different </li></ul>Complete Streets Messages
  35. 35. <ul><li>A design prescription </li></ul><ul><li>A mandate for immediate retrofit </li></ul><ul><li>A silver bullet; other issues must be addressed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land use (proximity, mixed-use) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transportation Demand Management </li></ul></ul>Complete Streets is NOT: … but a Complete Streets policy can help!
  36. 36. <ul><li>There is no singular design prescription for Complete Streets; each one is unique and responds to its community context. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets does not mean that every street has sidewalks, bike lanes, and transit. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no magic formula. </li></ul>What does a Complete Street look like?
  37. 37. The Many Types of Complete Streets Rural route with a shared use path
  38. 38. The Many Types of Complete Streets Rural route with a wide shoulder
  39. 39. The Many Types of Complete Streets Low traffic shared street
  40. 40. The Many Types of Complete Streets Residential skinny street
  41. 41. The Many Types of Complete Streets Low-traffic residential street
  42. 42. The Many Types of Complete Streets High visibility crossings
  43. 43. The Many Types of Complete Streets Small town Main Street
  44. 44. The Many Types of Complete Streets Historic downtown
  45. 45. The Many Types of Complete Streets Urban neighborhood street
  46. 46. The Many Types of Complete Streets Transit routes
  47. 47. The Many Types of Complete Streets Urban arterials
  48. 48. <ul><li>Need to provide for existing users. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets is meant to be achieved within existing budgets </li></ul><ul><li>Build support for new funding mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Add lasting value – bang for the buck! </li></ul>Discussing Costs
  49. 49. <ul><li>Complete streets is about using existing resources differently: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>STP, Equity Bonus, CMAQ, TE, State, Bond measures, gas tax, sales taxes, and now the stimulus $... the usual suspects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>While retrofit funding is important, it is not necessary to get started </li></ul><ul><li>Additional funding is not needed </li></ul>What about funding?
  50. 50. <ul><li>Avoid costly retrofits </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal additional funding </li></ul><ul><li>Save money with better design </li></ul>Does it cost more?
  51. 51. Simple, Low-Cost, High-Impact
  52. 52. <ul><li>Complete streets can save money. </li></ul><ul><li>Narrower travel lanes require less land, less pavement </li></ul><ul><li>Provide more options = reduce need for widening some intersections </li></ul><ul><li>Do it right the first time, not when forced to later – at a higher price </li></ul>Money-Saving Solutions
  53. 53. <ul><li>Needed to replace road after necessary sewer work </li></ul><ul><li>Priced at $6 million to replace road as is </li></ul><ul><li>Mn/DOT re-evaluated transportation needs and found no need for wide roadway </li></ul><ul><li>Reallocated road space for all users, saved $2 million </li></ul>Richfield, Minnesota
  54. 54. Getting Out of Traffic Most Americans feel providing more transportation options will reduce congestion, not building or expanding roads. Future of Transportation National Survey (2010)
  55. 55. <ul><li>A majority of Missourians support spending 25% of transportation $ on biking and walking facilities, </li></ul><ul><li>even if that reduces the total number of projects. </li></ul>Missouri http://tinyurl.com/89xdwc6
  56. 56. <ul><li>In 2006, Seattle voters passed a nine-year, $365 million levy for transportation maintenance and improvements. </li></ul><ul><li>Goals include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pave and repair Seattle streets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve pedestrian and bicycle safety </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create safe routes to schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase transit speed and reliability </li></ul></ul>Seattle, Washington
  57. 57. <ul><li>Mayor Karl Dean’s 2010-2011 transportation budget: </li></ul><ul><li>$12.5 million dollars for sidewalks </li></ul><ul><li>$3 million for bikeways </li></ul><ul><li>$10 million for transit </li></ul><ul><li>= Almost 60% of local transportation dollars </li></ul>Nashville, Tennessee Flickr.com user Keith Justin Gallagher
  58. 58. Streets Can Benefit Communities <ul><li>Increase capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Improve safety </li></ul><ul><li>Better health </li></ul><ul><li>Economic growth </li></ul><ul><li>Lower emissions </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce costs </li></ul><ul><li>Smarter growth </li></ul><ul><li>Provide choices </li></ul><ul><li>Improve transit </li></ul><ul><li>Equity </li></ul>
  59. 59. Incomplete Streets are Unsafe <ul><li>More than 40% of pedestrian deaths in 2007 and 2008 occurred where no crosswalk was available . </li></ul>National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Reporting System
  60. 60. <ul><li>Tool to reduce incidence of obesity and chronic disease </li></ul><ul><li>“ Active Transportation” = part of everyday life </li></ul><ul><li>Population-level solution, not individual </li></ul>Benefits: Health
  61. 61. <ul><li>20% of Americans have a disability that limits their daily activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets feature curb cuts, high visibility crosswalks, and other designs for travelers with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets reduce isolation and dependence. </li></ul>Benefits: People with Disabilities
  62. 62. <ul><li>By 2025, nearly 1/5 of Americans will be 65 or older. </li></ul><ul><li>About ½ of all non-drivers over the age of 65 would like to get out more often. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete streets policies help create streets that support older drivers and pedestrians through better design. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete streets help older Americans stay active and involved in their communities. </li></ul>Benefits: Older Adults
  63. 63. <ul><li>Americans spent 18 cents of every dollar on transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Working families in 17 of 28 regions pay more for transportation than they do for housing. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets give people more control over their expenses, replacing expensive car travel with cheaper options like walking, riding bikes, and taking public transportation. </li></ul>Benefits: Lower Costs
  64. 64. Enhance Economic Competitiveness <ul><li>$8 milllion public investment in streetscape improvement 2003-2004 </li></ul><ul><li>$8 million in private investment in following 2 years </li></ul>32 new business establishments $80,000 in sales tax annually Washington, DC: Barracks Row/8 th Street SE
  65. 65. <ul><li>Complete streets policies ‘pave the way’ for future Smart Growth development </li></ul><ul><li>They invest traditional highway funds in meeting basic Smart Growth principles. </li></ul>Benefits: Smarter Growth
  66. 66. <ul><li>Residents are 65% more likely to walk in a neighborhood with sidewalks. </li></ul><ul><li>Cities with more bike lanes per square mile have higher levels of bicycle commuting. </li></ul>Change Travel Patterns
  67. 67. <ul><li>Transportation accounts for nearly 1/3 of all greenhouse gas emissions. </li></ul><ul><li>Switching from driving a car to walking or bicycling for trips <1 mile could reduce CO2 emissions by 12 to 22 million tons/year . </li></ul>Lower Emissions, Cleaner Air
  68. 68. <ul><li>Rain gardens and bioswales can be built into traffic calming elements such as refuge islands and curb extensions. </li></ul><ul><li>Many complete streets solutions use less pavement – resulting in a lesser impact on water quality and the natural environment than auto-oriented streets. </li></ul>Sustainable Streets
  69. 69. Quality of Life <ul><li>Walkable communities = happier communities </li></ul><ul><li>Residents of walkable communities: </li></ul><ul><li>are more likely to be socially engaged and trusting </li></ul><ul><li>report being in good health and happy more often </li></ul>Shannon H. Rogers, et al. Examining Walkability and Social Capital as Indicators of Quality of Life at the Municipal and Neighborhood Scales. (2010)
  70. 70. <ul><li>Full-day, interactive, customized workshops with two nationally-known instructors </li></ul><ul><li>Engages planners, engineers, elected officials, community stakeholders, and other decision makers </li></ul><ul><li>Three types of workshops: </li></ul><ul><li>Laying the Foundation for Complete Streets </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets Policy Development </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets Policy Implementation </li></ul>Complete Streets Workshops For details, contact Linda Tracy at linda@apbp.org
  71. 71. For more information <ul><li>Fact sheets, photos, brochures </li></ul><ul><li>Information on changing policy </li></ul><ul><li>Policy tracking & examples </li></ul><ul><li>Complete Streets blog and monthly newsletter </li></ul><ul><li>Links to research & publications </li></ul>www.completestreets.org
  72. 72. [email_address]

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