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Sentence Structure

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Powerpoint Presentation about the structure of the various sentence patterns in English.

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Sentence Structure

  1. 1. This presentation includes explanations and examples of the structure of Simple Sentences, Compound Sentences, Complex Sentences and Compound – Complex Sentences. The images do not belong to me and are not used under any sort of lucrative circumstance. Their purpose is only to make this teaching material more appealing for my students.
  2. 2. Subject Verb My dog died. Careful! Only Intransitive Verbs can be used with this pattern. Simple Sentences: Pattern # 1
  3. 3. Simple Sentences: Pattern # 2 Subject Verb Direct Object She ate a hot dog. Careful! This pattern works only with Transitive Verbs.
  4. 4. Simple Sentences: Pattern # 3 Subject Linking Verb Subject Complement He is a good singer. Remember! A complement is a noun phrase, an adjective phrase, a single noun or a single adjective. Common Linking Verbs: BE, BECOME, LOOK, SMELL, SOUND, TASTE, FEEL, SEEM.
  5. 5. Simple Sentences: Pattern # 4 Subject Verb Direct Object Object Complement The girl left the door open. Remember! A complement is a noun phrase, an adjective phrase, a single noun or a single adjective.
  6. 6. Simple Sentences: Pattern # 5 Remember! In this pattern, the order of the objects may be switched like this: Subject Verb Indirect Object Direct Object He gave his teacher an apple. He gave an apple to his teacher.
  7. 7. Compound Sentences: Pattern # 1 Independent Clause ; Independent Clause I love apples; they are my favorite fruit. Careful! Avoid joining sentence fragments or dependent clauses with a semicolon.
  8. 8. Independent Clause, Compound Sentences: Pattern # 2 Coordinating Conjunction Independent Clause He ate pizza, and she ate a salad. Remember! Use a comma before the coordinator. Also, keep in mind that FANBOYS will help you remember the coordinating conjunctions below: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So.
  9. 9. Independent Clause; Independent Clause Compound Sentences: Pattern # 3 Conjunctive Adverb, I don’t like math; however, I know it is very important. Remember! You may also use transitional phrases with this pattern. Observe… I don’t like math; on the other hand, I know it is very important.
  10. 10. Independent Clause Complex Sentences: Pattern # 1 Subordinating Conjunction Dependent Clause Juan has been very happy since he passed his English exam. Remember! This pattern does not require a comma. Most common Subordinating Conjunctions: After, Although, As if, Because, Before, Since, Unless, Until, When, While, etc.
  11. 11. Complex Sentences: Pattern # 2 Dependent Clause, Subordinating Conjunction Independent Clause Since he passed his English exam, Juan has been very happy Remember! When a complex sentence begins with the subordinating conjunction and a dependent clause, you have to separate the clauses with a COMMA.
  12. 12. Compound – Complex Sentences: Pattern # 1 Remember! In this pattern, you may combine several dependent or independent clauses in different ways, but make sure you use the right linking words and punctuation to join them. Independent Clause Coordinating Conjunction Complex Sentence He loves parties, but he won’t go to prom because he is sick.

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