Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Introduction to Community Organizing for Occupy Midwest

1,876

Published on

This introduction to community organizing was created by Tom Tresser for the Occupy Midwest convention. More resources on organizing at http://tinyurl.com/OrganizingResources

This introduction to community organizing was created by Tom Tresser for the Occupy Midwest convention. More resources on organizing at http://tinyurl.com/OrganizingResources

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,876
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Community Organizing “Community Organizing” 1
  • 2. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY ORGANIZING“The whole history of the progress of human liberty showsthat all concessions yet made to her august claims havebeen born of struggle…Those who profess to favorfreedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who wantcrops without plowing up the ground. They want rainwithout thunder and lightning…Power concedes nothingwithout a demand. It never did and it never will. Find outwhat the people will submit to, and you have found theexact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposedupon them; and these will continue until they are resistedwith either words or blows, or with both. The limits oftyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whomthey oppress.” - Frederick Douglass, Letter to an abolitionist associate, 1849 “Community Organizing” 2
  • 3. Saul Alinsky (1909 – 1972)• Pioneer in grassrootsdemocracy theory andpractice• Founder of the IndustrialAreas Foundation (IAF)• Master organizer andchallenger of the status quo www.industrialareasfoundation.org “Community Organizing” 3
  • 4. “Change means movement.Movement means friction. Only in thefrictionless vacuum of a nonexistent abstract world can movement or change occur without that abrasive friction of conflict.” - Saul Alinsky “Community Organizing” 4
  • 5. The Midwest Academy teaches an organizing philosophy,methods and skills that enable ordinary people to activelyparticipate in the democratic process. The Academy coursesand consulting services are designed for progressiveorganizations and coalitions that utilize civic engagementactivities to build citizen power at all levels of our democracy. www.midwestacademy.com “Community Organizing” 5
  • 6. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING– TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct Service Self Help Education Advocacy Direct Action Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 6
  • 7. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct ServiceUnited Ways mission is to improve lives bymobilizing caring people to invest in thecommunity where their resources areneeded most. Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 7
  • 8. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Self HelpAlcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of menand women from all walks of life who meet together to attain andmaintain sobriety. The only requirement for membership is a desire tostop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership. Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 8
  • 9. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING– TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Education Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 9
  • 10. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS AdvocacyThe mission of the ACLU is to preserve these protections and guarantees:Your First Amendment rights-freedom of speech, association and assembly.Freedom of the press, and freedom of religion supported by the strictseparation of church and state.Your right to equal protection under the law - equal treatment regardless ofrace, sex, religion or national origin.Your right to due process - fair treatment by the government whenever theloss of your liberty or property is at stake. Source: Midwest AcademyYour right to privacy - freedom from unwarranted government intrusion intoyour personal and private affairs.“Community Organizing” 10
  • 11. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING – TYPES OF HELPING ORGANIZATIONS Direct ActionACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for ReformNow, is the nations largest community organization of low- andmoderate-income families, working together for social justice andstronger communities. ACORNs accomplishments includesuccessful campaigns for better housing, schools, neighborhoodsafety, health care, job conditions, and more. ACORN membersparticipate in local meetings and actively work on campaigns,elect leadership from the neighborhood level up, and pay theorganizations core expenses through membership dues andgrassroots fundraisers. Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 11
  • 12. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 12
  • 13. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of involvement of people directly affected by problem Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 13
  • 14. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Change of people involved in problem Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 14
  • 15. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of structural change Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 15
  • 16. FORMS OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Accepts Challenges Existing Existing Power PowerRelationships Relationships Level of Conflict Direct Service Direct Action Education Advocacy Self Help Source: Midwest Academy “Community Organizing” 16
  • 17. The Three Principles Of Direct ActionWin Real Improvements In People’s LivesMake People Aware Of Their PowerAlter The Relations Of Power • Build Strong Organizations • Change laws and Regulations • Elect good people “Community Organizing” 17
  • 18. 8 Direct Action Organizing Steps1. People (members) identify a problem2. Turn the problem into an issue3. Develop strategy4. Confront the target with large numbers5. Decision Maker reacts to us6. Win or move on to next round7. Move the issue into the electoral arena “Community Organizing” 188. Move the issue back to the legislative arena
  • 19. Organizing is about building power “Community Organizing” 19
  • 20. Your Power Equals Your StrengthPlus Their Weakness “Community Organizing”
  • 21. Their Weakness Includes:Conflict Of Interest $ Investment in Campaign Image ContributionsScandal Close Election Criminal ActivityHigher Ambition Past ConnectionsNeed To Look Potential RivalsGood To Someone “Community Organizing”
  • 22. Forms of Power Form Of Power What MattersPolitical - Legislative Votes - MoneyConsumer Ability To Cut ProfitsLegal - Regulatory Clear Laws & Regulations. Free Legal HelpStrikes - Disruptive Cut Profits Or Stop An Agency From Functioning. “Community Organizing”
  • 23. Selecting problems & issues “Community Organizing” 23
  • 24. There is a difference between a problem and an issue The issue is the solution to the problem “Community Organizing” 24
  • 25. Checklist For Choosing An Issue `Win Real Improvements Must Have A Clear TargetGive People Sense Of Power Time Frame That WorksAlter Power Relations Non-DivisiveMust Be Winnable Builds LeadershipWidely Felt Sets Up Next CampaignDeeply Felt Pocketbook AngleEasy To Understand You Can Raise Money Consistent With Your Values “Community Organizing” 25
  • 26. Developing Strategy “Community Organizing” 26
  • 27. The Strategy Chart Goals Org. Consti- Targets Tactics Consid. tuencyGoals are What re- Constitu- The Steps in thealways won sources can ents Decision campaign.from some- you put in? Makerone • Members Allies • Petitions • Leaders (Person with • Meetings • $$$ Opponents the power to • Letters • Staff give you whatLong Term • Electoral • Stuff you want.) Who cares • Media about the Hits How will it Secondary problem? build the or- TargetsIntermediate (What the ganization? • Coalition How are constituents (Pressure partners they organ- them to do to the • Visibility ized? pressure the targets toShort Term • Budget Decision make them • Experience What power Maker) give you the (Not always do they goals.) needed) Internal have over Opponents problems in the target? the way? “Community Organizing” 27
  • 28. Organizing Coalitions “Community Organizing” 28
  • 29. COALITION DEFINEDCoalition -- An organization of organizations A group of groups.If the people involved dont actuallyrepresent organizations, then it isnta coalition. “Community Organizing” 29 A group of groups
  • 30. COALITION DISADVANTAGES• The coalition gets the credit• Some benefit more than others• Influence is not equal• Compromise on Tactics• Long discussions• Not all do their share “Community Organizing”
  • 31. COALITION ADVANTAGESBuild powerBetter mediaEffective strategyLarger numbersIncreased resourcesLarger victories “Community Organizing”
  • 32. “Self-interest”From the Latin inter-esse. To be among.Self-interest means self among others. “Community Organizing”
  • 33. In a coalition, an organization must still meet these needs:1. Gain new members2. Raise money3. Be perceived as powerful4. Get publicity5. Build relationships with other groups6. Provide members with an exciting program7. Build internal morale8. Give its leaders “Community Organizing” a public role
  • 34. COALITION GUIDELINES 1. Seek common issues2. Avoid shopping lists 3. Hire neutral staff 4. Know members self interest 5. Respect members structure 6. All groups are not equal 7. Groups contribute different things 8. Tactics must suit all groups 9. Have top level representation “Community Organizing”
  • 35. IRS considerations “Community Organizing” 35
  • 36. Charitable 501(c)(3) Organizations• Contributions to them are tax deductible• Can get foundation money• Can not work in elections• Very limited lobbying• 20% of total budget on direct lobbing – 25% of lobbying budget on grass roots lobbying “Community Organizing”
  • 37. Civic/Social Welfare 501(c)(4) Organizations• Contributions to them are not tax deductible• May engage in restricted electoral activity – Communicate endorsement only to members• No limit on lobbying “Community Organizing”
  • 38. Some thoughts…• Where there is no vision, the people perish• Imagination precedes implementation• Listen, Learn, Lead• Start where the people are• Make the path by walking it “Community Organizing” 38
  • 39. Online Resources• The Midwest Academy – Training, excellent manual – www.midwestacademy.com• Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center – great workbook – www.inrc.org• New Organizing Institute – www.neworganizing.com• Community Organizers Handbook – www.organizershandbok.wikispaces.com• The Organizers’ Collaborative – organizerscollaborative.org• The Ruckus Society – Tools & training for organizing – www.ruckus.org• AlternativeROOTS – Arts. Community. Activism - http://alternateroots.org• TechSoup – Technology for nonprofits – home.techsoup.org• The Civic Commons - Technology for the public good – http://civiccommons.com• Rainforest Action Network – Activist resources – http://ran.org• Mobile Active – Cell phones for civic engagement – www.mobileactive.org• Industrial Areas Foundation – Founded by Alinksky, training- www.industrialareasfoundation.org• Gamaliel Foundation – Coalition of organizing efforts, training - www.gamaliel.org “Community Organizing” 39
  • 40. TAKE A SHORT ONLINE SURVEY ONCIVIC ENGAGEMENT… Please visit http://tinyurl.com/CvicSurvey “Community Organizing” 40
  • 41. Tom Tresser 312-804-3230 tom@tresser.com @tomsee www.tresser.com Materials for community organizing online @http://tinyurl.com/OrganizingResources “Community Organizing” 41

×