Less06 1

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Less06 1

  1. 1. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime—Choices From the Pyramid Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Chapter 6: Lifestyle Physical Activity and Positive Attitudes
  2. 2. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid <ul><li>Lesson Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Describe various types of lifestyle physical activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the FIT formula for lifestyle physical activities . </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>What are examples of lifestyle physical activities that can be done at home? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  4. 4. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Housework—vacuuming, cleaning </li></ul><ul><li>Yard work—raking the leaves, mowing the lawn, or shoveling snow </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  5. 5. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>What are examples of lifestyle physical activities that can be done at work? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  6. 6. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Occupations such as carpentry or bricklaying are physically active. </li></ul><ul><li>Walking and climbing the stairs (rather than taking an elevator). </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  7. 7. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Can some sporting events be classified as lifetime physical activities? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  8. 8. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Yes – sports like golf, tennis, and racquetball can be termed lifestyle activities. </li></ul><ul><li>The sports can be started when young. </li></ul><ul><li>They can be continued for life. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  9. 9. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>What is important about the intensity of lifestyle physical activities? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  10. 10. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>People can select the exercise intensity. </li></ul><ul><li>Higher levels of intensity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>will lead to greater improvements in fitness. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>will use a greater number of calories. </li></ul></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  11. 11. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>What does the word MET refer to? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  12. 12. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>The word MET comes from the word metabolism . </li></ul><ul><li>The word metabolism refers to the use of or the amount of energy to sustain life. </li></ul><ul><li>One MET refers to how much energy you use while resting. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  13. 13. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Lifestyle physical activities require more energy than is needed when you are just resting. How many METs do you use when doing lifestyle physical activities and vigorous physical activities? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  14. 14. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Lifestyle activities usually involve a caloric expenditure around 4-7 times the resting metabolic rate. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities that can be done by most people regardless of age or physical ability. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: mowing, raking leaves, housework, and brisk walking. </li></ul></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  15. 15. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid Answer (continued)
  16. 16. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>How many METs do you use when doing vigorous physical activities? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  17. 17. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Vigorous activities involve a lot higher caloric expenditure, around 10-15 times the metabolic rate. </li></ul><ul><li>This is an intensity of 10-15 METs. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  18. 18. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Where are lifestyle physical activities placed on the Physical Activity Pyramid? Why? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  19. 19. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Lifestyle activities are placed at the base of the Pyramid because </li></ul><ul><li>they are important for health, and </li></ul><ul><li>anybody can do them on a daily basis. </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>How much lifestyle physical activity is recommended? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  21. 21. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>All teens should do 30 minutes of moderate physical activity ( 4-7 METs/4-7 more energy than rest ) on most days of the week. </li></ul><ul><li>According to the FIT formula, doing at least 30 minutes of moderate activity on all or most days of the week is recommended. </li></ul><ul><li>It is best to get your 30 minutes in bouts or activity sessions lasting at least 10 minutes at a time. </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>How many calories should you expend each day and each week? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  23. 23. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>At a minimum (threshold), you should expend at least 200 calories a day in physical activity. </li></ul><ul><li>This would amount to 1,000 to 1,400 calories a week for exercise alone, based on 5 to 7 active days a week; total calories for optimal benefits to health & wellness would be approximately 2,000-3,500 calories a week. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  24. 24. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>What are pedometers? What lifestyle physical activity are they connected with? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  25. 25. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Pedometers count the number of steps people take. </li></ul><ul><li>These small computer devices are used to monitor (measure) how much walking a person does over the course of a day. </li></ul><ul><li>They can count running also but are more accurate for walking. </li></ul><ul><li>Walking is considered the most popular activity choice of people over 18. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  26. 26. <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>How could you use pedometers as a motivational tool to increase your physical activity levels? </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  27. 27. <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>You can first see how many steps you take on a normal day. </li></ul><ul><li>A personal goal of steps to achieve can be written down. </li></ul><ul><li>Observing the step counts during the day (and walking more if you are not on target) can help you achieve your walking goal. </li></ul><ul><li>Some experts believe that if you walk at least 10,000 steps each day, you will be in the target zone for lifestyle physical activity. </li></ul>Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime— Choices From the Pyramid
  28. 28. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>For whom is the walking test best suited? </li></ul>
  29. 29. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Less fit people. </li></ul><ul><li>It can be done at a low intensity. </li></ul><ul><li>The walking test gives you an alternative to the one-mile run, the PACER, and the step test. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>If you are active, is the walking test best for you? </li></ul>
  31. 31. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>The one-mile run or PACER may be best for estimating your cardiovascular fitness for active and fit people, but the walking test is also a good test. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>Do you need a warm-up for the walking test? </li></ul>
  33. 33. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Because you are walking, a warm-up is not necessary. The walk itself is a warm-up. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Question </li></ul><ul><li>How do you perform the walking test? </li></ul>
  35. 35. Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test <ul><li>Answer </li></ul><ul><li>Walk a mile at a fast pace (as fast as you can while keeping approximately the same pace for the entire walk). </li></ul><ul><li>Immediately after the walk, count your heart rate for 15 seconds. Calculate your one-minute heart rate by multiplying by 4. </li></ul><ul><li>Record your rate on your record sheet. (SW 6-1) </li></ul><ul><li>Locate your walking test rating using the appropriate chart and record your rating. </li></ul>

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