Spring 2012 capstone
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Spring 2012 capstone Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MA-TESL Capstone PresentationXiaoye XieUniversity of Central MissouriSpring 2012
  • 2. WHAT AM I GOING TO PRESENT? Teaching Children in EFL Settings Teaching Techniques and Skills in EFL Settings Treating Learners’ Errors in EFL Settings
  • 3. TEACHING CHILDRENIN EFL SETTINGS Ashton-Warner (1963) Mutoh (1998)
  • 4. TEACHER ---ASHTON WARNER Organic teaching is not new! The power of language is immeasurable! Respect children as who they are.
  • 5. MANAGEMENT OF A LARGE CLASS ---MUTOH
  • 6. PROBLEMS OF MANAGING A LARGE CLASS Taking of attendance Returning and collecting student work Communicating individually with students as needed
  • 7. TEACHING TECHNIQUES AND SKILLS
  • 8.  Echevarria, J., & Short, D. J., & Vogt, M. (2007). Chapter two: Lesson Preparation. Making content comprehensible for English learners: the SIOP model (3rd Edition). New York, NY: Allyn & Bacon/Pearson Education. Stevick, E. (1988). Part 1: Before you read. Teaching and learning languages. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. Bailey, K. M. (2003) Chapter three: Speaking. In D. Nunan (Ed.), Practical English Language Teaching. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Contemporary.
  • 9. MAKING CONTENT COMPREHENSIBLE FOR ENGLISHLEARNERS: THE SIOP MODEL Components of Chapter Two: (1). The introduction of background information (2). The rationale for each of the six features (3). Teaching scenarios involving three teachers
  • 10. SIOP FEATURES Writing language objectives Language objectives clearly defined, displayed, and reviewed with students Adaption of teaching materials to all levels of student proficiency Meaningful activities for language practice opportunities
  • 11. TEACHING AND LEARNING LANGUAGES (1).Between the people in the classroom (2). Performance from three kinds of competence (3). Learning, acquiring, remembering, and producing language
  • 12. FIVE STEPS OF MAKING YOU INTO A GOOD TEACHER!
  • 13.  Step 1. Find out what your students and their sponsors expect from the course Step2. Find out what will make your students feel welcome and secure Step3. Work out some basic techniques, and establish a simple, clear routine Step 4. Ask yourself these questions Step 5. Look at your students one at a time.
  • 14. PRACTICAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHINGChapter 3: Speaking Principles for teaching speaking Classroom techniques and tasks
  • 15. PRINCIPLES FOR TEACHING SPEAKING Give practice with both fluency and accuracy Provide opportunities for students to talk in groups or pairs; limit teacher talk Plan tasks that involve negotiation of meaning Design activities that involve guidance and practice in both transactional and interactional speaking
  • 16. HOW TO DEAL WITH ERRORS?
  • 17.  Tedick,D. & de Gortari, B. (1998). Research on error correction and implications for classroom teaching. ACIE Newsletter, 1(3). Katayama, A. (2007). Japanese EFL students’ preferences toward correction of classroom oral errors. Asian EFL Journal, 9, 289-305.
  • 18. RESEARCH ON ERROR CORRECTION ANDIMPLICATIONS FOR CLASSROOM TEACHING Should learners’ errors be correct? When should learners’ errors be corrected? How should errors be corrected? Who should do the correcting?
  • 19. HOW SHOULD ERRORS BE CORRECTED? Explicit correction Recast Clarification request Metalinguistic clues Elicitation Repetition
  • 20. IMPLICATIONS Consider the context Become aware of your current practices Practice a variety of feedback techniques Focus on the learner. It’s important to let learner self-correct
  • 21. JAPANESE EFL STUDENTS’ PREFERENCESTOWARD CORRECTION Students’ attitudes toward classroom oral error correction Their preferences for correction of different types of oral errors Their preferences for particular correction methods.
  • 22. RESULTS Students had strong positive attitudes toward teacher correction of errors. A preference for correction of pragmatic errors over other kinds of errors. The most favored correction method was for the teacher to give the student a hint which might enable the student to notice the error and self- correct.
  • 23. IMPLICATIONS FOR ME The need for accuracy more than fluency. Student-generated repairs are important in language learning Helps me select feedback techniques.
  • 24. TEACHING CHILDREN IS TOUGH!
  • 25. I HOPE MY STUDENTS WILL BE…
  • 26. HAPPINESS IS EVERYWHERE!
  • 27. Many THANKs to Dr. Yates, Dr. Eason, Dr.Muchisky and my amazing TESL colleagues! --Xiaoye Xie