Transferable Skills: Identifying and Marketing Your Unique Value to Non-LIS Employers
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Transferable Skills: Identifying and Marketing Your Unique Value to Non-LIS Employers

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Presentation by Kim Dority & Scott Brown to the Rocky Mountain SLA Chapter, November 15, 2012.

Presentation by Kim Dority & Scott Brown to the Rocky Mountain SLA Chapter, November 15, 2012.

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Transferable Skills: Identifying and Marketing Your Unique Value to Non-LIS Employers Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Kim Dority & Scott Brown SLA Rocky Mountain Chapter November 15, 2012© 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 1
  • 2. Where are we going today? Today we’ll focus on:  Identifying your skills that transfer into multiple career opportunities  Translating those skills into non-LIS language  Finding opportunities (i.e., job openings) for which those skills are appropriate © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 2
  • 3. Last time: Roles & SkillsWhat are all of your qualities and roles? © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 3
  • 4. Exercise: Roles, qualities & skillsWhat are the details of those skills? Volunteer Event planning  Planned 14 continuing education meetings over an entire year for 200-member regional association, bringing in revenue to the association treasury  Recruited, scheduled and coordinated speakers for each event  Sought and secured funding from local, national and international vendors for events  Managed registration and advertising for events © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 4
  • 5. 5How could your skills combine?  LIS + Nursing  Medical librarian  Patient advocate  And….. © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 6. 6• Competitive intelligence specialist for bioinformatics, medical research, pharmaceutical company• Information director for clinical research/academic health center• Records manager for managed healthcare company• Content developer for consumer health website• Business analyst, medical industry venture capital group• Librarian for healthcare-related professional organization © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 7. 7• Research-guide developer for consumer health topics• Current-awareness research for clinics, doctors, patients• Consumer health specialist for public library• Grant-writer, prospect researcher for community health organization• Teacher of medical-research course for nursing program © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 8. Learning more…about invisible jobs Invisible LIS jobs are sometimes tough to “unearth,” but more and more LIS professionals are ending up in these roles  Embedded librarianship  Embedded/integrated information professionals  What are these positions called?  Sample keywords and job titles  “Off the beaten track” sources © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 8
  • 9. Invisible jobs – where do I look? A few examples  “Off the beaten track”  EDUCAUSE: http://jobs.educause.edu/jobs  Non-profit:  http://www.coloradononprofits.org/career- center/nonprofit-jobs  http://www.redcross.org/about-us/careers  Employer sites: http://nikeinc.com/pages/careers © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 9
  • 10. Invisible jobs – where do I look? A few examples  Local  Oregon: http://www.oregonlive.com/jobs/  Twitter lists  https://twitter.com/scbrown5/infojobs  http://listorious.com © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 10
  • 11. 11Yes, they’re really there © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 12. 12Yes, they’re really there © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 13. Translating LIS language LIS-Wording Non-LIS WordingReference Information needs assessment Research (possibly research and analysis) Customer service (see also Research)Cataloging Information analysis Metadata assignment Records management / access and retrieval Taxonomy-building © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 13
  • 14. Translating LIS language LIS-Wording Non-LIS WordingAcquisitions Contract negotiation/management Content licensing Purchasing management Vendor relationsResearch Research analysis and synthesis Business or data analysis Market research Product development support Competitive intelligence Donor/prospect research © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 14
  • 15. What do you do?Contrast: Cataloger“I know MARC and XML, and I’ve cataloged books, videos, periodicals, and other media in a public library.”“I make sure important information is findable by making it as accessible as possible through tagging and cataloging quickly and efficiently.” © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 15
  • 16. What do you do?Contrast: Cataloger“I know MARC and XML, and I’ve cataloged books, videos, periodicals, and other media in a public library.”> This one says: “Zzzzzzzzz….”“I make sure important information is findable by making it as accessible as possible through tagging and cataloging quickly and efficiently.” >This one says, “I kick ass!” © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 16
  • 17. Back to your skills - KeywordsLook for the jobs you want and synch them up Job postings Resume/LinkedIn  Targeted to one job  Targeted to the types of jobs you want © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 17
  • 18. Keywords © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 18
  • 19. Keywords © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 19
  • 20. KeywordsIn LinkedIn, use them in: Summary Specialties Experience descriptions Volunteer work Education Interests Skills (if they match up with LinkedIn skills) © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 20
  • 21. Transitioning across borders Things to keep in mind © N-Media-Images - Fotolia.com © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 21
  • 22. Watch for words that hide specifics Trained Taught or instructed Assisted Provided Participated in Oversaw Worked with Served (on a board or committee) © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 22
  • 23. Multiple “identities” in social mediaLinkedIn – what do I do if I’m transitioning, or combining multiple “lives”? Write about your experience and skills more generically – more skills-based than industry-based It’s possible to create more than one LinkedIn account, and this may be a best option – but consider those searching for your profile, and how to manage in the future You may not have a perfect solution – and so maybe blogging or Twitter may be a better option © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 23
  • 24. Pop quiz: key take-aways? Your information skills can be broadly applied (transferred) across a multitude of job opportunities and industries To identify your strongest (or most rewarding) transferable skills, consider all the aspects of current and previous roles, both professional and personal © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 24
  • 25. Key take-aways (con’t) Then research potential areas of interest to see what words are used to describe your “LIS” skills – this will also help you discover those invisible jobs Also - you may have developed and mastered additional transferable skills that have nothing to do with your LIS knowledge/expertise – don’t hesitate to embrace these opportunities as well © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown 25
  • 26. 26 Upcoming webinars• So Tell Me About Yourself: Personal and ProfessionalBranding for LIS Students and Professionals, December 20,2012, 2pm ETSign up at http://rockymountain.sla.org/tag/virtual-programs/ © 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown
  • 27. 27Questions© 2012 Kim Dority & Scott Brown