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Presentation for EH 646 on Tuesday
 

Presentation for EH 646 on Tuesday

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These slides are to be delivered to UAB undergrads in EH 101 this term as part of my EH 646 course.

These slides are to be delivered to UAB undergrads in EH 101 this term as part of my EH 646 course.

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    Presentation for EH 646 on Tuesday Presentation for EH 646 on Tuesday Presentation Transcript

    • Writing to Summarize Presentation by Wayne Bartlett UAB EH 101 Tuesday, June 7, 2011 Questions? Comments? Email Mr. Bartlett at whb0006@tigermail.auburn.eduContent adapted from The Wisconsin Technical College, “Summary Writing.” Wisc-Online, N.p. Web. June 2, 2011. http://www.wisc-online.com/objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=TRG2603.
    • Writing to Summarize Here’s the Plan for Today 20-minute presentation on Writing to Summarize, including a guided practice session You’ll do a 15-minute practice in pairs We’ll take a 10-minute break We’ll look at your WtS products You’ll do a 15-minute practice WtS by yourself We’ll look at your WtS products from that practice You’ll do a second 15-minute practice by yourself for turn in to me That will be it for todayPresentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • But first…a word.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material This is the Process Re-Read the Material WfS is a process—approach Mark Up the Material: it on a step-by-step basis ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argument You can do each step; thus, Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point you can do the whole thingWrite Short Summaries of There are other ways to WfS Each Stage of Thought Combine the Summaries Modify for your own use Maintain tone of original Aim for about 20% length after you try it this way first Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Re-Read the Material Read the Material Mark Up the Material: There’s no way around this! ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argument Eliminate distractions to Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point improve effectivenessWrite Short Summaries of Read for understanding first Each Stage of Thought (this might involve looking up words, etc.) Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original Aim for about 20% length Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Re-Read the Material Re-Read the Material Mark Up the Material: You might have to re-read it a ID Stages of Thought couple of times, but… Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point Positive understanding of the material makes the rest easierWrite Short Summaries of Each Stage of Thought Read for structure and Combine the Summaries organization Maintain tone of original Aim for about 20% length Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Re-Read the Material Mark Up the Material Mark Up the Material: Actually mark on the paper ID Stages of Thought with pen, highlighter, whatever Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point Identify stages of thoughtWrite Short Summaries of Trace the author’s argument Each Stage of Thought Combine the Summaries Goal: Find the main point (or Maintain tone of original Aim for about 20% length theme, or whatever you call it) Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Write Short Summaries Re-Read the Material Mark Up the Material: of each Stage of Thought ID Stages of Thought This may not be strictly Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms necessary for short pieces Find the Main PointWrite Short Summaries of But imagine yourself doing it Each Stage of Thought Combine the Summaries For today’s purposes, we will Maintain tone of original write short summaries at each Aim for about 20% length stage of thought. Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Combine the Summaries Re-Read the Material This creates your final product Mark Up the Material: ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argument Try to maintain the Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point tone of the originalWrite Short Summaries of Length? About 20% of original Each Stage of Thought Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original Check your grammar, spelling, Aim for about 20% length style, usage, all that stuff Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Summaries must not Re-Read the Material include your opinion! Mark Up the Material: ID Stages of Thought Aim for distance Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms and transparency Find the Main Point Do not give any hint aboutWrite Short Summaries of Each Stage of Thought what you—as a person—think Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original The reader can decide what Aim for about 20% length to think about the material Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Give Credit where Re-Read the Material Credit is Due Mark Up the Material: ID Stages of Thought Credit the author of the work Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms which you summarize Find the Main Point Do it in MLA formatWrite Short Summaries of Each Stage of Thought (MLA is Modern Language Association) Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original Make friends with MLA; you’ll Aim for about 20% length use it a whole lot in college Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material Let’s try one together. Re-Read the Material Mark Up the Material: You’ll do a couple more ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argument later on your own. Look for Key Terms Find the Main Point Remember: A timedWrite Short Summaries of summarization is coming! Each Stage of Thought Combine the Summaries Now’s the time Maintain tone of original to practice the skills. Aim for about 20% length Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Read the Materialin sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, hasprovided a unifying faith for peoples Read for understandingstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Look up some words? Maybe.Ocean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s, How long is this? 103 words.Western ascendency, which culminated in How long might the summary be?colonization, eroded once glorious Muslimempires and reduced the influence of Islam. Re-Read the MaterialAfter the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline of Read for structureEuropean colonial empires following World and organizationWar II, Muslim nations adopted Western Read to positively understandideologies—communism, secularism, Re-read several times, if need benationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated incolonization, eroded once glorious Muslimempires and reduced the influence of Islam.After the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslimempires and reduced the influence of Islam.After the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslimempires and reduced the influence of Islam.After the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empirefollowing World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline ofEuropean colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet most This part says that somethingMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their surprising occurred: “Most Muslimsgovernments, secular regimes often backed by remained poor and powerless.”the West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet most This part says that somethingMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their surprising occurred: “Most Muslimsgovernments, secular regimes often backed by remained poor and powerless.”the West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet most This part says that somethingMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their surprising occurred: “Most Muslimsgovernments, secular regimes often backed by remained poor and powerless.”the West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt, This part tells why the surprising78). thing occurred “Corrupt and repressive governments.”Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Mark Up the Material:in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argumentprovided a unifying faith for peoples Look for Key Termsstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Find the Main PointOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s,Western ascendency, which culminated in Here’s how I would mark this up:colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim This part makes an assertion:empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “For a long time, Islam unified people.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire This part says “Then that changed.”following World War I and the decline of This part also says what caused theEuropean colonial empires following World change: “Western ascendency.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Western This part tells an effect of theideologies—communism, secularism, change: “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”nationalism, and capitalism. Yet most This part says that somethingMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their surprising occurred: “Most Muslimsgovernments, secular regimes often backed by remained poor and powerless.”the West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt, This part tells why the surprising78). thing occurred “Corrupt and repressive governments.”Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Write Short Summaries ofin sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has Each Stage of Thoughtprovided a unifying faith for peoplesstretching from the Atlantic to the Indian “For a long time, Islam unified people.”Ocean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s, “Then that changed.”Western ascendency, which culminated in “Western ascendency.”colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “Most Muslims remainedAfter the breakup of the Ottoman Empire poor and powerless.”following World War I and the decline of “Corrupt and repressive governments.”European colonial empires following WorldWar II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism,nationalism, and capitalism. Yet mostMuslims remained poor and powerless. Theirgovernments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt,78).Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse Combine the Summaries Maintain Tone of Originalin sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has Aim for about 20% Lengthprovided a unifying faith for peoples Check Style, Usage, etc.stretching from the Atlantic to the IndianOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s, “For a long time, Islam unified people.”Western ascendency, which culminated in “Then that changed.”colonization, eroded once glorious Muslim “Western ascendency.”empires and reduced the influence of Islam. “Muslim nations adopted Western ideologies.”After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire “Most Muslims remainedfollowing World War I and the decline of poor and powerless.”European colonial empires following World “Corrupt and repressive governments.”War II, Muslim nations adopted Westernideologies—communism, secularism, “For centuries, Islam unified people.nationalism, and capitalism. Yet most But the rise of the West changed that as Muslim nations adopted WesternMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their ideologies. Because of corrupt govern-governments, secular regimes often backed by ments, most Muslims remained poorthe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt, and powerless.”78). Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic January 2002: 76-85.Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print.
    • For nearly 1,400 years, Islam, though diverse “For centuries, Islam unified people.in sectarian practice and ethnic tradition, has But the rise of the West changed that as Muslim nations adopted Westernprovided a unifying faith for peoples ideologies. Because of corrupt govern-stretching from the Atlantic to the Indian ments, most Muslims remained poorOcean and beyond. Starting in the 1500s, and powerless.”Western ascendency, which culminated in Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic January 2002: 76-85.colonization, eroded once glorious Muslimempires and reduced the influence of Islam. Despite Western-style governments,After the breakup of the Ottoman Empire Muslim countries are mired in deepfollowing World War I and the decline of poverty and radical governments. This despite the fact that the religion hasEuropean colonial empires following World existed for several centuries. EuropeanWar II, Muslim nations adopted Western colonization ruined the Islamic religionideologies—communism, secularism, for a long time. You would find it hardnationalism, and capitalism. Yet most to imagine how many Muslims thereMuslims remained poor and powerless. Their really are out there. Belt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic January 2002: 76-85.governments, secular regimes often backed bythe West, were corrupt and repressive (Belt, Doesn’t follow path of original78). It’s a little long for this article It shifts to second-person POVBelt, Don. “The World of Islam.” National Geographic Jan. 2002: 76-85. Print. There’s traces of feeling here.
    • Now you try one. Find a partner. Work in pairs. Show your work Be ready to share your summaryPresentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 15 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 14 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 13 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 12 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 11 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 10 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 9 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 8 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 7 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 6 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 5 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 4 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 3 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 2 minutes.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • As governor, Calvin Coolidge becamenationally famous during the Boston policestrike of 1919. In defiance of police depart- 1 minute.ment rules, a group of Boston policemen hadobtained a union charter from the American Read the MaterialFederation of Labor. Police CommissionerEdwin U. Curtis suspended 10 of the union’s Re-Read the Materialleaders, and the next day almost three-fourthsof Boston’s more than 1,500 police officers Mark Up the Material:went on strike. Bands of hoodlums roamed ID Stages of Thought Trace the ArgumentBoston for two nights, smashing windows and Look for Key Termslooting stores. Coolidge mobilized the state Find the Main Pointguard and order was restored. When Curtisfired the 19 suspended policemen, the Write Short Summaries ofpresident of the labor union protested to Each Stage of ThoughtCoolidge. In reply, Coolidge made his Combine the Summariesfamous declaration: “There is no right to Maintain tone of originalstrike against the public safety by anybody, Aim for about 20% lengthanywhere, any time” (Mayer, 814). Check style, usage, etc.Mayer, George H. “Calvin Coolidge.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1979 Edition. 1979.
    • Great Job!Let’s take a break. Return in 10 minutes.
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material You’ve had a close look at this. Re-Read the Material We did one together. Mark Up the Material: You did one in pairs. ID Stages of Thought Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms Now you try one : Find the Main Point Summarization Exercise AWrite Short Summaries of Take 15 minutes Each Stage of Thought Follow the steps just as before Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original Work alone and show your work Aim for about 20% length Be prepared to share & defend Check style, usage, etc.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Read the Material “Thank you, sir; may I Re-Read the Material have another?” Mark Up the Material: ID Stages of Thought Summarization Exercise B Trace the Argument Look for Key Terms It’s a little longer: take 20 min. Find the Main Point Follow the steps just as beforeWrite Short Summaries of Work alone and show your work Each Stage of Thought This one’s for turn-in to me for Combine the Summaries Maintain tone of original grading and return to you on Aim for about 20% length Check style, usage, etc. Thursday.Presentation by Mr. Bartlett Questions or comments to whb0006@tigermail.auburn.edu
    • Writing to Summarize Presentation by Wayne Bartlett UAB EH 101 Tuesday, June 7, 2011 Questions? Comments? Email Mr. Bartlett at whb0006@tigermail.auburn.eduContent adapted from The Wisconsin Technical College, “Summary Writing.” Wisc-Online, N.p. Web. June 2, 2011. http://www.wisc-online.com/objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=TRG2603.