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Complete Streets Brochures

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redesign of existing Complete Streets Coalition brochures

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Complete Streets Brochures

  1. 1. What do others have to say How can I get involved with about Complete Streets? Complete Streets? “Now, finally, there’s an organized nationwide A broad coalition of advocates and transportation movement to fight the good fight for saner streets. professionals are working to enact complete streets policies It’s a coalition mounting a nationwide campaign across the country. for city and town roadways that include safe, quality space for pedestrians and cyclists and JOIN US BY BECOMING A public transit users, accommodating their wishes MEMBER OR PARTNER! just as seriously as those of car and truck drivers. It’s called, fittingly, the Complete Streets Becoming a member or partner is easy. We simply ask that movement.” you endorse the Coalition’s mission by returning the - Columnist Neal Peirce respective sign-up form (available at www.completestreets. org/getinvolved.html); collaborate with leading national and regional organizations to advance complete streets and make “We have very real challenges facing our country, an annual contribution at the appropriate level. and they are all interwoven. We now know that The streets we must change our environmental and energy While donations are not a requirement, they are central to of our cities policy, and reduce our impact on the planet. By our ability to spread the work, coordinate action, and help and towns ought opening up our roadways to pedestrians and organizations nationwide get it right. to be for everyone, cyclists, we can help ease the congestion on our nation’s roads.” Organizations serving on the National Complete whether young or old, -Representative Doris Matsui Streets Coalition Steering Committee are: motorist or bicyclist, walker or wheelchair user, bus AARP rider or shopkeeper. Active Living by Design America Bikes But too many of our streets are America Walks designed only for speeding cars, Schedule a workshop! American Council of the Blind American Planning Association or worse, creeping traffic jams. These These streets are unsafe for people on foot American Public Transportation Association or bike and unpleasant for everybody. To help organizations successfully American Society of Landscape Architects adopt complete streets policies, the National Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Now, in communities across the country, a Complete Streets Coalition offers City of Boulder movement is growing to complete the interactive workshops led by national Institute of Transportation of Engineers streets. States, cities, and towns are experts on policy development and policy League of American Bicyclists asking their planners, engineers, implementation. Visit our website for more McCann Consulting and designers to build road information about scheduling a workshop. National Center for Bicycling and Walking networks that welcome Safe Route ot School National Partnership all citizens. Smart Growth America Thunderhead Alliance for Bicycling and Walking National Complete Streets Coalition Dozens of places have been adopting policies at an 1707 L Street NW, Suite 1050 accelerating pace, including the States of California and Washington, DC 20036 Illinois, Seattle, and Iowa City. Keep track of our progress by (202) 207-3355 POLICY & IMPLEMENTATION info@completestreets.org signing up for our newsletter! www.completestreets.org www.completestreets.org
  2. 2. What are Complete Streets? Why do we need Complete A recent federal survey found that about one-quarter of walking trips take place on roads without sidewalks or Complete streets are designed and operated to enable safe Streets policies? shoulder, and bike lanes are available for only about 5 access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and bus percent of bicycle trips. Another national survey of riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along Americans want mobility. pedestrians and bicyclists found that the top complaints and across a complete street. Recent opinion polls found that 52 percent of Americans were the lack of sidewalks and bikeway - essentially, want to bicycle more, and 55% would prefer to drive less incomplete streets. and walk more. More than half (54%) of older adults who reported an inhospitable walking, bicycling, and transit environment outside their homes said they would walk, bicycle and take transit more if the streets were improved. Many streets where people bicycle or walk are incomplete. Dan Burden Our states, cities, counties, and towns have built many miles Dan Burden of streets and roads that are safe and comfortable only for travel by motor vehicle. These roadways often lack sidewalk, Few laws require states to build roads crosswalks, crosswalks, and space for bicyclists; furthermore, roadways often make no room for transit riders and no as complete transportation corridors. accommodation for people with disabilities. What does a good In 2000, the US Department of Transportation advised states receiving federal funds that “bicycling and walking facilities Complete Streets policy include? will be incorporated into all transportation projects unless exceptional circumstances exist.” Unfortunately, fewer than A good complete streets policy: half the states follow this federal guidance. Many highway improvements add automobile capacity and increase vehicle - Specifies that ‘all users include pedestrians, bicyclists, speeds, but do nothing to mitigate the negative impact this transit vehicles and users, and motorists, of all ages and usually has on bicycling and walking. abilities Streets without safe places to walk - Aims to create a comprehensive, integrated, connected network and bicycle put people at risk. - Is adoptable by all agencies to cover all roads While only nine percent of all trips are made by foot or bicycle, more than 13 percent of all traffic fatalities are - Applies to both new and retrofit projects, including bicyclicts or pedestrians. More than 5000 pedestrians and design, planning, maintenance, and operations, for the bicyclist die each year on U.S. roads. The most dangerous entire right of way places to walk and bicycle are sprawling communities with streets built for driving only. - Makes any exceptions specific and sets a clear proc dure that requires high-level approval of exceptions Roads without safe access for - Directs the use of the latest and best design standards non-drivers become barriers. - Directs that complete streets solutions fit in with the Roads without safe access for non-drivers become barriers context of the community to mobility. About one-third of Americans do not drive, so complete streets are essential for children and older - Establishes performance standards with measurable Americans, as well as people who use wheelchairs, have outcomes Dan Burden vision impairments, or simply cannot afford a car. Become part of the movement toward complete streets. For more information, visit www.completestreets.org
  3. 3. How are Complete Streets policies How can I get involved with implemented? Complete Streets? Instead of a project-by-project struggle to accommodate A broad coalition of advocates and transportation profes- bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly practices, complete streets sionals are working to enact complete streets policies across policies require all road construction and improvement the country. projects to begin by evaluating how the right-of-way serves all who use it. An effective complete streets policy should prompt transportation agencies to: JOIN US BY BECOMING A MEMBER OR PARTNER! * Restructure procedures to accommodate all users on every project. Becoming a member or partner is easy. We simply ask that * Re-write design manuals to include the safety of all users. you endorse the Coalition’s mission by returning the * Re-train planners and engineers in balancing the needs of respective sign-up form (available at www.completestreets. diverse users. org/getinvolved.html); collaborate with leading national and * Create new data collection procedures to track how regional organizations to advance complete streets and make well the streets are serving all users. an annual contribution at the appropriate level. s While donations are not a requirement, they are central to our ability to spread the work, coordinate action, and help f it Schedule a workshop! ne organizations nationwide get it right. The streets To help organizations successfully adopt of our cities complete streets policies, the National res a d Be Organizations serving on the National Complete and towns ought Complete Streets Coaltion offers Streets Coalition Steering Committee are: to be for everyone, interactive workshops led by national experts on policy development and policy AARP whether young or old, implementation. Visit our website for Active Living by Design motorist or bicyclist, walker more information about scheduling or wheelchair user, bus n a workshop. America Bikes rider or shopkeeper. America Walks American Council of the Blind But too many of our streets are American Planning Association Where are Complete Streets American Public Transportation Association designed only for speeding cars, or worse, creeping traffic jams. These American Society of Landscape Architects These streets are unsafe for people on foot Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals or bike and unpleasant for everybody. City of Boulder u *as of Institute of Transportation of Engineers Now, in communities across the country, a at Feb. 2009 League of American Bicyclists movement is growing to complete the McCann Consulting streets. States, cities, and towns are e National Center for Bicycling and Walking Safe Route ot School National Partnership F F asking their planners, engineers, and designers to build road Smart Growth America Thunderhead Alliance for Bicycling and Walking m m on on networks that welcome all citizens. Dozens of places have been adopting policies at an National Complete Streets Coalition 1707 L Street NW, Suite 1050 Washington, DC 20036 Com Com accelerating pace, including the States of California and (202) 207-3355 Illinois, Seattle, and Iowa City. Keep track of our progress by info@completestreets.org signing up for our newsletter! www.completestreets.org www.completestreets.org
  4. 4. What are Complete Streets? Why do we need Complete Complete streets encourage walking Complete streets are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists Streets policies? and bicycling for health. The National Institutes of Medicine recommends fighting and bus riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely Complete streets improve safety. childhood obesity by establishing ordinances to encourage move along and across a complete street. construction of sidewalks, bikeways, and other places for A Federal Highways Administration safety review found physical activity. What do Complete Streets that streets designed with sidewalks, raised medians, better bus stop placement, traffic-calming measures, and One study found that 43% of people with safe places to walk within 10 minutes of home met recommended policies do? treatments for disabled travelers improve pedestrian safety. Some features, such as medians, improve safety for all activity levels; among individuals without safe places to Complete Streets policies direct transportation planners users: they enable pedestrians to cross busy roads in two walk, just 27% were active enough. and engineers to consistently design with all users in mind stages and reduce left-turning motorist crashes to zero, a including drivers, transit riders, pedestrians, and bicyclists type of crash that also endangers bicyclists. as well as older people, children, and people with disabilities. What do Complete Streets look like? Surveys have found that a lack of sidewalks and safe places to eys la k While there is no prescription for a complete bike are a primary reason people give when asked why they do street, common features include: not walk or bicycle more. Photo from City of Santa Barbara. - SIDEWALKS Complete streets address climate change and oil dependence. - BIKE LANES The potential to reduce carbon emissions by shifting trips - WIDE SHOULDERS to lower-carbon modes is undeniable: The 2001 National Household Transportation Survey finds that 50% of all trips John LaPlante Joh John aPl nte John LaPlante Pla t - PLENTY OF CROSSWALKS in metropolitan areas are three miles or less and 28% of all metropolitan trips are one mile or less – distances easily - REFUGE MEDIANS traversed by foot or bicycle.Yet 65% of trips under one mile are now made by automobile, in part because of incomplete - BUS PULLOUTS streets that make it dangerous or unpleasant to walk, bicycle, or take transit. Complete streets would help - SPECIAL BUS LANES convert many of these short automobile trips to multi- Nevad Bi y le Coalit on Nevada Bicycle Coalition da ic oal liti Nevada Bicycle Coalition modal travel. - RAISED CROSSWALKS Walking and bicycling require no gasoline and transit’s use - AUDIBLE PEDESTRIAN of fuel is much more efficient than that of automobiles. SIGNALS Simply increasing bicycling from 1% to 1.5% of all trips in the U.S. would save 462 million gallons of gasoline each year. - SIDEWALK BUILB-OUTS Using transit has already helped the United States save 1.5 Dan Burden billion gallons of fuel each year since the early 1990s, which saf ty.fhwa.d t.go safety.fhwa.dot.gov safety.fhwa.dot.gov fe do gov is nearly 36 million barrels of oil. Become part of the movement toward complete streets. For more information, visit www.completestreets.org

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