Kinds of sentence
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Kinds of sentence

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includes,kinds of sentences according to purpose, use,order, fragments, basic sentence pattern, sentence structure like subject and predicate

includes,kinds of sentences according to purpose, use,order, fragments, basic sentence pattern, sentence structure like subject and predicate

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    Kinds of sentence Kinds of sentence Presentation Transcript

    • Lesson 1 Sentence Structures
    • Sentence • A sentence is a group of related words expressing a complete thought. Incomplete: “The rich young man.” “Cured the sick and fed the hungry.” Complete: “The rich young man asked the Great Teacher a serious question.” “Jesus cured the sick and fed the hungry.”
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate • THE SUBJECT OF THE SENTENCE -part of the sentence about which something is being said. *the subject is often a noun or a pronoun. “He answers our prayers.” *an adjective may also be used as subject. It is preceded by the article the and is followed by the plural form of the verb. “The meek will possess the earth.” *a gerund (the –ing form of the verb) may be used as a subject. “Preaching and teaching were Jesus’ main preoccupation when he was on earth.”
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate *adverbs may also be used as subjects. “Tomorrow is a vision of hope.” • THE PREDICATE OF THE SENTENCE -part of the sentence that says something about the subject. “People/ need spiritual nourishment.” • COMPLETE SUBJECTS and COMPLETE PREDICATES *Complete Subject contains the noun, pronoun, or group of words acting as a noun, plus their modifiers, that tells who or what the sentence is all about.
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate *Complete Predicate contains the verb or verb phrase, plus any modifiers or complements, that tells what the complete subject does or is. Complete Subject Complete Predicate Life is sacred. Taking in Scriptural knowledge lead to everlasting life. God’s love for us moves us to obey Him.
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate • SIMPLE SUBJECTS and SIMPLE PREDICATES *simple subject is the main word/s in the complete subject. “The Sermon on the Mount was delivered in Gallilee.” “Jesus’ first miracle was performed in Cana.” *simple predicate is the verb or verb phrase. It is the main word/s in the complete predicate. “He turned several jars of water into wine.” “True Christians follow Jesus’ example.”
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate • FINDING TRUE SUBJECTS 1. In the usual pattern of English sentences, the subject appears before the verb. “Simon Peter became a disciple.” “He was one of the twelve.” 2. In some sentences, all or part of the verb appears before the subject. a. The verb may precede the subject in a question. “Where are the dead?” “Why does God permit suffering?”
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate b. For variety, some sentences are inverted. That is, they are purposely written so that the subject follows the verb. “Into a lonely place went the Great Teacher to pray and choose his twelve disciples.” 3. To find the true subject of a sentence, first find the verb. Then ask who? or what? 4. The subject of an imperative sentence is always the word you, the person/s being addressed. “(You) Pray incessantly.”
    • Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate • COMPOUND SUBJECTS and VERBS *compound subject has two or more simple subjects joined by a conjunction. “The Jews and the Samaritans were related.” “Peter and James became fishers of men.” *compound verb consists of two or more verbs that are joined by a conjunction. “Jesus cured the sick, fed the hungry and raised the dead.” “The disciples preached the good news and baptized repentant ones.”
    • Lesson 2 Order in Sentences
    • Order in Sentences 1. Natural Order -subject at the beginning. Example: “The seagulls fly through the air.” 2. Inverted Order - subject at the end. Example: “Through the air fly the seagulls.”
    • Order in Sentences 3. Split Order -subject in the middle. Example: “Through the air the seagulls fly.”
    • Kinds of Sentences Lesson 3 According To Purpose
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Purpose 1. Declarative Sentence -makes a statement - ends with a period (.) “God created the first man, Adam.” 2. Interrogative Sentence - asks a question - ends with a question mark (?) “What is God’s purpose for mankind?”
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Purpose 3. Imperative Sentence - gives command or makes a request - ends with a period (.) or an exclamation mark (!) “(You) Please teach us how to pray.” 4. Exclamatory Sentence - expresses strong feelings such as joy, anger, sadness, excitement, and fear - ends with exclamation mark (!) “What an extraordinary prospect for mankind!”
    • Lesson 4 Kinds of Sentences According To Structure
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Structure 1. Simple Sentence - made up of one independent clause with no subordinate clause. Possible Variations of Simple Sentence: *One Subject and Verb: “The siren sounded.” *Compound Subject: “Ice cream and cookies are my two favorite desserts.”
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Structure *Compound Verb: “My sister acts and sings in the play.” *Compound Subject and Verb: “Frank and Bill crossed the mountain but failed to reach the campsite by nightfall.”
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Structure 2. Compound Sentence - made up of two or more independent clauses with no subordinate clause. -joined by coordinating conjunctions (FANBOYS) and a semicolon (;) “The disciples expected a small crowd, but thousands of people came.” “The Pharisees were self-righteous and arrogant; the Great Teacher was mild-tempered and kind-hearted.”
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Structure 3. Complex Sentence - made up of one independent clause and one or more subordinate clauses. “When Andrew saw Jesus, he was sure he had found the Messiah.” “The disciple, who betrayed God’s son, killed himself.”
    • Kinds of Sentences According To Structure 4. Compound-Complex Sentence - made up of two or more independent clauses and one or more subordinate clauses. “Israel was God’s chosen nation, but since the Jews rejected God’s son, Jesus, God also rejected them.”
    • Lesson 5 Basic Sentence Patterns
    • Basic Sentence Patterns 1. S-V Pattern (subject-verb)-simplest pattern “Everyone listened.” *Modifiers do not affect the sentence pattern. “Everyone in the crowd listened to the teacher.” *S-V Pattern remains unchanged even though the verb may appear before the subject, as in a question or an inverted sentence. “In Jesus Christ rests the hope for mankind.”
    • Basic Sentence Patterns 2. S-LV-PN Pattern -predicate nominative is defined as a noun or pronoun that follows a linking verb and renames or identifies the subject of the sentence. “The first book of the Bible is Genesis.” 3. S-LV-PA Pattern -predicate adjective is an adjective that follows a linking verb. “I am happy about your change of heart.”
    • Basic Sentence Patterns 4. S-TV-DO Pattern -direct object is a word or group of words that receives the action of the transitive verb. It answers the question what? Or whom? “The Pharisees questioned the disciples.” [Whom did the Pharisees questioned?] “She has read the daily text.” [What has she read?]
    • Basic Sentence Patterns When a sentence contains a direct object, its sentence pattern is S-TV-DO. “Young David killed a lion to save his flock.” “King Saul tried to kill him.” Direct objects may be nouns, pronouns, phrases or clauses. “Joseph loved his brothers.”(noun) “He checked on them on his father’s order.”(pronoun) “His brothers denied being jealous of him.”(phrase) “Do you know how Joseph’s story ended?”(clause)
    • Basic Sentence Patterns 5. S-TV-IO-DO Pattern -indirect object is a word that tells to whom or for whom the action of the transitive verb is done. The indirect object always comes immediately before the direct object. S TV IO DO “ Jacob gave Joseph a long shirt-like garment.” S TV IO “He asked his elder sons where Joseph was.”
    • Basic Sentence Patterns 6. S-TV-DO-OC Pattern - objective complement is a noun or an adjective that completes the meaning of the transitive verb and refers to the direct object. S TV DO OC “Pharaoh made Joseph overseer of his kingdom.” S TV DO OC OC “He considered Joseph wise and compassionate.”
    • Basic Sentence Patterns Objective components follow only the following action verbs: appoint consider make choose elect name
    • Lesson 6 Fragments
    • Fragments A sentence fragment is a group of words written incorrectly as a complete sentence. PHRASE FRAGMENTS Prepositional Phrase Example: “Without much experience in ruling. Young Josiah began to reign.” Correction: “Without much experience in ruling, young Josiah began to reign.”
    • Fragments Appositive Phrase Example: “Noah and his family built an ark. A three-storey structure that would float in water.” Correction: “Noah and his family built an ark, three-storey structure that would float in water.”
    • Fragments Infinitive Phrase Example: “This is all God expects. To obey his commandments.” Correction: “All God expects is for people to obey his commandments.”
    • Fragments CLAUSES FRAGMENTS Adjective Clause Example: “I read the Bible. Which was the King James version.” Correction: “I read the King James version of the Bible.”
    • Fragments Adverb Clause Example: “Peter had denied. Jesus three times. Before the cock crew.” Correction: “Before the cock crew, Peter had denied Jesus three times.”
    • Lesson 7 Simple Tenses
    • Simple Tenses Tense is the change in the form of the verb t show whether the time is past, present, or future. 1. Present Tense -shows the action occurring now, in the present. Example: Today I climb the stump. 2. Past Tense - shows action that occurred in the past. Example: Yesterday I climbed that rock. 3. Future Tense – shows action that will occur in the future. example: Tomorrow I will climb that rock.
    • Bibliography: – Basic English Grammar Course Workbook by Marie Rackham – English Pamphlet. Published by HYDN Publishing – Prentice Hall: Grammar and Composition