The danger waves

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information on the danger waves tsunami

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The danger waves

  1. 1. THE DANGER WAVES
  2. 2. A tsunami is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, generally an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.
  3. 3. How tsunamis are originated A tsunami is a series of large waves generated by an abrupt movement on the ocean floor that can result from an earthquake, an underwater landslide, a volcanic eruption or - very rarely - a large meteorite strike.
  4. 4. The after effects of a tsunami include both physical and mental disruption both to the affected and those not affected. Tsunamis also cause destruction and damage, death, harm, millions in financial loss, and long lasting emotional problems for the inhabitants of the region affected.
  5. 5.  The after effects of a tsunami include both physical and mental disruption both to the affected and those not affected. Tsunamis also cause destruction and damage, death, harm, millions in financial loss, and long lasting emotional problems for the inhabitants of the region affected.
  6. 6. How can be the effects of Tsunami reduced  Dense mangrove habitats reduce the force of waves and reduce the pressure.  Coral reefs may be artificially constructed: these have been shown to reduce the impact of tsunamis.  Better education of residents about evacuation procedures. In conjunction with this, early warning systems need to be devised.  Building settlements further inland and away from the lowest-lying regions also reduce the impact on people" if people do not live there. impact is
  7. 7.  JAPAN  INDONESIA
  8. 8.  Two years on from the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami, thousands of survivors have benefited from a variety of programmes carried out by the Japanese Red Cross Society ranging from caring for the psychosocial needs of the elderly to the reconstruction of major hospitalIn the immediate aftermath of the disaster, Japanese Red Cross medical teams deployed from their network of hospitals across the country, treated nearly 90,000 people. Since then, much of the focus for the Red Cross has been on providing welfare services; this includes help for 135,000 displaced families resettled into temporary homes that were provided with a package of household electrical appliances.
  9. 9.  Jakarta: A tsunami watch was issued for countries across the Indian Ocean after a 8.6-magnitude earthquake, the eight worst in the last 100 years, hit waters off Indonesia on Wednesday, triggering widespread panic as residents along coastlines fled to high ground in cars and on the backs of motorcycles. But earthquake and tsunami experts say that quake was horizontal and not vertical, lessening the threat of tsunamis. The National Disaster Management Authority in India said that there was no likelihood of tsunami being formed anywhere in the Indian Ocean.
  10. 10.  The US Geological Survey said the 8.6-magnitude quake was centered 20 miles (33 kilometers) beneath the ocean floor around 269 miles (434 kilometers) from Aceh's provincial capital.  The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii said a tsunami watch was in effect for Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, Australia, Myanmar, Thailand, the Maldives and other Indian Ocean islands, Malaysia, Pakistan, Somalia, Oman, Iran, Bangladesh, Kenya, South Africa and Singapore.

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