Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Pakistan Software Industry Best Practices Study 2004

3,747

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business, Travel
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,747
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PAKISTAN’S SOFTWARE INDUSTRY   BEST PRACTICES & STRATEGIC CHALLENGES     AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS                        MINISTRY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  GOVERNMENT OF PAKISTAN   ISLAMABAD         FEBRUARY 2005                
  • 2.               Copyrights © 2005 Pakistan Software Export Board (G) Ltd.  Ministry of Information Technology Government of Pakistan  Printing March 2005  Published by Pakistan Software Export Board  The Funding Agency The  “Best  Practices  in  Pakistani  Software  Sector”  Project  is  funded  by  the  Pakistan  Software  Export  Board  (PSEB). PSEB is the entity within Government charged with the task of enhancing exports of software and IT enabled services (ITES)  from  Pakistan.  PSEB  is  a  guarantee  limited  company  totally  owned  and  funded  by  the  Government  of Pakistan. Any questions or comments about this report may be directed to PSEB Islamabad at 92‐51‐111‐333‐666 or through e‐mail at  research@pseb.org.pk .   Disclaimer The report is published by PSEB for the use of its members & the IT industry. This report is a result of a 3‐month long independent research study conducted by the principal consultant with support from PSEB.  The study also incorporates feedback from PSEB, Ministry of IT and Telecom (MOITT) and stakeholders of the Pakistani IT industry.  It faithfully reports what the consultant found the on‐the‐ground reality of the Pakistani software industry to be and accurately reflects (and wherever possible attributes to others) the opinions he was able to form on the basis of his discussions and onsite visits to about 50 Pakistani software companies. To that effect,  the  report  solely  reflects  the  views  of  the  consultant  and  may  or  may  not  reflect  those  of  Pakistan  Software  Export  Board (PSEB), the Ministry of IT and Telecom (MOITT), or the Government of Pakistan (GOP).  The study advisors or the contributors are not responsible, in any way possible, for the errors/omissions of this report.  This report is a best intentioned effort to disseminate information about the Pakistan’s Software Industry and should not be used as a sole means of advice for making investment decisions. PSEB does not accept any liability for any direct and consequential use of this report or its contents. The contents of this report may be reproduced only after prior permission from PSEB.                                            Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  2     
  • 3. CONTENTS 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................................................................4 2. BACKGROUND & INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................11  2.1—BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY......................................................................................12  2.2—INTRODUCTORY REVIEW OF THE RELEVANT LITERATURE ...........................................................................13 3. THE OBJECTIVES, AUDIENCE, AND FORMAT OF THE STUDY..............................................................16  3.1—THE ANALYTIC AGENDA: .............................................................................................................................16  3.2—THE BENEFITS AND INTENDED AUDIENCE: ..................................................................................................18  3.3—THE FORMAT OF THE STUDY: ........................................................................................................................18 4. A BRIEF NOTE ON PROJECT METHODOLOGY...........................................................................................19 5. A STATISTICAL SNAPSHOT OF PAKISTAN’S SOFTWARE INDUSTRY.................................................22 5.1—ESTABLISHING A POINT OF REFERENCE FOR PAKISTAN’S SOFTWARE INDUSTRY ................22  5.2—SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT IN PAKISTAN: STATISTICS ON MANAGERIAL AND TECHNICAL PATTERNS.....24  5.3—SEARCH FOR THE HOLY GRAIL: DO STATISTICS REVEAL A PATTERN OF “BEST PRACTICES”? ...................49 6. UNDERSTANDING PROMINENT BUSINESS MODELS & COMPETITIVE DRIVERS ...........................53  6.1—A TAXONOMY OF GENERIC SOFTWARE BUSINESS MODELS.........................................................................54  6.2—THE EXPORT FOCUSED LOCAL FIRM (THE “SYSTEMS” OR “NETSOL” MODEL) ..........................................59  6.3—THE DOMESTIC FOCUSED LOCAL FIRM (THE “TPS” OR “LMKR” MODEL)...............................................68  6.4—THE EXPORT‐FOCUSED FOREIGN FIRM (THE “TECHLOGIX” OR “ETILIZE” MODEL)..................................80  6.5—THE DEDICATED DEVELOPMENT CENTER (THE “ITIM ASSOC.” OR “CLICKMARKS” MODEL) .................90 7.  ENVIRONMENTAL, INFRASTRUCTURE & PUBLIC POLICY CHALLENGES....................................101  7.1—TELECOM INFRASTRUCTURE COST & AVAILABILITY .................................................................................105  7.2—AVAILABILITY OF VENTURE AND RISK CAPITAL ........................................................................................106  7.3—UNDER‐DEVELOPED DOMESTIC MARKET ...................................................................................................107  7.4—AVAILABILITY OF PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE .........................................................................................108  7.5—INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS .............................................................................................................110 8. CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS..................................................................................................111  8.1—SUMMARY OF RESEARCH RESULTS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS ..................................................................112  8.2—THE WAY OF THE FUTURE: SOME TENTATIVE CONCLUSIONS ...................................................................114 9. APPENDIX A: LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS SURVEYED/INTERVIEWED ..............................................117 10. LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC REFERENCES ...................................................................................................119 11. ABOUT THE AUTHOR / CONSULTANT....................................................................................................123                                                    Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  3     
  • 4. PAKISTAN’S SOFTWARE INDUSTRY  BEST PRACTICES & STRATEGIC CHALLENGES  AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS  1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The  software  industry—widely  seen  as  the  “great  enabler”—provides  an  opportunity  to  the developing countries to play a greater economic role in the fast globalizing world. The example of  neighboring  India—whose  ambition  and  progress  towards  becoming  a  “mini  (software) superpower” is no mystery from the world—is often cited in the development literature as an evidence of the fact. Pakistan’s software industry—widely perceived to be sharing a number of key factors with India—has embarked upon an ambitious effort of its own to claim its share in the riches of the world’s software markets. Pakistan is currently viewed as a tier‐3 country in a widely  quoted  taxonomy  of  software  exporting  nations  (Carmel,  2003).  It  is  widely  believed that, with the wealth of talent and strengths available, the country deserves a better place in this global  pecking  order  of  software  exporting  nations—atleast  a  tier‐2  status  like  Russia  and China, or even a tier‐1 status alongside archrival India1.   Pakistan’s software industry has been a subject of the curiosity of interested by‐standers—both local and expatriate entrepreneurs—industry analysts, and potential investors alike. Yet, lack of credible  data  on  the  current  state  and  competitive  dynamics  of  the  industry  has  often  been  a hindrance  in  engaging  these  individuals  and  materializing  many  prospective  ventures.    We were recently involved, on the request of an expatriate investor, in an effort to incubate an IT‐focused  venture  capital  in  Pakistan.  As  we  spoke  with  industry  leaders  and  the  financial community, we repeatedly encountered a series of tough questions, for example:    • Why  hasn’t  the  Pakistani  software  industry  been  able  to  produce  a  single  world‐class  software firm (e.g. Wipro, Infosys or TCS of India) in the last 10‐15 years?  • Why  haven’t  we  been  able  to  grow  Pakistani  software  exports  beyond  a  certain  level  ($30‐60 million per annum) for the last 5 years?   • Does Pakistani software industry merely represent a lower  level of development or an  altogether different development trajectory as compared to known peer nations?  • What  constitutes  a  generalized  set  of  best  practices  in  the  local  software  industry  (i.e.  what differentiates better performers from those that don’t perform that well)?  This  study  attempts  to  answer  some  of  these  questions.  While  several  factors  are  widely believed to be a hindrance in the country’s aspiration to become a significant software exporter, 1 A widely quoted GOP target of $1B in software exports by Y2000 would have propelled Pakistan into theexclusive tier-1 club.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  4     
  • 5. not the least important of which are macro‐ and geopolitical in nature (e.g. law and order and security situation, image of the country etc.), we adopt an inside‐out approach that asks: “What can  the  various  players,  essentially  software  companies,  in  the  industry  learn  from  each other?”  There  is  a  growing  realization  that  we  must  truly  understand  the  structure  of  the Pakistani software industry and the nature of Pakistan’s competitive advantage in the software arena  in  order  to  devise  better  industrial  and  organizational  strategies  and  public  policy interventions. The Best Practices in Pakistani Software Sector Project—being the first of its kind and scope in Pakistan—is an exploratory study of the Pakistani software industry that attempts to do just that.  The  study  draws  upon  an  “on‐the‐spot”  survey  of  40  of  the  most  prominent  and  largest software  companies  in  Pakistan,  as  identified  by  PSEB  and  PASHA.  We  conducted organizational interviews with senior executives (CEOs/CTOs or Local of Heads of Operations) of  47  of  these  companies  to  supplement  the  statistical  data  with  qualitative  insights.  These interviews  focused  on  understanding  these  organizations,  their  business  and  revenue  models, competitive drivers, strategic challenges, and policy bottlenecks. We also conducted interviews of opinion leaders, policy‐makers, and senior executives of other organizational entities (e.g. IT MNCs, financial institutions, and academia) that had a significant bearing on the local software industry. In all we conducted over 65 interviews between Oct.‐Dec. timeframe (see Appendix)     The  substantive  findings  of  the  study  can  be  broadly  divided  into  two  components.  The  first part  attempts  at  creating  a  brief  statistical  snapshot  of  the  Pakistani  software  industry,  as gleaned  from  the  data  on  organizational,  managerial,  and  technical  practices  of  our respondents. The second part of the study uses taxonomy of generic software business models to develop a qualitative sense of software development activity in Pakistan. It also identifies key strategic  challenges  (13  in  all)  typically  faced  by  companies  within  each  of  these  generic business  models  and  managerial  best  practices  (20  in  all)  adopted  by  various  players  in  the industry to meet each of these strategic challenges. The report concludes with a discussion on environmental and policy bottlenecks and some tentative conclusions  The  results  of  the  statistical  analysis  are  quite  illuminating.  On  the  whole,  the  60  software houses  included  in  our  statistical  sample  employ  over  4000  technical  and  professional employees—for  an  average  of  62  employees  per  organization.  Roughly  one  third  (32%)  of  the software  companies  reported  annual  revenues  of  more  than  a  million  dollars  with  some reporting more than $5M, another third (36%) between $200K and $1M, and the rest (32%) less than $200K. 6 of the companies had more than 250 employees and another 8 had between 100 and 250 employees. On the whole these 60 companies had experienced an employment growth of about 27.5% and a revenue growth of 37.4% over the last year—pointing at better utilization of  excess  capacity  or  value‐addition  per  employee,  or  both.  Around  40%  of  the  companies  in our  sample  were  subsidiaries  of  foreign  companies—with  majority  of  them  having  a  parent company in the United States. 55% of the companies had one or more front offices abroad (50%                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  5     
  • 6. in  the  US,  11%  each  in  UK  and  Middle  East,  and  3%  in  the  Asia  Pacific  region).    45%  of  the respondents  had  quality  certification  (mostly  ISO‐9000  with  only  3%  having  CMM).  73.7%  of the companies had dedicated quality assurance teams. Broadly speaking, our respondents derive their revenues from export and domestic markets in a ratio of 60:40. On the exports side, they derive 22.5% and 38.5% of the revenues from products and  services  respectively.  Although  we  did  not  ask  directly,  our  conversations  with  the  top leaders of the industry suggest that a majority of the product‐exports are “customized” rather than  “shrink‐wrapped”  products.  On  the  domestic  side,  however,  the  ratios  are  somewhat reversed with products and services contributing 23% and 16.5% respectively. Our respondents predominantly  serve  the  private  sector  markets  with  around  85%  of  the  total  sales  going  to private sector (local and foreign combined) and the rest going to public sector, equally divided between domestic and foreign.   We  tried  to  parse  the  data  into  various  classifications  in  an  attempt  to  understand  the organization  and  dynamics  of  software  industry.  For  example,  we  looked  at  the  differences between  export‐focused,  domestic‐focused,  and  hybrid  software  operations;  between  product‐focused,  services‐focused,  and  hybrid  operations;  between  large  and  small  operations;  and between  operations  formed  prior  to  and  after  the  DotCom  Bubble  burst  in  the  United  States. Our results are suggestive of several interesting trends.   For  example,  on  the  managerial  practices  side,  there  is  some  suggestive  evidence  that  export‐focused software operations are more likely to distribute stocks/ownership among employees, hold  employee  bonding  activities,  and  benefit  from  employee‐driven  innovation  while domestic‐focused software operations are more likely to share profits with employees, provide additional benefits to female employees, have greater financial discipline, and provide time to employees to work on their own interests. Despite the latter, however, they seem to benefit less from  employee‐driven  innovation  and  suffer  more  from  a  perception  of  lower  delegation quality. Hybrids fall in between the two categories on almost all these measures.   Export‐focused operations tend to spend more, on average, on quality assurance while hybrids tend to have a greater propensity for seeking a quality certification. All companies, across the board, prefer to use and express greater satisfaction with high‐contact approaches of marketing (e.g. word‐to‐mouth, one‐on‐one contacts, and pre‐established networks). We do not find a lot of  differences  between  the  cost‐structures  of  export‐focused,  domestic‐focused,  or  hybrid operations,  except  that  hybrids  seemed  to  under‐invest  in  product‐development  to  pay  for expensive  marketing  and  advertising,  and  training  and  certification.  CEOs  of  export‐focused software operations tend to spend much more time in tactical rather than strategic mode (doing day‐to‐day management rather than marketing and business development).    Our  analysis  of  other  classifications  provides  few  interesting  insights.  The  dedicated development  centers  tend  to  be  smaller,  more  rigorous  (from  a  technical  and  process                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  6     
  • 7. standpoint) than the rest of the industry. They, however, seem to experience serious constraints to revenue and employment growth—a fact that we interpret as a manifestation of their “mid‐life”  crisis.  Although  we  see  a  trend  towards  productization  in  the  industry,  we  found  few significant  differences  between  product‐focused  and  services‐focused  operations.  This  lack  of differentiation  (e.g.  in  the  cost  structures  of  services  and  product‐focused  operations)  is problematic,  to  say  the  least.  There  were  also  few  significant  differences  between  large  and small software operations and between those created before and after the DotCom Bubble burst.   On the whole these findings also paint a picture of lack of focus and specialization within the Pakistani  software  industry.  Those  product‐focused  operations  are  similar  to  services‐focused operations  and  pre‐DotCom  operations  are  not  qualitatively  different  from  post‐DotCom operations  does  not  speak  well  for  the  maturity  of  the  industry  as  a  whole.  A  related substantive finding is the trend towards the “hybridization” of software development activity. The  hybrid  firm  has  emerged  as  an  important  organizational  class  on  its  own  rather  than  the average of the two extremes. While the hybrid firm tends to do better than the two extremes on some measures and hence might be seen as a manifestation of the industry’s survival instinct, it is not quite clear if it is the optimal model of organization of software development activity in the long run.   In  line  with  the  study  objectives,  we  also  asked  the  question:  Do  aggregate  statistics  reveal  a pattern  of  “best  practices”  within  the  software  Industry?  We  use  multiple  comparison  groups (e.g.  40  most  prominent  companies,  top‐10  companies,  14  fastest  growing  companies,  14 companies that describe themselves as globally competitive against the rest of the industry) and find  mixed  results  on  that  account.  For  example,  we  find  robust  evidence  to  support  the  fact that  better‐performing  companies  tend  to  adopt  a  set  of  employee‐friendly  management practices  (e.g.  flexibility,  stock  ownership,  profit‐sharing  etc.)  and  have  access  to  high  quality managerial  talent  (e.g.  mix  of  technical  and  business  backgrounds,  prior  venture  experience, financial  discipline  etc.)  than  the  rest  of  the  industry.  All  companies,  across  the  board,  prefer high‐contact  marketing  approaches  over  low‐contact  ones  but  better‐performing  companies report higher satisfaction with the former than the rest of the industry. Our results on various measures of technical and process quality are, however, inconclusive, at best. Here, we do not find  any  clear  patterns  that  differentiate  better‐performing  companies  from  the  rest  of  the industry. We believe that best practices within technical and process realms are dependent on the type of work performed and a number of project‐specific variables. As reported elsewhere, therefore, project‐level data might be better suited to identify these differences.    Next, based on our statistical findings and qualitative insights, we devise a 4‐part taxonomy of generic  business  models.  The  four  sub‐classifications,  named  after  their  most  prominent examples,  include:  Export‐focused  Local  Firm  (“Systems”  or  “Netsol”  Model),  Domestic Focused  Local  Firm  (“TPS”  or  “LMKR”  Model),  Export  Focused  Foreign  (Expatriate)  Firm (“Techlogix” or “Etilize” Model), and Dedicated Development Center (“ITIM” or “Clickmarks”                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  7     
  • 8. Model). We present a snapshot of each of these generic software business models and identify key  strategic  challenges  for  each—13  in  all  for  the  entire  industry.  As  we  discuss  the  ways relatively  more  successful  firms  in  the  industry  have  countered  these  strategic  challenges,  we also arrive at twenty (20) managerial best practices that could be replicated by other players in the industry.   The  Export‐focused  Local  Firm  is  one  founded  by  a  predominantly  Pakistan‐based entrepreneurial  team  (that  may  or  may  not  have  been  aided/encouraged  by  a  group  of expatriates), but with an explicit purpose of exporting software products or services. Majority of the firms established in pre‐DotCom Bubble burst era with an expressed purpose of exporting services  to  North  America  and  FIGURE–GENERIC BUSINESS MODELS & THEIR TRANSITIONS SCENARIOS Western European countries fall in    this  category.  Although  there  are    DOMESTIC‐FOCUSED  EXPORT‐FOCUSED  EXPORT‐FOCUSED  DEDICATED    LOCAL FIRM LOCAL FIRM FOREIGN‐FIRM DEVELOPMENT CENTERsome that have taken the products      ITIM Associatesroute, their  numbers are relatively    ZRG TPS ThreeSixtyDegreez Post Amazers Etilize Prosol MetaAppssmaller  than  those  focusing  on     Lumensoft Advanced Comm. Adamsoft Clickmarks Yevolve Netsol Ultimus Enabling Tech. (Quartics)export  of  services.  The  most    2B Technologies Makabu MixIT Trivor Systems   SI3 Autosoft Dynamics Techlogix Strategic Systems Int’ldefining  feature  of  this  class  of    Softech Systems Sidaat Hyder Morshed Xavor ESP Global Systems  companies,  namely,  the  local‐   Genesis Solutions Avanza Solutions Elixir Technologies   Alchemy Technologies GoNetpresence of their founders and the    AppXS Kalsoftexport‐orientation  of  their    Oratech Jinn Technologies 3   Askari Info Systems Secure Networksproducts/  services,  brings  a    Acrologix Systems Ltd   Comcept Progressive Systemsnumber  of  unique  and  important    LMKR Millennium Software Cressoft T K  challenges  to  this  type  of  a  firm.  CARE RANSITIONS  EY D      M&A  / F IVERSIFICATION  F W OREIGN IRM S P HIFTING  RIORITIESWe  discuss  three  of  these  in  great  M , V ‐ ATURITY B ALUE ADD L M . UYOUT BY  OCAL  GMTE P ‐O .  LEVATION OF  AK PSdetail and allude to several others. The  ones  we  discuss  in  depth  include:  customer  acquisition  in  a  foreign  market,  setting  up  a foreign marketing presence, and understanding the domain and context of a foreign customer. Some  salient  examples  of  this  type  of  business  model  in  action  are:  ThreesixtyDegreez,  Post Amazers, Advanced Communications, Makabu, Netsol, and Autosoft Dynamics etc.    The Domestic‐focused Local Firm, with an exception of a few companies, is really one because of circumstances rather than choice. More often than not, and logically so, the domestic‐focused local  firm  plans  to  export  its  products  or  services  abroad  and  is  merely  using  the  domestic market  as  a  vehicle  to  gain  a  track  record  with  real  life  customers.  Whether  a  firm  is  in  this category by choice (“I’ll do domestic first, export later”) or by circumstances (“Since the export market  doesn’t  seem  very  good  right  now,  I’ll  survive  by  selling  at  home”)  the  strategic challenges are quite similar. We discuss three of these in some detail. These include: operating in an under‐developed local market, getting access to capital, and having a business plan and a strategic/domain focus. Other challenges alluded to include: migrating from the domestic to the export  market,  developing  relationships,  delivering  quality  products/services,  and  even                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  8     
  • 9. marketing  abroad.  Some  salient  examples  of  this  type  of  business  model  in  action  are:  2B Technologies,  ZRG,  TPS,  Lumensoft,  Yevolve,  SI3,  Softech  Systems,  AppXS,  and  Genesis Solutions etc.  The  Export‐focused  Foreign  Firm  is  one  founded  abroad  (or  jointly,  in  Pakistan),  by  a predominantly foreign (usually, an expatriate) entrepreneurial team, with an explicit purpose of using  the  Pakistan‐based  offshore  development  facility  to  deliver  a  product  or  service demanded by the foreign market. This type of business model has been adopted by services and product‐focused companies alike. While this class of companies enjoys several advantages over those in earlier discussed categories, namely, quality of due‐diligence on the basic idea, foreign contacts/networks of founders, and better access to capital etc., there are significant challenges as well. We discuss four of these challenges in some detail and identify a number of managerial best practices followed by some of the interviewees. These challenges include: dealing with the “image” problem, countering the geographically shifting “labor arbitrage” argument, scaling up the  Pakistan‐based  operation,  and  getting  to  know  the  land  and  managing  expectations  etc. Some  salient  examples  of  this  type  of  business  model  in  action  are:  Elixir,  Etilize,  Ultimus, MixIT, TechLogix, Prosol, and Xavor etc.  The Dedicated Offshore Development Center, as the name suggests, is a fairly limited offshore operation  of  a  foreign  company.  It  is  different  from  the  Export‐Focused  Foreign  (Expatriate) Firm  in  the  sense  that  it  is  often  an  “add‐on”  to  an  already  existing  company  whose  strategic and managerial processes and controls are quite well‐established. Due to its unique nature (i.e. limited  scope)  it  faces  a  number  of  challenges  that  are  distinct  from  the  earlier‐discussed category.  We  discuss  three  key  challenges  faced  by  organizations  in  this  business  model  and identify  innovative  best  practices  to  counter  these.    These  include:  managing  the  parent‐subsidiary  relationship,  setting  up  an  offshore  facility  in  Pakistan,  and  building  a  quality software development operation. Some salient examples of this type of business model in action are:  MetaApps,  ITIM  Associates,  Clickmarks,  Trivor  Systems,  and  Strategic  Systems International etc.   The  taxonomy  of  generic  software  business  models  may  be  helpful  in  several  ways.  Firstly,  it gives  us  a  relatively  easy  and  comprehensive  way  to  classify  a  particular  software  operation into  a  broad  enough  category  of  organizations  and  a  hence  a  reference  point  to  compare ourselves  against.  Secondly,  it  highlights  the  importance  of  understanding  the  strengths, weaknesses,  pre‐requisites,  and  structural  limitations  of  each  of  the  generic  software  business models.  It  is  also  important  here  to  understand  that  while  transitions  between  these  generic software  business  models  are  possible,  they  are  not  necessary  or  automatic.  None  of  these business  models  is  essentially  good  or  bad,  they  are  just  different  and  one  must  pick  the particular model that best suits his/her idea‐offering‐destination mix.   We conclude the study with a brief review on environmental and policy bottlenecks that have hindered  the  growth  and  development  of  the  software  industry.  This  is,  by  no  means,  an                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  9     
  • 10. exhaustive  study  or  even  a  comprehensive  list  of  policy  issues  but  rather  a  description  of  our statistical and qualitative findings. The country’s image, over‐and‐above the company’s brand, tops the list as the problem identified by as many as 68% of all respondents. This is followed by quality of manpower (56%), the cost of IT/Telecom infrastructure (50%) and law‐and‐order and security  situation  (48%)  as  the  most  important  problems  from  the  perspective  of  all‐types  of firms combined. While there are variations between how each of these may disproportionately affect various sub‐categories of organizations, image, IT/Telecom infrastructure, and HR appear to  rate  consistently  as  among  the  top‐5  problems  in  all  categories.  We  also  faithfully  narrate several proposals, put forth by our interviewees, to address some of these issues.   On the whole, there are a few generalized conclusions that one can draw. The first and foremost contribution of this study is to bring forth the very vibrant face of Pakistan’s software industry. Pakistan today, unlike yesteryears, is fast turning into a happening place for IT.  Although the industry has come a long way since its first company opened shop in 1976, it has only been in the limelight—for investors and policymakers alike—since the early 1990s. Ten years is a very short time for the development of an entire industry and there are signs that Pakistan’s software industry,  having  laid  the  foundations  for  a  tomorrow,  maybe  in  for  better  times  ahead.  Last year  alone,  the  industry  has  grown  at  around  37%  in  revenues  and  27%  in  terms  of  technical and  professional  employment.  Many  of  the  CEOs  we  spoke  to  expect  a  better‐than‐last‐year performance  in  2005.  Another  encouraging  sign  is  the  increasing  number  of  Pakistani‐owned foreign  firms  being  located  to  Pakistan  as  well  as  the  reverse  brain  drain  being  caused  by returning Pakistani entrepreneurs who see the relatively less competitive and virgin market at home  as  a  tremendous  opportunity  for  setting  up  a  Pakistan‐based  company.  Systems Integration,  Innovation  and  Intelligence  (SI3)  and  The  Resource  Group  (TRG)  are  the  poster children of this undeniable trend. None of these would have been possible a decade ago.   On  the  domestic‐front  as  well,  there  is  a  growing  likelihood  of  considerable  opening  up  and modernization  of  traditionally  conservative  segments  of  the  economy.  If  deregulation  in  the financial sector is any credible sign of things to come, we are likely to see massive changes in the  shape  of  the  local  manufacturing  and  service  industries  by  virtue  of  telecom  sector deregulation  and  the  enhanced  competition  under  the  now‐effective  WTO  trade  regime.  The former  has  already  begun  to  show  tremendous  promise  with  around  a  billion  dollars  of promised investment in last year alone. An investor whom we spoke to sees the situation as the fading  away  of  the  Old  Pakistan  and  the  Emergence  of  the  New  Pakistan  that  is  effectively linked  to  and  a  significant  player  of  the  global  economic  system.  The  New  Pakistan  presents considerable promise and opportunity to those willing to bite at it. There are live examples of companies—TRG,  SI3,  LMKR,  Netsol,  Techlogix,  Etilize,  TPS  and  many  more—that  have capitalized on this new set of opportunities and positioned themselves to reap the rewards.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  10     
  • 11. There  are,  however,  considerable,  although  not  insurmountable,  challenges  too.  The  industry suffers  from  a  serious  professionalization  and  institutionalization  deficit.  The  200‐people barrier, although psychological,  is real till it  is  actually  broken—and broken convincingly and forever.  In  addition  to  the  200‐people  barrier,  we  also  face  a  20‐people  and  a  2‐people  barrier that  requires  as  much  attention  as  the  former.  Many  of  our  very  innovative  firms  continue  to resist professionalization and thus fail to grow beyond a particular size. The industry is hungry for  capable  investors/acquirers  to  come  forth  and  bring  about  paradigm  shifting  structural changes  to  these  companies  and  enable  them  to  move  to  the  next  higher  level  of  growth.  The fast maturing market of outsourcing and offshoring services necessitate that our entrepreneurs and  business  leaders  think  about  new  ways  of  doing  things.  It  is  unlikely,  given  the consolidation  in  the  outsourcing  industry,  that  we  would  see  a  new  player  replacing  Wipros, Infosys’,  or  TCS’  of  this  world.  Rather  than  blindly  copying  the  already  well‐established countries  and  players,  we  must  think  creatively  to  devise  a  model  that  best  suits  our  own strengths  and  weaknesses.  Our  ability  to  lead  in  the  business  model  innovation  would determine, to a large extent, our place in the future pecking order of software exporting nations. Playing the volumes‐game (ITES/BPO), without the requisite scalability and HR, is unlikely to succeed on an industry‐wide scale. Until we can resolve the scalability issue, we must learn to play in the equally lucrative ideas‐game.   In a dynamic and fast changing industry like IT/Software, tomorrow can and will be radically different, and not merely an extension of today. It would require investors’ foresight, business manager’s  insight,  and  entrepreneur’s  courage  to  capture  the  moment  and  build  the  next generation of niche players and industry leaders and build it in the New Pakistan. Profits are certainly  to  be  earned  by  those  who  “break  the  rules”  and  try  the  unthinkable.  There  is, however,  a  dire  need  to  think  deep  and  hard  about  the  problems,  patterns,  and  strategic challenges  identified  in  this  report,  find  explanations  for  these,  and  devise  strategies  to  get around them.   2. BACKGROUND & INTRODUCTION Pakistan’s software/IT industry has shown an uneven pattern of growth through its relatively short  history.  While  Information  technology  and  software  industries  were  not  a  government priority  before  early  nineties,  software  houses  have  existed  in  the  country  since  1970s.  From early‐to‐mid  1990s,  however,  promoting  the  software/IT  industry  has  been  a  stated,  if  not always adhered to, government priority—a fact motivated partly by India’s rise to prominence as a “mini (software) superpower”. Several policy actions and infrastructure development and up‐gradation projects have been undertaken by Government of Pakistan (GOP) to promote not only a domestic software/IT industry but also exports of software from Pakistan. Many of these                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  11     
  • 12. are documented in the National IT Policy and its accompanying Action Plan (MOST, 2000). The progress on these actions and initiatives has, however, been sketchy (UNCTAD, 2004). The local software scene does not yet show the kind of vitality and growth that is a characteristic of major tier‐1 or even tier‐2 software exporting nation as described in Carmel (2003).  2.1—Background and Motivation for the Study  While the causes of Pakistan’s below‐par performance in the software sector may be many, the importance of within industry learning and an organic growth cannot be overlooked. Pakistan’s software industry (and its ancillary and related industries e.g. banking, venture capital etc.) is in dire need of sharing of best practices, of its own industry icons and heroes, and of a lot of hope, optimism and the focus to succeed. It needs an in‐depth understanding of the current state of its affairs,  beyond  the  general  rhetoric,  and  a  vision  of  the  future  to  motivate  it  to  upgrade  itself and  capture  its  due  share  in  the  world  software/IT  market.  A  formal  research  study  of  best practices and strategic and competitive drivers of the Pakistani software sector has long been in order.  The  proposed  study  would  develop  a  shared  understanding  of  the  problems  and  the promise  of  the  Pakistani  software  sector  and  build  a  coalition  of  support  around  this  shared reality. It would also serve as an authentic source of data and information to quickly upgrade the understanding of potential investors intending to invest in the local software scene. Finally, and most importantly, it would help the industry itself in learning from each others’ successes and failures.   Several  factors  are  widely  believed  to  be  a  hindrance  in  the  country’s  aspiration  to  become  a significant  software  exporter,  not  the  least  important  of  which  are  macro‐  and  geopolitical  in nature  (e.g.  law  and  order  and  security  situation,  image  of  the  country  etc.).  While  resolving these  issues  is  critical  to  developing  a  strong  and  robust  industry,  this  study  adopts  a different—inside‐out—approach  that  asks  the  question:  “What  can  the  various  players, essentially  software  companies,  in  the  industry  learn  from  each  other?”  In  essence,  we  are attempting to learn from the variations in performance of companies operating under the same set  of  geo‐political  and  policy  environment.  Secondly,  there  is  a  growing  realization  that  we must  truly  understand  the  structure  of  the  Pakistani  software  industry  and  the  nature  of Pakistan’s competitive advantage in the software arena in order to devise better industrial and organizational strategies and public policy interventions.  A firm‐level analysis has the potential to unearth the factors behind within‐industry performance differentials (e.g. Netsol vs. Cressoft vs.  Enabling  Technologies)  and  identify  best  practices  that  can  be  adopted  industry‐wide. Regardless of what the final conclusion may be, the one thing that is certain about the Pakistani                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  12     
  • 13. software  industry  is  that  it  is  not  a  very  well  understood  and  researched  one.  For  example, questions like:    • Why  hasn’t  the  Pakistani  software  industry  been  able  to  produce  a  single  world‐class  software firm (e.g. Wipro, Infosys or TCS of India) in the last 10‐15 years?  • Why  haven’t  we  been  able  to  grow  Pakistani  software  exports  beyond  a  certain  level  ($30‐60 million per annum) for the last 5 years?   • Does Pakistani software industry merely represent a lower  level of development or an  altogether different development trajectory as compared to known peer nations?  • What  constitutes  a  generalized  set  of  best  practices  in  the  local  software  industry  (i.e.  what differentiates better performers from those that don’t perform that well)?  Answering these (and other) questions would require considerable industry research, sharing of best practices, and discussion/debate. The ultimate answer to these questions is most surely not going to be a silver bullet either but a formal inquiry has the potential to set in motion a process that  might  give  us  some  hints  towards  a  possible  answer  or  enable  us  to  ask  more  intelligent questions and thus lead us nearer to the truth.   2.2—Introductory Review of the Relevant Literature  There  has  been  considerable  increase  in  the  interest  in  software  industries  within  developing country  contexts  in  the  recent  years.  Proponents  of  the  school  of  thought  that  sees  IT  and software as a “great enabler” have argued that information technology in general, and software industry in particular, provides an opportunity to the developing countries to inextricably link themselves  with  the  developed  economies  of  the  west.  This  “globalization  of  work”  (or production),  some  believe,  is  a  harbinger  of  subsequent  phases  of  globalization  that  would reduce  the  disparities  across  the  world  and  provide  an  equal  opportunity  for  everybody  to participate in the global production and creative processes. In many instances, these predictions have  also  been  validated  by  initial  experiences  in  some  developing  countries.  Most  notable  of these are India, Ireland and Israel, famously known as the three Is of the global IT revolution and the new entrants in the tier‐1 of software exporting nations that already includes relatively more developed, mostly, OECD countries and, and to a lesser degree, China and Russia (tier‐2 countries). Following the examples of these tier‐1 and 2 nations, are a host of other developing countries,  namely,  Brazil,  Mexico,  Malaysia,  Sri  Lanka,  Pakistan,  Ukraine,  Bulgaria,  Hungary, Poland  and  the  Philippines  (tier‐3  countries)  and  Cuba,  Iran,  Jordan,  Egypt,  Indonesia  and Bangladesh (tier‐4 countries) and many others (Carmel, 2003).                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  13     
  • 14. While the boundaries between the countries in this 4‐tiered taxonomy are quite fuzzy, primarily by‐design but also due to lack of credible data on each, Carmel (2003) attempts to differentiate tier‐1  countries  as  having  hundreds  of  companies,  more  than  a  billion‐dollars  of  export revenues, and the industry maturity of more than 15 years; tier‐2 countries as having at least a hundred companies, exports revenues of more than $200 million, and greater than 10 years of industry  maturity;  and  tier‐3  countries  as  having  tens  of  companies,  more  than  $25  million  in export revenues, and over 5 years of industry maturity. All other “aspirants” that do not make the cut fall in the tier‐4 of the taxonomy.   Many  researchers  and  analysts  have  tried  to  understand  the  dynamics  of  the  Indian  software industry  (NASSCOM,  2001,  2002,  2003,  2004;  Heeks  et  al,  1996,  1998,  2002;  Bajpai  and  Shastri, 1998;  Desai,  undated;  Arora  et  al.,  2000).  Software  industries  of  other  countries  such  as  China (Tschang  and  Xue,  2003),  Japan  (Rapp,  1996),  Iran  (Nicholson  and  Sahay,  2003),  Romania (Grundey and Heeks, 1998), Sri Lanka (Barr and Tessler, 2002), Korea (Barr and Tessler, 2002) and  Malaysia  (Mohan  et  al.,  2004),  among  others,  have  also  been  documented  in  literature. Several researchers have attempted to take this knowledge and apply it to the context of other countries (UNCTAD, 2002, Tessler et al., 2003). Others have tried to develop policy frameworks and  draw  policy  conclusions  (Carmel,  2003b,  Heeks  and  Nicholson,  2002)  or  develop  generic analytic frameworks for analyzing the competitiveness of software industries (Heeks, 1999; and Bhatnagar, 1997). Heeks (1999) describes a 2x2 theoretical framework (described in section 5.2) that classifies software companies on the basis of their destination (domestic or export) and type of offering (product or service). Bhatnagar (1997), taking a different approach, describes nations as  going  through  four  stages  of  maturity  transitioning  from  building  skills  and  reputation,  to building services, to building products.   Heeks’ (1999) analytic framework is interesting and useful and roughly forms the basis of this report’s  analytic  framework.  The  four  resultant  categories  of  companies  from  Heeks’  2x2 frameworks are different in terms of their organizational characteristics, competitive strategies, and  enabling  conditions  and  requirements.  While  it  is  clear  where  most  companies  from developing  countries  would  like  to  be  (i.e.  exporting  products  and  services),  Heeks  (1999) argues that getting there is not all that easy. Very few companies have been able to successfully execute on strategies dictated by the needs of each of these four “quadrants” and Heeks (1999) claims  that  majority  of  what  we  see  is  a  constrained  kind  of  an  optimization—he  calls  them “survival strategies”— rather than a free play within these categories. Drawing upon an earlier paper  (Heeks,  1998)  it  also  presents  secondary  and  anecdotal  evidence  to  support  his conclusions.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  14     
  • 15. That the much‐touted success of the software “mini‐superpowers” may not be as convincing as it  is  portrayed  can  be  gleaned  from  the  following  facts.  Firstly,  developing  country  packaged software exports –the “24‐carat gold” of the software exports business—are minimal—in the 5‐10%  range  from  even  the  best  of  the  software  exporters  like  India,  with  the  sole  exception  of Ireland  and  perhaps  to  a  lesser  degree,  Israel.  Secondly,  majority  of  the  work  done  by  the developing  countries  consist  of  low‐skilled  programming  or  coding  services  and  while  some countries, notably India, might have done well in this type of activity, it seriously suffers from issues  of  value‐addition  and  scalability.  Thirdly,  majority  of  the  work  being  performed  by developing countries is located in relatively few concentrated enclaves of software development activity  worldwide  (e.g.  India’s  Bangalore),  being  performed  by  foreign‐trained  programmers working in subsidiaries of foreign companies who spend a major portion of the revenues onsite (in  the  country  of  their  clients)  to  pay  for  the  travel  and  living  expenses  of  their  consultants, leaving much to desired in terms of value gained by the developing country itself. Heeks (1999) describes  major  challenges  (or  bottlenecks)  that  a  firm  may  encounter  in  each  of  these  four product‐market categories and describes the reasons of the type of performance we see in each of these categories.   Still other researchers have taken a multi‐country view of software industries. Rubin (2000) is an interesting, though  dated,  overview  of  global  software  economics  (Pakistan  is  not included  as one  of  the  countries  surveyed).  It  presents  data  on  several  interesting  variables  (e.g.  labor productivity, size of software staff, size of portfolio, cost per delivered and documented line of code, cost per supported line of code, average salaries of developers and maintenance staff, and defects  per  1000  lines  of  code  etc.)  for  a  large  number  of  countries.  Coward  (2003)  takes  an “outsourcers’  view”  of  the  software  industry  looking  at  the  14  factors  that  influence  the decisions  of  American  SMEs  to  outsource  software  development  activity  to  developing countries.  Cusumano et. al. (2003) is a review of global software development practices. Based on a study sample of 104 projects, it compares the software development practices of American, European, Japanese, and Indian companies.   This study finds that conventional software engineering practices (e.g. functional specs, design reviews,  code  reviews  etc.)  are  popular  in  India,  Japan,  and  Europe  but  not  the  United  States where they are used less, across the board. It identifies Indian companies as especially adept in mixing  these  conventional  approaches  with  the  relatively  newer  approaches  like  daily‐builds, tester‐developer pairs, and paired programming techniques. Overall, the report finds Japanese and European software operations to be most productive (in terms of lines of code per average staff*calendar)  followed  by  US  and  Indian  operations.  Japanese  projects  also  produced  the lowest  number  of  defects,  followed  closely  by  Indian  and  US  projects,  and  the  Europeans finishing last on this metric.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  15     
  • 16. This study confirms similar findings by other researchers that describe the technical quality of software  development  processes  employed  by  Indian  software  companies  (Dutta  and  Sekhar, 2004)  and  the  adoption  of  standardized  quality  practices  like  Six  Sigma  methodologies (Radhakrishnan,  2004)  and  CMM  certifications.  These  geographical  differences  in  software development  practices,  however,  maybe  attributed  to  both  cultural  and  type‐of‐work  related factors. For example, Cusumano et al. (2003) observe that India and Japan significantly lag the American  and  European  software  operations  in  terms  of  the  innovative  quality  of  their  work.  Dutta  et  al.  (1997)  finds  similar  across‐country  differences  within  16  different  European countries.   Collectively,  this  constitutes  a  wealth  of  information  about  the  development  and  evolution  of software development activity in developing country contexts from multiple perspectives. They point  towards  a  number  of  factors,  environmental,  policy‐analytic  (e.g.  Carmel’s  Oval  Model, Heeks’  National  Export  Success  Model)  and  organizational  (e.g.  Cusumano  et  al.,  2003,  and Cusumano, 2004) and identify major bottlenecks that might affect the execution of a particular strategy  (e.g.  Heeks,  1999).  While  development  planners  seek  to  extract  prescriptions,  this collective  body  of  literature  falls  short  of  doing  so  hinting  instead  at  the  idiosyncratic  factors and early‐mover advantages that might distinguish some countries’ progress from the rest.   The  overall  picture  that  emerges  from  various  models  and  frameworks  is  a  complex  one.  It underscores  the  importance  of  understanding  a  large  number  of  policy,  environmental,  and organizational  factors,  and  how  they  interact  with  each  other,  as  well  as  the  individualistic features  of  each  of  the  countries  and  their  target  markets  before  a  policy  or  an  industry‐wide prescription  can  be  made.  Every  country  that  we  looked  at  (e.g.  India,  China,  Japan,  Ireland, Israel  etc.)  is  different  from  every  other  country  and  understanding  these  unique  features  is important  before  any  lessons  can  be  drawn  and  applied  from  other  contexts.  We  take  up  this challenge in this report on Pakistan’s software industry.   3. THE OBJECTIVES, AUDIENCE, AND FORMAT OF THE STUDY  The Best Practices in Pakistani Software Sector Project—being the first of its kind and scope in Pakistan—is  an  exploratory  study  of  the  Pakistani  Software  Industry.  Not  only  is  the  whole subject of the formation and dynamics of software industry around the world, and especially in developing countries, relatively new and hence under‐studied, the Pakistani software industry is  a  totally  uncharted  territory  as  far  as  the  structure,  management  practices,  technical  ability, and the industry dynamics are concerned.   3.1—The Analytic Agenda:  This study has been undertaken with a two‐pronged analytic agenda, namely:                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  16     
  • 17. At  the  most  basic  level,  the  study  attempts  to  collect  qualitative  (but  also,  whenever  possible within  the  purview  of  the  research,  quantitative)  information  on  the  current  state  of  software industry in Pakistan with an emphasis on firm‐level characteristics and competitive dynamics. This  would  help  in  identifying  the  various  organizational  success  factors,  develop  a  shared understanding  around  those,  and  enable  stakeholders  to  derive  strategic  and  policy prescriptions  from  these.  It  explores  the  importance  and  prevalence  of  the  various  structural constructs  in  the  Pakistani  software  industry  and  documents  perceptions  of  business  leaders, entrepreneurs, and influential individuals in the industry towards each of these constructs. The study attempts to do a one‐level‐deeper analysis of why individuals hold a certain perception to move  the  level  of  debate  within  the  industry  to  the  next  higher  level  (i.e.  from  identifying problems to identifying solutions). For example, if we hear alternative explanations of lack of a culture  of  entrepreneurship,  we  would  like  to  explore  why  and  on  what  factors  are  those perceptions based upon and, to the extent possible, corroborate that with ground reality.   At the more advanced level, the study attempts to establish best practices within the Pakistani software sector. This is a problem riddled with controversies, not the least important of which is the  identification  of  high‐performers  in  the  absence  of  credible  performance  data.  Additional issues have to deal with “definitional” (i.e. “what is a best practice?”) and maturity (i.e. “when does a practice become a best practice”) problems2. The study tries to tackle this controversial subject  in  a  number  of  ways.  Firstly,  we  try  to  identify  the  relatively  more  successful  and prominent  software  companies  in  Pakistan  and  compare  their  various  organizational, structural,  and  process  features  against  several  others  that  have  not  been  as  successful.  Although  it  is  likely  that  the  differences  between  the  best  and  the  “not‐so‐good”  performers may  not  turn  out  to  be  substantive  enough  (or  worse  yet,  they  may  turn  out  to  be  quite “obvious”),  the  results  of  the  study  would,  nonetheless,  form  a  documented  baseline  against which  changing  trends  in  the  Pakistani  software  industry  may  be  compared  in  the  future  or against that of other countries (e.g. India).   To  the  extent  that  a  (semi‐)  statistical/quantitative  analysis  is  likely  to  be  of  limited  utility,  a qualitative/anecdotal approach may still be of tremendous value in identifying and developing a  shared  understanding  of  best  and  unique  practices  (and  “what’s  possible”)  within  the software  sector  in  Pakistan.  Similarly,  a  valid  criticism  of  our  approach  maybe  that  in  a relatively nascent and immature industry like ours, a single company may not represent all the desirable “best practice” features. We use a qualitative approach to identify and “cherry pick” specific  innovative  and  successful  features  of  the  software  development  and  marketing 2 According to one long‐time industry observer, “it might be difficult to identify ‘best practices’ in the relatively nascent Pakistani software industry, what one might get in return for the quest for the former would be a lot of ‘worst practices’.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  17     
  • 18. processes  (e.g.  partnering  and  alliance  building,  customer  acquisition,  and  product development strategy etc.) to develop a laundry list of best practices that the rest of the industry can emulate. While our primary focus is managerial best practices, we do briefly touch upon the issue of technical practices in the passing. This is done for the primary reason that there exists an interplay and dependence between the latter and the former. We do not, however, attempt an exhaustive analysis of the technical practices of organizations being studied.   3.2—The Benefits and Intended Audience:  The  primary  purpose  of  undertaking  this  study  is  that  of  within‐industry  learning  with  the secondary purpose being investment promotion and facilitation. The benefits of (and intended audience for) the above analysis would, therefore, be three fold:    • Firstly,  the  findings  of  the  study  would  be  of  considerable  value  for  the  existing  software  entrepreneurs,  executives,  and  managers  seeking  to  learn  from  the  collective  experience  of  their  compatriots.  This  learning  could  take  the  form  of:  What  are  the  critical success factors, the Dos and Don’ts, so to speak, of running a software business  in  Pakistan?  The  industry  managers  would  be  able  to  gauge  the  performance  of  their  companies  against  the  best‐in‐class  companies  and  derive  recommendations  for  correcting course, if necessary.     • Secondly,  the  study  would  also  inform  the  interested  (yet  skeptic,  at  times)  by‐ standers—potential  entrepreneurs,  interested  businessmen  and  managers,  and  investors—contemplating  starting  a  software  venture  and  looking  for  a  good  sense  of  what  we  can  learn  from  the  experiences  of  tens  of  successful  and  not‐so‐successful  entrepreneurs. It would also help inspire and illuminate the decisions of a vast number  of  stakeholders,  namely,  business  leaders,  industrialists,  managers,  financiers  and  investors,  regulators,  policymakers  etc,  whose  decisions  to  engage  or  disengage  with  this nascent sector of the economy can mean the difference for the software industry.    • Thirdly, the study—being the first of its kind in Pakistan— could be of potential value  for  foreign  investors,  clients,  and  policymakers  whose  appetite  for  meaningful  quality  information  on  the  subject  goes  unsatisfied  for  want  of  credible  analysis  done  on  the  subject. To that effect, this study may provide a credible data benchmark (or reference  point) for putting Pakistan’s software industry in larger global perspective and getting  the message across to potential investors, clients, and policymakers.   3.3—The Format of the Study:  The study can be broadly divided into two parts. The first part covers a statistical snapshot of the  industry  as  gleaned  by  data  on  our  respondents.  The  second  part  combines  this  with  the more qualitative information to discuss strategic challenges and good practices in the industry.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  18     
  • 19. The  study  is  formatted  as  follows:  Section‐3  provides  some  background  that  builds  the motivation for the study. Section‐4 deals with the objectives, audience, and format of the study. Section‐5  briefly  describes  the  project  methodology  in  a  narrative  and  a  graphical  fashion. Section‐6  starts  with  the  results  of  the  survey  and  attempts  to  build  a  statistical  profile  of  the Pakistani software industry as gleaned from an “on‐the‐spot” survey of 60 of its major players.   This  section  is  divided  into  4  major  parts.  The  starting  part  sets  the  context  of  this  statistical analysis by discussing results from a very limited number of earlier studies. Then we discuss a basic statistical snapshot of the industry using export‐focused and domestic‐focused firms as a basis  for  classification.  Next  we  discuss  various  other  classifications  (e.g.  product‐focused  vs. services‐focused,  small  vs.  large,  pre‐DotCom  vs.  post‐DotCom,  and  development‐centers  vs. rest  of  the  industry)  to  assess  how  these  varying  organizational  factors  affect  the  managerial and  technical  processes  of  software  companies  in  Pakistan.  Finally,  we  assess  whether  the industry statistics reveal a pattern of “best practices”? In essence, we use the statistical data to answer the question: How do better‐performing firms differ from the rest of the industry?  Section‐7 supplements this with information gained from around 65 qualitative interviews.  It uses taxonomy of generic software business models in Pakistan to identify generic profiles and strategic  and  competitive  challenges  faced  by  software  companies  in  Pakistan.  We  identify  13 such  challenges,  divided  across  4  generic  categories  of  software  business  models,  and  discuss ways  in  which  our  respondents  have  innovatively  tried  to  address  each  of  these.  There  are lessons to be learnt here for the software entrepreneurs and businessmen, both young and old that  could  be  applied  and  replicated  across  the  industry.  Section‐8  briefly  touches  upon environmental, infrastructure, and policy bottlenecks confronting the software industry. Finally, Section‐9 discusses some tentative conclusions and recommendations.   This report can be read in its entirety or selectively depending upon what a reader is specifically looking for. In its entirety, we have tried to structure the report in a manner that could give the reader a comprehensive view of Pakistan’s software industry, its current state, its peculiarities, and  the  major  challenges  faced  by  the  software  community.  One  can  also,  however,  pick  and choose  what  specific  sections  to  read.  For  example,  the  generic  profiles  of  different  types  of software business models and the challenges specific to each can be read without reference to the  rest  of  the  report.  Either  way  we  hope  the  report  would  present  considerable  original information and generate some thought and reflection among its readers.   4. A BRIEF NOTE ON PROJECT METHODOLOGY  In order to meet both qualitative and quantitative requirements of the study, we adopted a two‐pronged approach to the project, comprising an “on‐the‐spot” statistical survey and qualitative interviews with top organizational executives of major software companies in Pakistan. Owing to  the  relatively  short  time‐line  of  the  project,  a  convenience  sample  of  software  houses  (or                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  19     
  • 20. software development operations) was selected and contacted to become part of the study. An effort  was  made,  however,  to  include  key  large  and  prominent  players  of  the  industry  in  the analysis. Four sources of input were utilized for this purpose. PSEB and PASHA officials were contacted to identify, from amongst their member companies, the largest, most prominent, and most  significant  software  operations.  The  consulting  team  also  utilized  its  own  knowledge  of the  local  software  industry  to  add  to  this  list  of  nominations.  Finally,  several  companies  were added to the list on an on‐going basis as names of companies doing innovative and interesting work came up during interviews with industry professionals.   In  all,  22  companies  in  Karachi,  and  13  each  in  Islamabad  and  Lahore  (for  a  total  of  47 companies)  were  personally  visited  and  surveyed.  13  more  companies  were  added  to  the statistical  sample  through  the  Online  Survey  of  Best  Practices  in  the  Pakistani  Software Industry3. This increased the total number of survey respondents to 60. 40 of these 60 companies (or  2/3rd  of  the  total)  were  identified  and  hence  categorized  as  the  more  prominent  and relatively successful software operations in Pakistan. This enabled us to develop two reference groups and allowed the possibility of statistical comparisons between these two groups with a view to identifying differences between them in various managerial and technical dimensions.  3                       Best Practices Online Survey is available at: http://www.hostedsurvey.com/takesurvey.asp?c=PSEB The PSEB                Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  20     
  • 21.    R&D PERFORMANCE MAIL SURVEY    1.Research 2. Survey 3. Survey  Questions Parameters Instrument  (RQ) (sample Preliminary Literature  Review (LitR1) 4. 5. Survey 6. Analysis  Instrument Administra & Results  Testing -ion Reflective  Data Collection on  Lit. Review (LitR3)  Context & Background   COMPANY INTERVIEWS x-Method  Analysis Perceived Policy Problem Policy & Problem & Definition Research 1.Thematic 2. Identify 3.  Opportunity Questions (RQ) Areas for Sample / Administer  Interviews Participant Interviews  Briefing &  Write-up   ON‐GOING LITERATURE REVIEW (LITR2)    Figure-I: The Multi-Pronged Research Methodology                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  21     
  • 22. Several other comparison groups were also created to highlight differences in managerial and technical  practices.  Throughout  the  following  analysis,  where  appropriate,  we  invoke  the differences  between  various  categorizations  (e.g.  export‐focused  vs.  domestic‐focused  vs. development centers, better performers vs. rest, product‐focused vs. services‐focused, and large vs. small software houses) to make the results more meaningful to the software community. Figure‐I (below) presents a graphical snapshot of the project methodology. Next we look at the results of the analysis.   5. A STATISTICAL SNAPSHOT OF PAKISTAN’S SOFTWARE INDUSTRY A discussion of the size, structure, and dynamics of Pakistan’s software industry must begin by setting  an  appropriate  reference  for  the  same.  This  reference  can  either  come  from  within Pakistan (i.e. comparing the current industry with its state at some point in the past) or outside Pakistan (i.e. comparing it with the state of software industry of a comparable country). There are potential problems with both these approaches. For the former, barring a handful of reports, we lack comprehensive and credible data of any kind, whatsoever, to say anything meaningful about the industry at different instances in time. While for the latter, one faces the problem of finding  an  appropriate  country  to  make  comparisons  with.  Most  often,  for  reasons  of prominence and tradition, the example of India is invoked when analyzing Pakistan’s software industry—a  practice  that,  although  may  have  some  value,  can  at  times  be  quite counterproductive or lead to wrong policy prescriptions4. We will discuss each of these points of reference in greater detail below.  5.1—Establishing a Point of Reference for Pakistan’s Software Industry  Looking  for  points  of  reference  relevant  to  the  Pakistani  software  industry,  we  could  identify only a handful of studies/documents of varying credibility from the past. These include: A 1999‐2000  CSP‐SEARCC5  ICT  Manpower  and  Skills  Survey;  a  2002  PASHA‐LUMS  Study  of Pakistan’s Software/IT Industry, a 2004 UNCTAD Study, and a 2004 EAC6 Study of Pakistan’s IT Industry.  Each of these studies is fairly limited in terms of the scope and coverage of policy 4 This has been a case quite a few times in past, for example, the Government of Pakistan’s “$1 Bn. Software ExportTarget by FY2000” was motivated in part by using the Indian software export figure and appropriately discounting itto a smaller value rather than any credible assessment of the industry’s present or future capability.5 This study was conducted by the Computer Society of Pakistan (CSP) in collaboration with South East AsiaRegional Computer Confederation (SEARCC) and used methodology and instruments that were used among 14countries of South-East Asia.6 Experts Advisory Cell (EAC) is housed within Ministry of Industries, Government of Pakistan.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  22     
  • 23. and organizational (technical and managerial) issues. These studies, like any other study of this nature,  also  have  a  fair  number  of  methodological  issues  and  problems.  For  example,  CSP‐SEARCC & PASHA‐LUMS studies are quite dated. While the former does fairly well as far as being  representative  of  the  industry  and  providing  a  good  reference  point  for  cross‐country comparisons, it is fairly limited in its scope (i.e. only deals with manpower issues). The latter, however, while being much broader in scope does fairly poorly on representativeness7.   TEXT BOX # 1:  SALIENT FINDINGS & METHODOLOGIES OF PRIOR STUDIES   CSP‐SEARCC Study of ICT Manpower (2000): 314 of 441 organizations responded (71%   response rate) of which 40.8% were IT suppliers, 14.5% public‐sector, and 44.7% private sector end‐ users. 2375 of 5000 IT professionals responded (46% response rate) of which 60.3% worked in   development and 39.7% in services. Some salient findings are:  • 51.3% IT professionals worked in software development while 6.3% in IT Mgmt.  • IT professionals aged between 25‐29 (33%), 20‐24 (23%), and 30‐34 (19%)   • Male : Female ratio is 9:1, with roughly proportional representation in jobs incl. IT mgmt.  • Salary levels: < $3000 p.a. (44%), $3‐5000 p.a. (25%), $5‐8000 p.a. (14%)  • 85% of organizations report shortage of manpower (34%‐extreme, 51%‐moderate)   • Top‐5 skills in critical shortage: Applications/systems development, network  protocol/typologies, dBase, mobile/wireless comm.., and multimedia development     PASHA‐LUMS Software/IT Study (2002):  Sample size was 16 organizations. Asked questions  about domains, revenue sizes, projects acquisition, HR and quality practices etc. The sample was   highly biased towards successful software houses. Salient findings are:  • Average programmer has the potential of generating $13,000 in exports every year  • 75% of companies have ISO certification and 7% have CMM certification   • Average stay of an IT professional in a company is about 2 years  • Of the total employment, around 56‐58% were programmers and 11% QA professionals.  • Larger firms (>PKR 25M) employed double the QA professionals than smaller on a % basis.      UNCTAD Study (2004): Comprises review of secondary literature in the Pakistani and  international contexts. Salient findings of the study, generally critical of the industry, are:   • Discernable action on only 18 of the 162 (11%) “commitments” of National IT Policy  • Pakistan 76th of 102 countries in Network Readiness Index   • Actual spending under IT Policy 2000 lags allocations, esp. in Exports/e‐Commerce  • Revenues in Export: $12.2M (growth of 84%) and Domestic: $5M (growth of 49%)  • Current estimate of software exports at about $12 M  The  latter  two  studies  (i.e.  UNCTAD,  2004  and  EAC,  2004)  are  focused  more  on  the  policy environment and less on organizational issues. The former makes an attempt to impose policy prescriptions  from  other  countries  without  adequately  demonstrating  an  understanding  the 7 The maximum sample size in PASHA LUMS (2002) is 16 with very strong statistical generalizations made, attimes, with as little as 7 observations, without any mentioning of potential non-response biases.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  23     
  • 24. peculiar dynamics of the local software industry. The latter provides a lot of data, which is at best,  sketchy,  and  aggregates  a  lot  of  “mundane”  secondary  information  in  an  unimaginative fashion.  These  weaknesses  notwithstanding,  these  studies  provide  a  starting  point  for  a discussion  on  the  current  state  of  Pakistan’s  software  industry.  Text  Box  #  1  (above)  provides some of the salient features and findings of these reports. More importantly, however, these reports provide an impetus and a motivation to undertake a more extensive on‐the‐ground (“hands on”) analysis of the Pakistani software sector.  5.2—Software Development in Pakistan: Statistics on Managerial and Technical Patterns  Pakistan’s Software Industry has come a long way from its start in 1976—when a company by the name of Systems Pvt. Ltd. opened its offices in Lahore. Over the last three decades or so, the industry  has  grown  from  zero  to  an  approximate  size  of  well‐over  a  hundred  million  dollars and  employs  thousands  of  professionals8.  During  this  time,  the  industry  has  seen  periods  of nascence,  hope,  euphoria,  disillusionment,  renewal,  and  rebuilding.  The  last  decade  has  in particular not only been a time of great promise, but also a test for the industry that has been through a full cycle of reversals—from an inside‐out (“domestic first, export later) to an outside‐in (“export‐first, domestic later”) worldview and back again. In the process, it probably has also been  through  considerable  maturation,  not  only  in  terms  of  its  ability  to  develop  good innovative software but also build successful businesses. We find considerable evidence of the fact  that  the  country’s  financial  community—the  business  houses,  investors,  and  business managers—are  learning  how  to  manage  the  IT  and  the  IT  professionals  are  learning  how  to manage  the  “business”  parts  of  the  IT  business.  The  industry,  however,  has  a  long  way  to  go before it can truly realize it’s potential. The statistical picture that we present below, therefore, is a snapshot, at a particular point in time, of what essentially is a moving target.   Before we discuss the statistical results, however, a disclaimer is in order. The study in question only looks at the relatively well‐known 50‐odd software houses (or development operations) in Pakistan and hence does not claim to be representative of the entire industry. To the extent that an 80:20 rule can be demonstrated to apply to Pakistan’s software industry, our survey sample 8 Although a significant number in its own right, these figures present a picture of an industry that is quiteinsignificant in the bigger scheme of things, namely, its contribution to Pakistan’s economy both in terms of revenuegeneration as well as employment creation capacity.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  24     
  • 25. could easily claim to cover the largest and the most prominent players among its respondents9.  We do not, however, go any farther than that in trying to assess or claim how representative our findings  are  for  the  rest  of  the  industry.    For  some  key  statistics,  for  example,  the  study  can provide some very accurate and useful lower and upper bounds. This maybe the case with data on industry revenues, employment, and quality certifications etc. For other statistics, the study may only be able to provide a gut‐feel estimate of how things are on the ground. This maybe the case with data on managerial, marketing, and technical practices, and access to funding etc. For others  still  (e.g.  issues  specific  to  smaller  companies),  the  study  may  not  represent  the  true picture  of  the  industry  at  all.  We  leave  it  to  the  judgment  of  our  audience  to  draw  their  own conclusions on a case‐by‐case basis.  Table‐I (below) presents a brief statistical snapshot of Pakistan’s software industry—as gleaned from our sample 60 respondents. Although the data is quite self‐explanatory, some aspects are worth noting here. In a cumulative sense, the 60 software houses in our statistical sample have combined revenues of over $80 million (see footnote and Table‐II for details) and employ over 4000  technical  and  professional  employees.  This  picture  of  revenues  is,  however,  merely  an estimate  extrapolated  through  categorical  data.  Table‐II  presents  more  accurate  categorical estimates of the revenues of our respondents. Of the 52 companies that reported their revenues, slightly more than a third (19 companies or 36%) had annual revenues between $200K and $1M, about  a  third  (17  companies,  or  32%)  had  annual  revenues  greater  than  $1M  (4  of  these  had annual  revenues  in  excess  of  $5M),  and  another  third  (16  companies,  or  30%)  had  annual revenues of less than $200K. In an aggregate sense, these software houses have seen a revenue and employment growth of about 37.4 and 27.4 percent respectively over the last year—hinting at either improved capacity utilization in the industry or value‐addition per employed technical and managerial employee, or both. The average size of a software house comes out to be about 62 employees with the per‐employee revenue potential being around $21,800 per annum.    9 UNCTAD (2004) makes a similar claim, attributed to PSEB, in that the top-15 or so software companies inPakistan (e.g. the likes of Xavor, Techlogix, Netsol, Systems, Softech etc.) could account for as much as 75% of theoverall industry revenues                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  25     
  • 26.   Table I: Key Aggregate Statistics On Respondent Companies*      Revenue & Employment in Surveyed Companies  #(%) of Software Houses  Total Number of Software Houses Surveyed  60***  Cumulative Revenues (calculated through mid‐point estimation)**  $81.15 Million*^  Total # of Professional/Technical Employees  4070  Average size of Company (# of Professional/Technical Employees)  62  Revenue per Technical and Professional Employee  $21,814  % Growth in Professional/Technical Employment (over last year)  27.47%  % Growth in Revenues (over last year)  37.4%      Ownership Structure and Quality Characteristics of Companies       % of Companies that are subsidiaries of Foreign Companies   40%  % of Companies having Front Offices abroad (US, UK/EU, ME, AP)  55%  % of Companies having a Quality Certification (ISO, CMM)  45% (3.3% have a CMM)  % of Companies having a Dedicated Quality Assurance Team  73.7%      Product & Strategic Posture of Companies   Product Profile****             Product‐focused or Packaged Software Company  56.67%          Software/IT Services Company  48.34%          Software/IT Consulting Company  31.67%  Strategic Posture****            Niche product/service for a Niche Market  36.67%          Product/service applicable to several industries  56.67%          Product/service applicable to an industry vertical  33.34%      * These are based on self‐reported annual revenues  *^ The State Bank of Pakistan estimates the country’s exports figures of last year to be $32M.  ** This estimate needs to be used with great caution. The corresponding lower and upper limits  are $39.35 and $110.95 Million.  Please refer to Table‐II for a detailed categorical breakdown  *** 46 software houses were surveyed in‐person—while 14 submitted data through online survey  **** These categories are not mutually exclusive i.e. a company can opt for one or more categories In  terms  of  their  product/service  strategy  and  strategic  posture  in  the  market,  56%  of  the companies  described  themselves  as  product‐focused  (packaged‐software)  companies,  48%  as software/IT‐services  companies,  and  31%  as  software/IT  consulting  companies.  It  is  worth emphasizing here that majority of the companies that described themselves as product‐focused dealt with customized rather than shirk‐wrapped products. In terms of industry focus, about a third  of  the  companies  described  themselves  as  niche  players,  another  third  focused  on  an industry  vertical,  and  about  56%  produced  a  product/service  applicable  to  several  industries. Clearly, none of these categories are mutually exclusive. Many companies (as many as 42% and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  26     
  • 27. 23%)  identified  with  more  than  one  category  in  the  product  profile  and  strategic  posture respectively.    TABLE II: SIZE OF RESPONDING COMPANIES BY REVENUE* &  EMPLOYMENT      Annual Revenues in US$ (PKR**)  #(%) of Software Houses    N=52***  Greater than $ 5 Million (>PKR 300 Million)   4   (7.69%)  Between $ 1 and 5 Million (~ PKR 60‐300 Million)  13  (25%)  Between $ 500K and 1 Million (~ PKR 30‐60 Million)  9   (17.31%)  Between $ 200K and 500 K (~ PKR 12 – 30 Million)  10 (19.23%)  Between $ 100K and 200 K (~ PKR 6‐12 Million)  6   (11.54%)  Between $ 50K and 100 K (~ PKR 3‐6 Million)  5   (9.62%)  Less than $ 50K (~ PKR 3 Million)  5   (9.62%)  Total  52 (100%)      Full‐time Employment       N=60  Greater than 250 Employees  6 (10%)  Between 100 and 250 Employees  8 (13.33%)  Between 25‐100 Employees  23 (38.33%)  Between 5‐25 Employees  22 (36.57%)  Less than 5 Employees  1 (1.67%)  Total  60 (100%)      * These are based on self‐reported annual revenues  ** 1 US$ = 60 PKR  *** Eight companies in our sample did not report full‐year revenues either because it was their  first year of operation or because they were development centers of foreign companies with no  independent revenue estimates of their own.    Table‐III presents a statistical profile of the industry’s target customers. Broadly speaking, our 60 respondents derive their revenues from export and domestic markets in a ratio of 60:40. One the  exports  side,  our  respondents  derive  22.5%  and  38.5%  of  the  revenues  from  products  and services  respectively.  Because  of  the  preponderance  of  customizable  products  in  the  product‐service mix, we contemplate that the proportion from export of products maybe over‐estimated and thus represent an upper bound only10. 10 Some local software houses engaged in development of software (i.e. programming and coding)—a service, from the standpoint of the local outfit—for foreign product‐based companies may have identified their revenues as arising from products.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  27     
  • 28.   TABLE III: WHOM DO PAKISTANI SOFTWARE COMPANIES SELL TO?      Exports vs. Domestic & Products vs. Services  % of Total Revenues*     N=54  Export‐Products  22.56%  Export‐Services  38.52%  Domestic‐Products  23.37%  Domestic‐Services  16.53%      Exports vs. Domestic & Public vs. Private Sectors      N=54  Public Sector (Govt.)— Domestic  8.51%  Public Sector (Govt.)— Foreign  5.90%  Private Sector – Domestic  30.79%  Private Sector – Foreign  54.77%      * These are based on self‐reported percentages of annual revenues   On  the  domestic  side,  our  respondents  derive  around  23%  and  16.5%  of  their  revenues  from products  and  services  respectively.  Again,  a  major  chunk  of  the  products  revenue  would comprise  “customized  or  custom‐developed”  products  rather  than  shrink‐wrapped  products. Another  factor  worth  considering  on  the  domestic  side  is  a  certain  number  of  “hybrid” companies  that,  for  reasons  having  to  do  with  the  necessities  of  their  business  and  revenue models,  bundle  hardware  with  the  software  they  develop.  Examples  maybe  banking automation  companies,  call‐center  solutions  companies,  and  mobile/handheld  devices companies  and  others  whose  offerings  depend  on  simultaneous  sale  of  specialized  hardware. This,  once  again,  would  necessitate  that  the  figure  on  revenues  from  domestic  products  is  an upper  bound  rather  than  an  accurate  estimate  of  sales  from  purely  software  development activity.  At the sectoral level, our respondents derive an overwhelming portion of their revenues  (>85%) from  the  private‐sector  with  only  8.5%  of  the  sales  coming  from  govt.  or  public  sector  on  the domestic  front  and  another  6%  on  the  foreign  front.  This  essentially  confirms  the  observation about  the  relatively  insignificant  role  played  by  public  sector  and  the  government  as  a sophisticated buyer of software products and services in Pakistan. Many interviewees that we spoke  to  stressed  the  need  for  the  government  to  jumpstart  the  demand  for  local  software                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  28     
  • 29. development  by  intelligently  using  its  demand‐creating  ability.  We  will  discuss  this  theme  in much greater detail in a later part of this report.   As  we  dig  deeper  into  this  statistical  analysis,  it  is  quite  obvious  that  while  these  top‐level (aggregate) statistics have their own value, they tend to mask the vitality and heterogeneity of the  underlying  data.  That  export‐focused  operations  may  be  different  from  domestic‐focused operations,  larger  operations  maybe  different  from  smaller  operations,  and  product‐based operations  maybe  different  from  services‐based  operations  not  only  in  terms  of  their organizational and managerial arrangements but also the strategic and competitive drivers is a foregone  conclusion.  What  we  need,  therefore,  is  a  much  more  fine‐grained  analysis  that focuses on these important sub‐categories in addition to the aggregate‐level statistics. This kind of analysis also has important implications for the business model and strategy issues that we address, in a qualitative sense, in section‐6 of this report.   As we attempt to derive important sub‐categories of our data, our first reference point maybe Dr. Richard Heeks’ work on software strategies for developing countries (Heeks, 1999). Figure‐II  (below)  presents  a  graphical  representation  of  Heeks’  software  strategies  framework  that divides the potential universe of strategies into 4 distinct components, namely, export‐services (Strategy‐A),  export‐products  (Strategy‐B),  domestic‐products  (Strategy‐C),  and  domestic‐services  (Strategy‐D).  For  comparison  purposes,  he  names  the  former  (Strategy  A  &B)  as  “24‐Carot or Fools’ Gold”, and the latter (Strategy‐C) as “Third World Microsoft” and (Strategy‐D) as  “Small  Fish  in  a  Small  Pond”.  According  to  Heeks  (1999)  each  of  these  four  strategies  is distinct  in  the  sense  that  each  has  its  own  set  of  organizational  requirements,  competitive drivers,  environmental  pre‐requisites,  and  risk‐factors.  Yet,  as  Heeks  (1999)  points  out  with illustrations  from  India’s  case,  companies  try  to  adopt  each  of  these  strategies  to  varying degrees of success.                                                  Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  29     
  • 30.      Export A: B:  (Export-Services > 50%) (Export-Products > 50%)    Total #: 20 Total #: 11  % of Total: 37% % of Total: 20%   Market Served       D: C:  (Local-Services > 50%) (Local-Products > 50%)    Total #: 5 Total #: 14  % of Total: 9% % of Total: 25%  Domesti        Services Packages Software Business   Figure—II:  Richard Heeks’ Taxonomy of Software Businesses, as applied to Pakistan While Heeks (1999) discusses relevant factors that might make each of these approaches more or less risky (and thus more or less likely to succeed) without actually presenting empirical data on how many Indian companies adopt each of these approaches and what percentage of them do  so  successfully,  we  are  able  to  put  data  on  Heeks’  framework  for  the  case  of  Pakistan’s software industry. These data are presented in figure‐II (above). In all, 37% of our respondents seem  to  follow  strategy‐A,  20%  seem  to  follow  strategy‐B,  9%  seem  to  follow  strategy‐C,  and another  25%  seem  to  follow  strategy‐D.  The  overall  picture  that  emerges  from  overlying  our data on Heeks’ framework is that of over‐reliance on the relatively riskier of the four strategies (Strategies A&B) that Heeks calls “24‐Carot or Fools Gold” and under‐reliance on the relatively less  riskier  one  (Strategy  D)  that  he  calls  “Small  Fish  in  Small  Pond”.  Figure‐III  presents  this data in a graphical format. We will discuss generic business strategies that are modification of Heeks’ 4‐part framework in somewhat detail in the next section.                                           Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  30     
  • 31.    Domestic <--- Market Served ---> Export 100% Exports 100 75 100% Products 50 25 0 0 25 50 75 100 Services <--- Software Business ---> Products Fig-III: Product-Market Profile of Pakistani Software Cos.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  31     
  • 32. Another  way  to  look  at  the  data  is  to  classify  software  companies  solely  according  to  their market orientation i.e. those that are predominantly export‐focused vs. domestic‐focused with a lot  of  hybrids  working  in  between  in  both  export  and  domestic  markets  in  almost  equal proportions.    From  the  standpoint  of  being  able  to  identify  differences  in  organizational, managerial,  marketing,  and  technical  processes,  this  seems  to  be  a  more  promising  approach than Heeks (1999) as it remedies for the abrupt boundary changes across the four segments in Heeks’ classification11. We use an arbitrary limit of 75% (exports vs. domestic and products vs. services)  to  define  a  new  typology.  Thus,  we  define  an  export‐focused  company  as  one  that derives  more  than  75%  of  its  revenues  from  exports  and  a  domestic‐focused  company  as  one that  derives  more  than  75%  of  its  revenues  from  the  domestic  market  (products  and  services combined).  In  between  these  two  categories  are  a  bunch  of  companies  that  are  categorized  as “hybrids” (almost equally active in export and domestic markets). A similar scheme, based on a 75% cut‐off, can be devised for product‐ and services‐focused companies.    Given  the  importance  of  market‐orientation  (rather  than  product‐service  orientation)  as  a defining factor in the conceptualization of software ventures in the Pakistani environment, we first  look  at  that  in  greater  detail. Figure‐VI  (above)  presents  a  Fig-IV: Market Orientation ofbreakdown  of  our  respondents  Software Companies in Samplebetween  domestic‐,  export‐ Hybrids 22%focused,  and  hybrid  operations.  DomesticApplying  the  above  classification  37%on  our  sample,  we  get  18  (37%)  Exportcompanies as domestic‐focused, 20  41%(41%)  of  the  companies  as  export‐ Domestic Export Hybridsfocused,  and  11  (22%)  of  the companies  as  hybrids.  We  now look  at  the  technical,  managerial,  and  marketing  practices  of  companies  in  our  sample  from both an aggregate and a categorical perspective.     11 One can speculate that the company doing 51% product-exports is not likely to be very different from doing 49%product-exports, yet the former would be placed in a different category than the latter under Heeks’ (1999) scheme.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  32     
  • 33.  Before  we  discuss  the  results  of  this  analysis,  however,  it  is  important  recognize  that  almost none  of  the  differences  between  export‐  and  domestic‐focused  operations  are  statistically significant at the 5%  TEXT BOX # 2: WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR A RESULT TO BE (NOT) significance  level  STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT?  40 qaproll Two  sub‐populations and,  therefore,  may  e.g.  different  types  of at best be termed as  30 software  houses,  are  considered  to  be suggestive.  In  the  20 different, at a statistically following  significant‐level,  if  one discussion,  when  10 can  rule  out,  with  a  measure  of  confidence we  talk  of  0 that indeed they are not   1 2 3 4  “significance”,  we  generated  from  the  same  underlying  population.  For  example,  for  a  5% would  mean  a  significance level to hold, one must be sure that 19 out of 20 times, a draw  from one sub‐population would come out to be distinctly different from a finding  of  draw from the other sub‐population. We do not get statistically significant significance  from  results  when  either  the  sub‐populations  are  not  dissimilar  in  which  case  there  is  little  variation  between  them  or  there  is  too  much  variation,  as  is practical rather than  the case in the figure above where the standard deviation bands (variation) statistical  around  the  means  are  so  large  that  none  of  four  sub‐populations  is standpoint.  Also,  distinctly  different  from  others.  Smaller  sample  sizes  can  sometimes,  not  always, be a hindrance in getting statistical significance.  what  is  practically significant may vary from situation to situation and construct to construct (e.g. a 10% difference maybe  of  little  value  in  one  context  but  of  great  value  in  another).  With  that  caveat  in  mind, here are some of the statistical findings:  The formation & funding strategies for export‐ & domestic operations are changing. Going back to our data, export‐focused software houses are much less likely to be funded with savings of local founders than either the domestic‐focused or hybrid operations (Table‐IV). We believe this to  be  a  representation  of  an  after‐the‐fact  conclusion  i.e.  it  is  not  that  there  is  a  dearth  of  the desire to explore the export route among local founders but rather than the latter have not been able  to  successfully  do  so,  either  because  of  inadequate  capital  or  lack  of  networks  abroad. Investment by a venture capital fund or a local partner (e.g. a business house) is almost equally likely  to  result  in  a  domestic‐,  an  export‐focused  or  a  hybrid  software  operation.    Domestic‐focused  software  houses  are  much  more  likely  to  be  focused  on  financial  and  automation systems,  and  sell  a  mix  of  hardware‐software  offerings  than  export‐focused  software                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  33     
  • 34. operations. They have, on average, smaller revenue sizes but also lesser dependence on a single  client.       TABLE IV:  WHERE DO SOFTWARE HOUSES GET FUNDED FROM?       Market Orientation of Software Houses Sources of Initial Funding for Software  All  Domestic    Export Ventures   Hybrids  Combined Focused*  Focused     N=58  N=19  N=11  N=20 Savings of local (Pakistan‐based) founders  43%  52%  72%  35% Investment by (savings of) foreign partners/founders  32%  26%  18%  20% Investment by a local partner (e.g. a business house)  13%  15%  18%  15% Funded through initial project work (or cash‐flows)  15%  15%  0%  20% Venture capital or banking sources  17%  21%  18%  20% Other  7%  10%  0%  5%          * Domestic/Export‐focused software house is one with > 75% sales in domestic/export markets respectively      Export‐focused software houses tend to suffer from lack of growth in profitability (“operations  continue  to  grow  in  revenues  but  not  in  profitability”)  much  more  than  domestic‐focused  or  hybrid software houses. This might be due to adverse terms‐of‐trade arising from recession in  major software export markets in the recent years, an inability to climb up the value‐chain, or an  over‐representation of development‐center‐type work done by companies in this category.     There  is  no  clear‐cut  winner  among  domestic/export‐focused  operations  in  managerial  practices. >From the standpoint of managerial practices (see Table V, below), there seems to be  virtually  no  statistically  identifiable  difference  between  domestic,  hybrid,  and  export‐focused  software  operations  in  terms  of  the  technical  backgrounds  of  the  entrepreneurial  team  (i.e.  founders). There is some suggestive evidence that export‐focused software operations are more  likely  to  distribute  stocks/ownership  among  employees  (a  practice  that  seems  to  have  permeated  from  their  foreign  origins),  hold  employee  bonding  activities,  and  benefit  from  employee‐driven  innovation  while  domestic‐focused  software  operations  are  more  likely  to  share  profits  with  employees,  provide  additional  benefits  to  female  employees,  have  greater  financial discipline, and provide time to employees to work on their own interests. Despite the  latter,  however,  they  seem  to  benefit  less  from  employee‐driven  innovation  and  suffer  more  from a perception of lower delegation quality. Hybrids tend to perform somewhere between the  two extreme categories or at‐least as well as one of the two in almost all managerial practices  except a few.  They tend to do better than either of the categories in terms of benefits to female                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  34      
  • 35. employees  and  employee‐driven  innovation  and  worse  in  terms  of  improvements  in  profitability  of  the  operations—a  fact  that  might  reflect  a  lack  of  focus  on  the  part  of  their  “inexperienced” entrepreneurial teams.     TABLE V:  PREVALENCE OF KEY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOFTWARE HOUSES       Market Focus of Software Houses Key Managerial Practices Employed   All  Domestic    Export  Hybrids  Categories  Focused  Focused   N=58  N=18*  N=11  N=20 MP1. Top management team primarily comprises  81%  78%  81%  80% people with technical degrees  MP2. Company’s top‐management team has  44%  52%  27%  40% started successful/unsuccessful ventures before MP3. Incentives (or profits) are shared among the  51%  63%  54%  50% company’s employees  MP4. Company offers stock ownership to its  34%  26%  36%  40% employees MP5. Company offers additional benefits (e.g.  65%  68%  81%  55% flex times, maternity leave) to female employees  MP6. Provides some paid time to employees to  22%  31%  18%  25% work on their own interests MP7. Company holds regular employee bonding  68%  52%  72%  70% events (e.g. Tech‐Forums, Picnics) MP8. Top leadership closes tracks cash‐flows  79%  89%  90%  65% several months into the future MP9. Company’s employees are regularly briefed  77%  78%  81%  80% about strategy and goals MP10. Company continues to grow in revenues  20%  10%  36%  30% but not in terms of profitability MP11. Employees/managers often feel: “I have to  39%  42%  36%  35% do it myself, if I have to get things done” MP12. Portion of company’s current/future  36%  26%  45%  40% product‐line comprises employee‐conceived projects          * These sub‐categories exclude operations strictly categorized as “offshore‐development‐centers”.    Export‐focused  operations  spend  more  on  quality  assurance,  and  hybrids  on  certifications.  Table‐VI  (above)  presents  a  view  of  technical  and  process  quality  of  our  respondents.  Again,  some  differences  are  worth  emphasizing  here.  While  there  is  no  significant  difference  in  the  proportion  of  companies  having  a  dedicated  quality  assurance  team,  the  export‐focused  operations tend to spend more effort on quality assurance as evidenced from the average size of  the  quality  assurance  teams  and  %  of  employee  payroll  dedicated  to  the  quality  assurance                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  35      
  • 36. function. One interesting finding is that a greater proportion of hybrids seem to have (or seek) a  quality certification, followed by export‐ and then domestic‐focused software houses. The lower  propensity  of  domestic‐focused  software  houses  to  seek  a  quality  certification  is  quite  understandable—given the relatively less premium that the domestic customer puts on quality,  but the difference between the relative propensities of hybrids and export‐focused operations is  quite  surprising.  If  anything,  we  would  have  expected  an  opposite  relationship  in  that  the  export‐focused operations paying more emphasis on quality certifications than the hybrids. We  believe what we are seeing here is a sorting of software exporting companies in export‐focused  and  hybrid  categories  based  on  the  sort  of  competitive  pressures  that  they  face.  Hybrids  generally  compete  more  openly  for  the  export  business  and  thus  require  quality  certification  while  export‐focused  software  operations  leverage  their  long‐established  relationships  to  do  business in export markets.       TABLE VI:  KEY TECHNICAL PRACTICES IN PAKISTANI SOFTWARE HOUSES        Domestic  Export Characteristics of Technical Quality  All  Hybrids  Focused  Focused  Categories  N=58  N=19  N=11  N=20 % of Companies with dedicated QA Team  73%  73%  72.7%  68% Ave. size of the QA team (as % of total employment)  17%  9.8%  13%  26% % of employee payroll spent on QA function  13.96%  11.64%  11.8%  16.9% % of Companies with ISO/CMM Certification  45%  36%  72%  50% Programmer‐to‐PM Ratio (PM incl. Team‐leads)  5.87  4.16  8.4  5.7          Software Engineering Design Methodology Used  %  %  %  %       Waterfall  32%  36.8%  54%  15%        Iterative  44%  36.8%  63%  40%        Prototyping  50%  68.4%  54%  30%        Home‐grown  29%  15.7%  9%  45%        Other  18%  15.7%  9%  30%          How Often Are Technical Best Practices Used  Freq*  Freq  Freq  Freq        Project plan tracking  1.87  1.66  2  1.94        Code and design reviews  2.72  2.55  3.2  2.44        Documentation of the code  2.58  2.36  2.88  2.8        System to learn from on‐going projects  2.74  2.46  3.11  2.76        Measurement and review of process quality  2.85  2.53  3.09  2.93          * Frequency scores are presented as an average #, 1= daily/continuously, 2=weekly, 3=monthly, and 4=as needed (generally, small is better). Excluded from these figures are companies that don’t use a particular approach.      There  is  no  clear‐cut  trend,  suggestive  or  real,  in  the  use  of  software  design  methodologies,  except  perhaps  that  the  export‐focused  software  houses  rely  more  on  home‐grown  or  more                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  36      
  • 37. esoteric approaches while domestic‐focused and hybrid operations show a greater reliance on the more traditional ones (e.g. waterfall, iterative, and prototyping). Although only suggestive, an  interesting  pattern  emerges  from  figures  on  the  use  of  technical  best‐practices.  Domestic‐focused software houses tend to carry out four of the five best‐practices more frequently than either the export‐focused or the hybrid companies with the latter doing worst of all. Needless to say, however, that this particular finding is quite the opposite of the common perception about domestic‐focused operations and needs a closer analysis.    Companies, across the board, focus on high‐contact marketing strategies and channels to seek customers.  We  look  at  various  marketing  approaches  used  by  software  houses  and  their perception  of  “successfulness”  of  the  same.  Table‐VII  presents  this  analysis.  As  before,  while none of the between‐category differences are statistically significant, some broad findings and trends  can  be  gleaned  from  the  data.  Most  importantly,  “selling  software  is  a  highly  contact intensive  sport”.  All  types  of  organizations  identify  high‐contact  methods  like  one‐to‐one contacts,  network  and  relationships,  and  word‐of‐mouth  referrals  as  the  most  successful  (all rated > 3.5 on a scale of 5, on average) of the marketing approaches and low‐contact ones like advertising and going to conferences and exhibitions as least successful (rated <2.5 on a scale of 5,  on  average)  of  the  approaches.  The  use  of  alliances  and  agreements  with  channel  partners seem to fall in between these two extremes—with the important caveat that these do not seem to  work  as  well  for  domestic‐focused  operations  as  they  do  for  hybrids  and  export‐focused ones.  Consequently,  in  line  with  the  perceptions  of  successfulness,  companies  seem  to  have focused their energies on approaches that appear to work best. This clearly has implications for the  marketing  and  networking  initiatives  designed  by  PSEB  and  PASHA  for  the  software entrepreneurs.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  37     
  • 38. TABLE VII:  SUCCESS OF MARKETING STRATEGIES USED       Market Orientation of the Software Operation Success of Marketing Strategies Used   Average Rating* (% Don’t Use)      All  Domestic    Export  Companies  Focused  Hybrids  Focused   N=57  N=19  N=11  N=20 MA1‐Word of mouth approach (client referrals etc.)  3.76 (19%)  3.88 (10%)  3.90  (0%)  3.53 (25%) MA2‐Advertising in trade local/foreign journals  2.21 (59%)  2.20 (47%)  2.20 (54%)  2.14 (65%) MA3‐Attending local/foreign trade conferences  2.48 (38%)  2.23 (31%)  2.25 (27%)  2.66 (40%) MA4‐Initiate 1‐to‐1 communication w/ potential clients  3.70 (19%)  4.11  (5%)  3.53  (0%)  3.45 (25%) MA5‐Use pre‐established networks/personal relationships  3.52 (29%)  3.6 (26%)  3.75 (27%)  3.13 (25%) MA6‐Alliances and agreements w/ channel partners  2.94 (36%)  2.53  (31%)  3.00  (36%)  3.14 (30%) MA7‐Depend on a “captive” client since formation  3.16 (57%)  3.67 (68%)  2.90 (63%)  2.25 (45%)          * Respondents were asked to rate the perception of successfulness of each of these approaches on a scale of 1‐5 (1=least successful, 2=somewhat successful, 3=moderately successful, 4=quite successful, 5=most successful.)      Export‐focused companies seem to do more “relationship‐selling” rather than direct marketing  &  advertising;  hybrids  under‐invest  in  product‐development,  perhaps,  to  pay  for  costlier  marketing  and  certifications.  How  do  software  houses  spend  their  money  to  develop  and  market  their  product‐service  offerings?  Table‐VIII  (below)  tries  to  present  a  picture  of  their  operations  in  terms  of  percentages  of  expenditures  on  key  expense‐heads.  There  are  some  noticeable differences. Hybrids tend to spend more (3‐5 percentage points‐level) than either of  the two categories on marketing and advertising. That export‐focused software houses tend to  spend the least on the same is surprising. This finding might support our earlier hypothesis that  export‐focused software houses tend to do more relationship selling and hence need to spend  less  on  marketing  and  advertising  as  compared  to  hybrids  that  compete  more  openly  in  the  export  markets.  This,  however,  can  only  be  a  partial  explanation.  One  would  have  expected  these figures to show the very high costs of setting up marketing front‐offices in the American  and  European  markets  that  has  become  somewhat  of  a  norm  these  days.  According  to  our  estimates,  foreign  front‐office  and  marketing  operations,  on  average,  are  300‐500%  more  resource  intensive  than  local  operations.  The  survey  data  suggests  that  for  companies  having  front‐offices abroad, on average, 75% of the expenditure is made on the foreign operation that  only accounts for 25% of the workforce. Possible explanations for the above discrepancy might  be that firms are using different companies (or legal entities) to fund the overseas operations or  entering  in  partnering  agreements  with  foreign  companies  to  share  the  cost  of  selling  abroad.  We certainly find strong evidence in support of the former, and some hint of the latter.                                               Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  38      
  • 39. TABLE VIII:  HOW DO SOFTWARE HOUSES SPEND THEIR MONEY?       Market Orientation of Software Houses Major Expenditure Heads of Software  All  Domestic    Export Houses   Hybrids  Combined  Focused*  Focused*     N=57  N=17  N=11  N=21 Marketing and Advertising  9.5%  11.1%  14.3%  9.5% Product Development / Service Delivery  46.4%  48.35%  39.8%  45.7% Product/Service Support   15.5%  15.1%  15%  15.9% Research and Development (R&D)  8.4%  9.58%  9.27%  7.4% Quality Assurance  8.5%  6.05%  7.95%  7.7% Training and Certification  4.6%  4.17%  8.45%  4.1% Other  6.4%  6.17%  5.36%  7.47%          * Domestic/Export‐focused software house is one with > 75% sales in domestic/export markets respectively  Hybrids also tend to spend more, almost twice as much (in percentage terms), on quality and certification than either of the two categories. This, again, is in line with our earlier observation that  hybrids  are  much  more  likely  to  seek  a  quality  certification  than  either  of  the  two categories.  They,  however,  under‐invest  in  product‐development  and  service‐delivery  by  as much as 5‐10%. This is a finding that we cannot explain on the basis of differences in demand for products/services in the domestic/foreign markets. Perhaps, what we are seeing here is the effect  of  a  squeeze  on  expenditures  to  make  room  for  their  high‐than‐average  investment  in certification/training and marketing/advertising etc. In other words, the hybrids may be cutting corners  to  pay  for  these  expenses  and  the  expense‐head  that  most  often  gets  cut  is  product‐development. There might be alternate explanations for what we see. For example, the product‐service characteristics of these firms might be different than either domestic‐ or export‐focused companies  and  thus  require  lesser  product‐development  expenditure.  We,  however,  do  not have any evidence to support or reject that hypothesis.   Export‐CEOs  operate  in  a  relatively  tactical  profile—focusing  more  on  day‐to‐day management  and  less  on  product  and  strategic  planning  &  marketing/advertising.  Finally  we look  at  how  software  CEOs  (or  local  heads  of  operations)  distribute  their  time  on  various aspects  of  the  business  in  an  average  month.  The  quality  of  top‐leadership  has  often  been described  as  a  key  bottleneck  in  the  development  of  software  industries  in  third  world  and emerging  market  contexts.  How  the  top‐executive  (in  particular)  and  senior  management  (in general)  distribute  their  time  is also  an  indicator  of  professionalization and  delegation  quality within  an  organization.  For  example,  within  our  data,  we  find  a  strong  negative  correlation                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  39     
  • 40. between the percentage of time a CEO spends on day‐to‐day management of the business and  the perceived quality of delegation. We also find that the more effort a company puts in to brief  its employees about its corporate strategy and goals, the less their CEOs have to spend time on  day‐to‐day  management  of  the  company—a  possible  sign  of  greater  involvement  and  ownership on the part of the company’s employees. The correlation may be spurious but it is a  correlation nonetheless.       TABLE IX:  HOW DO SOFTWARE CEOS SPEND THEIR TIME?       Market Orientation of Software Houses Breakdown of Time Spent in an “Average  All  Domestic    Export Month”   Hybrids  Combined  Focused*  Focused*     N=57  N=18  N=11  N=20 Day‐to‐day management  32%  20%  34%  36.5% Strategic & Product Planning  20.5%  24%  20%  15.5% Fund‐raising  6.0%  9.4%  2.7%  7.25% Marketing & Business Development  24.6%  31%  30.4%  20.65% Hiring & Recruitment  7.95%  5.6%  4.81%  11% Other  8.65%  8%  7.9%  9.25%          * Domestic/Export‐focused software house is one with > 75% sales in domestic/export markets respectively    Table‐IX (above) presents the relevant data on CEOs in our sample. As before, while there are  no clear‐cut patterns, we do have some suggestive findings. CEOs of domestic‐focused software  houses  tend  to  spend  much  less  time  on  day‐to‐day  management  of  their  business  than  the  other two categories. Somehow being involved in the export markets tends to get CEOs more  hands‐on onto day‐to‐day management of the business, either because of concerns for quality or  having to deal, on a day‐to‐day basis, with foreign operations and customers etc. CEOs of many  smaller startups also do a fair bit of programming/coding themselves. CEOs of export‐focused  companies  tend  engage  significantly  less  in  marketing  and  business  development  activities.  This  can  either  be  due  to  their  limited  role  as  a  local  head  of  operations  of  a  development‐ center‐type setting or in line with our earlier observation of export‐focused companies having a  greater  propensity  to  engage  in  relationship  selling  rather  than  direct  marketing/advertising.  Export‐CEOs  also  spend  considerably  more  time  (~  5%  more,  on  average)  in  hiring  and  recruitment—a fact that supports the perceived need for higher quality in the export markets.     What  does  all  this  mean  for  software  development  industry  in  Pakistan?  At  the  most  fundamental level, we find a lack of real “focus” and specialization within the industry. While  there  do  exist  some  definite  differences  between  sub‐categories  of  companies  on  the  basis  of                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  40      
  • 41. their market‐destination (i.e. domestic, export, or hybrid) these are not very pronounced.  For example,  one  of  the  things  we  often  heard  from  industry  executives  was  that  running  a domestic  –focused  business  and  software  exports  were  two  entirely  different  types  of businesses. Many suggested that even the cost structures of companies exporting software and developing it for local consumption were so radically different that it became impossible for the former to sell locally. We do not seem to find an evidence of this conjecture in our data. Infact, we  found  a  lack  of  statistically  significant  differences  on  majority  (almost  all)  measures  of relevance  between  the  three  categories.  Even  from  a  practical  standpoint,  the  data  seems  to suggest  that  companies  engaged  in  domestic  and  export‐oriented  software  development  are more similar to each other than not.   What  we  are  probably  seeing,  from  an  industry‐wide  perspective,  is  a  move  away  from  the export‐focused  firm  to  a  well‐diversified  firm  with  quite  a  few  companies  completely abandoning  their  desire  to  play  in  the  software  export  game  and  focusing  instead  on  the domestic market. The post‐DotCom and 9/11 scenario has brought quite a rude awakening for the “(ir)rational exuberance” of the local software entrepreneur and his/her expatriate‐sponsor and has been a watershed event for the Pakistani software industry.  Some of this is probably reflected in our data. Another interesting, yet related, finding is the distinctiveness of the well‐diversified “hybrid” firm. Rather than falling somewhere in the middle, the hybrids tend to do better  or  worse  than  the  other  two  categories  on  several  accounts  thus  elevating  them  to  an interesting  category,  in  and  of  themselves,  rather  than  merely  the  residual  of  the  other  two categories. With the hybrid model increasingly becoming a norm in the industry, rather than an exception, with its own strategic and competitive drivers warrant an investigation.   The market destination (domestic or export), although one of the most important, is not the only important  factor  confounding  the  strategic  choices,  organizational  structures,  and  technical‐managerial  practices  of  software  companies.  There  are  several  other  factors,  some  exogenous others endogenous, that impinge upon the decision calculi of software entrepreneurs and CEOs. Among  them  are  the  product‐service  mix,  the  size,  and  other  environmental  factors  (e.g. economic  booms  and  busts).  We  looked  at  some  of  these  in  an  attempt  to  try  to  gain  a  finer‐grained understanding of the industry and its dynamics.  Following is a brief discussion:   The  “dedicated”  development  centers  present  considerable  promise  but,  thus  far,  have shown limited capacity to grow in size and scope.  Among our subjects, we found companies with  a  number  of  different  business  models  and  strategic  foci.  One  interesting  class  of operations  can  be  termed  as  a  dedicated  “offshore‐development  center”  (more  on  that  later).                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  41     
  • 42. Although most subsidiaries of foreign companies—and there are 24 of them in our sample (40% of  the  total)—use  the  Pakistan‐based  operation  in  a  development  center  format  as  evidenced from data on revenue contribution to the foreign parent (60% of the foreign parent’s revenues, on  average,  can  be  attributed  to  Pakistan‐based  operation),  8  of  our  respondents  can  be described as the purest forms of dedicated development centers (Figure V). These organizations are different in the sense that they have a very limited strategic mandate, namely, to solely serve as a back‐up operation (for product development) of the foreign parent. They are also different from  other,  more  “hybrid”  software  development‐center  operations  in  the  sense  that  they  are very  tightly—almost  exclusively—linked  to  their  foreign  parents  and  do  not  operate domestically or even seek other clients in the international market.   >From a strategic standpoint, they are virtually unattached to, and to a large extent unaffected by, the developments on the Pakistani  software scene and the strategic and competitive drivers  Fig-V: Proportion of "Dedicated"of  the  local  industry,  except  for  their  Development Centersdependence  on  availability  of  IT/Telecom infrastructure  and  access  to  quality  human  Developresources.  Because  of  these  qualities,  many  of  Center 15%the  organizational  and  managerial  statistics related  to  these  operations  are  thus  not  Others 85%comparable  with  the  rest  of  the  industry. Nevertheless, they are an important segment of  Development Center Othersthe  Pakistani  software  scene  that  must  be looked  at  closely,  with  a  view  to  identifying differences, similarities, and best practices, and we do so in the following paragraphs.   The  dedicated  development‐center‐type  operations,  almost  universally,  have  a  strong expatriate‐connection as subsidiaries of foreign companies. They have a greater dependence on a  smaller  client  base  (~50%  from  a  single  client,  and  as  much  as  90%  from  top‐5  clients),  a greater‐than‐average  export‐  and  product‐focus  and  an  almost  negligible  domestic‐focus  that confirms our assertions about their “isolated enclave” nature on the local software development scene. These operations tend to specialize more in automation systems across various domains (e.g.  printing,  stock  trading,  workflow  etc.)  These  operations  have  a  greater‐than‐average expenditure on product‐development/ service‐delivery and lower‐than‐average expenditure on certification/training. They are also less likely to have a quality certification. The development center‐type  operations  are  much  more  intensive  from  a  technical  process  standpoint  (as                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  42     
  • 43. measured from a variety of indirect measures like programmer‐to‐project‐manager ratio, % of payroll spent on QA, size of QA team as percentage of total staff etc.) but less in terms of actual rigid  application  of  known  methodologies  (e.g.  waterfall,  iterative,  prototyping  etc.)  and technical best practices like project tracking, code‐and‐design reviews. This might be attributed to  the  nature  of  the  work  they  perform  or  their  adherence  to  unique  parent‐specific methodologies rather than the standard suite of design approaches and technical best practices.   From  an  organizational  standpoint,  these  development  center  operations  are  smaller  (almost half the average size) and have a higher employee turnover—a finding that may be explained by  the  relatively  easier  outward  mobility  of  their  employees  to  the  countries  of  their  parent companies.  This  is  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  they  tend  to  pay  more  in  salary  than  the  average software  house  in  Pakistan.  They  are,  however,  less  likely  to  distribute  profit  among  their employees.  Development  center‐type  operations  are  predominantly  established  with funds/investment  from  foreign  partners  and  the  better‐managed  ones  are  often  headed  by  a foreign  founder  relocating  to  Pakistan  to  serve  as  a  local  head  of  operation.  These  heads  of operations, or local CEOs, are much more involved in day‐to‐day management of the company (spend  15%  more  time,  on  average)  and  much  less  involved  in  marketing  and  fundraising (spend 20% less time, on average).   Another  interesting  and  potentially  consequential  finding  is  that  development  center‐type operations show a significantly lower rate of revenue and employment growth (as much as one‐half  of  the  average  revenue  growth,  and  one  third  of  the  average  employment  growth)  thus highlighting  the  relatively  limited  scope  of  their  operations  and  difficulties  inherent  in  the scalability  of  this  organizational  model.    While  some  of  this  lack  of  revenue  and  employment growth maybe attributable to the depressed demand of the software of their parent companies in their respective markets (abroad)—a situation that might improve over time—whether or not the  development‐center  model  can  outgrow  its  limited  character  and  resolve  certain management challenges (discussed in section 7.5) is, however, an open question.    We see a gradual shift towards “productization” of services. However, services‐ and products‐focused companies in Pakistani software industry maybe  more alike  than different from each other,  thus  pointing  out  towards  a  lack  of  specialization  in  the  industry.  Product  or  service orientation  of  a  software  operation  has  been  a  subject  of  considerable  debate  within  the academic and practitioner communities. While some assert that a company cannot hope to do well  in  both  types  of  offerings  simultaneously,  others  have  argued  and  documented  the inevitability  of  the  convergence  between  product  and  services‐focused  companies.  Cusumano                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  43     
  • 44. (2004)  asserts  that  increasingly,  product‐focused  companies  are  increasing  their  share  of revenues  from  service  offerings  and  the  services‐focused  companies  are  moving  towards productization.  It  views  this  convergence  as  a  robust  middle‐way  for  large  western  software companies struggling to survive during economic recessions.   In  the  context  of  software  industries  of  emerging  markets,  like  Pakistan’s,  the  product‐service dimension assumes an even more critical meaning as it may be confounded or even driven by the demands of the intended market rather than the inherent product‐or‐service character of the firm’s offering. Many companies seem to have adopted a services posture merely because of the founders’  interest  to  export  rather  than  any  other  competitive  factor.  Also,  a  large  number  of these  companies  often  find  themselves  in  a  “projects‐trap”—moving  from  one  project  to  the next, and in the process, often unable to build critical intellectual property or a domain expertise that  could  serve  as  value‐differentiator  in  the  longer  run.  That  majority  of  India’s  exports comprise  low‐end  services  or  body‐shopping  rather  than  more  profitable  shrink‐wrapped products are well‐documented in literature (Heeks, 1998).   Given  the  importance  of  the  product‐service  distinction  and  the  peculiar  organizational  and strategic requirements of each, we sought to look at these distinct sub‐segments separately. As before,  we  defined  a  product‐focused  company  as  one  that  earned  more  than  75%  of  its revenues from product‐sales and a service‐focused company as one that earned more than 75% of its revenues from services. In between these two categories is the hybrid company—the well‐diversified firm that may earn its revenues from as much as 50% of products and services each. This  categorization,  we  believe,  is  most  likely  to  identify  the  key  differences  between organizational  structures  and  competitive  strategies  of  product  and  services‐focused  software operations. Of the 52 companies in our sample  (“dedicated”  development‐ Fig-VI: Product Profile of Softwarecenters  excluded),  23  (44%)  were  thus  Companies in Samplecategorized  as  services‐focused,  13  Hybrids Product 31% 25%(25%)  as  products‐focused,  and  16 (31%) as hybrids (Figure VI).  Looking  at  our  data,  we  find  that product‐focused  operations  are  much  Service 44%more  likely  to  be  domestic‐focused rather than export‐driven, although in  Product Service Hybridsan  aggregate  they  are  much  more                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  44     
  • 45. likely  to  be  well‐balanced  between  domestic  and  foreign  markets  than  service‐focused operations. They are also much more likely to be “focused” (not only in terms of their domain offering  e.g.  financial,  telecom,  or  automation  systems,  but  also  in  terms  of  their  overall organizational  strategy),  and  much  more  likely  to  sell  a  mix  of  software‐hardware  offerings.  Product‐focused  companies  are  more  likely  to  be  established  through  investment  by  a  local source  (e.g.  a  business  house)  or  a  venture  capital  fund.  They  are  also  more  likely  to  share profits,  depend  on  intellectual  property  for  their  continued  vitality,  be  financially  disciplined, and benefit from employee‐led innovation.  They are also much less likely to be affected by the “image” problem than the services‐focused companies.  Product‐focused operations, however, seem to do worse than service‐focused companies as far as revenue size is concerned but are likely to be less dependent on a smaller number of clients. They  spend  more  on  R&D  and  service/support,  less  on  certification/training,  and  as  much  on marketing and advertising as the services‐focused operations. Product‐focused companies also paid  less  (to  their  employees)  than  services‐focused  companies  but  experienced  greater  sales and employment growth (about 30% point greater on each measure), on average.  There is also some  hint,  although  a  relatively  weak  one,  of  a  less‐than  one‐to‐one  correspondence  between revenue  and  employment  growth  in  the  product‐focused  category  as  against  the  more manpower  intensive  services‐focused  category.  For  most  of  these  measures,  hybrids  fall  in between  these  two  categories.  They  do,  however,  tend  to  do  better  than  either  of  the  two extremes as far as revenue sizes are concerned but they are also likely to employ more people, on  average.  Hybrids  also  seem  to  have  experienced  faster  growth  than  services‐focused companies, both in revenue and employment terms.   On the technical process side, product‐focused companies are less likely to be quality‐certified (30%  ISO  certified  as  against  60%  for  service  companies),  are  much  less  likely  to  have  a dedicated QA team (46% as against 81% for services‐focused companies), and they spend half as  much  as  the  latter  on  the  quality  assurance  function  (about  9%  vs.  16%  of  total  employee payroll).  While  the  relatively  less  propensity  to  seek  quality  certification  is  somewhat understandable  and  can  be  explained  by  a  perceived  lesser  demand  of  the  same  from  their foreign customers (for products only) the less emphasis on quality assurance must be a source of some concern for the industry. Although beta‐testing is becoming somewhat of a norm in the software  industry,  testing  and  quality  assurance  functions  for  product‐based  companies  are atleast as important, if not more, as they are for services‐focused companies.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  45     
  • 46. One  possible  explanation  for  why  product‐based  companies  might  be  able  to  survive  despite this lack of emphasis on quality assurance may be the lack of maturity of the domestic market to whom  they  sell  a  major  chunk  of  their  products.  According  to  several  industry  insiders,  the domestic customer is much less technology savvy, and hence more tolerant of the poor quality. As  one  interviewee  pointed  out,  it  is  not  hard  to  find  examples  where  a  software  company, unable to deliver the product of requisite quality, either due to faulty processes or specification creep,  ends  up  blaming  the  customer  for  lack  of  his/her  technical  sophistication.  Barring  this anomaly, the trend of increasing productization is a healthy move towards a more balanced and robust industrial structure.   Although  organizational  size  can  be  an  important  predictor  of  key  strategic  &  managerial characteristics  (e.g.  focus  and  professionalization  etc.),  we  find  very  few  statistically significant  differences.  Size  of  a  company  has  also  been  a  strong  predictor  of  organizational practices and thus a subject of considerable debate in the industrial organization literature. It is also  the  only  categorization  on  which  past  data  may  be  available  in  the  context  of  Pakistani software  industry12.  We  categorize  organizations  as  large  and  small  using  the  number  of  its professional and technical employees. We categorize 31 organizations (or 62%) as small and 19 organizations  (or  38%)  as  large  (Figure‐VII).  This  classification  roughly  compares  with  the findings  of  PASHA‐LUMS  study  that  categorized  7  companies  as  small  (63%)  and  4  as  large (37%) on the basis of FY2000 revenues.   In  our  sample,  smaller  organizations  are  more  likely  to  be  focused  than  larger  organizations. They are also less likely to be a subsidiary of a  Fig-VII: Proportion of Small/Largeforeign  company  or  have  a  front‐office  Companies in Sampleabroad.  Smaller  organizations  also  derive  a greater  proportion  of  their  revenues  from selling services abroad and products at home than  larger  organizations  that  have  a  more  Large 38%balanced  portfolio  of  service‐product  and  Smallexport‐local  mix.  They  are  also  more  62%dependent on a single client, on average, than  Small Large12 PASHA-LUMS study focused on organizational size as a determinant of performance and managerial practices. Itdefined size, however, in terms of revenues (i.e. organizations having revenues > or < PKR 25 Million being the cut-off for large and small organizations respectively). Due to lack of accurate continuous data on revenues, we useprofessional and technical employment as a parameter for organizational size with 50 employees being the cut-off.This, however, roughly corresponds with the PASHA-LUMS study’s cut-off of revenues of $200,000 (PKR 25 M).                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  46     
  • 47. their larger counterparts. Smaller companies spend more, on average, on product‐development‐service delivery and less on certification/training. They are also likely to pay lower salaries, on average,  than  larger  organizations.  They  are  less  likely  to  share  profits  or  distribute  stocks (ownership)  to  its  employees,  and  less  likely  to  provide  appropriate  additional  benefits  to female employees. Top‐executives of smaller software companies are less likely to be financially disciplined  (“monitor  cash‐flows  several  months  in  advance”)  and  they  spend  less  time,  on average, on marketing/business development and hiring/recruitment and more time on actual programming and coding.   From  a  technical  standpoint,  although  smaller  companies  are  less  likely  to  have  a  dedicated quality  assurance  team  and  have  a  quality  certification,  they  tend  to  spend  much  higher percentage  of  their  payroll  on  the  quality  assurance  function  (ratio  of  QA  employees  to  total employment  in  smaller  companies  is  almost  four  times  that  of  larger  ones)  and  have  half  the number  of  programmers  per  project  manager  or  team‐lead.  Although  there  is  no  clear‐cut pattern,  smaller  companies  tend  to  do  worse  than  larger  companies  on  several  technical  best practices. There is some evidence of “growing pains” among smaller companies.    Despite expectations and perception to the contrary, DotCom Bubble burst seems to have little statistically  identifiable  impact  on  strategic  direction  of  the  industry.  In  order  to  assess whether  the  DotCom  Bubble  burst  had  any  identifiable  impact  on  the  structure  and organization  of  the  Pakistani  Fig-VIII: Proportion of Cos. Establishedsoftware  industry,  we  categorized  Before/After DotCom Bubble Burstall respondents in 2 classes—the pre‐ and  post‐dotcommers—depending  Post-on  whether  they  were  incorporated  Dotcommerprior  to  or  after  FY2001.  Using  this  33%approach,  we  categorized  35  Pre-software  operations  (67%)  as  pre‐ DotCommer 67%dotcommers  and  17  operations (33%)  as  post‐dotcommers  (Figure  Pre-DotCommer Post-DotcommerVIII).  As  a  class,  post‐dotcommers tend  to  be  smaller,  on  average,  in  both  revenue  and  employment  terms.  They  have,  however, experienced  much  faster  growth  rates  (as  much  as  30%  higher,  over  the  last  year)  than  pre‐dotcommers.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  47     
  • 48. Post‐dotcommers  are  much  less  likely  to  have  been  established  through  the  savings  of  local founders or investment by a local partner (e.g. a business house), and more likely to be funded by  a  venture  capital  source—a  fact  that  might  merely  represent  the  going  out‐of‐favor  of software  investing  among  business  houses  and  coming  in  vogue  of  venture  capital  financing arrangements  in  Pakistan.  Post‐DotCom  operations  are  equally  likely  to  have  an  expatriate‐connection, although they are much less likely to be subsidiaries of a foreign company. The pre‐ and  post‐dotcommers  are  virtually  identical  in  terms  of  their  product‐service  and  export‐domestic offerings, except for some very minor differences (e.g. the latter, on average, sell more export‐products  and  domestic‐services  than  former).  Both  the  categories  are  also  virtually identical in terms of their expenditure profile and their employment (work‐type) profiles. There also  is  no  significant  difference  between  the  strategic  focus  of  organizations  conceived  during these  two  time  vintages.  This  finding,  if  correct,  is  a  potentially  damaging  to  our  de‐facto argument that DotCom Bubble burst has led to considerable learning within the industry that may  be  reflected  in  better‐focused  firms  being  formed  in  the  first  place.  One  potential explanation,  somewhat  substantiated  by  qualitative  interviews,  for  this  lack  of  finding  is  that the  DotCom  revolution  might  have  affected  the  software  industry  more  by  modifying  the offerings  and  behaviors  of  already  established  firms  than  by  affecting  the  formation  of  new firms.  Moreover,  the  sizes  of  the  firms  in  latter  category  might  be  too  small  to  register  a significant effect at the industry level.     The  pre‐dotcommers  are  slightly  less  likely  to  distribute  profit  and  more  likely  to  distribute equity  among  employees,  they  seem  to  do  better  at  providing  additional  benefits  to  female employees,  and  are  better  disciplined  at  managing  cashflows.  Post‐dotcommers,  on  the  other hand,  tend  to  suffer  more  from  issues  of  delegation  quality  and  a  profitability  crunch—issues that might be attributable to younger organizational structures and less‐mature product‐service profiles.  Post‐dotcommers suffer more than pre‐dotcommers from retention issues—with their average  employment  length  almost  a  full‐year  shorter  than  pre‐dotcommers.  Top‐executives (CEOs) of post‐dotcommers also tend to spend less time, on average, on strategic and product planning  and  marketing/business  development  and  more time  on  fundraising  and day‐to‐day management.   Post‐dotcommers  are  almost  35%  less  likely  to  have  a  quality  certification  than  the  pre‐dotcommers. However, they are almost as equally likely to have a dedicated quality assurance team,  and  outspend  the  latter,  in  percentage‐of‐expenditure  terms,  on  the  quality  assurance function. They have double the number of QA professionals for every technical and managerial employee  and  a  slightly  favorable  programmer‐to‐project  manager  ratio  than  the  pre‐                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  48     
  • 49. dotcommers.  While  there  is  no  clear‐cut  pattern  in  favor  of  a  particular  software  design methodology,  post‐dotcommers  seem  to  consistently  employ  the  technical  best  practices  in  a regular fashion.   In aggregate, while there maybe differences among pre‐ and post‐DotCom ventures, and many would  like  that  conjecture  to  be  true,  we  did  not  find,  at  a  statistical  level,  many  of  the hypothesized ones. An alternate explanation would be that the industry as a whole, and hence our  data,  contains  too  much  variation  to  identify  any  significant  patterns.  Perhaps  the  pre‐DotCom operations are so big, from a relative standpoint, that they end up overshadowing the uniqueness  of  the  post‐DotCom  operations.  On  this  count,  therefore,  our  analysis  is,  at  best, inconclusive.   5.3—Search for the Holy Grail: Do Statistics Reveal a Pattern of “Best Practices”?  Clearly  the  results  discussed  above  indicate  a  pattern  that,  although  informative,  is  quite inconclusive and somewhat disturbing. We do not find many statistically significant differences between  companies  specializing  in  exports  vs.  domestic  markets,  and  products  vs.  services, those  that  are  small  vs.  large,  that  were  created  before  the  DotCom  Bubble  burst  vs.  those created  after  that.  This  might  be  an  artifact  of  the  data  (e.g.  non‐representative  sample)  or suggestive  of  lack  of  maturity  and  specialization  in  the  industry  (e.g.  large  variations  around estimates). In view of the above problems, we decided to further restrict our categorization of companies used for identification of “Best Practices” within the Pakistani software industry.   Thinking  that  one  particular  categorization  scheme  may  not  adequately  represent  a  multi‐dimensional  concept  like  success,  we  used  4  different  ways  to  categorize  our  sample  using classification schemes depending on third‐party judgment, researchers’ judgment, an objective criterion,  and  self‐described  measure  of  performance.  The  first  of  these  schemes  consists  of  a comparison  of  40  most  prominent  and  successful  organizations  (identified  by  PSEB  and PASHA) against the rest of the sample.  The second scheme uses a reference sample consisting of companies that, in the researchers’ views, were the 10 best‐in‐class companies and compared it against the rest of the sample. The third categorization scheme consists of the fastest growing companies  (over  last  year)  in  the sample  against  the  rest—with  the  caveat  that  the  companies that achieved a sales growth of greater than 40% on a revenue base of atleast a million dollars were included in this reference group. We found 14 such companies in our sample and grouped them  together  for  comparison  purposes.  Finally,  we  also  compared  companies  that  had identified  themselves  as  “among the  top‐quartile,  globally”  in  terms  of  “overall  performance” against the rest of the companies. We believe these were generally companies with innovative                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  49     
  • 50. products/services that were deemed globally competitive in the marketplace by their initiators. 14 companies were included in this reference group as well.   Although  there  are  possibilities  of  different  types  of  biases  in  each  one  of  these  categories, together,  we  believe,  they  can  lead  to  robust  conclusions  about  how  better  performing companies may differ from the not‐so‐good‐performers in the Pakistan software industry. In the following  narrative  we  would  use  the  nomenclature  “better‐performing”  for  the  above described reference groups. The results of this analysis are presented in Table X (below).   We see a mixed pattern. Generally speaking, for all classification schemes, an average company in the better performing of the groups is larger in terms of revenues—a statistically significant finding  at  the  5%  level.  An  average  company  in  the  better  performing  of  the  groups  is  also larger  in  terms  of  technical  and  professional  employment,  more  likely  to  seek  quality certification,  retain  its  employees  for  a  longer  period  of  time,  more  likely  to  earn  a  greater portion of its revenues from exports and services. These findings are, however, not statistically significant. For all classification schemes, except global top‐quartile, there is a greater likelihood that the company in the better performing group would be a subsidiary of a foreign company and would have a front‐office abroad.  Companies in the better performing groups consistently rated higher in terms of the prevalence of  key  managerial  practices  that  made  them  more  attractive  to  employees,  namely,  profit sharing  and  stock‐ownership  among  employees,  additional  benefits  for  female  employees, regular  employee  bonding  events,  and  provision  of  some  flexible  time  to  work  on  employees interests. While these results are not statistically significant, they are consistent enough that we can  comfortably  describe  them  as  managerial  best  practices  or  attributes  of  better  performing organizations. We also found a clear and consistent pattern with regards to what we believed were indicators of management quality, namely, better performing companies were more likely to display qualities like a mix of technical‐business backgrounds of top‐management, financial discipline, involvement in conveying strategy and goals to employees, a clear strategy to ensure growth  in  both  revenues  and  profitability,  and  prior  experience  of  creating  new  ventures  etc. Once again, the pattern was consistent enough that we are confident in claiming these aspects of management‐quality  to  be  best  practices  within  the  industry.  We  did  not,  however,  find  any clear  and  consistent  pattern  in  the  proportion  of  time  spent  by  the  CEO  on  day‐to‐day management of the company.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  50     
  • 51. There  is  a  clear  and  consistent  pattern  in  the  use  and  satisfaction  with  various  marketing approaches.  The  companies  in  better‐performing  categories,  except  for  the  global  top‐quartile classification, tend to express greater satisfaction with the high‐contact marketing approaches, like  word‐of‐mouth  (client‐referrals),  one‐to‐one  contacts,  and  networks  of  personal relationships.  Low‐contact  marketing  approaches  like  advertising  in  trade  journals  and attending conferences etc. are deemed much less satisfactory. Partnerships and alliances score in between these two categories.                                               Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  51     
  • 52.   TABLE X: THE HOLY GRAIL OF INDUSTRY BEST PRACTICES?  All  Top‐40 Companies  Ten Best in Class  Fastest Growing  Global Top‐Q   Aggregate  T40  Rest  T10  Rest  FG  Rest  GTQ  Rest Important Structural Variables   (N=60)   (N=40)  (N=20)  (N=10)   (N=50)  (N=14)  (N=46)  (N=14)  (N=46)     Foreign Subsidiary  40%  41%  38%  50%  38%  64%*  32%  35%  41%     Front Office Abroad  55%  58%  47%  70%  52%  71%  50%  50%  56% Composition of Revenues & Growth                        Average Revenues (Midpoint Estimate, $M)  $1.35M  $1.9M*  $368K  $2.8M*  $1.06M  $2.5M*  $992K  $2.5M*  $980K     Export‐Domestic Mix  61:39  59:41  63:37  59:41  61:39  75:25  58:42  67:33  59:41     Product‐Service Mix  45:55  48:52  42:58  35:65  48:52  36:64  47:53  39:61  47:53     Dependence on Largest Client  36.5%  33.7%  42%  32%  37%  33.7%  37%  47%  34%     Revenue Growth over Last Year  56.8%  58%  51%  47%  59%  105%*  46%  64%  54% Employment Figures & Growth                       Average # of Employees  68  87  32  91  64  98  59  90  62     Employment Growth over Last Year  45%  23%*  94%  23%  49%  61%  40%  80%  35%     Average Length of Employment (yrs)  2.61  2.7  2.42  3.65*  2.37  2.86  2.55  3.65*  2.37 Managerial Practices (Complex Indices)                      Employee Attractiveness 1‐5 (MP3, 4, 5, 6, 7)  2.43  2.7*  1.89  2.9  2.33  3.07  2.24  3.07  2.24    Mgmt Quality 1‐5 (MP1’, MP2, 8, 9, 10)  3.0  3.02  2.94  3.2  2.95  3.23  2.93  3.15  2.95    Top Mgmt Time Spent on Day‐to‐Day Activities (%)  32%  32%  31.6%  26.5%  33.2%  32%  32%  30%  32% Marketing Practices (Complex Indices)                      Average Rating of High Contact Approaches (MA1,4,5)  3.66  3.73  3.52  4.38  3.48  3.88  3.58  3.61  3.67    Highest Rating of Low Contact Approaches (MA2,3,6)  2.94  3.00  2.77  3.50  2.78  3.55  2.74  3.25  2.85 Process and Technical Quality Measures                       % of companies with Quality Certification   45%  51%  33%  80%*  38%  57%  41%  57%  41%     % of employee payroll spent on QA  14%  14.5%  12.4%  10.4%  14.76%  13.45%  14.1%  11.3%  14.7%     Programmer‐to‐Project Manager Ratio  5.87  7.09*  3.36  9.62  5.14  5.55  5.97  3.91  6.48                    * indicates a 5% significance level, Sample‐sizes are for completed entries (individual figures may differ due to item non‐response).                                             Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  52      
  • 53. Results  are  mixed  on  measures  of  technical  and  process  quality.  While  better‐performing organizations  show  a  greater  propensity  to  have  a  quality  certification,  there  is  no  consistent pattern in terms of spending on quality assurance (as a percentage of employee payroll) and the ratio  of  programmers  to  a  project  manager.  That  companies  in  better  performing  categories companies  tend  to  spend  less  on  QA  (as  percentage  of  employee  payroll)  and  hire  more programmers  per  project  manager  seems  counter‐intuitive  at  first  sight.  There  can  be  several possible explanations for these findings. Our interviews with top executives and technical and process  quality  managers  revealed  several  of  these.  For  example,  the  less  QA  expenditure  by better  performing  companies  can  be  attributed  to  more  streamlined  and  well‐defined processes—the  dividend  of  up‐front  investments  in  process  quality,  so  to  speak.  Similarly, higher  programmer  to  project  manager  ratios  among  better  performing  companies  can  be explained through the fact that most better‐performing and well‐established operations tend to use bi‐layered hierarchical structures with team‐leads mediating between project managers and programmers thus artificially increasing the programmer‐to‐pm ratio. Clearly, we need to look at the data on technical and process quality in finer detail along with the type of product‐service offerings  and  software  development  work  being  performed  in  the  companies.  Other  studies have  looked  at  technical  and  process  quality  using  project‐  rather  than  company‐level  data  to account for these differences (Cusumano et. al., 2003). Perhaps such an approach is in order to identify technical best practices among our respondents.   The overall picture that emerges from this analysis is both encouraging and discouraging, albeit inconclusive, at times.  Firstly, while the lack of specialization and focus in the industry is quite evident  from  the  raw  statistics,  what  is  not  so  evident  is  whether  or  not  this  lack  of specialization and focus is a natural and hence desired consequence of the level of development or  maturity  for  the  industry.  This  conjecture  somewhat  resonates  with  the  consensus  of participants  at  a  consultative  meeting.    Secondly,  while  there  exists,  broadly  speaking,  a  clear set of best practices in managerial and marketing domains, the picture on measure of technical and process quality is far less illuminating. This lack of finding—whether driven by data or the underlying process—is consequential and hence needs more attention. A more detailed analysis that attempts to test alternate hypothesis and/or incorporate qualitative factors is in order.   6. UNDERSTANDING PROMINENT BUSINESS MODELS & COMPETITIVE DRIVERSAs we try to move away from an industry‐wide perspective to that of an individual firm, it is important, once again, to define certain sets of features that determine firm‐level strategic and competitive dynamics. These are essentially a set of generic features that are common across a                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  53     
  • 54. large  number  of  firms  thus  enabling  us  to  analyze  them  in  groups  rather  than  individually. Before  we  do  so,  however,  we  would  like  to  flesh  out  taxonomy  of  generic  software  business models to guide this process.  6.1—A Taxonomy of Generic Software Business Models  For the purpose of convenience and brevity, we define four prominent categories of “generic” software business models.  The defining characteristics of these generic business models are the intended  market  of  the  software  product/service  (i.e.  domestic  or  export)  and  the  place  of conception of the firm’s idea.   That the first of these factors is going to be a key differentiator of the firm’s organization and its strategic and competitive drivers should come as no surprise to us (i.e. an export‐focused firm is very  likely  to  face  an  entirely  different  set  of  challenges  than  a  domestic‐focused  firm)  and hence  does  not  require  an  elaboration.  The  second  of  these  factors,  namely,  the  place  of conception/origin  of  the  firm’s  idea,  however,  warrants  some  elaboration.  We  believe  that  it does  matter,  considerably,  in  terms  of  the  eventual  organizational  structure  of  firm  (e.g.  the incentives  sharing,  issues  of  coordination  and  control,  parent‐subsidiary  relationships  etc.)  as well  as  the  marketing  challenges  that  it  faces  (e.g.  developing  networks,  domain  expertise, marketing  arrangements  etc.),  whether  the  firm’s  primary  proponents  are  based  at  home  (in Pakistan)  or  the  target  market  of  the  firm’s  products/services.  Before  we  name  the  four  sub‐categories  of  generic  business  models,  we  would  also  like  to  emphasize  the  following.  The placement  of  companies  in  the  category  as  well  as  the  nomenclature  of  the  categories themselves  refers  to  the  circumstances  at  the  inception/start  of  the  company  or  the  idea. Therefore,  a  company  that  started  as  export  focused  with  an  entrepreneurial  team  based  in Pakistan  is  placed  in  the  export‐focused  local  firm  category.  Over  time,  the  company  may develop a local‐focus or a foreign identity but the initial challenges it faced in getting there are best represented by its export‐focused local firm identity. This is a subtle point but an important one nonetheless. We would briefly introduce each of these models below and discuss them in more detail later.   The  Export‐Focused  Local  Firm—is  one  founded  by  a  predominantly  Pakistan‐based entrepreneurial  team  (that  may  or  may  not  have  been  aided/encouraged  by  a  group  of expatriates), but with an explicit purpose of exporting software products or services. Majority of the firms established in pre‐DotCom Bubble burst era with an expressed purpose of exporting services—a  name  given  to  the  dominant  Indian  model  of  doing  offshore  programming  and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  54     
  • 55. coding for foreign clients—would probably fall within this category. Although there are some that have taken the products route, their numbers are relatively smaller than those focusing on export of services. There are considerable challenges in working under this business model, not only with regards to setting up a software development operation that could deliver the sort of quality product or service demanded by a sophisticated foreign customer but also in terms of putting in place a cost‐effective marketing front‐end in a foreign land. Some salient examples of this  type  of  business  model  in  action  are:  ThreesixtyDegreez,  Post  Amazers,  Advanced Communications, Makabu, Netsol, and Autosoft Dynamics etc.    The Export‐Focused Foreign (Expatriate) Firm—is one founded abroad (or jointly, in Pakistan), by  a  predominantly  foreign  (usually  an  expatriate)  entrepreneurial  team,  with  an  explicit purpose  of  using  the  Pakistan‐based  offshore  development  facility  to  deliver  a  product  or service  demanded  by  the  foreign  market.  This  type  of  business  model  has  been  adopted  by services and product‐focused companies alike. Within both the services and products domains, this type of business model has been more valuable than the Export‐Focused Local Firm model, primarily  because  of  the  ability  of  this  firm’s  expatriate  founders  to  capitalize  on  their  own personal presence and networks in foreign lands. The key challenge for this business model has less to do with not finding domain focus or customers abroad—which the expatriate founders often  have  a  very  good  grasp  of—and  more  to  do  with  successfully  pulling  off  the  task  of setting  up  a  development  facility  in  Pakistan  by  finding  appropriate  talent,  setting  up  work‐systems,  and  getting  over  the  hill  as  far  as  offshore‐onshore  coordination  is  concerned.  Some salient  examples  of  this  type  of  business  model  in  action  are:  Elixir  Technologies,  Etilize  Inc., Ultimus, MixIT, TechLogix, Prosol, and Xavor etc.  The  Domestic‐Focused  Local  Firm—with  an  exception  of  a  few  companies,  is  really  one because of circumstances rather than choice. More often than not, and logically so, the domestic‐focused  local  firm  plans  to  export  its  products  or  services  abroad  and  is  merely  using  the domestic market as a vehicle to gain a track record with real life customers. Whether a firm is in this  category  by  choice  (“I’ll  do  domestic  first,  export  later”)  or  by  circumstances  (“Since  the export  market  doesn’t  seem  very  good  right  now,  I’ll  survive  by  selling  at  home”)  the challenges  are  quite  similar,  namely,  first,  to  do  enough  “large”  projects  fairly  quickly  in  the local  market  to  build  a  reputable  portfolio  of  customers  but  more  importantly,  to  develop  a domain expertise, and to migrate effectively from a producer of products/services for a rather unsophisticated domestic customer to a much more sophisticated and quality conscious foreign customer. The more successful of these firms have already begun to look overseas, primarily the Middle Eastern region, for a piece of the export market and have been fairly successful at that.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  55     
  • 56. Some salient examples of this type of business model in action are: 2B Technologies, ZRG, TPS, Lumensoft, Yevolve, SI3, Softech Systems, AppXS, and Genesis Solutions etc.  The  missing  category  of  this  taxonomy,  namely,  the  Domestic‐Focused  Foreign  (Expatriate) Firm is almost non‐existent for reasons having to do with the small size and lack of maturity of the  local  market.  It  does,  however,  find  some  expression  in  the  relocation  of  Pakistani expatriates back to Pakistan with a desire to set up  companies that either serve the local—the prime  example  being  SI3  whose  expressed  purpose  is  to  work  on  the  domestic  front—or  the export  market  but  who  end  up  doing  quite  a  fair  bit  of  work  in  the  domestic  market  as  well. Instead we include, as our fourth category, the Dedicated Offshore Development Center. This model,  although  somewhat  of  a  variation  of  the  Export‐Focused  Foreign  (Expatriate)  Firm  is different enough, in terms of some of the organizational and strategic issues it faces, to warrant a separate treatment.   Dedicated Offshore Development Center— is, as the name suggests, a fairly limited offshore development  operation  of  a  foreign  company.  It  is  different  from  the  Export‐Focused  Foreign (Expatriate) Firm in the sense that it is often an “add‐on” to an already existing company whose strategic  and  managerial  processes  and  controls  are  quite  well‐established.  It,  therefore,  does not  get  an  equal  say  in  the  long‐term  vision  and  strategic  direction  of  its  parent.  This  is  true atleast from the short‐to‐medium term and may change depending on how the parent wants the offshore  development  operation  to  evolve  over  the  longer  run  and  on  what  terms  and conditions was the Pakistani subsidiary conceived. The key challenges of this business model, therefore, also differ with reference to the timeframe in question.   In  the  short‐to‐medium  run,  the  challenge  is  to  set‐up  a  facility  that  could  deliver  quality products/services  in  support  of  the  product‐service  strategy  of  its  foreign  parent,  to  do  it  in  a manner that the local operation is in sync with the foreign parent and its clients, and to transfer the  necessary  domain  expertise  and  customer  experience  to  the  local  developers.  In  the medium‐to‐long run, however, as the local operation matures and acquires a life of its own, the key challenge then is to continue to align its interests and requirements with that of the foreign parent.  If  not  managed  well,  this  may  give  rise  to  considerable  management  tension  and employee  discontent.  While  most  companies  established  under  such  an  arrangement  in Pakistan  have  not  yet  reached  the  “longer‐run”  of  their  existence,  some  have,  and  one  can clearly see them navigating through these later‐stage challenges. Some salient examples of this type of business model in action are: MetaApps, ITIM Associates, Clickmarks, Trivor Systems and Strategic Systems International etc.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  56     
  • 57.   FIGURE‐IX – GENERIC BUSINESS MODELS & THEIR TRANSITIONS SCENARIOS    DOMESTIC‐FOCUSED  EXPORT‐FOCUSED  EXPORT‐FOCUSED  DEDICATED   LOCAL FIRM LOCAL FIRM FOREIGN‐FIRM DEVELOPMENT CENTER  ZRG ThreeSixtyDegreez Etilize ITIM Associates  TPS Post Amazers Prosol MetaApps  Lumensoft Advanced Comm. Adamsoft Clickmarks  Yevolve Netsol Ultimus Enabling Tech. (Quartics)  2B Technologies Makabu MixIT Trivor Systems  SI3 Autosoft Dynamics Techlogix Strategic Systems Int’l   Softech Systems Sidaat Hyder Morshed Xavor ESP Global Systems  Genesis Solutions Avanza Solutions Elixir Technologies  Alchemy Technologies GoNet  AppXS Kalsoft  Oratech Jinn Technologies  Askari Info Systems Secure3 Networks  Acrologix Systems Ltd  Comcept Progressive Systems  LMKR Millennium Software  CARE Cressoft   TRANSITIONS KEY   DIVERSIFICATION     M&A W/ FOREIGN FIRM SHIFTING PRIORITIES   MATURITY, VALUE‐ADD BUYOUT BY LOCAL MGMT.  ELEVATION OF PAK‐OPS.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  57     
  • 58. It is also important to mention here that none of these categories are as black‐and‐white as they seem. There is considerable gray area in between and a company might show characteristics of more than one type of generic software business model. For example, whether a company is an Export‐Focused  Foreign  Firm  or  a  Dedicated  Offshore  Development  Center  depends  on  the specific  details  of  the  founding  arrangement  of  the  Pakistani  and  foreign  directors.  The Pakistani version of the export‐focused foreign firm might appear like a dedicated development center if the former ends up getting into a strict parent‐subsidiary relationship with its foreign counterpart.  In  case  where  that  happens,  it  is  likely  that  it  would  encounter  the  challenges identified for the latter category of businesses. On the contrary, it is also likely that, depending upon  the  nature  of  its  relationship  with  its  foreign  parent,  a  dedicated  development  center would begin to look more and more like a export‐focused foreign firm and thus may not face the  later‐stage  challenges  alluded  to  above.  In  essence,  it  is  not  the  organizational  or  legal arrangement  between  the  parent  and  the  subsidiary,  but  the  more  invisible  and  intangible relationships that would determine the final outcome for these local‐foreign hybrids.   Similarly, another possibility is that of one type of firm transitioning into another type during its own life‐cycle. The most common examples that come to mind are a domestic‐focused local firms  transitioning  into  export‐focused  local  firms  or  vice  versa.  We  could  also  identify instances  when  export‐focused  foreign  firms  had  to  turn  to  the  domestic  market  for  survival during  harsh  economic  times  in  the  US  and  European  markets.  Again,  as  a  particular  type  of business model transitions into another, partially or fully, temporarily or permanently, we are bound  to  see  hybrids  that  would  show  characteristics  of  several  of  the  business  models identified  above.  It  is  not  uncommon  for  an  entrepreneurial  venture  to  undergo  a  major transformation of its original business model—as conceived in the first business plan—and we see  the  evidence  of  that  on  the  Pakistani  software  scene  as  well.  Many  companies  that  were formed  during  the  peak  of  the  dot‐com  euphoria  with  the  sole  purpose  of  capitalizing  on  the Internet/e‐Commerce boom have undergone a major re‐assessment of their business models in the light of the changed realities in their target markets.  We now discuss each of these models and their strategic and competitive drivers in some detail. While  the  narrative  on  each  of  the  four  generic  software  business  models  describes  the  key structural  features  and  competitive  drivers,  strategic  challenges  and  best  practices  specific  to each classification of companies, there is also a fair degree of commonality across these generic business models. We, therefore, use a numbering system for the strategic challenges (thirteen in all) and best practices (twenty in all) that runs continuously across all generic business models. Another  observer  might  differ  with  our  placement  of  a  particular  strategic  challenge  and  best                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  58     
  • 59. practice  under  one  specific  business  model  and  not  the  other.  Readers  seeking  to  thoroughly understand the strategic challenges faced by Pakistani software industry are hence advised to read through all four descriptions and their respective strategic challenges and managerial best practices to get a better feel of the landscape as each contains some elements overlapping with others.  6.2—The Export Focused Local Firm (The “Systems” or “Netsol” Model) The  Export  Focused  Local  Firm  (defined  above)  is  the  most  prevalent  of  all  generic  business models in our sample of firms. As shown in Figure‐IX (above), it accounts of about a third (32%) or  15  of  the  47  firms  in  our  sample.  The  key  reason  for  the  high  degree  of  popularity  of  this model  is  the  Millennium  (Y2K)  and  DotCom  Boom  in  major  software  export  markets  of  the world,  especially  the  United  States,  that  resulted  in  lot  of  new  firm  creation  activity  in developing  countries,  like  India  and  Pakistan.  We  also  expect  that  an  even  greater  number  of software  houses  were  created  during  the  mid‐to‐late  1990s  in  response  to  the  expectations  of getting  lucrative  software  development  contracts  from  the  United  States—many  of  which ultimately  failed  after  the  US  market  for  software  went  into  a  recession  (starting  early  2001) which was further reinforced by the 9/11 Terrorists attacks in the US later that year (Sept. 2001).  To be fair, however, not all the firms in this model were created solely in response to the Y2K or the DotCom boom. Many were already in business when the Y2K or DotCom bubble happened and  were  only  influenced,  to  TEXT BOX # 3: THE SYSTEMS OR NETSOL MODEL, varying  extents,  by  the  bubble.  IN A NUTSHELL Systems  Pvt.  Ltd,  Netsol,  Autosoft  Total # of Companies in Category: 16Dynamics,  and  Sidaat  Hyder  Average Employment: 90Morshed  Associates  (SHMA)  are  #/% of Foreign Subsidiaries: 12.5%some  of  the  examples  of  companies  % w/ Front-Office Abroad: 31%that  preceded  the  DotCom  bubble.  Exports : Domestic Market: 85:15%Many others, (e.g. Avanza Solutions,  Product : Services Offerings: 28:72%ThreesixtyDegreez,  Kalsoft,  and  Average Sales Growth (last year): 48%Millennium  Software  etc.)  were  Average Employment Growth: 42%created at the height (or with a slight  #/% of Companies with ISO/CMM: 44%lag)  of  the  DotCom  bubble  with  Programmer-to-PM Ratio: 5.03 QA Employees as % of Employment: 9.5%plans  to  get  into  the  software  QA Function % of Payroll: 10.3%services  outsourcing  business.  For  Top-3 Policy Challenges: Image (43%), Quality ofmany of these companies, the reality  Manpower (31%), Venture Capital (31%)                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  59     
  • 60. turned  out  to  be  quite  different  from  the  expectations.  Several  others,  (e.g.  Post  Amazers, Secure3 Networks etc.) have jumped into the fray well after the DotCom Bubble burst and have business  plans  incorporating  the  changed  geo‐political  environment  at  home  and  business environment abroad.  We  have  named  this  generic  business  model  in  recognition  of  two  of  the  most  prominent companies in this category, namely, Systems Ltd—the oldest software operation in Pakistan—and  Netsol—a  CMM‐Level4  company  that  is  currently  perceived  to  be  one  of  the  most successful companies in this category. This naming convention is purely for memorization and reference purposes and does not aim to under‐emphasize the contributions of other companies mentioned  (and  those  not  mentioned)  in  this  category.  Text  Box  #  3  presents  some  salient statistics  on  organizational‐market  characteristics  of  companies  in  our  sample.  Text  Box  #  4 presents  a  list  of  companies  classified  in  this  generic  business  model  along  with  their  key product‐services offerings and domain expertise.  Regardless  of  the  exact  timeframe  at  which  these  companies  might  have  entered  the  market, their most important and defining feature is the local‐presence of their founders and the export‐orientation  of  their  products/ services. This combination brings a  TEXT BOX # 4: LIST OF COMPANIES IN SAMPLE &number  of  unique  and  important  THEIR DOMAIN EXPERTISE / OFFERINGS:   challenges  to  this  type  of  a  firm.  Netsol – Financial, Leasing SolutionsThese  are  illustrated  in  Text  Box  #  Systems Ltd.-- Mortgage, System Integration5.  The  most  important  of  these  Avanza Solutions—Banking, CRM, ATM Solutions Sidaat Hyder Morshed – Financials, ERP Solutionsproblems  have  to  do  with  the  Kalsoft – Financials-Accounting, ERP Solutionsdifficulty  in  marketing  abroad,  Millennium Software – Y2K, HR, ERP Solutionswith  or  without  a  marketing  Progressive – e-Commerce, CRM, Accountingpresence  in  the  company’s  foreign  Jinn Technologies – Multi-media, Animationmarkets.  Other  related  challenges,  Secure3Networks – VPN Security (Startup)arising  out  of  and  accentuated  by  GoNet –Call Center Automation, Healthcare Solutionsthe  distance/separation  between  Post Amazers – Animation & Post-Productionthe  development  and  marketing  Advanced Communications – VoIP Billingoperations,  include:  understanding  Autosoft Dynamics – Banking Automationand mastering a foreign customer’s  Makabu – Outsourced NPD / Software Developmentdomain,  dealing  with  the  “image”  ThreeSixtyDegreez – ERP, Banking Solutionsproblem,  penetrating  the  Indian monopoly  in  the  foreign  markets,  answering  the  “quality”  question,  etc.  We  discuss  each  of                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  60     
  • 61. these challenges in some detail (below) and identify best practices adopted by firms that have been relatively successful in addressing these.   Strategic  Challenge  #  1:  Difficulties  of  Customer  Acquisition  in  a  Foreign  Market—Of  the several  major  challenges  faced  by  this  class  of  companies,  the  most  important  one  has  been, beyond  doubt,  the  difficulties  of  the  customer  acquisition  process  in  a  foreign  market.  The relatively more successful of the companies in this category seemed to have done better on this count  more  so  by  design,  than  by  conscious  efforts  of  the  company’s  leadership.  There  are several exceptions, however. Majority of the better performing companies in this category were founded by returning expatriates i.e. individuals (or entrepreneurial teams) who either had 5‐10 years  of  experience  living  abroad  and  hence  had  connections  or  first‐hand  knowledge  of  the target markets.   Wherever  these  companies  were  founded  by  people  without  a  firsthand  experience  of  their target  markets,  we  have  generally  found  that  the  entrepreneurs’  expectations  had  been  rather “misplaced” or just too simplistic, especially on the customer acquisition front. Consequently, a fairly  common  regularity  among  the  not‐so‐good  performers  in  this  class  of  companies  is  the inability of their founders to correctly estimate the difficulty in marketing products/services to a foreign client. The DotCom euphoria and the then common perception that exporting software was the easiest of the businesses to get into and all one needed to do was to get a desktop PC and an internet connection may have encouraged a lot of naïve professionals to venture into this domain. The truth, however, was far from that simplistic.   Indeed, a connection or intimacy with the targeted market seems to have paid off quite well for atleast  some  of  the  ventures  in  this  category.  The  more  successful  of  these  businesses  have leveraged  the  foreign  networks  and  contacts  of  their  founders  to  get  a  “foot‐in‐the‐door”  or even,  at  times,  the  first  customer.  Most  of  our  interviewees  believed  that  their  first  foreign customer has almost always come through a prior contact or a trusted referral rather than cold‐calling,  advertising,  or  visiting  trade  conferences.  And  it  was  only  after  one  begins  working with  foreign  clients  and  developing  long‐term  trusted  relationships  and  a  customer  portfolio that  other  marketing  approaches  begin  to  work.  This  observation  is  also  in  line  with  our statistical  findings  where  an  overwhelming  majority  of  respondents  rate  pre‐established networks/contacts  as  far  more  successful  than  any  other  marketing  approach  (with  the  other two  highly  rated  approaches,  namely,  word‐of‐mouth  client  referrals  and  cold‐calling  only becoming  a  possibility  after  one  has  acquired  the  initial  few  contracts).  The  importance  of                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  61     
  • 62. networks  is  even  more  critical  in  some  very  high‐trust  and  exclusive  domains  like  banking solutions, online trading systems etc.  This  gives  rise  to  a  managerial  best  practice  for  creating  and  sustaining  successful  software operations in Pakistan. Namely:   Managerial Best Practice #1 (MBP1)— To develop effective export‐focused operations,  to  the  extent  possible,  seek  a  strong  expatriate  connection  (e.g.  a  founder  or  co‐founder  either  based  abroad  or  operating  equally  from  home  and  abroad)  and  use  his/her  personal  connections and networks to get a “foot‐in‐the‐door” or even acquire first customers.   Strategic  Challenge  #  2:  Setting  Up  a  Marketing  Operation  in  a  Foreign  Market—A  problem somewhat  related  to  acquiring  the  first  customer  is  scaling  up  the  marketing  operation  to handle a larger number of potential customers  and continually managing the interaction with them.  Companies,  understanding  the  limitations  of  an  interaction  at  a  distance,  have  tried  to setup  onshore  marketing  operations  to  achieve  greater  penetration  and  acceptability  in  their target  markets.  Opening  front‐offices  abroad  (especially  in  America)  has  thus  been  a  fairly common tactic for those who can afford such a proposition. Having a front‐office abroad is also seen  as  a  means  to  counter  the  negative  perception  of  having  to  deal  with  an  unknown  and never‐seen foreign outfit, especially in the highly skeptical post‐9/11 scenario.  Setting up a foreign marketing front office, however, is an expensive proposition, even for the relatively  better  endowed  software  operations  in  Pakistan.  The  general  consensus  among  our interviewees  was  that  a  very  small  (2‐3  person)  operation  can  cost  as  much  as  half  a  million dollars  a  year.  One  can  perhaps  defray  some  of  this  cost  by  finding  an  appropriate  Pakistani already settled abroad to do the job but such arrangements are sometimes perceived to be not as effective, from an image standpoint, as employing a bunch of “gora(s)” for the same job.   One  of  the  companies  that  we  surveyed  took  the  former  route  at  the  height  of  the  DotCom bubble by relocating one of its founders to North America, but saw its efforts going in vain as the  doors  of  opportunities  closed  soon  after  the  bubble  burst.  It  has  since  then  lowered  its expectations  from  its  foreign  operation  and  shifted  its  business  priorities  to  focus  on  the domestic market. This is not to say that this can’t be done, or has not been done successfully, but  only  that  opening a front  office  abroad  is  not  an  automatic  remedy  for  this  challenge  and that,  given  the  costs  involved,  must  be  undertaken  after  a  good  amount  of  due‐diligence  on possible  alternatives.  We  expect  the  larger  and  more  resourceful  of  the  companies  to  still continue  to  try  using  this  option—albeit  with  no  guarantees  of  success—but  the  smaller companies may have better more cost‐effective (or lower risk) alternatives to consider.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  62     
  • 63. One  such  alternative  is  the  use  of  alliances  and  marketing  partnerships  (arrangements)  with foreign  companies  whose  business  models  are  deemed  synergistic  with  the  Pakistani counterpart.  If  properly  undertaken,  there  is  tremendous  potential  in  this  kind  of  an arrangement,  and  we  recommend  that  more  companies  must  consider  this  as  one  of  the  few alternatives on the table. Pakistani companies have tried marketing alliances and partnerships, primarily in the context of Middle  Eastern markets where they are more of a necessity than a conscious  strategy.  We  must  look  at  the  possibility  of  doing  so  in  North  American  and European Markets as well. Atleast a few of the companies that we studied, had recently penned marketing  arrangements  with  foreign  affiliates  that  looked  quite  lucrative  and  promised  to greatly enhance the marketing reach of the Pakistani entity. Many others were actively seeking such an arrangement.   TEXT BOX # 5: KEY STRATEGIC CHALLENGES & MANAGERIAL BEST PRACTICES-I    Strategic Challenge # 1: Difficulties of the Customer Acquisition in a Foreign Market—There are many manifestations of this problem, namely, acquiring the first customer and building a customer portfolio etc. MBP1—Using personal connections and networks of expatriates (returning, or based abroad) to get a “foot-in-the-door” or even acquire first customers. Strategic Challenge # 2: Setting up a Foreign Market Presence—Companies seeking to develop and intimate connection with the customer have tried various approaches e.g. opening front offices abroad, pursuing partnership arrangements and alliances etc. MBP2—Actively pursue alliances with synergistic entities and off-shoring and marketing relationships with past clients MBP3—Engage with software multinationals (e.g. Microsoft, IBM, SAP, NCR, Oracle etc.) in development and marketing arrangements Strategic Challenge #3: Understanding Foreign Domains & Contexts—This problem arises in multiple contexts, namely, the idea-focused company and the generic provider of off-shoring services MBP4— Understand the importance of developing a domain expertise and maintaining a focus. Develop a domain expertise by learning to take the big-picture view of the client’s business operations and look for opportunities to sell business rather than a technology solution. Get domain experts involved, if need be. Avoid the temptation of “on-today-off- tomorrow” type of contracts. Other Challenges (discussed in detail elsewhere): The “image” problem, scaling the operation to deal with a larger customer base etc.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  63     
  • 64. Seeking the right partner and inking the right arrangement, however remains the key to success in this mode of operation. One of the founders—a very successful local brand—talked about a situation where a potential foreign partner wanted to sell the company’s product under its own name—a  prospect  that  did  not  look  too  appealing  to  the  Pakistani  founder.  Another  of  the founders that we spoke to justified the arrangement that he got into in the following words: “I made as many as 10 trips to the Middle East last year, and finally found a partner with whom I could do business with. Although these trips cost me a lot of time and money, I have recovered all my investment in a single year since my partner has allowed me to co‐locate and host my Middle Eastern operations in his own premises, free of cost.”   Another possibility is the use of one’s own clients to actively pursue offshoring and marketing arrangements.  One  of  the  software  houses  that  we  looked  at  prides  itself  for  caring  for  its customers.  “We  would  do  the  first  projects  at‐cost  or  even  below‐cost,  just  to  allow  the  customer  to assess  our usefulness  and dependability. Once  the project is done, we would definitely let the customer know what all we can do and express our interest in becoming a trusted partner for any outsourcing/off‐shoring work that they might want to send our way or if they would like to market our products in their region. Many a times you would find a satisfied customer willing to talk about such arrangements”, says the business development manager of this local operation.   Such  favorable  arrangements must  be  actively  sought  and,  when  possible,  definitely  pursued. The key problem here is that such arrangements do not enjoy the same kind of visibility, at the industry  level,  as  opening  up  a  front‐office  abroad,  and  thus  for  lack  of  awareness  or  fear  of misadventure,  many  entrepreneurs  fail  to  think  about  and/or  capitalize  on  them.  It  is  also important  to  focus  the  interactions  and  discussions  of  PSEB/PASHA’s  trade  delegations towards trying to facilitate Pakistani and foreign companies to work towards these kinds of an outcomes rather than merely trying to make a point‐sale.   Another  possible  way  to  forge  a  marketing  alliance  is  to  align  oneself  with  a  large  developer, namely,  likes  of  Microsoft,  Intel,  SAP,  Oracle,  NCR,  IBM  etc.  and  benefit  from  their  clout  and network in the regional and international markets. Many have tried to do this and a fair number of  our  interviewees  had  positive  things  to  say  about  these  arrangements.  Using  the  local subsidiaries of these big foreign brands— that have over the recent past become more active in supporting  the  development  of  the  local  software  industry  by  providing  development opportunities,  free  or  subsidized  training,  product  promotion,  and/or  co‐branding—  is  a starting point of such a strategy.                                            Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  64     
  • 65. One CEO shared an interesting insight with us in this regard, namely, to seek a direct affiliation with one of the divisions of these large corporations rather than the local subsidiaries. He was of the view that the local subsidiaries were really very small—in business size and importance—in the overall scheme of things and hence it was unlikely that anything “big” would come his way if he dealt with them. His approach was to “get‐a‐foot‐in‐the‐door” of a major division of one of these  companies  in  its  own  home‐country,  do  a  small  project,  and  gradually  build  upon  that relationship.  When  possible,  such  an  approach  can  bring  one’s  company  into  play  for  major contracts on the innovative end of the market. While we did not find enough companies doing this  successfully  enough  to  consider  it  a  managerial  best  practices  but  this  is  certainly  an approach innovative enough to warrant some careful attention.   Based  upon  their  widespread  use  among  relatively  successful  software  operations  and perceived successfulness, two clear managerial best practices emerge from the above.  Namely:   Managerial  Best  Practice  #2  (MBP2)—  Enter  into  partnering  agreements  and  marketing alliances with entities having synergistic goals and objectives, especially, when  the partner contributes market knowledge and reach of the target market to the relationship.  Imaginative partnering agreements, executed tactfully, can greatly diminish the difficulties  faced by a cash‐constrained startup attempting to break into a foreign market.   Managerial Best Practice #3 (MBP3)— Engage and partner, both locally and globally,  with  software/IT  multinationals  (e.g.  IBM,  SAP,  Microsoft,  Oracle,  Intel  etc.)  on  software/applications  development,  marketing,  and  co‐branding  opportunities.  These  arrangements allow a startup firm to leverage the financial resources, domain knowledge,  and marketing reach of these behemoths without spending comparable resources.   Strategic  Challenge  #  3:  Understanding  Foreign  Domains  and  Contexts—Another  major challenge has been that of first understanding ones’ customers’ domain and then developing a domain specialization that could provide the firm with its differentiation in a cutthroat foreign market. On this count as well, the record of this class of Pakistani companies has been mixed, at best.  While  some  star  performers  in  this  class  of  companies  have  done  fairly  well  at  quickly understanding  and  mastering  a  foreign  domain,  others  have  failed  to  so.  Some  of  the  most noteworthy  examples  of  the  more  successful  companies  in  this  class  are  Systems  Ltd.  and Netsol.  The  former  specializes  in  software  for  mortgage  industry  in  the  US  and  has  an  entire suite of products for that industry. The company’s expertise in this domain is such that six of the top‐10 US mortgage companies are on its clients’ list. The latter specializes in software for                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  65     
  • 66. the  leasing  industry.  One  of  its  star  clients  is  Daimler‐Chrysler  that  uses  Netsol’s  leasing software  to  manage  its  auto‐leasing  operation  in  several  countries  in  Asia  and  Pacific.  More recently,  however,  in  recognition  of  Netsol’s  expertise  in  this  domain,  Daimler‐Chrysler  has decided  to  deepen  its  commitment  to  Netsol  by  agreeing  to  use  its  software  for  the  entire Western Europe region.  Here, Pakistani companies have faced two types of issues, depending on the exact focus of their business.  One  the  one  hand  is  the  idea‐centric  company  that  is  trying  to  break  into  a  foreign market  of  a  particular  niche  and  suffers  from  the  typical  issues  of  trying  to  guess  what  the customer wants. In majority of the cases here, the firm already has a specific domain (expertise) in  mind  and  is  only  looking  to  fine‐tune  the  idea  to  make  the  sale  to  its  targeted  customers. Although daunting as it is, this is a relatively common challenge for all startups and hence easy relatively  straightforward.  The  only  complicating  factor  here  is  whether  and  how  much  does the “distance from the customer” make it more difficult for the firm to feel the customers’ pulse and  make  the  necessary  modifications  to  the  idea  to  make  the  sale.  The  founders’  prior experience with the domain is of tremendous help in dealing with the basic understanding and fine‐tuning of the domain, as has been the case with Autosoft Dynamics (in Banking solutions) and Post Amazers (in Animation & post‐production services).    On the other side of the spectrum is the service‐centric company that is formed with the explicit purpose to undertake contracts entailing outsourcing of programming or coding services. These types  of  operations  are  generally  conceived  as  “commodity”  operations  designed  to  make money  on the  differential  in  labor  rates  between  the  local  and  foreign markets.  While  there  is nothing inherently wrong with the above argument, the tightening and recession in the export markets (especially US/UK/EU) has stiffened the competition for such contracts as well. Domain expertise  has  thus  become  quite  important—almost  a  differentiator—in  what  is  in  the  post‐DotCom  era  a  commodity  market.  Increasingly,  US/EU  outsourcers  are  looking  for  firms experienced  in  doing  a  particular  type  of  outsourcing  work  (e.g.  in  hospital  management  or medical  systems,  financial  software  etc.)  rather  than  a  software  outsorucing  outfit  per  se. Consequently  these  types  of  businesses  have  also  found  it  necessary  to  develop  a  domain expertise  to  differentiate  themselves  in  the  marketplace.  That  differentiation  has  been  hard  to come by in an environment where firms have been taking whatever project they could get in an effort to survive. While some of these firms have been able to develop some domain expertise—although quite a weak one at that—the process has been rather slow and painful for many of those involved.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  66     
  • 67. For those that have done well in this category, the initial contracts or breakthroughs have been the  deciding  factor.  Examples  of  companies  like  Netsol  and  Systems  (cited  above)  are illustrative of this dynamic. Even for these firms, and others like these, it has taken quite a bit of insight and farsightedness on the part of the founders, to maintain their focus, make the best out of  what  they  got,  and  not  be  tempted  by  the  “on‐today‐off‐tomorrow”  type  of  opportunities. Some have done it better than others and many an entrepreneur have fumbled on the way. This underscores  the  importance  of  maintaining  ones  focus  and  having  a  solid  business  plan—an alterable  but  solid  business  pan—to  follow  as  one  navigates  through  this  critical  challenge. Many  naïve  entrepreneurs  have  been  found  off‐guard  in  this  respect.  Although  the development  of  domain  expertise  has  been  a  critical  differentiator  between  successful  and relatively unsuccessful companies, a caveat is in order. The CEO of one of the more successful software operations underscored the value of muddling through for a while before deciding on a  particular  domain  focus.  “It  is  difficult  to  imagine  if  we  had  survived  this  long  had  we  decided  to focus on a specific domain upfront. It is important not to force yourself into a tight corner by declining work  that  help  you  survive  in  a  tough  marketplace  and,  perhaps,  lets  you  experiment  with  several domains before you can pick your particular sweet spot. Domain is important but rushing into one too soon might be disastrous. You often only get once chance at getting it right.”    We  definitely  do  concur  with  this  executive.  Ultimately,  developing  a  successful  software operation  is  about  making  the  right  choices  at  the  right  time  and  developing  the  domain expertise  is  just  one  of  the  several  challenges  an  entrepreneurial  team  has  to  master.    Making these choices is clearly an art, not a science, that can only be learnt through experience. Every entrepreneurial  team  finds  itself  in  a  slightly  different  situation  from  every  other entrepreneurial  team  and  hence  there  is  no  generalizable  solution  to  the  problem.  What  is important,  however,  is  the  realization  that  developing  a  domain  expertise  is  important.  This gives  rise  to  another  managerial  best  practice  for  creating  and  sustaining  successful  software operations in Pakistan, namely:   Managerial  Best  Practice  #4  (MBP4)—Understand the importance of developing a domain expertise and maintaining a focus. Develop a domain expertise by learning to take the big-picture view of the client’s business operations and look for opportunities to sell business rather than a technology solution. Get domain experts involved, if need be. Avoid the temptation of “on-today-off-tomorrow” type of contracts.   In addition to the challenges at the market‐end of the business plan (already discussed above) these  companies  also  faced  several—if  not  equally  daunting—problems  at  home.  The  most important of these are hiring quality talent, training them on its specific tools and domains, and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  67     
  • 68. developing  the  flexibility  to  ramp‐up  or  scale‐down  the  operation  according  to  the  business conditions prevailing in the target markets. Each of these is a challenge in its own right, but not unique to the firms in this category of business models and we will discuss them in somewhat detail  in  other  contexts.  We  would,  however,  close  the  discussion  on  the  export‐focused  local firm  model  by  briefly  highlighting  the  importance  of  scale  and  scalability  in  the  context  of services‐oriented businesses in this category. Availability of quality human resources is one of the major issues confronting the local industry. Many CEOs confided with us that even if they had business in hand, it would be very difficult to scale up their operations by only as few as fifty(50) additional people within a short span of time. These difficulties in scalability might be affecting the services‐focused businesses much more than they would affect a product‐focused operation—thus providing food for thought for the industry leaders.    6.3—The Domestic Focused Local Firm (The “TPS” or “LMKR” Model) The  Domestic‐Focused  Local  Firm  (defined  above)  is  the  second  of  the  two  most  prevalent business models in the Pakistani software sector, comprising another third (36%) or 17 of the 47 companies surveyed for the purpose of this study. We have named this generic category after the most prominent of the companies in this class of business models, namely, TPS and LMKR. Transaction Processing Systems (or TPS) is software operation involved in financial transactions processing  systems  (e.g.  ATMs  etc.).  TPS—a  hybrid  software‐hardware  operation—has developed  and  maintained  the  country’s  largest  multi‐bank  ATM  system.  It  is  a  hybrid (software‐hardware)  operation.  LMKR,  on  the  other  hand,  touts  its  strength  from  its  GIS solutions, especially for the petroleum industry. It maintains the country’s only such system for the  Government  of  Pakistan.  LMKR—since  its  acquisition  by  a  US  company—is  focusing  on diversifying its offerings to become a full‐spectrum IT services company that is also looking to expand  its  export  offerings.  While  LMKR  has  adopted  a  typical  profile  of  a  domestic‐focused operation,  TPS  was  originally  conceived  as  an  export‐focused  company  but  quickly  found success  on  the  domestic  front.  As  before,  this  nomenclature  is  for  easy  memorization  and recognition  only  and  does  not  mean  to  undermine  the  success  of  other  companies  mentioned (and those not mentioned) in this category. Text Box # 56presents key statistical features of this generic class, as a whole. Text Box # 7 presents a list of companies, from our sample, that fall in this category of software business models.   As stated earlier, a fairly significant proportion of the companies in the domestic‐focused local firm category are there not as much by choice as due to circumstances. During our discussions with  CEOs  of  these  companies,  we  hardly  found  an  example  where  there  was  no  desire  to                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  68     
  • 69. engage in the export markets. The question was not one of whether or not one would export but rather  when  would  it  be  possible  and  cost‐effective  to  do.  A  large  number  of  the  companies identified in this category (see Text Box # 7) are already engaged in some kind of export activity or  are  contemplating  doing  so  in  the  future.  Many  of  these  and  several  others,  however,  are currently focusing on the local market and planning to make a gradual transition into the export domain. This approach to target‐market has its roots in the collective experience of the industry.   In  the  post‐DotCom  Bubble  scenario,  many  entrepreneurs  who  played  in  the  high‐stakes exports  game  and  totally  shifted  their  core  focus  to  greener  pastures  abroad  got  their  fingers burnt  as  result.  Consequently,  TEXT BOX # 6: THE TPS OR LMKR MODEL, IN Athere  is  a  growing  realization  NUTSHELL   that  a  permanent  and  steady  Total # of Companies in Category: 14stream  of  domestic  revenues,  if  Average Employment: 89only  to  sustain  operations  in  the  #/% of Foreign Subsidiaries: 28.5%bad  times,  is  important  for  the  % with Front-Office Abroad: 78%companies’  long‐term  viability.  Exports: Domestic Market: 32:68%Many  narrated  the  often‐cited  Product: Services Offerings: 35:65%example  of  Cressoft—one  of  Average Sales Growth (last year): 74%industry’s  icon  of  the  yester  Average Employment Growth: 29%years—as  one  that  left  its  #/% of Companies with ISO/CMM: 50%domestic  base  and  went  all  out  Programmer-to-PM Ratio: 7.89to  the  export  market  and  in  the  QA Employees as % of Employment: 14%process  was  all  but  eliminated.   QA Function % of Payroll: 15.6% Top-3 Policy Challenges: Image (64%), Govt.Learning  from  this  example,  not  Procurement (35%), Telecom cost (28%)only  are  many  new  export‐focused software operations now look inwards to establish a domestic presence before setting shop abroad but also many others, having adopted the “domestic first, export later” philosophy for  reasons  of  necessity  or  strategy,  are  focusing  on  strengthening  the  local  operation  as  an insurance against the fluctuations of the international software market.   Among the companies being established in this category, we see a much greater domain focus than  the  earlier  category  (discussed  above).  The  primary  reasons  for  this  is  that,  unlike  the exports segment, there is little or no lure of pure software programming/coding “services” on the  domestic  front.    Thus  everyone  must  be  in  the  business  to  solve  a  fairly  well‐defined problem or not be in the business at all. This has led to a much faster accumulation of domain knowledge  and  maturity  and  perhaps  to  some  degree  better  and  more  focused  business                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  69     
  • 70. strategies to start with in the first place. This does not, however, mean that this generic business model has been without its fair share of challenges and problems.  Strategic Challenge # 4: Operating in an Under‐Developed Domestic Market—Like the export‐focused local firm model, we see a herd mentality in the domestic‐focused local firm segment as well—albeit  one  of  a  different  kind.  TEXT BOX # 7: LIST OF COMPANIES IN SAMPLE &One  of  key  challenges  of  firms  THEIR DOMAIN EXPERTISE / OFFERINGS: trying  to  create  a  viable  software  ZRG – Call Center & Telephony Solutionsbusiness  on  the  domestic  front  has  TPS – Banking and Switching Solutionsbeen  that  of  avoiding  the  tendency  Lumensoft – ERP & Inventory Systemsto “reinvent the wheel”. Yet, from a  Yevolve – Software for Handhelds in Transport/SCMpractical  standpoint,  this  has  been a  2B Technologies – Call Center Solutionsstruggle  for  reasons  having  to  do  SI3 – System Integration & Back-Office Outsourcingwith the lower level of development  Softech Systems –Financial & Trading Systemsof  the  market  and  lack  of  demand  Genesis Solutions –ATMs, Info &Vending Kiosks Alchemy Technologies – Risk-Mgmt Solutionsfor  high‐end  innovative  products  AppXS – Financial & Trading Systemsetc.  It  is  difficult  to  conceive  of  the  Oratech – Oracle-based Applicationsdomestic‐focused  local  software  Askari Info Systems – ERP, Financials-Accountingfirm trying to develop a cutting edge  Acrologix – ERP, Archiving, foreign-language OCRproduct  when  the  level  of  Comcept – Communications Systemsautomation  in  the  local  industry  LMKR – Large DBs, GIS, Petrochemicals etc.makes  it  impossible  to  sell  such  a  CARE—Telecom Eqpt., ASICs, EDA Tools etc.product.  Taking  the  cue  from  the market’s level of development, and a perceived need for automation of industry and business houses,  a  large  number  of  software  companies  have  ventured  into  the  ERP  segment  of  the market—trying, in essence, to create the much touted “Poor Man’s ERP”. Some have succeeded but many more have failed in this endeavor.   The  problem  has  been  so  endemic  that  almost  every  medium‐to‐large  name  on  the  domestic software side has an ERP system, a general ledger application, a billing or an HR solution in its products showcase. Yet, very few of them have been able to successfully sell the same to even recover a fraction of their investment on its development. As one of our interviewees pointed out,  there  are  no  high  profile  success  stories  of  ERP  implementations  in  Pakistan.  An  even smaller  number  of  firms  have  really  been  able  to  use  this  products  showcase  in meeting  their stated objective of migrating to the export markets. Among those that have been able to do so,                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  70     
  • 71. Middle East has been the only possible export destination. Thus, the dream of “domestic first, export later” has remained unrealized so far in any big way. We would like to qualify the above observation  with  a  caveat,  however.  This  is  by  no  means  a  wholesale  rejection  of  business models or companies in the business to develop ERPs but merely a statement of fact about the way  things  have  worked  out  for  majority  of  those  who  ventured  along  this  road.  There  are exceptions,  however.  Algorithm  Consulting—a  company  engaged  in  developing  and implementing ERP systems for the textile industry—is one such example. What we are trying to emphasize here is something far subtle than an advice against venturing into creating an ERP.  We are essentially against having unrealistic expectations from ones venture. If one takes on the task  of  “creating  a  market”  one  must  realistically  gauge  the  resources  and  time‐horizons required to do so and plan accordingly.   There  are  many  reasons  for  the  lackluster  performance  of  the  domestic‐focused  software industry—not  all  of  them  are  of  their  own  doing.  The  general  lack  of  awareness  and development on the user/buyer side of the local software market is a well‐known fact. Several of our  interviewees  talked  about  the  difficulties  in  selling  to  local  industrialist  or  owner  of  a business  house—the  much‐maligned  “seth”,  so  to  speak.  One  of  our  interviewees  complained about the attitude of the seth in the following way: “the industrialist or the business house owner that we are dealing with would spend twice the amount of money on getting tiles for his office and ten‐times the amount of money on his car but when I quote him a price of half‐a‐million rupees for an ERP application that would save him at‐least as much money every year, he would sit on it, toss and turn, and never  come  around  to  saying  yes.”  This  seemingly  myopic  attitude  of  the  local  industrialist  or business  house  owner  is  a  common  feature  of  the  Pakistani  society—although  it  is  further accentuated in the context of the sale of an intangible product like software.    There  is,  however,  some  good  news  on  the  user‐side  of  the  equation.  The  next  generation  of industry and business leaders has taken, or is in the process of taking, control of the country’s business and industrial empires. This “progressive seth”—as one software CEO calls them—is the  son/daughter  of  the  seth  and  is  mostly  educated  abroad.  This  new  breed  of  business leadership,  many  believe,  is  much  more  aware  and  receptive  to  new  technologies  or  value‐enhancing modernization. In the coming years, the major challenge would be to bridge the gap between  the  “much  improved  and  business  savvy”  software  entrepreneur  and  the  “much improved and technology savvy” business leader.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  71     
  • 72. TEXT BOX # 8: KEY STRATEGIC CHALLENGES & MANAGERIAL BEST PRACTICES-II   Strategic Challenge # 4: Operating in an Under-developed Domestic Market —There are many manifestations, namely, the psychological price barrier, lack of user awareness, lack of business MBP5—Focus on the better-developed segments of the market. Understand the requirements and difficulties in “creating” a market single-handedly and plan accordingly. MBP6—Sell a business-solution, rather than a technology. Price innovatively. Strategic Challenge #5: Getting Access to Capital—Software industry in Pakistan greatly suffers from lack of capital at the venture initiation, expansion, and working capital stages: MBP7—Find a strategic first customer who is willing to fund (a part of) the startup and is “willing and patient” enough to transfer domain knowledge and let you experiment. MBP8—Use the financial clout, domain knowledge, and regional network of locally operative multi-nationals (MNCs) to fund startup. Strategic Challenge # 6: Have a Business Plan and a Strategic/Domain Focus—Many of the domestic focused software companies have been formed on a herd mentality rather than a clear focus: MBP9—Understand where you need help (e.g. management, marketing, institution- building, legal, accounting) and seek it. Remember: a minority stake in a larger (more successful) venture is worth more than majority stake in a smaller (less successful) one. Other Challenges (discussed in detail elsewhere): Migrating from a domestic to an exports company, developing trust in relationships, delivering quality products and services etc.  Some  part  of  the  blame  must  also  lie  with  the  software  entrepreneur  who  has  often  failed  to really  make  a  convincing  enough  “business  case”  for  the  modernization  of  the  industrial  and business houses. We asked several of out interviewees if they had ever tried to make an “ROI‐based”  case  for  implementation  of  ERP  or  automation  systems.  Did  they  ever  see  one  being made  in  the  industry?  Did  anybody  they  know  of  talk  about  flexible  pricing  strategies  (e.g. gain‐sharing etc.)? Did people consistently try to sell the solution of a business problem rather than  a  technology  with  a  fancy‐sounding  name?  We  did  not  get  a  lot  of  examples—and certainly  none  that  could  rise  to  a  level  of  prominence.  There  is  definitely  a  need  for  greater sophistication  in  the  way  technology  people  think  about  selling.  One  entrepreneur  that  we talked to—after having spent two long years struggling to get a break for his embedded systems company—acknowledged that he had thought that selling the technology once it is made won’t be such a big deal. He now believes that the marketing part is as much important to the success of a software company as the technology itself. This is a reality that has taken a lot of time to sink‐in with the predominantly technically trained Pakistan software entrepreneur.                                           Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  72     
  • 73. Another major inhibitor, besides the lack of awareness on the domestic front has been a lack of general  economic  growth  in  various  sectors  of  the  economy.  The  prime  example  of  how  this might  have  affected  the  fortune  of  the  local  software  firm  is  the  financial  and telecommunications sector. Since the DotCom Bubble burst and the 9/11, Banking/Finance and Telecommunication  sectors  are  the  only  ones  that  have  experienced  major  growth  in  the country’s  economy.  Manufacturing  and  industry  has  been  rather  depressed,  and  new investment  in  industrialization,  with  the  exception  of  some  in  textiles,  has  been  minimal. Consequently,  software  companies  associated  with  financial  and  telecom  sectors  have  done much better than the rest of the industry.   In  fact  there  is  a  fairly  strong  positive  correlation  between  revenue  growth  of  software companies and their involvement in financial or telecom industries and a negative correlation if they are involved in the ERP business. This, once again, is something beyond the control of the software industry alone—what to talk of a single resource constrained software firm. Many an entrepreneur has taken on the challenge of “creating” a demand for their products and services and seriously underestimated the difficulty in doing so. Most entrepreneurs that we talked to, especially  those  dealing  with  sub‐sectors  that  suffered  from  depressed  demand  for  software, believed  in  the  government’s  ability,  as  a  regulator  or  a  facilitator,  to  ”create”  demand  in  the depressed sectors of the economy as a means to jumpstart growth. We will address this issue in some detail in the public policy segment of this report.   The  above  discussions  provides  us  with  two  managerial  practices  adopted  by  the  relatively more successful companies and thus may be described as managerial best practices. These are:    Managerial Best Practice #5 (MBP5)— Building successful businesses is as much about “doing the unthinkable” as it is about identifying opportunities ready to be exploited and executing upon them. Focus on the untapped opportunities in the better-developed or fast- emerging segments of the market. When “creating a market”, understand the requirements and difficulties of doing so single-handedly and plan accordingly.   Managerial  Best  Practice  #6  (MBP6)— Sell a business-solution, rather than a technology. Look at your (potential) clients’ business processes and think of ways in which your product may make a difference to his/her bottom-line. Make an ROI-based argument for the sale and price innovatively.  Strategic Challenge # 5: Access to Risk, Working, and Expansion Capital—One critical issue for all software startups—but an acute one for the domestic‐focused local firms—is that of access to risk or even expansion capital. The software industry is especially disadvantaged in this respect                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  73     
  • 74. because of the structure and the nature of its business—namely, a major chunk of its assets are intangible (e.g. its employees, and software etc.) and hence difficult to valuate or even liquidate, if needed. This essentially closes the doors of traditional collateral‐based lending channels to the software industry.   The  alternative  approach,  namely,  risk/venture  capital  is  a  relatively  nascent  experiment  in Pakistan  and  would  take  sometime,  and  a  few  big  successes,  before  both  investors  and entrepreneurs  could  become  used  to  it  as  a  mainstream  financing  instrument  for  early  stage startups.  This  leaves  the  software  industry  with  very  few  alternative  sources  to  access  capital from.  In  the  days  prior  to  and  during  the  DotCom  Bubble,  one  channel  of  capital  sometimes accessible to software entrepreneurs was investment by large business houses. However, after the high‐profile failures of several of these ventures, namely, Cressoft, Atlas Software etc. that too has been severely restricted. While the reasons for these failures are still undocumented, the fact  remains  that  only  a  handful  of  business  houses  have  any  significant  investments  in IT/software operations today. The salient ones being Kalsoft and Askari Information Systems.   Founders’ equity (both cash and kind) and friends’ and family’s financial support have largely remained  as  the  key  vehicles  for  funding  of  domestic‐focused  software  ventures.  This  has sometimes, though not always, put a lot of entrepreneurs in a fairly tight situation. Many have abandoned product development activities midway, and still others have been forced to take on projects that have resulted in the dilution and loss of company’s focus. While on the hand, one can argue that restricted access to capital might have resulted in a natural selection of the best ideas  in  the  market,  stricter  financial  discipline  in  the  industry,  and  in  keeping  one  focused towards making money. On the other hand, however, there is a possibility that some (or quite a few)  promising  ideas  never  saw  the  light  of  the  day  primarily  because  of  the  entrepreneur’s inability to  sell it to a financier. This also makes prominent the “peoples and marketing skill” aspect of being a software entrepreneur—a trait that may not necessarily be in abundance in the Pakistani software entrepreneurs.   Consequently, the domestic‐focused software firms, especially those that have not had the good fortune to attract one of the few locally available sources of investment from business houses or venture capital, have either adopted a path of “organic growth” or have become unsustainable and  diversified  into  (unrelated)  areas.  Many  have  gone  out  of  business.  One  of  the  most common strategies, even for today’s product‐oriented businesses, has been to start as a projects‐based  company  and  gradually  move  your  way  towards  a  generic  product.  This  strategy  has worked  especially  well  in  places  where  the  final  product  has  been  innovative  enough  that  a                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  74     
  • 75. potential buyer was willing to pay for all or part of the product‐development and learning cost. Prominent examples can be cited from areas of banking automation (ATMs etc.) and financial trading systems etc. Here too, however, some companies have been able to transition well from a project to a products company while others have fumbled.   There  are  a  lot  of  technical  and  business  issues  involved  in  trying  to  do  this  right,  e.g.  the technicalities  of  creating  a  generic  product  platform  from  a  specific  project  (e.g. parameterization) and complexities of trying to guess the needs of a general audience from that of  a  specific  customer  etc.  The  key  challenge  and  the  differentiating  factor  between  those  that have  done  this  well  and  those  that  have  not,  is  the  ability  to  convince  an  “eager  and  patient” first customer who is willing to transfer critical domain knowledge and be the subject of some experimentation by the software company.   The  example  of  Softech  Systems  as  “best  practice”  case  is  worth  emphasizing  here.  While designing the online trading platform for a major brokerage house in the country, Softech was able  to  negotiate  a  non‐exclusivity  agreement  with  its  first  customer  that  allowed  Softech Systems to sell the later versions of the trading platform to other clients in exchange for some royalty,  free  upgrades,  and  a  subsidy  on  annual  maintenance  fees.  Needless  to  say  that  the arrangement  has  been  a  win‐win  situation  for  both  the  brokerage  house  and  the  software company—and  more  generally  for  the  Pakistani  industry  and  the  end‐consumer.  Many  other successful  companies  have  adopted  similar  approaches  and  have  succeeded  in  adding successful products in their portfolios.   Another  innovative  strategy  for  funding,  or  partially  off‐setting,  the  cost  of  product development  activity  in  a  resource‐constrained  environment  like  Pakistan’s,  is  the  intelligent use  of  MNCs.  Being  able  to  use  the  financial  wherewithal  of  Multinational  Corporations  (e.g. Financial institutions and Banks like ABN AMRO, Standard Chartered, and Citibank and others like Shell and P&G etc.) has been a fairly successful strategy for many companies, not only for product‐development  but  also  follow‐on  marketing.  The  example  of  Genesis  Solutions—a provider of ATMs and other financial transaction equipment—is a case in point.   The  foundation  of  Genesis  was  laid  when  a  multi‐national  bank,  having  ruled  out  the  ATM equipment available in the international market, approached its founder and asked if he could develop  something  specific  that  it  had  in  mind.  The  gentleman  signed  an  agreement  as  per which the bank provided some experimentation capital to develop a prototype, a major portion of the contract as advance, and an order of 20‐odd machines. Not only was this client himself                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  75     
  • 76. satisfied  with  the  product  delivered,  it  also  introduced  and  showcased  Genesis’  ATM equipment at its regional meetings in Dubai and opened up doors for Genesis’ subsequent foray into  the  Middle  Eastern  and  South  Asian  market.  Other  similar  stories  of  satisfied multinationals  leading  the  software  vendor  to  a  larger  regional  audience  are  not  very uncommon—thus making it a potentially useful strategy for software houses to look at.     Another common way, sometimes available, to get around the issue of finances is to use another parallel  operation—a  consulting  or  a  hardware  company—as  a  means  to  finance  the development  of  the  product.  This  is  essentially  a  variation  of  using  a  project‐based  business model  to  fund  product  development.  Depending  on  the  synergy  between  the  two  businesses, some companies have been able to do it more successfully than others. An example is Alchemy Technologies—a  company  spawned  out  of  Alchemy  Associates—an  actuarial  consulting  and training practice, that is launching a risk‐management software for fund managers of financial institutions. It is possible that Sidaat Hyder Morshed Associates also leveraged its established consulting practice in developing its fairly successful financials software.   We saw another interesting and ingenuous model of funding a start‐up at work at Lumensoft—a  Lahore‐based  ERP  company  that  was  incubated,  under  quite  generous  terms,  at  LUMS.  In addition to LUMS’ support, that gradually tapered off and forced the company to “graduate” to an off‐campus location in just over 2 years time, Lumensoft also used quite an ingenuous way of  distributing  the  firms’  ownership  among  several  partners—who  rotated  in  and  out  of  the firm during times when the operation was not sustainable or even worked elsewhere to pay for the subsistence salaries of other partners engaged in product development. “We had some people who  were  working  full‐time  in  the  company—the  working  partners—and  some  who  were  merely contributing  money  every  month  to  keep  the  operation  going—the  sleeping  or  capital  partners.  These were  working  professionals,  like  us,  who  were  putting  in  money  to  incubate  the  idea.”  is  how  one  of Lumensoft’s  founders  described  their  approach  of  sharing  and  diversifying  the  risks  and burdens of starting their new venture.  Managerial Best Practice #7 (MBP7)— Find a strategic first customer who is willing to fund (a part of) the startup and is “willing and patient” enough to transfer necessary domain expertise and let you experiment with it. Innovative non-exclusivity contracts that give you the right to productize a particular solution and sell it to other clients in exchange for a royalty to the strategic first customer can lead to “win-win” solutions for both parties. Managerial Best Practice #8 (MBP8)— Use the financial clout, domain knowledge, and regional network of locally operative multi-nationals (e.g. Financial institutions like ABN                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  76     
  • 77. AMRO, Citibank, Standard Chartered etc., FMCG companies like P&G and Nestle etc.) to fund startups. A satisfied MNC customer is not only a great addition to the customer portfolio but can also help with introductions to its regional network of associates, partners, and clients. Strategic Challenge # 6: Have a Business Plan and a Strategic/Domain Focus – While one can quote several examples of successful and unsuccessful ventures in the domestic‐market space, the  factor  that  is  inextricably  associated  with  the  success  of  a  domestic  venture  is  the opportunity  to  quickly  build  a  domain  and  ably  navigate  the  projects‐to‐products  transition. There are many companies who seem to have done that admirably well and, as a result, have created considerable value for their investors. Many have even been able to attract the interest of  large  foreign  companies  as  potential  acquisition  candidates.  One  of  the  examples  is  LMKR that  began  its  operations  as  a  domestic‐focused  outfit,  quickly  developed  a  strong  domain expertise, and was able to attract major investment by a foreign company.   Developing a domain expertise—or starting off with one already in place—has been one of the major issues confronting the Pakistani software entrepreneur. Majority of the companies were established  by  the  naïve  entrepreneur  in  the  hopes  of  attracting  good  foreign  business  or finding instant utility for his “technology”. (S)he did not worry much about the importance of having a domain to start with. Indeed, “if I can build it, they will buy it” seems to have been the mantra  of  industry’s  earlier  entrepreneurs.  Things  have  changed  a  bit  and  DotCom  Bubble burst has been instrumental in hastening the process. Domain expertise (or atleast the need to have  one)  is  gradually  emerging  in  the  industry  with  the  newer  ventures  are  much  more focused in terms of what they want to achieve than the earliest ones. The realization that there is no  free  lunch  in  exports  and  the  competition  for  commodity‐type  programming  and  coding operations  is  fairly  cutthroat  has  forced  the  IT  entrepreneurs—old  and  new—to  think  hard about  strategy,  domain  knowledge,  and  product‐or‐services  issues.  Needless  to  say,  however, that this process of learning has been gradual and sometimes painful for those involved.   The  local  entrepreneur  is  still  far  from  the  type  of  business  sophistication  you  would  expect from  his/her  American  or  even  Indian  counterpart.  Another  important  element  that  has  been lacking on the Pakistani scene is the teaming‐up of technical, business/management, marketing, and  domain  expertise  at  the  inception  of  ventures.  The  predominant  model  has  been  one  in which the IT professional starts a venture, and over time and through trial and error, acquires a domain expertise and learns how to run a successful business as well. We encountered several such entrepreneurs who had excellent technology under their belt but were seriously lacking in terms  of  their  ability  to  grow  their  organizations  and  thus  realize  the  full  potential  of  their                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  77     
  • 78. operations.    One  of  our  interviewees  prided  himself  in  the  fact  that  the  company  culture  in his/her  organization  is  such  that  the  CEO  is  involved  in  everything  from  product  design  and development  to  preparing  quotations  and  writing  responses  to  RFPs.  This  CEO  was  working 12‐hour days and hardly found time to get into the strategic mode of operation from the tactical mode  in  which  he  was  so  used  to  operating.  Needless  to  say,  however,  that  the  company, despite its tremendous potential, was operating in a day‐to‐day mode and suffered from serious deficit of strategic and forward thinking. The good thing about this case was that the CEO had realized that he needed help. He just did not know where to look for it.   Many a times, therefore, the software entrepreneur understands what (s)he lacks and is looking for help but may not find it. The reason being that the software industry does not yet feature as a  place  where  top‐quality  business  and  management  graduates  and  experienced  managers would  like  to  go  and  work.  That  would  not  happen  until  we  have  success  stories  of  software companies and the industry is seen as a place where people could find life‐time employment or a monetarily lucrative career. Again, help might be on the way in non‐traditional ways. A vast number  of  students  in  the  current  MBA  class  of  the  country’s  leading  business  school  have  a Bachelor  degree  in  computer  science.  Unable  to  find  jobs  abroad,  these  “discouraged”  young computer scientists/programmers have decided to call it a day and join the MBA bandwagon. They might, however, some day return to their first professions as business leaders, managers, marketers,  and  domain  experts.    When  that  happens,  it  would  be  a  welcome  sign  for  the country’s software industry.    Programs aimed at facilitating the blending and teaming‐up of business visionaries with those capable  of  executing  on  a  technical  concept  are  a  step  in  the  right  direction.  One  way  is  to develop the culture of multi‐disciplinary university education programs to help create networks of friendship and affiliation between professionals within technical and managerial (and other softer) disciplines. The often‐prevalent concept of uni‐disciplinary education (e.g. IT Institutes, Management  Institutes,  but  not  robust  multi‐disciplinary  universities)  may  be  contributing  to the stove‐piping of technical and managerial talent in the country.   LUMS is trying to make some inroads in this direction—by leveraging and blending its strong multi‐disciplinary  undergraduate  program  and  good  quality  graduate  programs  in  business and  computer  science.  Other  schools  maybe  following  suit.  Another  problem  is  more  cultural than  academic.  While  there  is  plenty  of  entrepreneurship  culture  among  the  trading  and business community in Pakistan, the relatively well‐educated middle and upper‐middle classes from  which  the  country’s  gets  most  of  its  software  professionals  feels  less  inclined  towards                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  78     
  • 79. entrepreneurship. Education seems to be making people more risk averse. One of the deans of a private sector university that we talked to believes that encouraging people to experiment with entrepreneurship during their student years is one way to inculcate this often‐lacking attribute among  our  more  educated  (“professional”)  classes.  “When  you  are  a  student,  your  risk‐return calculus is very different from that after graduation. Nobody expects you to be responsible and ‘get a job’ thus  giving  you  ample  opportunity  to  experiment  with  doing  something  on  your  own,  like  running  a business. This might be the best time to teach entrepreneurship”, he asserts.  Programs that facilitate such undertakings must be encouraged. LUMS’ support for on‐campus business incubation is, once again, a step in the right direction, and hence must be carefully looked at, evaluated, and replicated. Lumensoft is a fine example of the potential of such programs. The above discussion brings forth another managerial best practice in the Pakistani software industry, namely:  Managerial  Best  Practice  #9  (MBP9)  —  Understand where you need help (e.g. management, marketing, institution-building, legal, accounting) and seek it. Remember: a minority stake in a larger (more successful) venture is worth more than majority stake in a smaller (less successful) one. These  are  only  few  of  the  more  important  challenges  facing  a  domestic‐focused  software operation.  Others  might  include  migrating  from  a  domestic‐focused  operation  to  a  well‐diversified  or  even  export‐focused  one,  organizing  to  deliver  quality  software  products  and services,  and  institutionalizing  and  professionalizing  the  operation  etc.  We  will  not  delve deeper into each of these issues here as they are not unique to domestic‐focused operations only and hence have been largely covered in the discussion within other more relevant contexts. We would,  however,  highlight  the  importance  of  and  difficulties  and  pitfalls  in  migrating  from  a domestic‐focused to a well‐diversified or export‐focused operation.   This  is  an  inherently  difficult  undertaking—made  further  critical  by  the  sheer  number  of companies  trying  to  accomplish  it.  Yet,  we  do  not  have  many  success  stories  or  a  very  solid roadmap to help a company trying to make this transition. A vast number of Pakistani software companies that have made this transition have done so in the Middle Eastern or African regions where  the  local  domain  experience  is  much  more  readily  acceptable  than  the  far  better developed  North  American  or  Western  European  market.  There  is  an  urgent  need  for  the industry to identify success stories of “domestic first, export later” model, document them, and learn from the critical success factors responsible for such transitions.   In the final analysis, the domestic software scene is quite vibrant and has a lot of potential. It is only a matter of time, and the want of a few success stories, before the herd behavior of the local                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  79     
  • 80. market could be channelized to its own advantage. The much‐awaited automation of the local industry  will  arrive  one  day.  Some  sectors  may  lead  the  rest  of  the  industry  but  others  are bound  to  follow.  The  government  can  play  a  role  in  hastening  the  process  by  intelligent  and careful use of public policy. What is most needed is a shift in the attitudes and sophistication of the IT entrepreneurs, the business leaders and managers, the financiers, the industrialists, and the policymakers and government bureaucrats for everything to fall into place.   Trust  is  the  most  critical  ingredient  of  success  in  this  multi‐faceted  set  of  relationships.  We talked  to  a  number  of  entrepreneurs  who  seemed  to  be  uncomfortable  bringing  in  domain expertise, especially business managers, onboard for the fear of losing control of their venture. Sometimes,  their  fear  may  be  justified  but  many  a  times  it  is  not.  Public  policy  and  legal arrangements  that  strengthen  the  intellectual  property  environment  and  provides  essential safeguards  for  each  can  sometimes  help  in  creating  a  minimum  threshold  of  trust  among various  stakeholders  and  bring  them  to  the  table.  LMKR’s  Atif  R.  Khan—who  sold  majority stake of his venture to a foreign acquirer but still remains in‐charge—is a shinning example. “It is better to be a minority owner of a large (more successful) company than to be a majority owner of  a smaller (less successful) one.”   6.4—The Export‐Focused Foreign Firm (The “TechLogix” or “Etilize” Model) The  Export‐Focused  Foreign  Firm  (defined  above)  is  the  third  most  prevalent  of  the  generic business models, accounting for about a fifth (17‐20%) or 8 of the 47 companies in our sample. We have named this business model after two companies representing the variations within this generic  model.  Techlogix  is  a  well‐recognized  and  respected  name  in  the  Pakistani  software industry.  The  company  operates  in  the  customized  software  development  and  consulting services space and leverages its US ownership to bring business from North American/Western European markets to be executed upon in its development center in Lahore, Pakistan (and now Beijing). Other companies in our sample that operate on the same general principle as Techlogix are  Prosol,  Adamsoft,  and  Xavor  etc.  Etilize,  on  the  other  hand,  is  a  relatively  lesser‐known operation of about 200+ employees that represents the other type of export‐focused businesses, namely, those operating in the more innovative‐products space of the market. Other companies in our sample that operate in a fashion similar to Etilize are MixIT, Elixir, and Ultimus.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  80     
  • 81. With  its  clearly  international  orientation,  the  export‐focused  foreign  firm  model  is  also considered  one  of  the  more  lucrative  and  prestigious  of  the  four  business  models  in  our taxonomy.  The  canonical  form  of  TEXT BOX # 9: THE TECHLOGIX OR ETILIZEthis  business  model  comprises  a  MODEL, IN A NUTSHELL foreign  entity  (an  individual  or  a   firm,  generally  an  expatriate  Total # of Companies in Category: 7individual  or  an  expatriate‐owned  Average Employment: 77firm)  coming  up  with  the  general  % of Foreign Subsidiaries: 100%idea of the business, and for reasons  % with Front-Office Abroad: 100%of costs or patriotism or both, setting  Exports: Domestic Market: 98:2%up  a  company  with  a  front  office  in  Product: Services Offerings: 40:60%the  target  market  and  back‐office,  Average Sales Growth (last year): 82% Average Employment Growth: 28%generally  a  product  development  #/% of Companies with ISO/CMM: 57%facility,  in  Pakistan.  This  model  is  Programmer-to-PM Ratio: 10.44different  from  the  dedicated  QA Employees as % of Employment: 13.7%development center (to be discussed  QA Function % of Payroll: 12.67%next)  in  the  scope  and  nature  of  its  Top-3 Policy Challenges: Image (57%), ManpowerPakistan‐based  operations.  Unlike  Availability (42%), Telecom cost (42%)the  dedicated  development  center model, the Pakistan‐based operation of the export‐focused  foreign firm is a critical element of the basic business idea.   More  often  than  not,  the  value  proposition  of  this  class  of  firms  is  clearly  the  arbitrage  in  the labor‐market  of  IT  professionals.  Many  firms  were  established  for  precisely  this  purpose  and would not have been able to attract their start‐up capital or successfully execute their business models13 without the low‐cost offshore back‐office/development‐operation being an element in the business plan. Many of the firms in our sample were created at the height of the DotCom Bubble—or slightly lagging that. In fact, in the capital‐scarce post‐DotCom Era, many western (especially US‐based) investors have looked favorably on ventures that have demonstrated the commitment to keep product development costs at the minimum by shifting the back‐office or development  operations  offshore,  mostly  to  India,  Eastern  Europe,  or  republics  of  the  former Soviet Union.   13 Many industry experts have made that argument in the context of outsourcing of US IT work to Indian companies.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  81     
  • 82. Etilize Pvt. Ltd., for example, is a case in point. Etilize is a Karachi‐based, 200+ people company with  a  front‐office  in  Southern  California.  It  specializes  in  developing  catalogues  for  online retailers and has clients with worldwide name recognition, like Amazon, Best Buy etc. One of the  important  parts  of  Etilize’s  business  operations  is  the  development  and  maintenance  of product taxonomies and knowledge‐bases—a manpower intensive task that is the backbone of its business model but would have taken a whole lot of more capital to set up and run in the United  States.  Etilize’s  Karachi  operation  does  it  at  a  fraction  of  the  total  cost  thus  giving  the idea  a  chance  to  succeed.  The  result  is  a  win‐win  situation  for  both  the  local  and  the  foreign stakeholders  of  the  company.  Although  the  degree  of  dependence  on  “labor  arbitrage”  might vary across ventures, the basic theme runs across majority of the organizations in this class of business models.   As the name indicates, there are two defining  features  of  this  business  TEXT BOX #10: LIST OF COMPANIES IN SAMPLE &  THEIR DOMAINS EXPERTISE / OFFERINGS: model,  namely,  the  idea  is  largely   applicable  to  a  foreign  (target)  Etilize – Online & Smart Cataloguing, Knowledgemarket  and  the  key  proponents  of  Prosol—Lotus Notes, .Net Applicationsthe  idea  i.e.  the  founders  of  the  Adamsoft—Hospital & Patient Mgmt. Systemsventure  are  generally  based  abroad  Ultimus—Workflow Automation Systems(in  the  target  market  itself).  What  MixIT—Online Trading Systemsthis  means  is  that  majority  of  the  Techlogix—ERP, BP Automation, EI, DBcompanies  in  this  segment  of  Xavor—Enterprise Applications Integration, BPRgeneric  business  models  do  not  Elixir Technologies—Automation of Volume Printingsuffer  from  the  weaknesses  in domain expertise or pre‐launch due‐diligence that is endemic to some of the locally conceived ventures that were discussed in the context of export‐focused local firms. The foreign investor (or  entrepreneur)  is  assumed  to  be  much  more  business  savvy  than  their  local  counterpart. Since most of these companies also seek initial capital from and hope to go public in a far more intelligent market abroad, they also have the additional advantage of fairly quick and ruthless feedback on the basic idea. This is certainly true of the post‐DotCom Bubble Era than the height of the DotCom Bubble when, even in the more sophisticated markets of the west, a lot of money was  thrown  into  fairly  mediocre  business  ideas.  What  this  means  from  the  perspective  of  the Pakistani software industry is a greatly diminished possibility that a company would pursue a “not‐so‐good”  idea  because  of  the  lack  of  business  sophistication  of  a  naïve                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  82     
  • 83. entrepreneur/investor—a  factor  that  has  been  an  anathema  of  the  earlier  discussed  classes  of business models.   Another  possible  advantage  available  to  companies  in  this  class  of  generic  business  models, besides  a  better‐thought‐through  idea  and  a  more  business  savvy  and  aware  entrepreneur‐investor,  is  a  relatively  better  access  to  venture  and  expansion  capital.  An  overwhelming majority  of  companies  in  this  class  of  business  models  have  been  formed  either  with  foreign venture capital routed through the foreign parent or investment‐savings of expatriate founders. We  clearly  see  the  effect  of  this  enhanced  access  to  capital  on  the  product‐service  offerings  of companies in this segment. Majority of the companies in this segment, therefore, are product‐based,  to  start  with  and  thus  depend  on  the  creation  and  preservation  of  critical  intellectual property.  Majority  of  these  companies  have  also  been  able  to  fund  major  portions  of  their product‐development  efforts  internally.  This  is  in  sharp  to  the  companies  in  the  earlier  two business models that had to resort to project‐based funding for product development and thus run the risk of diluting the focus of the business. An additional positive factor for this class of companies  is  a  better  chance  of  attracting  an  exit  event—an  acquisition  by  a  larger  foreign company  or  an  IPO  on  a  foreign  stock  exchange—that  has  been  a  major  bottleneck  for  the domestic‐focused or even the export‐focused local company. These advantages aside, however, there are some significant—in fact daunting—challenges in successfully executing upon an idea in this space  Strategic  Challenge  #  7:  Dealing  with  the  “Image”  Problem—Of  the  several  challenges encountered  by  these  companies,  not  the  least  important  of  which  is  the  infamous  “image” problem  that  these  companies  have  to  face  in  the  foreign  markets.  Although  there  are  several dimensions  of  the  image  problem,  it  all  boils  down  to  one  single  bottom‐line.  Due  to  factors beyond  the  control  of  an  individual‐firm,  or  even  a  single  government,  the  western customer/investor  is  hesitant  in  doing  business  with  Pakistan  or  an  entity  with  significant presence in Pakistan. The most often‐quoted example is that of Align Technologies and the fate of its fairly  large operation in Lahore. The common industry folklore has it that Zia Chishti—Align’s CEO at the height of the US War in Afghanistan and Pakistan‐India tensions in 2000‐2—fell  out  with  its  Board  of  Directors  who  thought  that,  given  the  geo‐political  situation  in  the world  and  South  Asia  in  particular,  the  risk  of  war  in  the  subcontinent  was  far  too  much  for Align to bear and asked that the development center be moved to a safer location, like Taiwan or Mexico. Unable to make his case to his Board of Directors, Zia resigned in protest, and the Pakistan operations of the company were later wrapped and shifted elsewhere.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  83     
  • 84. While there is no point in denying either the seriousness of this challenge to companies in this class of business models or the need for a concerted government‐level effort at executing either a harm‐reduction strategy in the interim or putting together a proactive strategy for repairing of the  country’s  image  abroad  in  the  long‐run,  several  companies  that  we  looked  at  have countered this challenge in their own unique and innovative ways.  The  most  basic  approach,  that  is  partly  inherent  in  this  model,  is  to  work  with  a  front‐office abroad  and  under‐emphasize  the  Pakistan‐element  of  the  company’s  operations.  Many companies,  in  an  effort  to  under‐emphasize  Pakistan,  tend  to  use  the  term  “South  Asia”  as  a proxy for where some (or most) of their back‐office operations are carried out. While this may be  an  acceptable  approach  for  short‐to‐medium  term,  it  has  two  basic  flaws.  First,  that  the company  has  a  significant  linkage  with  Pakistan  cannot  be  permanently  hidden  from  key foreign  stakeholders,  as  amply  demonstrated  in  Align’s  example.  The  issue  then  becomes,  at what time would it be most appropriate to let the skeptical foreign stakeholders face the reality. Second, under‐emphasizing the Pakistan‐connection and not letting positive examples of doing business  in  Pakistan  become  a  part  of  the  industry  grapevine,  further  reinforces  the  negative perception  and  feeds  back  into  the  image  problem  itself.  Small  actions  like  these,  sometimes justifiable  from  an  individual  company’s  standpoint,  end  up  creating  a  bigger  collective problem for the entire industry.   Many  senior  executives  that  we  interviewed,  however,  also  emphasized  upon  the  fact  that sometimes “image indeed becomes the reality” and some effort and persuasion on their part has been fairly  effective in  nullifying the effects of the country’s misperceived image.  The CEO of one  of  the  largest  companies  in  Pakistan  that  has  incorporated  in  the  US  and  enlisted  on NASDAQ to nullify the image factor has this to say about his experiences: “We have never had a customer who has come to Pakistan (Lahore) and has not given business to us. Although it might take us a  while  to  convince  our  foreign  collaborators/customers  who  are  skeptical  of  the  law‐and‐order  and security situation in Pakistan and misperceive it to be an under‐development and tribal country, once we get  over  that  initial  bottleneck—  sometimes  through  gradual  persuasion  and  other  times  assurances  of security  etc.—  and  get  him/her  to  land  in  Lahore,  we’ve  almost  always  won  the  deal.  I  once  took  a potential customer, first to Mumbai and then brought him to Lahore. The contrast between the squalor and lack of infrastructure of Mumbai and the orderly and classy infrastructure of Lahore couldn’t have been more pronounced. Needless to say that his/her fears and perceptions were based more on hearsay and less on reality. That one trip to Lahore did the trick for us in winning over his business.”  Stories like these are not uncommon, highlighting towards a way to deal with the image problem.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  84     
  • 85. Another dimension of the image problem is the enhanced security needs of many countries and the  resulting  difficulties  in  obtaining  visas  for  Pakistan‐based  staff  to  travel  to  the  country  of their  customers.  Here  again,  many  companies  have  found  intelligent  workarounds,  e.g.  by ensuring  a  minimal  number  of  staff  that  have  valid  visas  to  the  country  of  destination  or  by hiring dual nationals or Pakistanis with long‐term valid visas of the target country. Many of our interviewees, however, believed that the government, through the Foreign Office, can and must play a positive part in facilitating business visas to software (and other) professionals.  This brings us to a couple of managerial best practices in dealing with this particular strategic challenge. These are:  Managerial Best Practice # 10 (MBP10)— Counter the “image problem” by incorporating  in foreign countries and opening development centers in “safer” locations (e.g. Dubai, China  etc.). Hire dual nationals or people with long‐term valid visas to get around visa restrictions.  Managerial  Best  Practice  #11  (MBP11)—  Do  not  let  the  image  become  the  reality.  Be  creative  and  innovative  about  projecting  Pakistan  as  a  responsible  country.  Persuade  your  customers and foreign partners to visit Pakistan and see for themselves.  Strategic  Challenge  #  8:  The  Geographical  Shifting  of  Labor  Arbitrage—Another  potential challenge  and  a  serious  one  at  that,  to  this  class  of  companies  is  the  shifting  of  the  labor arbitrage. For the very reason, apart of the patriotic leanings of the founder‐entrepreneur, that a back‐office/development‐center in Pakistan became an integral part of the company’s business‐plan,  it  can  also  become  a  liability.  The  case  in  point  is  the  geographical  shifting  of  the  labor‐arbitrage set in motion due to “over‐crowding” of the first‐generation of locations for offshore software development (e.g. India, Russia, Ireland etc.) and the coming of age of several second‐generation  locations  (e.g.  China,  Ukraine,  and  other  “less‐problematic”  countries).  Most recently, for example, the Indian tech‐towns of Bangalore, Mumbai, and Hyderabad have been marred with shortages of quality manpower and skyrocketing infrastructure costs thus forcing investors and Indian planners to seek other destinations in India and across the world.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  85     
  • 86. TEXT BOX # 11: KEY STRATEGIC CHALLENGES & MANAGERIAL BEST PRACTICES-III   Strategic Challenge # 7: Dealing with “Image” Problem—Foreign customers and partners are hesitant doing business in Pakistan or with an entity associated with Pakistan. MBP10—Counter the “image problem” by incorporating in foreign countries and opening development centers in “safer” locations (e.g. Dubai, China etc.). Hire dual nationals or people with long-term valid visas to get around visa restrictions. MBP11—Do not let the image become the reality. Be creative and innovative about projecting Pakistan as a responsible country. Persuade your customers and foreign partners to visit Pakistan and see for themselves. Strategic Challenge #8: Countering the Geographically Shifting “Labor Arbitrage”—For the very reasons an offshore operation in Pakistan became a possibility, it can turn into a liability: MBP12—Develop strong domain expertise to lock in customers, move towards value- addition to avoid being pressed by the pressures of the commodity business, or continually cut costs by automating your own processes. MBP13—The “second best” is better than none at all. Open alternate development centers in fast emerging new destinations (e.g. in Dubai, the Philippines, and China) Strategic Challenge # 9: Scaling Up the Pakistani Operation by Hiring Quality People—The dark-side of “cheap labor” i.e. shortage of quality professionals has emerged as a major challenge for software companies: MBP14—Counter the shortage of quality labor by hiring expatriate or returning Pakistanis. Hire people with the right attitude, not skill-set or coursework. Strategic Challenge # 10: Getting to Know the Land and Managing Expectations—Expatriates are at a disadvantage as far as knowledge of local business customs is concerned, they also come to Pakistan with expectations that belie the reality: MBP15—Know the land, its people and their customs and, to the extent possible, play by its rules. Make use of connections to get your way around. Make use of facilitation agencies e.g. PSEB. BOI, or PASHA where possible. Other Challenges (discussed in detail elsewhere): Setting up an operation in Pakistan, and managing the parent-subsidiary coordination etc. There  are  some  signs  of  this  trend  hitting  Pakistan’s  software  industry  in  the  not‐too‐distant future,  as  well.  If  that  happens  too  soon,  the  global  software  revolution  would  have  skipped Pakistan as a favored destination without assimilating it in any big and meaningful way. One potential  sign  and  also  a  way  to  encounter  such  an  event  is  the  recent  opening  of  the  Beijing office of Techlogix Inc.—one of Pakistan’s star performers in this model. Many other companies that  we  spoke  to  are  looking  at  possibilities  of  opening  development‐operations  in  Dubai,                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  86     
  • 87. Taiwan, the Philippines, or even Iran to counter this trend and some of the other long‐standing weaknesses (e.g. access to quality labor) in their Pakistani operations.   Apart  from  becoming  a  part  of  the  shifting  labor  arbitrage  and  capitalizing  on  it  (described above), there are several other ways of countering it as well. One such approach is to develop strong domain expertise that could be used as a lock‐in strategy by the software firm. Several companies have been successful in creating such dependencies among their clients and are thus successfully  countering  the  above  threat.  Another  approach  is  to  move  higher  up  the  value chain  from  providing  commodity‐type  software  development  services  to  more  expertise dependent  consulting  services  that  are  less  prone  to  regional  fluctuations.  Still  another approach  would  be  to  further  lower  the  cost  of  one’s  operations  through  automation  of  the labor‐intensive processes in the software development cycle. One company that we interviewed was developing its own process automation and speech recognition tools to further reduce the cost of its call center and BPO operation thus countering the possibility that its clients would be able to find cheaper alternatives elsewhere.   Regardless  of  what  ones  approach  is,  it  is  important  to  recognize  that  the  labor  arbitrage argument  cannot  last  forever  and  that  one  must  strategize  and  plan  for  it,  primarily  through innovation, cost‐reduction, and value‐addition, and thus remain competitive in the long run.   Managerial  Best  Practice  #  12  (MBP12)—  Develop strong domain expertise to lock in customers, move towards value-addition to avoid being pressed by the pressures of the commodity business, or continually cut costs by automating your own processes. Managerial Best Practice #13 (MBP13) — The “second best” is better than none at all. Open alternate development centers in fast emerging new destinations (e.g. in Dubai, the Philippines, and China. Strategic  Challenge  #  9:  Scaling  Up  the  Pakistani  Operation  by  Hiring  Quality  Manpower—One of the most important of our weaknesses, apart from general shifting of the labor arbitrage argument, is the difficulty of scaling up the operations i.e. adding/hiring quality technical and managerial  talent  in  Pakistan.  This  might  come  as  a  surprise  to  the  proponents  of  the  “cheap and  abundant  (software)  labor”  advantage  but  it  isn’t  a  surprise  for  the  executives  in  the Pakistani  software  industry.  While  there  emerged  some  conflicting  opinions  on  this  issue during  the  course  of  our  industry  interviews,  the  substantial  consensus  of  the  executives interviewed—and  amply  supported  by  statistical  findings  on  policy  and  environmental bottlenecks—seemed to be on viewing the labor market of software and related professionals as a weakness rather than a strength.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  87     
  • 88.  Majority  of  our  interviewees  seem  to  think  that  Pakistan’s  educational  infrastructure  is producing  a  large  number  of  software  professionals  that  are  seriously  deficient  in  important skills  and  capabilities.  A  large  number  of  these  CEOs  only  prefer  to  hire  from  the  top‐three institutes of the country, namely, FAST, LUMS, GIK and perhaps a few more. However, there were exceptions as well as a few companies emphasized the fact that it is the attitude (to learn and adjust) rather than the already acquired knowledge/expertise that they look for in a recent graduate which are sometimes equally likely to be found in second‐tier institutions as well. “No matter  what  you  teach  an  IT  graduate  in  school,  it  would  become  obsolete  in  a  matter  of  years,  if  not months.  Therefore,  what  we  need  to  emphasize  on,  and  create  in  our  students,  is  the  ability  and willingness to learn. That’s where attitude comes into the picture. We try to hire those who demonstrate the right attitude rather than an academic track record or a course here or there”, is how one executive described his company’s hiring philosophy.   In addition to the technical skills, there are other weaknesses in the typical Pakistani software professional.  Many  of  these  are  basic  (e.g.  communication  skills,  basic  critical  thinking, conceptualization and mathematical ability etc.) and soft (e.g. people skills) skills sometimes not emphasized  in  their  technical  programs.  Although  many  of  these  skill‐related  deficiencies  are applicable generally, these are further accentuated when a professional begins to work in a firm closely  linked  to  a  foreign  market.  “What  do  you  do  when  your  chief  software  architect  or  project manager cannot communicate properly with your client” asked a CEO of one company. This entry‐level  skills‐shortage  combined  with  an  equally  strong,  if  not  more,  deficiency  in  project management  expertise  has  led  many  of  these  companies  to  seek  and  relocate  people  with requisite project management experience from abroad.   “It  is  very  difficult  to  find  people  with  2‐5  years  of  work  experience  in  the  local  market  and  almost impossible  to  find  those  who  have  and  can  manage  large  projects  as  well”,  is  the  way  one  industry executive describes the HR‐situation. Many blame the lack of large projects in the local market itself  as  contributing  to  the  situation.  Brain  drain  to  the  foreign  (especially  the  US)  markets  is another  important  factor  in  this  equation.  Others  believe  the  development  practices  of  the software industry are to be blamed for the quagmire as even those companies that did get large projects  from  foreign  clients  and  successfully  executed  upon  them  have,  with  an  exception  of the few, not been able to produce good quality project managers for the industry. “You cannot hope to train a lot of project managers if you end up following a haphazard process over a large period of time over and over again”, asserted one executive that we spoke to. Regardless of what ones exact stated position is on this issue, there are no two ways of emphasizing the need for developing                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  88     
  • 89. quality  software  professionals  with  both  technical  and  soft  skills  in  large  enough  numbers  to really play the “labor arbitrage” card in a highly competitive international labor market. One of the solutions (emphasized above), namely, opening up development centers in other labor‐rich locations (e.g. Dubai or China) might also lessen the impact of labor shortages in the short‐to‐medium term and give the country’s educational infrastructure the long lead time it might need to begin producing quality software labor in adequate numbers. Until that is done, however, the following qualifies as a managerial best practice:  Managerial Best Practice #14 (MBP14)— Counter the shortage of quality labor by hiring expatriate or returning Pakistanis. Hire people with the right attitude, not skill-set or coursework. Strategic  Challenge  #  10:  Getting  to  Know  the  Land  and  Managing  Expectations—Another important challenge for companies in this space is that of setting up shop in Pakistan with the right  set  of  expectations  and  parent‐subsidiary  relationships.  This  is  critical,  not  only  at  the start‐up phase, but also for continued sustainability and the health of the entity. We will discuss the dynamics and challenge of the parent subsidiary relationship in more detail later, but would like  to  address  the  issue  of  getting  to  know  the  land  and  managing  expectations  here.  This  is one area where the foreign founder‐entrepreneur might be at a comparative disadvantage and need some help from the local software community and supporting institutions (e.g. PSEB, BOI, PASHA etc.) There is some evidence that many efforts of foreign entrepreneurs/professionals to translate  their  desire  to  work  with  a  Pakistani  company  or  create  one  in  Pakistan  are  riddled with  difficulties  having  to  do  with  their  lack  of  understanding  of  the  local  market  and  the norms  of  doing  business  in  Pakistan.  Many  enthusiastic  entrepreneurs  have  come  to  Pakistan with  high  expectations  and  gone  back  disappointed  when  they  do  not  find  a  receptive  local partner  or  found  one  that  is  deceptive  in  his/her  dealings.  Those  who  are  shrewd  enough  to understand the local customs and rules and hence come with the right set of expectations or are willing to tough it out manage to do better than others.   At the Pakistan‐side of the equation, there is a need to manage these expectations through a mix of better information and facilitation. Government entities, like PSEB, can definitely play a role in  this  regard.  One  of  the  companies  that  we  surveyed,  narrated  an  incident  where  the  local PTCL exchange would not set up a leased Internet line at its facility without the payment of a bribe  to  the  linesman—a  situation  that  was  only  resolved  after  the  direct  involvement  of  the PSEB. We need to be doing a better job than allowing the linesman of a telephone exchange to pull  the  plug  on  a  potential  foreign  investment  opportunity  in  this  country.  This  incident  is                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  89     
  • 90. somewhat  indicative  of  the  situation  generally  true  for  a  host  of  other  support  agencies  and must be addressed in a resolute manner and at the very earliest.   At  the  other  side  of  the  expectations  management  issue  as  well,  a  lot  can  be  said  and  learnt about how to (and how not to) structure the parent—subsidiary relationship. Again there is a need  here  for  better  awareness—not  only  on  the  part  of  the  expatriate  founder‐entrepreneur‐investor  but  also  on  the  part  of  the  local  team—of  how  to  do  this  right  in  the  first  place. Experience  has  shown  that  the  right  set  of  expectations  and  well‐structured  institutional arrangements  lead  to  better  managed  interactions  and  breed  more  trust  while  the  converse leads to mistrust and frictions between the two organizational entities. This is certainly an area where the local professional and the foreign entrepreneur are both gradually learning over time.   Structuring  an  appropriate  relationship  and  expectations  (e.g.  distribution  of  financial resources,  reporting  relationships,  incentives  structures,  possibilities  of  wealth  transfer  and expansion,  the  rights  of  the  subsidiary  to  seek  alternate  clients  other  than  the  parent,  and avenues  to  contribute  in  the  parent’s  global  strategy  etc.)  that  could  last  the  test  of  time  is certainly an area worth all careful attention that one can give.  Ironically, it is not an area that gets as much importance at the time of inception as it deserves and thus may become, over time, a  cause  of  friction  in  the  parent‐subsidiary  relationship.  In  fact,  there  are  signs  that  some  fast maturing ventures might be suffering from these frictions today (we will discuss this in the next sub‐section).  There  is  a  need  for  the  industry  to  learn  from  its  own  past  (e.g.  adopting  the practices  from  the  well‐managed  relationships  and  avoiding  ones  from  those  gone  sour)  and build upon it to do better in the future.   Managerial  Best  Practice  #15  (MBP15)—  Know the land, its people and their customs and, to the extent possible, play by its rules. Make use of connections to get your way around. Make use of facilitation agencies e.g. PSEB. BOI, or PASHA where possible. 6.5—The Dedicated Development Center (The “ITIM Assoc.” or “Clickmarks” Model) The  Dedicated  Development  Center  Model  is  the  fourth  and  final  of  the  class  of  generic software business models, accounting for 7 of the 47 (or 15%) of the organizations surveyed for the  purpose  of  this  study.  This  is essentially  a “limited  version”  of  the export‐focused  foreign firm  model.  We  have  named  this  model  after  two  relatively  well‐known—though  slightly different—companies  in  this  class  of  business  models.  ITIM  Associates  is  a  10‐year  old,  well‐established,  dedicated  development  center  of  a  UK‐based  conglomerate.  It  provides  software development  services  to  various  divisions/sister‐companies  of  that  conglomerate  or  for  third                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  90     
  • 91. party clients through the conglomerate. It cannot, however, seek or undertake additional client work  on  its  own.  Clickmarks,  on  TEXT BOX # 12: THE “ITIM ASSOCIATES” ORthe  other  hand,  is  a  dedicated  “CLICKMARKS” MODEL, IN A NUTSHELL  development center of a US‐based   company  established  purely  for  Total # of Companies in Category: 7the  reasons  of  benefiting  from  the  Average Employment: 42differential  in  the  labor  rates  % of Foreign Subsidiaries: 71%between  Pakistan  and  the  US  % with Front-Office Abroad: 57%market.  These  organizations  differ  Exports : Domestic Market: 98:2%in terms of the nature and scope of  Product : Services Offerings: 33:67%their relationship with their parent  Average Sales Growth (last year): 17%entities—a fact that we would take  Average Employment Growth: 6%up  shortly.  Text  Box  #  12  presents  % of Companies with ISO/CMM: 42%some  summary  statistics  on  the  Programmer-to-PM Ratio: 6.12 QA Employees as % of Employment: 22%dedicated  development  centers  in  QA Function % of Payroll: 20%our  sample.  Text  Box  #  13  Top-3 Policy Challenges: Image (71%), Manpowerenumerates  these  companies  and  Availability (43%), Venture Capital (43%)identifies  their  domain  expertise and product‐services offerings.   That the dedicated development center is a variation of export‐focused foreign (expatriate) firm necessitates  that  many  of  the  same  challenges  and  bottlenecks  affect  firms  in  this  business model  as  well14.  However,  as  we  noted  elsewhere  in  this  report,  the  dedicated  development center is different from the export‐focused foreign firm in several significant ways arising out of the very limited nature and scope of its relationship with the foreign parent. These differences give  rise  to  several  unique  challenges  or  may  accentuate  some  of  the  challenges  discussed above. In the following discussion, we will briefly highlight the similarities and differences in challenges in making this model work better and discuss the new ones in more detail.    Majority of the companies in this business model segment have a similar value‐proposition (i.e. labor arbitrage) and motivation (part‐economics, part‐patriotic and associational) for setting up their  development  center  in  Pakistan.  One  of  the  CEOs,  whose  company  recently  moved  its development  center  to  Pakistan,  justified  the  economic  case  for  the  move  in  the  following words: “Once the initial one‐time set‐up investment has been made, it costs me $8,500 per month to run 14 To that effect, we recommend that this section be read in conjunction with the earlier section on the Export-Focused Foreign Firm.                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  91     
  • 92. my 21‐person development operation in Pakistan. In that kind of money, I could only hire one‐software professional at my Silicon Valley office. When you decide to relocate to Pakistan, that’s the sort of labor‐savings you are looking at”. Another businessman who moved his development center from Los Angeles  to Karachi  proudly  claimed  that  his  Karachi  set‐up  was  delivering  the sort  of  quality that  is  equal  to,  if  not  better  TEXT BOX # 13: LIST OF COMPANIES IN SAMPLE &than,  his  Southern  California  THEIR DOMAINS EXPERTISE / OFFERINGS: operation.  Encouraged  by  the    ITIM Associates—Retail (ePos) and Travel Mgmtquality  of  work  that  can  be  MetaApps—Offshore Software Developmentdelivered  by  the  operations  in  Clickmarks—Mobility Products for PortalsPakistan,  many  of  these  Enabling Technologies—Video over IP Solutionscompanies  have  even  moved  Trivor Systems—Engineering Graphics, Gamingtheir  high‐end  product  design  Strategic Systems Int’l—Supply Chain Optimizationand  product  enhancement  ESP Global—Banking-Financials, ERP, e-Commerce,work  to  Pakistan.  Many  of these set‐ups are able to attract the best talent from the market—by paying premium wages or simply  due  to  the  lure  of  moving  abroad—provide  them  with  a  good  working  environment, and  still  show  respectable  savings  for  their  foreign  parents.  Setting  up  a  quality  development center  operation,  however,  is  not  as  easy  as  it  seems.  There  are  important  challenges  to  the returning expatriate who is often not very well aware of the local business and social norms. We discuss these strategic challenges in detail.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  92     
  • 93. TEXT BOX # 14: KEY STRATEGIC CHALLENGES & MANAGERIAL BEST PRACTICES‐IV   Strategic Challenge # 11: Setting Up a Development Center In Pakistan—Several factors play a role, namely, making a case to the foreign management, doing a preliminary assessment of potential, hiring talent from the local market, planning for disruption etc. Sometimes, it is said, successfully setting up in Pakistan requires a certain kind of “perseverance” by the entrepreneur: MBP16—Do a detailed analysis of the local scene, including one or more visits to Pakistan. Use contacts and references as much as you can, in setting up and hiring. MBP17—Smoothen the transition by temporarily relocating a senior member of the technical staff to Pakistan. Ensure frequent interaction, including face-to-face interaction, between the Pakistan-based and foreign employees of the company, atleast in the initial days of the operation, to facilitate transmission of corporate culture and tacit knowledge. Strategic Challenge #12: Building a Quality Software Development Operation—The issue of technical and process quality comes up in multiple contexts, namely, certifications and delivery capability: MBP18—Understand the “hidden” value of quality. Build it in the processes and culture from day-one. Never take a “short-cut” to process quality—an action done for wrong reasons is worse than one not done at all. MBP19—Get a certification only if you need to but develop quality processes because you have to. Make certification a means to an end, rather than an end in itself. Think hard about process and methodology, don’t follow blindly. Strategic Challenge #13: Managing the Parent-Subsidiary Relationship—As the development center matures, it takes a life of its own, giving rise to possibilities of serious (mis)alignment in the objectives and interests of the parent and the subsidiary. MBP20—Clearly define the scope and nature of the parent-subsidiary relationship in the founding agreement. Provide a mechanism for the subsidiary to have a say in parent’s strategic direction. Other Challenges (discussed in detail elsewhere): Hiring and training the local workforce and integrating them in the parent’s culture, dealing with the image problem, countering the shifting “labor arbitrage” argument etc. Strategic  Challenge  #  11:  Setting  Up  a  Local  Development  Center  Operation—There  is  a common approach to setting up a development center in Pakistan. The process generally starts with a perceived need, by the parent’s top‐management, for setting up such a facility. The idea may also be floated by a champion—generally an expatriate Pakistani—who does some initial homework  before  presenting  it  to  the  parent’s  management  committee  and  directors.  This  is followed  by  detailed  homework  on  the  Pakistani  software  scene  with  special  emphasis  on infrastructure  availability  and  costs  and  the  human  resource  situation.  At  some  point  in  time,                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  93     
  • 94. the  informal  consultation  (i.e.  asking  friends  and  contacts)  may  also  lead  into  a  more  formal study (e.g. a couple of visits to and meetings with key stakeholders in Pakistan).   Once  the  top‐management  of  the  parent  becomes  comfortable  with  the  idea  and  is  willing  to seriously  consider  the  alternative,  a  concurrent  search  for  legal  arrangements,  office‐location, and a local head of operations is undertaken. Only after acceptable progress has been made on each  of  these  fronts  is  the  decision  made  to  actually  begin  undertaking  some  of  the  more engaging  parts  of  the  TEXT BOX # 15: SPECIMEN STEPS AND TIMELINE FORmove. These might include  SETTING UP A DEVELOPMENT CENTER IN PAKISTAN   formal  incorporation  of  a  June-July 2003: The idea champion started playing with thesubsidiary  in  Pakistan  or  idea of setting up an offshore development center to serve anrequisite approval from the  already established US-based company.Board of Investment, hiring  December 2003: (S)he visited Pakistan, informally, to look atand  training  of  head  of  the HR/talent-situation in the country. Wanted to get a feel of what is possible by understanding the level of sophistication ofoperations  and  the  initial  the local IT-graduates. Went back to the US quite satisfiedstaff,  and  the  preparation  (visit time: 5 weeks, part-private)of  the  foreign  parent’s  March 2004: Convinced the CEO of the company (anexisting staff and processes  expatriate who had never been to Pakistan) to come down andto  undergo  the  disruption  look at the labor market/other factors himself and to getassociated  with  the  move.  comfortable with its potential (visit time: 1.5 weeks) May-June 2004: Started to recruit for the company byThe  process  may  take  advertising in the newspapers. Hired a corporate lawyer toanything from 6‐12 months  incorporate the company as a Private Ltd. Co (4-weeks). Searchdepending upon the extent  for office-space began simultaneously with the help of a localof  operations  being  moved  friend (visit time: 6 weeks)and  its  agreed  upon  pace  July 2004: Moved from States and began operations. Issued appointment letters to employees. and effective July-1 peopleor urgency.    began working from home. Moved in a renovated residentialText  Box  #  15  describes  building on Sept. 2004.typical  steps,  along  with  September 2004: First day in the new office building.timelines,  that  one  of  the companies we surveyed undertook in the beginning of this year to complete the process in just under a 9‐month period (from first visit to Pakistan to the inauguration of its office). The idea champion,  not  initially  planning  to  re‐locate  to  Pakistan,  started  off  his/her  quest  with  just  a faint idea of what (s)he wanted to do and little or no knowledge of the local land. The CEO to whom (s)he was hoping to sell the concept, again an expatriate, had never been to Pakistan and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  94     
  • 95. was even more skeptical of whether an arrangement like the one being proposed could actually work.  During  the  informal  survey  of  the  local  labor‐market,  it  became  apparent  to  the  idea‐champion  that  while  the  market  was  brimming  with  talented  young  minds,  project management and middle‐management skills were in short supply. “We came to a realization that you  would  literally  have  to  bring  middle  management  from  abroad  in  order  to  develop  a  successful operation  in  Pakistan”.  This  conviction  grew  as  the  idea‐champion  spent  time  looking  for management talent and ultimately morphed into his/her own decision to temporarily re‐locate to Pakistan.   Putting  together  an  initial  team  was  again  a  challenging  task.  Friends  and  acquaintances warned the idea‐champion of considerable noise in the local labor‐market. “We were working on an  assumption  that  finding  and  hiring  one  good  person  per  month  would  be  a  good  target,  and  not  to expect  any  more  than  that”.  However,  an  innovative  strategy  paid‐off  as  the  idea‐champion teamed up with some professors of a reputed computer science school who recommended some of their brighter students and even convinced a few to join the company. The team was thus put together  in  a  much  better‐than‐expected  period  of  time.  Another  factor  that  has  often  been associated  with  improving  the  possibility  of  hiring  good  talent  is  the  emphasis  paid  on advertising.  Bigger  and  more  prominent  advertising  space  is  more  likely  to  capture  the attention  of  potential  employees  than  small  advertisements.  Many  executives  we  spoke  with viewed  this  additional  investment  in  advertising  space  as  something  that  ultimately  pays  off handsomely  in  terms  of  better  access  to  talent  for  the  company.  Finding  appropriate  office‐space, putting the IT/Telecom infrastructure (read as “Bandwidth”) in place, and incorporating the legal entity were other significant steps—but none of them seemed to turn out to be as bad as a skeptic would like you to believe. The team was ready to work in 6‐months and moved to an office location in 9‐months from start to finish.   This  is  a  fairly  typical  story  of  the  experience  of  setting  up  a  development  center  in  Pakistan. Several factors, that may appear as minor at first sight, play a significant role in improving the possibility  of  navigating  this  tricky  process  in  a  successful  manner.  These  are  encapsulated  in the two managerial best practices below:  Managerial  Best  Practice  #16  (MBP16)—  Do a detailed analysis of the local scene, including one or more visits to Pakistan. Use contacts and references as much as you can, in setting up shop and hiring talent for the same.  Managerial  Best  Practice  #17  (MBP17)—  Smoothen the transition by temporarily relocating a senior member of the technical staff to Pakistan. Ensure frequent interaction,                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  95     
  • 96. including face-to-face interaction, between the Pakistan-based and foreign employees of the company, atleast in the initial days of the operation, to facilitate transmission of corporate culture and tacit knowledge. Strategic Challenge # 12: Building a Quality Software Development Operation—As discussed elsewhere,  the  issue  of  technical  and  process  quality  arises  in  atleast  a  couple  of  contexts, namely,  the  propensity  to  seek  a  certification  and  the  ability  to  deliver  a  quality  product  or service  per  se,  with  or  without  a  certification  to  show  for  it.  That  companies  use  quality certifications, primarily ISO9000 but increasingly CMM, as a means of signaling the quality of their  processes  is  a  well‐established  fact  in  literature  (Arora  and  Asundi,  1999).  Indian companies have been, by far, the most sophisticated users of quality certification with over half of the total worldwide CMM‐Level5 certifications going to Indian companies alone. In Pakistan too,  this  has  had  a  ripple  effect,  with  an  increasing  number  of  Pakistani  companies  trying  to acquire a quality certification. NCR’s Teradata Division recently announced itself to be the first CMM‐Level5 company in Pakistan. Netsol is widely believed to be at CMM‐Level4 and Kalsoft claims to be at CMM‐Level3. Taking the widely perceived CMM‐ISO equivalence standards into account,  another  30‐40  companies  may  be  assessed  as  CMM‐Level2  compliant.    The  cost  of certification has thus far been a major, although as we will argue, not the only prohibitive factor in  an  even  larger  number  of  companies  acquiring  a  CMM  certification.  Consequently,  the government,  through  PSEB,  has  stepped  in  to  subsidize  first  the  ISO9000  and  now  CMM certification of a fairly respectable number of software companies.   To  be  fair,  the  importance  of  quality  certification,  where  it  makes  sense,  cannot  be  denied.  There  are,  however,  clear  indications  in  our  sample  of  various  types  of  companies  showing different  propensities  to  seek  a  quality  certification.  For  example,  companies  in  the  exports  of services,  especially  hybrids,  are  most  likely  to  seek  a  quality  certification.  Alternatively, product‐focused  companies  are  least  likely  to  seek  one—probably  because  the  track  record  of their products serves as an ample signaling mechanism. One of the often‐cited and very visible examples  is  that  of  Microsoft—a  company  that  is  not  CMM  certified  nor  does  it  plans  to  be. Microsoft’s  example  is  also  relevant  here  from  another  standpoint.  When  operating  at  the cutting‐edge of innovative products, “good enough” quality maybe acceptable to the customer (Cusumano,  1995).  We  found  some  evidence  of  that  within  the  Pakistani  market.  One  of  the CEOs  that  we  spoke  to,  whose  company  specialized  in  cutting‐edge  VoIP  billing  solutions, asserted  that  in  his  particular  product  segment,  the  underlying  technology  or  the  business solution  being  offered  is  so  innovative  that  he  can  afford  to  ship  a  product  that  may  not  be totally  defect‐free.  This  is  a  kind  of  luxury  not  available  to  most  Pakistani  product‐focused                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  96     
  • 97. companies  as  they  focus  on  less‐innovative  end  of  the  products  market,  namely,  ERPs, accounting  software,  and  run‐of‐the  mill  billing  and  automation  systems.  Another  empirical regularity  is  that  the  dedicated  development  center  operations  are  considerably  less  likely  to seek  certification  but  much  more  likely  to  adopt  rigorous  technical  and  process  quality approaches.  Herein  lies  the  other  key  element  of  the  quality  issue.    Many  in  the  industry  believe  that certification is not the only measure of technical and process quality. Several of our interviewees shared  the  often‐expressed  apprehension  about  the  certification  process.  “The  very  act  of  going through a certification process, at times, overshadows the actual software development process itself. We tend to do a lot of things because they are needed by the certification process rather than their value in terms of improving the quality of the process”, says one gentleman that we spoke with.  It is always a bad idea for the certification to become an end in itself rather than a means to an end (process quality).  Most  organizations  are,  therefore,  quite  cautious  about  whether  or  not  they  seek  a certification  and  how  they  bring  up  the  quality  of  their  technical  (software)  development processes to get there.   While  our  statistical  findings  on  software  engineering  methodologies  used,  and  technical  best processes  employed,  failed  to  show  a  clear  trend,  the  interviews  did  add  some  perspective  to the picture. A fair number of companies use one of the several software design approaches (e.g. waterfall,  iterative,  prototyping  etc.)  and  the  final  choice  is  dictated  by  the  type  of  product‐service  offering  and  its  demands  on  the  development  process.  Another  factor  that  seemed  to influence  the  choice  of  particular  software  design  methodologies  was  the  need  to  have  a connection  and  alignment  with  the  processes  of  the  intended  customer.  For  the  five  technical best  practices,  namely,  project  plan  tracking,  design  and  code  reviews,  documentation  of  the code,  system  to  learn  from  on‐going  projects,  and  measurement  of  process  quality,  while  we encountered  some  knee‐jerk  reactions  from  respondents  (“oh,  of  course  we  do  it”,  was  a response  of  one  respondent  who,  we  were  not  quite  sure,  clearly  understood  what  the  term meant),  the  data  suggests  that  better‐performers  consistently  did  better  than  the  rest  of  the sample.  These  relationships  were  not  quite  as  simple  for  other  more  complex  metrics  like  % spent on QA, programmer‐to‐project‐manager ratio etc.   One of the issues that several of our respondents faced, specifically in the context of deciding on whether  to  have  a  dedicated  quality  assurance  function  but  also  more  generally,  was  the inability  to  foresee  benefits  from  such  a  process.  We  found  several  of  our  respondents struggling with the idea of whether to hire a 1‐2 person QA team for a relatively small operation                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  97     
  • 98. of  10‐15  employees.  “Wouldn’t  it  make  better  sense  to  use  a  person  who  works  part‐time  on  quality assurance? That way the utilization of resources can be optimized”, explained one interviewee when asked about his/her decision calculus. Yet, companies that seemed to have done well in terms of providing quality to their customers seem to disagree with that logic and emphasize instead on “having faith”. Investments in process quality—but also in professionalization of the venture—initially take a lot of faith on the part of the company executives. CEOs/Entrepreneurs who have come to terms with this fact—and are quick to see the rewards at the end of the tunnel—end up developing quality processes, others do not. Also, quality culture, if it has to be done well, must be  emphasized  from  the  day‐one  of  the  company  rather  than  left  for  convenient  “good  times when  one  would  be  able  to  afford  it”.  Several  of  the  interviewees  described  the  difficulties  in changing the work practices of their employees, once formed.    Another  issue  that  has  considerable  bearing  on  the  quality  practices  of  the  local  software operations  is  simply  inexperience  and  lack  of  adequate  amount  of  work.  In  the  end,  process maturity  is  important—regardless  of  whether  it  comes  with  a  certification  or  without.  Many entrepreneurs have come to realize that over time, as most point out to the fact that “maturity” comes  with  gaining  experience  in  doing  projects.    Ones  processes  cannot  become  mature overnight thus making it a classic chicken‐and‐egg problem. One of the CEOs cautioned against trying  to  artificially  fast‐track  this  process,  especially  in  the  context  of  Government’s  CMMI Initiative, asserting that “the word ‘capability maturity’ is the essence of the entire model and it would not be good practice to move from one level to the next in six months, if the model demands the sort of maturity  of  processes  that  could  only  come  in  2  years.”  The  following  two  sets  of  managerial practices describe the “best practice” in the industry:  Managerial Best Practice #18 (MBP18)— Understand the “hidden” value of quality and have faith in it. Build it in the processes and culture from day-one. Never take a “short-cut” to process quality—an action done for wrong reasons is worse than one not done at all.  Managerial  Best  Practice  #19  (MBP19)—  Get a certification only if you need to but develop quality processes because you have to. Make certification a means to an end, rather than an end in itself. Think hard about process and methodology, don’t follow blindly. Strategic Challenge # 13: Managing the Parent‐Subsidiary Relationship— The most important challenge, in our view, that is being faced by a number of dedicated development center‐type operations  in  Pakistan  today  and  would  be  faced  by  an  increasingly  number  of  younger operations  in  the  years  to  come  relates  to  the  (mis)management  of  the  parent‐subsidiary relationship. Although also a challenge for the export‐focused foreign firm, it assumes a much                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  98     
  • 99. critical importance in the context of the dedicated development center because of its exclusive (“dedicated”) and limited (read as “development center”) role in the overall scheme of things.   There  are  differences  in  the  timeframe  and  scope  of  the  establishment  of  a  dedicated development  center  operation  as  compared  to  the  export‐focused  foreign  firm  model.  Unlike the  latter  model,  where  the  Pakistan  operation  is  an  integral  part  of  the  firm’s  business‐plan right from the inception and hence conceived as such, the dedicated development center may or may not have the similar luxury of starting from the clean‐slate days of the company. What this means  is  that  the  dedicated  development  center  starts  its  life  in  a  well‐established organizational environment with strategic processes and managerial controls already laid out in advance.  More  often  than  not,  in  the  initial  years  of  the  development  center’s  life,  the  parent continues  to  remain  engaged  in  product‐development  at  its  headquarters  or  an  alternate location—an activity that is gradually transferred to the newly established offshore operation. This puts the development center under greater managerial control and oversight, and reduces its say in the strategic direction of the parent company—a fact that may or may not change with the  passage  of  time.  This  set  of  initial  conditions  can  have  interesting  repercussions  on  the evolution of this operation and pose some serious challenges in the mid‐to‐long term.   What  really  happens  as  a  result  of  this  restrictive  relationship  between  the  parent  and  the subsidiary is that the latter, as it evolves into a mature operation, takes a life of its own. As this parent‐subsidiary relationship enters in this phase of its life, the interests of the subsidiary may not  always  align  well  with  the  interests  of  the  parent  and  in  the  absence  of  an  appropriate mechanism for aligning these (e.g. by allowing the subsidiary to have some say in the parent’s strategy) they can end up being in sharp conflict with each other.   We  clearly  saw  this  dynamic  at  work  at  several—almost  all—of  the  more  mature  dedicated development  centers  in  our  sample.  For  example,  one  of  the  development  centers  that  we looked at had a lot of potential for expanding its useful product‐services offerings, but being a “dedicated”  operation  was  constrained  by  the  strategic  objectives  of  its  parent  company  that saw little need for doing so. Consequently, this operation has been in an almost hiring‐freeze or had  even  declined  in  times  when  other  less  capable  and  endowed  companies  had  grown.  We found  a  clear  sense  of  “something  is  amiss  in  our  relationship”  while  talking  to  the  senior management of this development center operation.    Another operation we looked at is in an informal organizational arrangement with its principal, and only, client whereby it rents out teams of professionals to project managers in the client’s                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  99     
  • 100. organization.  Painfully  aware  of  the  fragility  of  the  arrangement,  especially  in  the  case  of  an M&A event, the operation is looking for ways to gradually shift its dependence on its principal client.  A  third  operation  that  we  looked  at  recently  suffered  a  painful  breakup  as  a  result  of misunderstanding and mismanagement of the mutual expectations of the contracting parties. In the post‐DotCom Bubble burst, as the market began to look bad for the parent, these differences in expectations and incentives led to friction and mistrust in the parent‐subsidiary relationship. As tensions arose on both sides of the equation, the relationship collapsed as if it was destined to fail in the first place.   One can learn a lot—in terms of how to structure or how not to structure a relationship, what pitfalls  to  avoid,  and  how  to  manage  expectations  across  large  distances—from  a  detailed analysis of these examples. Setting up a dedicated development operation is merely a small part of the overall scheme of things. Delivering quality products‐services require putting in place not only  a  technical  infrastructure  but  also  critical  managerial  processes  and  organizational structures, rules and regulations that could serve the organization well throughout its life‐cycle.  Navigating these challenges through careful attention to these pitfalls is the key to successfully executing upon the dedicated development center model. On the most basic level, however, the following may be categorized as a managerial best practice for software companies:    Managerial  Best  Practice  #20  (MBP20)—  Clearly define the scope and nature of the parent-subsidiary relationship in the founding agreement. Provide a mechanism for the subsidiary to have a say in parent’s strategic direction. In  addition  to  setting  up  an  office  and  putting  in  place  a  quality  software  development operation, the dedicated development center model also shares a sleuth of challenges with the export‐focused foreign firm and other models, namely, training the locally hired workforce on tools  and  methodologies  being  used  at  the  parent’s  original  location,  getting  them  acquainted with  the  customs  and  culture  of  the  parent  company  and  its  clientele,  transferring  the  all important domain expertise, countering the “image” problem, and the geographical shifting or vanishing of the “labor‐arbitrage” argument.  As  we  conclude  this  discussion  on  the  taxonomy  of  generic  software  business  models,  it  is important  to  highlight  its  several  qualities  and  characteristics—as  well  as  its  proper  and improper uses—to allow the readers to put this taxonomy in its proper perspective.  Firstly, the taxonomy gives us a relatively easy and comprehensive way to classify a particular software operation into a broad enough category of organizations, giving us a broad reference point  to  compare  ourselves  against,  and  quickly  begin  looking  for  certain  organizational                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  100     
  • 101. features,  managerial  characteristics,  strategic  challenges,  and  critical  success  factors.  This  act alone,  somewhat  simplifies  the  complexity  of  the  Pakistani  software  scene,  not  only  from  the perspective of the industry (e.g. a policymaker/investor) but also a firm (e.g. entrepreneur). In doing so, it narrows down the search for comparables to look at or seek advice from.   Secondly,  it  is  important  to  understand  the  fact  that  none  of  these  generic  software  business models are inherently good or bad—just that  each has its own place in the overall scheme of things.  It  is  somewhat  meaningless  to  compare  firms  across  business  models.  It  takes  a  fairly different set of initial conditions and skills to start, and overcoming a different set of challenges to successfully execute upon each.  Each of these models, however, have better‐performing and not‐so‐good performing firms within them and what one can do, again to a certain degree only, is to compare the performance of a firm against another within the same category.   Thirdly,  while  transitions  between  the  generic  business  models  are  possible—they  are  not automatic. Depending on what a firm intends to do (idea‐offering‐destination mix), there is a right  model  to  look  at  and  adopt.  Although  it  is  possible,  it  is  not  necessary  that  a  company must try to migrate from a domestic‐focused operation to an export‐focused operation or from a local firm to a foreign firm. One can remain within a particular model and aspire to be best in class within that particular model. An entrepreneur‐investor must, therefore, clearly understand model implications before starting a firm.   Finally,  it  is  important  for  aspiring  entrepreneurs,  business  leaders  and  managers  of  existing ventures to understand the strengths, weaknesses, pre‐requisites, and structural limitations of each  of  the  generic  software  business  models.  They  must  vet  their  ideas  through  the  lens  of these business models and ensure that they fully understand their various dimensions and then adopt one that bests fits the idea‐offering‐destination profile of their venture and their short and long‐term  aspirations  from  the  same.    Understanding  the  model  limitations  is  critical  to  the long‐term growth of firms and the industry as a whole. Depending upon the circumstances and the  goals  and  aspirations  of  the  founders,  many  firms—trapped  in  the  structural  limitations  a particular model—try to outgrow it by doing more of the same. This, they ultimately find out is the  fruitless  approach.  This  taxonomy  also  attempts  to  drive  home  the  fact  that,  when  in  a situation like that, one must change the structure rather than fight it.   7.  ENVIRONMENTAL, INFRASTRUCTURE & PUBLIC POLICY CHALLENGES In addition to the competitive, strategic, and organizational drivers, we also sought to identify various environmental, infrastructure, and public policy challenges facing the respondents. The survey  questionnaire  contained  a  question  asking  the  respondents  to  identify,  from  a  list  of twenty  possible  factors,  what  they  perceived  to  be  the  most  important  environmental  and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  101     
  • 102. public policy bottlenecks to the development of software industry in Pakistan. The results of the survey are tabulated in Table‐XI (below).   The  simple  aggregation  of  the  data,  on  perceived  prevalence  of  environmental  and  policy bottlenecks,  suggests  a  clear  picture.  The  table  presents  the  percentage  of  respondents  that identified  a  particular  environmental/policy  bottleneck  as  applicable  to  the  Pakistani  software industry  and  highlights  (in  bold)  the  top‐5  problems  identified  by  each  sub‐category  of organizations.  Country’s  Image,  over‐and‐above  the  company’s  brand,  tops  the  list  as  the problem  identified  by  as  many  as  68%  of  all  respondents.  This  is  followed  by  quality  of manpower  (56%),  the  cost  of  IT/Telecom  infrastructure  (50%)  and  law‐and‐order  and  security situation  (48%)  as  the  most  important  problems  from  the  perspective  of  all‐types  of  firms combined.  We,  however,  do  see  some  variations  within  sub‐categories.  While  the  “image” problem remains a concern for most number of organizations across all categories, there is some evidence  that  cost  of  IT/Telecom  infrastructure  might  affect  domestic‐focused  operations disproportionately than export‐focused or hybrid operations. Similarly, a greater proportion of domestic‐focused operations tend to identify customs and tariff barriers, availability of physical infrastructure (e.g. power, office‐space etc.), credible information on vendors/customers (lack of market  maturity),  and  absence  of  intellectual  property  rights  as  serious  policy  issues  while  a greater  proportion  of  export‐focused  software  operations  tend  to  see  the  image  problem  and quality of manpower as major concerns. Hybrids tend to fall in between these two categories.                                         Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  102     
  • 103. TABLE XI :  PERCEPTION OF POLICY & INFRASTRUCTURE BOTTLENECKS       Market Orientation of Software Houses Policy & Infrastructure Bottlenecks   All  Domestic    Export  Hybrids  Combined*  Focused*  Focused**     N=58  N=19  N=11  N=20 Cost of IT/Telecom Infrastructure (e.g. Bandwidth)  50%   63%  36%  30% Availability of IT Telecom Infrastructure  43%   47%  36%  30% Country’s image, over‐and‐above company’s brand  68%   63%  63%  70% Quality of manpower  56%   52%  54%  65% Law and order and security situation  48%   52%  63%  25% Brain‐drain and retention of talented employees  43%  44%  27%  45% Absence of Intellectual Property Regime (IPR)  43%  52%  45%  25% Availability of Human Resources  43%   38%  45%  50% Problems in dealing with customs & tariffs   34%  57%  18%  20% Lack of credible information on customer/vendors  32%  63%  27%  20% Lack of Physical Infrastructure (estate, power etc.)  39%  57%  54%  15% Availability of venture/risk capital  36%  42%  27%  45% Difficulties in dealing with regulatory bureaucracy  39%  52%  54%  25%          ** Domestic/Export‐focused software house is one with > 75% sales in domestic/export markets respectively * Top‐4/5 in each category are highlighted (bold)    In order to further confirm these results, we also asked the respondents to identify the “Top‐3  environment  and  policy  problems  that  had  actually  affected  the  growth  and  development  of  their  company”.  This,  we  thought,  would  further  substantiate  the  earlier  results  and  identify  differences in the perception and the reality. The results are summarized in Table‐XII (above).   The “image” problem again emerges as one that had affected the most number of companies in  our sample, closely followed by quality and availability of manpower. The law‐and‐order and  security situation seems to be a component of the image problem and does not alone, by itself,  cause a lot of concern to the respondents. There are some interesting differences too. Brain drain  of  talented  employees  tends  to  be  a  significant  inhibitor  for  domestic‐focused  software  operations, as does the cost of IT/Telecom infrastructure. Lack of government contracts appears  to  disproportionately  affect  hybrids.  Absence  of  intellectual  property  does  not  seem  to  be  among  the  top‐three  growth‐inhibiting  factors  for  either  the  hybrids  or  the  export‐focused  operations. Only 15% of the domestic‐focused operations believe lack of IP regime has been one  the top‐3 inhibiting factors. Apart from these minor differences, however, the results are more  or less consistent and seem fairly credible.                                           Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  103      
  • 104. TABLE  XII:    REALITY  &  PERCEPTION—TOP‐3  POLICY  &  INFRASTRUCTURE BOTTLENECKS AFFECTING GROWTH OF SOFTWARE COMPANIES      Types of Software Houses Policy & Infrastructure Bottlenecks   All  Domestic    Export  Hybrids  Combined*  Focused*  Focused*     N=58  N=19  N=11  N=20 Cost of IT/Telecom infrastructure (e.g. Bandwidth)  24%  26%  10%  20% Availability of IT telecom infrastructure  15%  15%  9%  20% Country’s image, over‐and‐above company’s brand  48%  42%  81%  35% Quality of manpower  31%  31%  27%  35% Law and order and security situation  12%  5%  18%  5% Brain‐drain and retention of talented employees  20%  31%  9%  15% Absence of intellectual property regime (IPR)  5%  15%  0%  0% Availability of human resources  32%  26%  45%  35% Lack of availability of venture/risk capital  20%  21%  18%  20% Lack of government contracts to software firms  13%  15%  27%  10%          * Top‐3 in each category are highlighted (bold)    Developing  a  detailed  analysis  of  these  problems,  identification  and  recommendation  of  remedial  measures,  or  even  a  detailed  discussion  on  each  of  them  is  beyond  the  scope  of  the  current research. It is strongly recommended that an exercise be undertaken to identify the most  critical  of  these  issues,  develop  status/position  papers  on  each  of  these  issues,  elucidating  the  problem and its various dimensions using traditional policy‐analytic paradigm of a) defining a  problem, b)  constructing the evidence, c) constructing alternatives, d) conducting analysis e.g.  cost‐benefit,  business‐case,  or  market/government‐failure  analysis,  e)  selecting  a  criteria,  f)  analyzing  trade‐offs,  and  g)  making  a  decision.  The  final  solution  must  also  carry  a  detailed  road‐map  along  with  performance  measures  for  each  stage  of  the  roadmap,  and  must  be  developed  in  consultation  with  key  stakeholders,  including  private‐sector  entities  and  the  software community. We suggest  putting in place a comprehensive public‐private partnership  based on a series of confidence‐building measures and contingent commitments by both parties.  The detailed conceptual framework and action plan for putting together such an effort can be  developed with guidance from a realistic assessment of problems on the ground and other such  arrangements in the world.  While  the  Government  of  Pakistan  has  done  some  work  in  many  critical  areas,  especially  in  putting a friendlier regulatory and tax environment in place and bringing down the cost of IT  infrastructure, our survey indicates that a lot still needs to be done to bridge the gap between  the  current  and  the  desired  state  in  almost  every  environmental/policy  bottleneck  area,  but                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  104      
  • 105. more  specifically,  in  the  areas  of  image  management,  infrastructure  cost  and  availability, human  resources  quality,  local‐market  development  and  demand  creation,  availability  of venture and risk capital, and intellectual property rights etc. While we have already discussed several  of  these  issues  in  some  detail  above  (e.g.  HR  availability  and  quality,  image  problem etc.)  we  would  briefly  touch  upon  the  less‐discussed  ones  and  see  how  they  affect  our respondents.  We  would  also  talk  about  some  of  the  suggestions  put  forward  by  our interviewees. However, we do warn our readers that this, by no means, is a complete analysis of the problems and should not be construed as such. Following is a brief review of some of the key  issues,  as  identified  by  the  survey  responses  and  qualitative  interviews  with  over  65 industry officials from about as many organizations.    7.1—Telecom Infrastructure Cost & Availability Telecom  infrastructure  or  simply  Internet  connectivity  and  bandwidth  remain  an  area critical  to  the  industry’s  short‐term  survival  and  long‐term  viability  and  growth.  High quality  bandwidth  assumes  an  even  more  important  role  for  the  export‐focused  industry where its importance is akin to the importance of airports and seaports for trade. To be fair, the bandwidth availability and cost has significantly improved in the last few years with a dedicated leased line now costing as little as Rs. 45,000 per month (~$800) and a high‐speed T1 line costing about US $2000 a month. This is in sharp contrast to the situation a few years back  when  the  former  was  almost  not  available  and  the  latter  was  prohibitively  costly. While  the  costs  would  still  have  to  come  down  and  there  is  some  evidence  that  they  are, availability and reliability of supply is as much an issue as cost.    Many of our respondents, while appreciative of Government’s efforts in terms of providing telecom  infrastructure,  highlighted  the  need  for  further  improvements.  Many  of  our interviewees  asserted  that  for  most  mission‐critical  applications  or  support  functions  (e.g. doing  back‐office work,  hosting  applications for them  etc.)  a  connectivity  of  anything  less than  24x7  is  not  acceptable  to  potential  clients.  One  of  the  persons  we  interviewed—who host banking transaction systems for several overseas clients from his facility in Pakistan—narrated  the  story  of  one  such  blackout  when  the  entire  country’s  backbone  went  dead without prior warning and he could not get any alternative route to connectivity. With his cell‐phone ringing continuously, he had to upload his entire software on his laptop, embark on a flight to London, and plug the laptop into the Internet from his hotel room in London to  restore  the  availability  of  his  client’s  systems.  While  this  example  may  be  unique,  the problem is quite generic and needs further attention of policy‐makers in this country.                                          Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  105     
  • 106. Another  problem  that  our  respondents  often  alluded  to  was  selective  availability  of bandwidth.  While,  the  Internet  connectivity  at  Software  Technology  Parks  (STPs)  around the country may be much more reliable than the rest of the country, these locations are few and  far  between  and  are  not  equally  accessible  to  all  types  of  clients.  To  start  with, availability of space in STPs in Islamabad seemed to be an issue. Secondly, because of larger lot‐sizes, locating into an STP is not really an option for a new start‐up company with 3‐5 employees—yet cost of bandwidth and availability might be as critical to them as it is to a large  company. There is  certainly a  need  to  improve  the  accessibility  of  high‐speed,  high‐quality round‐the‐clock bandwidth to more locations around the country.   7.2—Availability of Venture and Risk Capital  The availability of risk/venture as well as later‐stage (“expansion”) and working capital is another critical policy issue for the software industry. There are at‐least two angles to look at  this  issue,  namely,  the  software  industry  and  the  financial  community.  That  there  are only limited avenues to get startup financing and majority of these end up being controlled by  unsophisticated,  from  the  software  standpoint,  individuals/groups  would  not  be  an understatement.  The  below‐par  performance  of  software  ventures  created  through  the investment  of  business  houses,  and  the  reluctance  of  the  financial  sector  to  make investments in software startups for reasons of lack of in‐depth knowledge of the industry dynamics  and  inability  to  correctly  evaluate  and  execute  upon  a  software  venture  further complicates  the  situation.  There  is  a  dire  need  to  educate  the  relevant  stakeholders—the entrepreneurs and the financial community—to appreciate each others’ perspectives. There is a lack of understanding and sophistication on both ends of the spectrum that needs to be addressed  through  networking  and  education.  Although,  this  process  is  happening gradually—one sign of which is the experimentation of the financial sector with the venture capital  instrument—it  may  be  receptive  to  well‐thought‐out  interventions  by  the  relevant stakeholders or a trusted intermediary.   Is  there  a  role  of  a  public‐sector  venture  capital  fund  to  support  software  and  technology focused businesses? While this question was not directly asked to us, it was hinted upon by several entrepreneurs in our discussions. Public sector venture capital has been a dominant theme  in  the  technology  policy  literature  for  a  while  now.  While  there  are  examples  of  a public‐sector venture capital programs done‐well (e.g. Israel’s Yozma Program has been an unqualified  success)  or  one  that  have  had  a  catalytic  effect  on  the  industry  (e.g.  SBIC program  in  US,  or  the  public  venture  capital  funds  established  in  India  in  the  1980s),  the technology  policy  community  generally  sees  it  as  an  instrument  that  needs  very  careful                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  106     
  • 107. analysis  and  planning,  and  equally  adept  execution.  That  does  not,  however,  imply  that lessons  cannot  be  gleaned  from  such  programs  around  world  and  an  effective  program cannot  be  developed—just  that  it  may  require  great  caution  and  care—things  that  do  not generally come naturally to politically‐motivated public sector bureaucracies. Should such an initiative be planned for the local industry, we would recommend an unbiased clearly‐defined  objective  and  an  in‐depth  analysis  of  alternative  organizational  arrangements  to house the initiative.   7.3—Under‐developed Domestic Market The under‐development of the domestic market for software was another recurring theme in  our  discussions  with  the  industry  executives.  Barring  few  areas  (e.g.  financials, Telecommunications etc.)—where we see some activity and demand for locally developed software—the  local  industry  suffers  from  a  serious  lack  of  demand  for  software  products and services. There can be many reasons contributing towards the status‐quo, namely, the prevalence  of  piracy  and  resulting  fixation  of  the  customer  on  low‐priced  high‐quality pirated software, the inability of the customer to define his/her requirements and evaluate software  vendors  effectively,  the  inability  of  the  developer  to  make  an  effective  business case  to  the  customer,  and  the  absence  of  many  replicable  success  stories  etc.    The  general level  of  maturity  and  awareness  in  the  market  is  something  that  would  take  its  time—although the process may be, and in some cases has been, facilitated and expedited through appropriate  interventions.  The  current  government  program  of  developing  standardized specifications  for  major  industrial  sectors  is  one  such  example.  Not  every  past  or  present program has been as successful, though. Many in the industry point out towards the faux pax in executing the Industry Automation and GEMS 2000 initiatives.  Government’s role in demand creation on the domestic front is fairly controversial. While some  seem  to  appreciate  its  role,  especially  more  recently,  others  are  still  very  skeptical. Many of our interviewees highlighted the need for awarding large government contracts to local software firms. “They expect us to do large projects for foreign companies. How can we do it if  we  have  never  done  a  large  project  in  our  lives.  When  the  government  wants  to  award  a  large contract, it gives it to a foreign company or creates its own (NADRA was the often‐cited example), how can we begin doing quality work when there is no work to do”, was a comment made by one executive but reflects a somewhat general feeling within the industry. Several ideas in this regard  ranged  from  an  export‐credit  scheme  specifically  targeted  at  encouraging  the software  industry  to  export  to  focusing  on  non‐traditional  markets,  namely,  Middle  East and the Islamic Bloc, to putting in place a government program of “picking winners” and                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  107     
  • 108. creating  “keiretsus”  or  “super‐firms”  as  done  in  Korea  and  the  European  Union respectively,  to  starting  up  plain‐vanilla  procurement  programs  of  significant  magnitude.  Each of these alternatives has its own merits and demerits and must be carefully evaluated in  the  light  of  these.  Although  we  are  fairly  skeptical  of  the  whole  use  of  an  “infant industry” argument, we believe there is some merit to these suggestions and thus a need for soul‐searching and analysis of various alternatives.   Small imaginative steps can trigger and catalyze a process that may pay‐off in the long‐run. We  came  across  a  number  of  ideas  in  this  regard.  One  CEO  of  a  large  software  house pointed out one major kink in the taxation system. While exports are exempt from taxation for a few years, companies have to pay a tax on sale of domestic software. “There is hardly any revenues on the domestic side, what good does it do to tax whatever little companies are able to make from it?” questioned this executive. What it perhaps does is that it distorts the decision calculus of many firms at inception and forces them to work on the export‐front rather than the  domestic  side.  In  a  perfectly  well‐meaning  intention  to  promote  export,  this  policy ultimately ends up producing a counterproductive effect i.e. hindering the development of a  domestic  market  for  software  that  might  in  turn  feed  into  the  software  exports  of  the country. Many other interviewees seemed to agree with the above notion.   Another CEO also pointed out the fact that the effective “indirect” taxation on the software industry  may  be  much  more  than  other  industries  in  a  relative  sense.  The  reason  for  this discrepancy,  he  believes,  is  the  different  organizational  nature  of  the  software  production business.  “We  do  not  use  a  lot  of  inputs  that  are  subsidized  by  the  government  in  the  same proportions  that  other  industries  do  and  thus  do  not  benefit  from  the  tax  subsidies  by  the government. If you do accounting calculations, a software business ends up paying 40‐45% higher tax than other businesses”. Again, without going into the merits or de‐merits of each of these arguments, we would like to underscore the need for a careful examination.   7.4—Availability of Physical Infrastructure Availability  of  physical  infrastructure  (e.g.  office‐space,  power  and  water,  parking  etc.)  is another area that may be acting as a hindrance in the way of software industry. One of the most important issues confronting software industry—perhaps as important as round‐the‐clock bandwidth—is uninterrupted power‐supply.  With the quality of the country’s power supply,  most  ventures  must  also  make  provisions  for  the  additional  costs  of  putting  UPS and  supplemental  power  generation  capability.    Another  irritant  that  many  of  our interviewees pointed out to us was the differences in rates at which power was provided to the  software  industry.  Specifically,  despite  being  acknowledged  as  an  industry,  the                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  108     
  • 109. software industry cannot get a power connection at industrial rates. The commercial rates that  software  houses  get  for  their  power  connections  are  about  30‐40%  higher  than  the industrial rates—thus putting an added and unwarranted burden on a nascent and fledging industry.   In certain areas where it is most needed, office space is in critically short supply. Islamabad is one example where software executives told us that it is very difficult to get decent and affordable office‐space with all the infrastructural paraphernalia that is needed to set up a software  operation.  One  of  the  executives  told  us  that  he/she  has  been  looking  for something that (s)he would like for the last 2 years but haven’t been able find it. “My foreign partner wants to open up an office in Islamabad and keeps on asking me how to go about it. I’ve been avoiding coming to the point with him for the last year or so. When I can’t even space for myself, how  can  I  possibly  help  him”,  says  this  executive  claiming  that  this  is  a  possible  foreign investment opportunity gone waste for Pakistan.   On the contrary, many of our interviewees pointed out to us that majority of STPs are being setup  in  locations  that  are  not  as  rich  from  a  human  resources  standpoint,  as  many company  executives  would  like  them  to  be.  One  of  our  respondents  questioned  the  logic behind setting up an STP in a posh Karachi locality while 90% of his/her employees—and this was a fairly common feature in Karachi—commuted from Gulshan‐e‐Iqbal and North Karachi areas. “I have a car and can travel to Gulshan‐e‐Iqbal every day”, claims this America‐returned Director of the company, “but what use to me is this office‐space if my employees have to spend 2 hours coming to work everyday and change two buses each way and end up coming to work in a frame of mind not so conducive for creative work and then they want to go back home early because they won’t find a bus if they sit late in the office”. Yet, as this Director pointed out, there is  no  move  to  set  up  an  STP  in  areas  where  they  could  be  most  productive  for  software development activity. Another CEO in Islamabad—pointing out to the fact that Islamabad‐based  companies  have  already  consumed  most  of  the  quality  manpower  available—expressed  reservations  about  a  mismatch  between  where  the  demand  for  high‐quality infrastructure is and where it is being provided.  While many may not agree with the experiences of these gentleman/ladies, we believe, they have  enough  merit  to  warrant  a  detailed  analysis  of  the  demand‐supply  patterns  in  the software industry to guide and set in motion short‐to‐long term infrastructure development plans.   Several  other  interesting  ideas  came  up  in  our  conversations  with  other  interviewees.  For example, one of the interviewees looked at the vast unutilized lands of Punjab University in                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  109     
  • 110. Lahore  and  wondered  if  the  University  could  develop  a  part  of  it  into  office  spaces  for technology  ventures.  “I  can  bet  that  in  a  few  years,  Punjab  University  would  be  earning  much more  revenues  from  this  alone  than  what  it  gets  from  HEC”.  This  is  precisely  what  Stanford University did in the 1950s that led to the creation of Silicon Valley in California. Perhaps there are lessons to be learnt from this example.   Another  interviewee  suggested  a  way  to  get  around  the  security  and  congestion  issue  in Karachi by developing STPs near the Quaid‐e‐Azam International Airport. “The land belongs to  CAA  and  as  far  as  I  know,  they  have  also  been  receptive  to  leasing  out  the  land  to  for‐profit ventures. Perhaps in a few years, people would plan to develop hotels right next to the STP and the airport.  For  an  isolated  area  like  this,  one  can  develop  a  better  functioning  and  foolproof  security arrangement as well. This might open up a way for foreigners to visit Pakistan. You just land at the Airport,  go  to  your  hotel,  hop  into  the  STP,  do  your  work  and  fly  out.”  There  is  some  merit  in both  of  these  proposals.  But  more  importantly,  it  underscores  the  need  for  our policymakers  to  think  “out‐of‐the‐box”  in  dealing  with  issues  like,  image,  law‐and‐order, congestion, infrastructure etc.  7.5—Intellectual Property Rights The  fifth  and  final  issue  that  we  would  like  address  in  this  list  of  hitherto  un‐discussed issues  is  that  of  intellectual  property  rights.  The  issue  is  sensitive  in  the  way  it  is  often talked about in the local‐literature and policy circles. It is often associated with the images of BSA’s anti‐piracy campaigns and Microsoft’s desire to extract revenues from poor third world customers. However, there is more to it than that. To be fair, the Pakistani software industry  is  both  a  beneficiary  and  the  affectee  of  software  piracy.  A  lot  of  reasons  for  the lack  of  demand  of  software  development  in  the  local  market  may  be  attributed  to  the availability  of  pirated  software.  Many  executives  highlighted  the  notion  that  the  local customer was mentally so fixated at Rs. 50 being the price of software, any software, that (s)he was unwilling to appreciate the actual cost of developing a software locally. “When I can get it in Rs. 50, why should I pay you Rs. 200,000 or even Rs. 10,000” is a typical response they  get  from  their  customers.  Yet,  on  the  other  hand,  all  software  houses,  whether  they acknowledge  it  or  not,  benefit  from  these  cheap  software  CDs  indirectly,  if  not  directly, either through the gradually increasing software‐literacy of the local market or the cheaply trained manpower they can get because of it.   The issue of developing an appropriate regime of intellectual property rights in developing world in general, and Pakistan in particular is so complex, that it would warrant a separate independent  investigation  of  its  own.  Whether  Pakistan  can  develop  a  viable  and  world‐                                       Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  110     
  • 111. class  software  industry  or  attract  significant  foreign  investment  without  arriving  at  an acceptable  solution  to  software  piracy  is  a  question  that  requires  much  detailed  analysis and is beyond the scope of this research. What we can say from our survey, however, is that the absence of intellectual property rights is seen as a moderate‐level environmental/policy bottleneck—40‐50%  companies  believe  so—but  is  hardly  seen  as  something  that  has significantly  hampered  their  development—only  5‐15%  companies  categorize  it  as  a significant (top‐3) bottleneck. Many companies that we spoke to have developed ways and means  (e.g.  security  arrangements,  alternate  business  models,  and  source‐code  sharing policies) to get around the issue and their CEOs see it as an issue that they “would like to get solved some day but don’t lose too much sleep over.”  8. CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONSIn Summary, this study reveals a mixed picture of the Pakistani software industry. On the one hand, we find an industry that is evolving and gradually maturing over time from its much‐hyped  beginnings  in  the  early‐to‐late  1990s,  while  on  the  other  hand,  we  see  some serious  challenges  that  still  need  to  be  addressed  if  it  is  to  make  it  mark  on  the  world’s software markets. The unrealized expectations and promise of the DotCom era has resulted in  much  thinking  and  reflection  on  the  part  of  the  entrepreneurs  and  businessmen  about issues that are critical to the long‐term viability of a software business. Terms like domain expertise,  strategic  focus,  and  product‐services  trade‐offs  are  now  becoming  a  part  of  the industry  lingo.  While  we  could  not  statistically  identify  the  effect  of  the  DotCom  Bubble burst on the industry, we can relate several pieces of anecdotal evidence about the sobering effect  it  has  had  on  the  structure  of  some  of  the  largest  firms  in  the  industry.  Those  that have survived this difficult time are much stronger and more focused companies and they are now beginning to see things turn a corner for them.   “Ten years or slightly a little more is a very short time in the life of an industry”, claims the CEO of one of the largest software houses in Pakistan. “It has taken India atleast a couple of decades and a lot of good luck before they could reach a point were they stand today. We have only sown the seed of an industry—that I am hopeful would become strong one day. What we have been able to do in the last decade or so is to put in place the basic organizational and infrastructural paraphernalia on which we can build a strong industry. I am positive that the next few years would see us doing much better as individual firm and as an industry”, he added.  While not all that we spoke to would  agree  with  this  optimistic  assessment  of  the  future,  we  believe,  today’s  software                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  111     
  • 112. industry is much wiser and more prepared to take on the future challenges than at any time during  the  past  decade.  True,  there  are  several  weaknesses  and  bottlenecks,  both  at  the organizational and the policy levels, that we would have to collectively address, but it can be done, provided we have the will to do it.   8.1—Summary of Research Results and Future Directions  From the research standpoint, this study points towards several interesting and substantive findings and highlights areas where more research work needs to be conducted.   First,  we  failed  to  find  conclusive  evidence  in  support  of  a  trend  of  specialization  and focus,  at  the  level  of  an  industry,  if  not  the  firm.  Are  we,  as  an  industry,  doing  better  at creating  more  focused  firms?  Can  we  detect  differences  in  the  organization  of  software development  activity  that  might  point  towards  greater  specialization  or  optimality?  For example,  the  organizational  processes  of  a  company  trying  to  do  software  outsourcing should be significantly different from one focusing on a product market, a fact that should be  reflected  in  organizational‐level  data  on  these  two  types  of  organizations.  While  there are examples of “best‐in‐class” firms operating within well‐defined product‐services niches and  doing  a  good  job  at  that,  we  do  not  find,  on  average,  significant  differences  between product‐focused vs. services‐focused firms, export‐focused vs. domestic‐focused firms (etc.) in  terms  of  their  organizational  structures  and  managerial  practices.  This  is  one  area  that needs more work on the part of the industry and a more in‐depth analysis to identify the reasons for the same.   Second,  there  is  some  suggestive  evidence  of  best  practices  within  the  industry.  The relatively  better‐performing  firms  tend to  adopt more  employee  friendly  policies  than  the rest  of  the  industry.  Also,  they  tend  to  have  better  quality  management  talent.  These  are robust  findings  across  multiple  reference  and  control  groups  (e.g.  top‐10  firms,  fastest growing firms, and global top‐quartile firms etc.). Similarly firms of all sub‐specializations tend  to  favor  the  more  high‐contact  marketing  approaches  (e.g.  word  of  mouth,  pre‐established  networks,  and  one‐to‐one  contacts)  against  the  relatively  low‐contact  ones. There  might  be  lessons  in  this  for  the  policy‐makers  designing  programs  (e.g.  trade delegations,  conference  attendances)  to  improve  the  networking  and  customer  acquisition ability  of  Pakistani  software  firms  or  for  the  industry  entrepreneurs  themselves                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  112     
  • 113. contemplating  a  new  venture.  We  further  supplement  these  statistical  results  with qualitative findings of strategic challenges and managerial best practices.    Third,  although  our  results  on  measures  of  technical  practices  and  process  quality  are mixed—and  sometimes  counter‐intuitive—they  point  towards  some  consequential findings.  From  the  standpoint  of  technical  and  process  quality,  we  find  a  lot  of  variation within  the  Pakistani  software  industry—a  fact  that  may  or  may  not  auger  well  for  the industry’s  maturity.  That  firms  maybe  acquiring  quality  certifications  (e.g.  ISO  9000)  for reasons that may not have a lot to do with the actual quality of their processes is yet another finding worth some thought. We also found evidence of differential propensities to seek a quality  certification  (e.g.  hybrids  seem  to  have  a  greater  propensity  to  seek  a  quality certification  than  either  the  export‐focused  or  the  domestic‐focused  software  operation) among  our  sample  of  respondents.  This  was  in  contrast  with  the  actual  expenditure  on quality assurance where the export‐focused software operations tend to do better than the rest.  Similarly,  there  are  no  clear  patterns  in  terms  of  the  type  of  software  engineering methodologies  or  technical  best  practices  (drawn  partially  from  the  CMM  methodology) preferred  by  various  sub‐categories  of  software  operations.  A  more  detailed  project‐level analysis  of  the  technical  and  process  quality  of  software  operations  that  adequately accounts for the differences in the type of work performed, the intended market, and other project‐level determinants is warranted.   Fourth,  there  are  a  number  of  generic  strategic  challenges  that  need  to  be  addressed  by entrepreneurial ventures of various types. We find a number of innovative ways in which companies have tried to address these challenges—some more successfully than others. We discuss  several  different  approaches  to  each  of  the  thirteen  (13)  strategic  challenges identified  in  the  report  and  document  twenty  (20)  managerial  best  practices  adopted  by relatively  successful  companies  that  others  might  consider  using  as  well.  While  many  of these  challenges  have  a  clearly  organizational  focus  (e.g.  developing  a  domain  expertise, setting  up  a  quality  software  development  operation,  managing  parent‐subsidiary relationships etc.) others may be beyond the influence of a single firm (e.g. countering the “image”  problem,  getting  access  to  quality  human  resources  etc.)  and  others  still  may require  a  partnership  between  public  and  private  sector  entities  (e.g.  setting  up  an operation in Pakistan, scaling up the Pakistani operation etc.).                                           Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  113     
  • 114. An example of one such challenge for the industry is scaling up the size of average software development operation to undertake larger projects. The (in)famous number beyond which only a few firms have managed to grow—a psychological barrier of sorts—often quoted as a  part  of  the  industry’s  grapevine  is  200  people.  Several  reasons  are  put  forth  for  this seemingly  intriguing  regularity,  including,  the  lack  of  quality  professionals,  inability  to acquire enough customers to predict demand in the future, a lack of middle management and  project  management  professionals,  a  lack  of  trust  between  various  stakeholders,  a hesitance to professionalizing the venture, and a lack of experience in institution‐building etc.    Needless  to  say  that  there  are  companies  that  have  grown  to  a  size  of  200  or  more employees  but  the  fact  that  we  have  not  been  able  to  do  so  more  regularly  and  build companies  that  are  an  order‐of‐magnitude  or  more  bigger  than  what  we  have,  is  still  a critical strategic challenge for the industry.   Finally,  despite  considerable  progress  on  a  number  of  public  policy  and  infrastructural bottlenecks,  the  industry  still  faces  a  number  of  environmental  and  public  policy challenges. The prevalence of the “image problem” as a critical bottleneck to the growth of the  industry  and  perceived  to  have  actually  affected  the  largest  number  of  firms  in  our sample is one example. Other significant environmental and policy bottlenecks include: the quality  and  availability  of  human  resources,  cost  and  availability  of  IT/Telecom infrastructure,  and  lack  of  availability  of  physical  infrastructure  (e.g.  office‐space,  water, power etc.). We underscore the need for careful analysis of the extent of these problem and their  impact  on  the  industry,  some  creative  and  “out‐of‐the‐box”  thinking  on  possible solutions, and putting in place a public‐private partnership framework based on contingent commitments  of  the  two  parties  and  governed  by  a  transparent  performance‐based assessment framework to address these.   8.2—The Way of the Future: Some Tentative Conclusions  Where do we go from here? The implications of the data and findings presented above are quite  clear.  We  would  not  try  to  go  beyond  the  mandate  of  this  report  and  suggest alternative scenarios for the development of the Pakistani software industry and/or suggest a  concrete  roadmap  to  get  to  the  most  desired  scenario.  Our  objective  was  to  create  the awareness  and  an  unbiased  assessment  of  where  we  are  so  that  those  responsible  for deciding  where  to  go,  and  how  to  get  there,  at  both  organizational  and  policy‐levels,  can use the information to make better‐informed decisions. We have, however, taken the liberty                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  114     
  • 115. to make some tactical recommendations as and when we have found one staring at our face during the course of this analysis.   On  the  whole,  however,  there  are  a  few  generalized  conclusions  that  one  can  draw.  The  first and  foremost  contribution  of  this  study  is  to  bring  forth  the  very  vibrant  face  of  Pakistan’s software industry. Pakistan today, unlike yesteryears, is fast turning into a happening place for IT.    While  the  industry’s  first  documented  firm—  Systems  Ltd.—opened  shop  in  1976,  the industry has only been a subject of focused attention for just over a decade now. The decade of the  1990s  and  the  DotCom  Bubble  burst  have  brought  considerable  maturation  and  reality‐check  to  industry  players.  Ten  years  is  a  very  short  time  for  the  development  of  an  entire industry and there are signs that Pakistan’s software industry, having laid the foundations for a tomorrow, maybe in for better times ahead. Last year alone, the industry has grown at around 37%  in  revenues  and  27%  in  terms  of  technical  and  professional  employment.  Many  of  the CEOs we spoke to expect a better‐than‐last‐year performance in 2005.   Another  sign  of  the  industry’s  maturity  and  coming  of  age—facilitated  by  the  global geopolitical  environment  and  offshoring  trends—  is  the  fact  that  an  increasing  number  of Pakistani‐owned foreign companies are setting up development center operations in Pakistan. While many of these choose to operate under the radar screen, they are definitely going to bring about considerable transfer of know‐how and ideas from western software markets to Pakistan and result in the generation of local entrepreneurial activity. Also, another unmistakable sign is the  trend  of  reverse  brain‐drain  of  quality  Pakistani  professionals  from  abroad  who,  given significantly less competition for ideas and talent and a relatively virgin market at home, see a tremendous  opportunity  in  setting  up  a  Pakistan‐based  company.  Systems  Integration, Innovation and Intelligence (SI3) and The Resource Group (TRG) are the poster children of this undeniable trend. None of these would have been possible a decade ago.   On  the  domestic‐front  as  well,  there  is  a  growing  likelihood  of  considerable  opening  up  and modernization  of  traditionally  conservative  segments  of  the  economy.  If  deregulation  in  the financial sector is any credible sign of things to come, we are likely to see massive changes in the  shape  of  the  local  manufacturing  and  service  industries  by  virtue  of  telecom  sector deregulation  and  the  enhanced  competition  under  the  now‐effective  WTO  trade  regime.  The former  has  already  begun  to  show  tremendous  promise  with  around  a  billion  dollars  of promised investment in last year alone. An investor whom we spoke to sees the situation as the fading  away  of  the  Old  Pakistan  and  the  Emergence  of  the  New  Pakistan  that  is  effectively linked  to  and  a  significant  player  of  the  global  economic  system.  The  New  Pakistan  presents considerable promise and opportunity to those willing to bite at it. There are live examples of companies—TRG,  SI3,  LMKR,  Netsol,  Techlogix,  Etilize,  TPS  and  many  more—that  have capitalized on this new set of opportunities and positioned themselves to reap the rewards.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  115     
  • 116.  There  are,  however,  considerable,  although  not  insurmountable,  challenges  too.  The  industry suffers  from  a  serious  professionalization  and  institutionalization  deficit.  The  200‐people barrier, although psychological,  is real till it  is  actually  broken—and broken convincingly and forever. In addition to the 200‐people barrier, we also face a 20‐people and a 2‐people barrier that requires as much attention as  the former. Many of our very innovative firms continue to resist professionalization and thus fail to grow beyond a particular size. The industry is hungry for  capable  investors/acquirers  to  come  forth  and  bring  about  paradigm  shifting  structural changes  to  these  companies  and  enable  them  to  move  to  the  next  higher  level  of  growth.  The fast maturing market of outsourcing and offshoring services necessitate that our entrepreneurs and  business  leaders  think  about  new  ways  of  doing  things.  It  is  unlikely,  given  the consolidation  in  the  industry,  that  we  would  see  a  new  player  replacing  Wipros,  Infosys’,  or TCS’  of  this  world.  Rather  than  blindly  copying  the  already  well‐established  countries  and players,  we  must  think  creatively  to  devise  a  model  that  best  suits  our  own  strengths  and weaknesses. Our ability to lead in the business model innovation would determine, to a large extent,  our  place  in  the  future  pecking  order  of  software  exporting  nations.  Playing  the volumes‐game (ITES/BPO), without the requisite scalability and HR, is unlikely to succeed on an industry‐wide scale. Until we can resolve the scalability issue, we must learn to play in the equally lucrative ideas‐game.   In a dynamic and fast changing industry like IT/Software, tomorrow can and will be radically different, and not merely an extension of today. It would require investors’ foresight, business manager’s  insight,  and  entrepreneur’s  courage  to  capture  the  moment  and  build  the  next generation of niche players and industry leaders and build it in the New Pakistan. Profits are certainly  to  be  earned  by  those  who  “break  the  rules”  and  try  the  unthinkable.  There  is, however,  a  dire  need  to  think  deep  and  hard  about  the  problems,  patterns,  and  strategic challenges  identified  in  this  report,  find  explanations  for  these,  and  devise  strategies  to  get around them.                                                  Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  116     
  • 117. 9. APPENDIX A: LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS SURVEYED/INTERVIEWED  LIST OF ORGANIZATIONS & INDIVIDUALS INTERVIEWED    Name of Individual  Position, Organization  Interview Date        List of Organizational Interviews 1. Mr. Adnan Agboatwalla  MD, Clickmarks Pvt. Ltd.  19/10/04 2. Mr. Rahim Hasnani  CTO, ITIM Associates  20/10/04 3. Mr. Abdul Gaffar Memon  CEO, KalSoft Pvt. Ltd.  22/10/04 4. Mr. Qamber Hydery  CEO, 2B Technologies Pvt. Ltd.  24/10/04 5. Mr. Mazhar Hasan  CEO, Yevolve Pvt. Ltd.  21/10/04 6. Syed Asif Iqbal Qadri  CEO, Post Amazers Pvt. Ltd.  25/10/04 7. Mr. Amer Hashmi  CEO, S‐iii Systems Innovation  21/10/04 8. Mr. Suhail Munir  CEO, Secure3 Networks  20/10/04 9. Mr. Arshad Khalil  Chairman, Jinn Technologies  21/10/04 10. Mr. Aamir Baig  CTO, Etilize Pvt. Ltd.  21/10/04 11. Mr. Ashraf Kapadia  MD, Systems Pvt. Ltd  23/10/04  11b. Mr. Nadeem Malik   Director, Systems Pvt. Ltd.  11/11/04 12. Mr. Jawwad Farid  CEO, Alchemy Technologies  14/10/04 13. Mr. Akbar Munir  Director, Elixir Technologies   27/10/04 14. Dr. Qasim Shaikh  Local Head of Operations, Quartics      27/10/04 15. Mr.Atif R.Khan  CEO, LMKR (Pvt) Ltd  26/10/04 16. Mr Mohd Azam  CEO, Askari Info. Systems            28/10/04 17. Mr. Nevil Patel  COO, Prosol Technologies           28/10/04 18. Mr. Salman Rana  GM, Ultimus Pakistan                             01/11/04 19. Dr. Farrukh Kamran   CEO, CARE Pvt. Ltd  29/10/04  20. Syed Nauman Hashmi  CEO, Advanced Comm.  29/10/04 21. Mr. Mohd. Shamim  CEO, Comcept Pvt. Ltd.  29/10/04 22. Mr. Ovais Ashraf (CEO)  CEO, Trivor Systems   28/10/04 23. Mr. Mansoor A Khan  CEO, Makabu Pvt. Ltd.  02/11/04 24. Wg Cdr. (Retd.) Shahid Tufail  EVP, Oratech Systems Pvt. Ltd.  27/10/04 24b. Mr. Basim Mirza  Mgr., MIT Pvt. Ltd.  27/10/04 25. Mr. Mohsin Aziz  CEO, Xavor Pakistan Pvt. Ltd.  04/11/04 26. Mr. Shoaeb Shams  EVP, ESP Global IT Services Pvt. Ltd  10/11/04 27. Mr. Salim Ghori  CEO, Netsol Pvt. Ltd.  12/11/04 28. Mr. Nauman A. Zaffar  VP, Techlogix Pvt. Ltd.   05/11/04 29. Dr.Salman Iqbal  CEO, Softech Systems (Pvt) Ltd  09/11/04 30. Mr. Shahab Ashraf  GM, Strategic Systems Int’l  08/11/04 31. Mr. Ali A. Sheikh  CEO, AcroLogix (Pvt). Ltd  04/11/04                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  117     
  • 118. 32. Mr. Lutfullah Khan  CEO, Autosoft Dynamics Pvt. Ltd.  08/11/04 33. Mr. Raza Saeed  CEO, Uraan Pvt. Ltd.  09/11/04  34. Mr. Zia Imran  COO, MetaApps Pvt. Ltd  09/11/04  35. Mr. Abdul Aziz  CEO, Lumensoft Pvt. Ltd.  10/11/04 36. Mr. Masood Khan  CEO, Adamsoft Pvt. Ltd.  11/11/04 37. Mr. Urooj A. Khan  Sr. Mgr., Sidaat Hyder Morshed   26/11/04 38. Mr. Junaid Khan  CEO, Avanza Solutions Pvt. Ltd.  25/11/04 39. Mr. Asad Alim  CEO, ThreeSixty Degreez Pvt. Ltd  19/11/04 40. Syed Yousuf   Progressive Systems Pvt. Ltd.  16/11/04 41. Mr. Khalid Razzaq  CEO, Genesis Solutions Pvt. Ltd.  20/11/04 42. Mr. Yousuf Jan  MD, MixIT USA Pvt. Ltd.  24/11/04 43. Mr. Ahmed Allauddin  CEO, Millennium Software Pvt. Ltd.  19/11/04 44. Mr. Mohd Sohail  CEO, TPS Pakistan. Pvt. Ltd.  25/11/04 45. Mr. Ayub Butt  CEO, ZRG Int’l Pvt. Ltd.  20/11/04 46. Mr. Farooq A. Khan  COO, GONet/AMZ Ventures  26/11/04 47. Mr. Zafar A. Sheikh  CEO, APPXS Pvt. Ltd.  25/10/04  Individuals’ (MNCs, Policy‐Makers, Academics etc.) Interviews  48. Ms. Samina Rizwan  Country Manager, Oracle ‐ Pakistan  26/10/04 49. Mr. Faisal Khaliq  Manager, NCR Pakistan  26/10/04 50. Mr. Nasir Lone  Country Manager, TRG   05/11/04 51. Ms. Jehan Ara  President, PASHA  20/10/04 52. Mr. Tariq Badsha  Member IT, MOITT  29/10/04 53. Mr. Aamir Khan  S‐iii, Ex‐IBM, Pakistan  02/11/04 54. Dr. Fakhar Lodhi  Professor, FAST Lahore  11/11/04 55. Dr. Altaf A. Khan  Dean, UMT (Ex‐KASB‐Ventures)  08/11/04  56. Dr. Zahir Syed  Director, KIIT  18/11/04 57. Dr. Sohaib A. Khan  Asst. Professor, LUMS  05/11/04 59. Mr. Ikram Khan  CEO, Business Beam Pvt. Ltd.  02/12/04 60. Mr. Asad Ur Rahman  President, Ponder Alliance  02/12/04 61. Mr. Sohaib Umar  CEO, TMT Ventures  21/10/04 62. Mr. Umar Suleman  Entrepreneur, Ex‐Embedded Systems  11/11/04 63. Mr. Nasim Beg  CEO, Arif Habib Securities  06/12/04 64. Mr. Zaheer‐uddin‐Khalid  BD Manager, First Capital Equity  02/12/04 65. Mr. Murad Ansari  Head of Research, KASB   06/12/04                                           Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  118     
  • 119. 10. LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC REFERENCES  [1] Aberdeen,  “Offshore  Software  Development:  Localization,  Globalization,  and  Best  Practices  in  an  Evolving  Industry”,  Aberdeen  Group  Inc.,  Boston,  Massachusetts,  USA, 2001  [2] Aberdeen,  “Offshore  Software  Outsourcing  Best  Practices”,  Aberdeen  Group  Inc.,  Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 2002  [3] Aberdeen,  “The  Global  Sourcing  Benchmark  Report”,  Aberdeen  Group  Inc.,  Boston,  Massachusetts, USA, 2003  [4] Arora  et  al.,  “The  Globalization  of  Software:  The  Case  of  the  Indian  Software  Industry”, Pittsburgh, USA, Carnegie Mellon University, 1997  [5] Arora et al., “The Indian Software Services Industry”, Pittsburgh, USA, Alfred P. Sloan  Foundation, 2000  [6] Arora,  Ashish  and  J.  Asundi,  “Quality  Certification  and  the  Economics  of  Contract  Software  Development:  A  Study  of  the  Indian  Software  Service  Companies”,  NBER  working paper 7260, Cambridge, MA., 1999  [7] Ashish  Arora,  V.S.  Arunachalam,  Jai  Asundi,  and  Ronald  Fernandes,  ʺThe  Indian  Software  Services  Industry:  Structure  and  Prospectsʺ,  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundation,  2001  [8] Arora,  Ashish,  Alfonso  Gambardella,  and  Salvatore  Torrisi,  “In  the  footsteps  of  the  Silicon  Valley?  Indian  and  Irish  software  in  the  international  division  of  labour”,  Stanford  Institute  for  Economic  Policy  Research  (SIEPR),  Stanford  University,  CA,  USA, June 2001  [9] Bajpai,  Nirupam  and  Vanita  Shastri,  Software  Industry  in  India:  A  Case  Study,  Development Discussion Paper # 667, Harvard Institute of International Development  (HIID), 1998  [10] Barr, Avron, and Shirely Tessler, Developing Sri Lanka’s Software Industry Report to  the Worldbank, Aldo Ventures, Inc., 2002  [11] Barr Avron, Shirely Tessler, William Miller, Korea and the Global Software Industry:  Final Report to the Korean IT Industry Promotion Agency, October 2002  [12] Barr,  Avron,  Shirley  Tessler,  and  Nagy  Hanna,  “National  Software  Industry  Development:  Considerations  for  Government  Planners”  in  Electronic  Journal  for  Information Systems in Developing Countries, 2003                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  119     
  • 120. [13] Bryan  Campbell, “OffShore  Development  Tips  and Techniques: Leveraging Offshore  Development  Centers”,  available  at  <http://www.bryancampbell.com/>,  visited  <October 2, 2002>  [14] Carmel, Erran, “Taxonomy of New Software Exporting Nations” in Electronic Journal  of Information Systems in Developing Countries (EJISDC), 2003  [15] Carmel, Erran, “The New Software Exporting Nations: Success Factors” in Electronic  Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries (EJISDC), 2003  [16] Chakrabarty, Chandana, and Dilip Dutta, Indian Software Industry: Growth Patterns,  Constraints, and Government Initiatives, undated  [17] Commander,  Simon,  What  explains  the  growth  of  a  Software  Industry  in  Some  Emerging Markets, DRC Working Papers # 22, London Business School, 2003  [18] Computer Society of Pakistan, ICT Manpower and Skills Survey 1999‐2000, SEARCC,  2000  [19] Coward,  Christopher  T.,  “Looking  Beyond  India:  Factors  that  Shape  the  Global  Outsourcing  Decisions  of  Small  and  Medium  Sized  Companies  in  America”  in  Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, 2003  [20] Crone,  Mike,“A  Profile  of  the  Irish  Software  Industry,  Northern  Ireland  Economic  Research Centre, Belfast, April 2002.  [21] Cusumano,  Michael,  and  Richard  W.  Shelby,  Microsoft  Secrets:  How  The  World’s  Most Powerful Software Company Creates Technology, Shapes Markets, and Manages  People, Profile Books, 1995  [22] Cusumano,  Michael,  Business  Models  that  Last:  Balancing  Products  and  Services  in  Software and Other Industries, Paper # 197, Center for e‐Business @ MIT, 2003  [23] Cusumano, Michael, Alan MacCormack, Chris F. Kremmer, and William Crandal, The  Global Survey of Software Development Practices, Paper # 178, Center for e‐Business  @ MIT, 2003  [24] Cusumano, Michael, The Business of Software, Free Press / Simon Schuster, 2004  [25] Dave,  Rishi,  ʺPatterns  of  Success  in  the  Indian  Software  Industryʺ,  Stanford,  USA,  undated  [26] DʹCosta,  “Technology  Leapfrogging:  Software  Industry  in  India”,  2nd  International  Conference  on  Technology  Policy  and  Innovation,  Calouste  Gulbenkian  Foundation,  Lisbon, 1998.                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  120     
  • 121. [27] Dutta,  Dilip,  Anna  Sekhar,  Major  Indian  ICT  Firms  and  Their  Approaches  Towards  Achieving Quality, ASARC Working Paper 2004‐04, University of Sydney, 2004  [28] Dutta, Soumitra, Selvan Kulandaiswamy and Luk N. Van Wassenhove, Benchmarking  European Software Management Practices, Research Initiative for Software Excellence,  INSEAD, undated.  [29] Experts  Advisory  Cell,  “Prospects  of  IT  Industry  in  Pakistan”,  Special  report  by  Experts Advisory Cell, Ministry of Industries and Production, May 2004  [30] Hassan, Zahoor Syed, “Software Industry Evolution in a Developing Country: An In  Depth Study”, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan, 2000  [31] Richard Heeks, “India’s Software Industry, State Policy, Liberalization, and Industrial  Development”, Sage Publications, New Delhi, India, 1996  [32] Heeks,  Richard,  ʺSoftware  Strategies  in  Developing  Countriesʺ,  Development  Informatics, Working Paper Series, Paper No. 6, Institute for Development Policy and  Management, University of Manchester, UK, June 1999  [33] Heeks,  Richard,  Su‐Ying  Lai  &  Brian  Nicholson  ʺUncertainty  and  Coordination  in  Global Software Projects: A UK/India‐Centred Case Studyʺ, Development Informatics,  Working  Paper  Series,  Paper  No.  17,  Institute  for  Development  Policy  and  Management, University of Manchester, UK, 2003  [34] Heeks,  Richard,  ʺThe  Uneven  Profile  of  Indian  Software  Exportsʺ,  Development  Informatics, Working Paper Series, Paper No. 3, Institute for Development Policy and  Management, University of Manchester, UK, October 1998  [35] Heeks, Richard, S. Krishna, Brian Nicholson & Sundeep Sahay, ʺSynching or Sinking:  Trajectories  and  Strategies  in  Global  Software  Outsourcing  Relationshipsʺ,  Development  Informatics,  Working  Paper  Series,  Paper  No.  9,  Institute  for  Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester, UK, July 2000  [36] Heeks, Richard & Brian Nicholson, ʺSoftware Export Success Factors and Strategies in  Developing  and  Transitional  Economiesʺ,  Development  Informatics,  Working  Paper  Series, Paper No. 12, Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of  Manchester, UK, 2002  [37] Hohenssohn,  Heidi,  and  Jiayin  Hang,  Product‐  and  Service  Related  Business  Models  for Open Source Software, Siemens Business Services, undated.  [38] Kakola, Timo, “Software Business Models and Contexts for Software Innovation: Key  Areas for Software Business Research” in Proceedings of HICSS’03, 2002  [39] Malik, Hameed, IT Sector Study Draft, United Nations Development Program, 2004                                        Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  121     
  • 122. [40] MOST,  Information  Technology  Policy,  Ministry  of  Science  and  Technology,  Government of Pakistan, undated  [41] NASSCOM, Strategic Review 2001: The IT Industry in India, 2001  [42] NASSCOM, Strategic Review 2002: The IT Industry in India, 2002  [43] NASSCOM,  “E‐Commerce  Opportunities  for  India  Inc.”,  NASSCOM‐BCG  Report,  2002  [44] NASSCOM, Strategic Review 2003: The IT Industry in India, 2003  [45] NASSCOM, Indian ITES‐BPO market, 2003  [46] NASSCOM, Strategic Review 2004: The IT Industry in India, 2004  [47] NASSCOM‐McKinsey,  “NASSCOM‐McKinsey  Report  2002,  Strategies  to  achieve  the  Indian IT industry’s aspiration”, NASSCOM‐McKinsey, 2002  [48] Nicholson, B., and Sundeep Sahay, Building Iran’s Software Industry: An Assessment  of  Plans  and  Prospects  Using  the  Software  Export  Success  Model,  Development  Informatics Paper # 15, 2003  [49] PASHA‐LUMS, PASHA‐LUMS Study on Software Industry of Pakistan, undated  [50]  Posio,  Tero,  From  Project  Business  to  Product  Business,  Briefing,  VTT  Technical  Research Center for Finland, 2003  [51] Rapp,  Willam  V.,  Customized  Software:  Strategies  for  Acquiring  and  Sustaining  Competitive Advantage: A Japanese Perspective, Center for Economic Relations with  Japan, University of Victoria, 1996                                                 Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  122     
  • 123. 11. NOTE ABOUT THE PRINCIPAL CONSULTANT & PROJECT ADVISORS/CONTRIBUTORS:  The  Principal  Consultant  for  this  project  was  Mr.  Athar  Osama.  The  Principal  Consultant  was  advised and  facilitated  by  Mr.  Najam  U  H  Kidwai  (CEO  CCMedia  Live  Inc.,  UK),  Mr.  Irfan  Virk  (CEO, CambridgeDocs, USA) and Dr. Zahir Syed, Director, Karachi Institute of Information Technology (KIIT). Several  other  individuals  contributed,  informally  and  formally,  to  this  report.  The  most  notable contribution  that  ranged  from  detailed  feedback  on  the  study  design  and  the  survey  instrument  and frequent comments, insights, and suggestions came from Mr. Jawwad Farid, CEO of Alchemy Associates Pvt.  Ltd.  Other  contributors  include:  Mr.  Zia  Imran,  Mr.  Nauman  A.  Sheikh,  Mr.  Zamir  Farooqi,  Mr. Sohaib Athar, Mr. Saqib Rashid, Ms. Ghazal Javed Beg, Mr. Raheel Zia, Ms. Rabia Garib, and Mr. Adnan Shahid.  The study was overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee comprising Dr. Aamir Matin, MD‐PSEB, Mr. Tariq Badsha, Member‐IT, MOITT, and Ms. Jehan Ara, President‐PASHA.   11. ABOUT THE AUTHOR / CONSULTANT Mr. Athar Osama is the Managing Partner at Technomics‐International, and a Doctoral Fellow at  the  Fredrick  S.  Pardee‐RAND  Graduate  School  (PRGS)  for  Public  Policy  in  Santa  Monica, California with a specialization in Technology and Innovation Policy. He has a Bachelors degree in  Avionics  engineering  (PAF  College  of  Aeronautical  Engineering,  Risalpur),  and  a  Masters degree  in  Public  Policy  (RAND  Graduate  School,  Santa  Monica),  as  well  as  a  post‐graduate qualification  in  Business  Administration  (IBA,  Karachi).  Athar  has  worked  widely  in  several areas of technology and innovation management and policy, including but not limited to, R&D and  innovation  policy,  regional  technology  policies,  technology  strategy,  techno‐market  risk assessment,  venture  capital  funds  in  developing  countries  and  public‐sector,  organizational strategy, performance, and incentives systems in R&D labs and high‐technology companies etc. He has also written widely (over 50 Op/Eds) for Pakistani Newspapers (Dawn, The News etc.) on  issues  related  to  technology  and  economics.  Athar  has  also  presented  at  a  number  of conferences,  representing  Pakistan  and  otherwise,  including  the  World  Energy  Congress (Tokyo, 1995; Houston, 1998) and the Research Symposium for Next Generation of Leaders in Science and Technology Policy (Washington DC, 2002) organized by the American Association of  Advancement  of  Science  (AAAS).  Athar  is  the  founder  of  the  Pakistan  Research  Support Network—a  virtual  group  of  over  1200  Pakistani  researchers  and  research‐enthusiasts (students)  from  around  the  world.  Athar  may  be  contacted  for  comments  and  suggestions  at ProudPakistani@ieee.org.                                            Pakistan’s Software Industry: Best Practices & Strategic Challenges 2005  123     

×