LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)     ...
LSU Post-Katrina Research  on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience                     Data Basis:        7,000 interv...
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   Maps of Flooding & Damage                  Rick Wei...
Mapped from U.S. Geological Survey Data
Mapped from City of New Orleans Data
Source: LSU Disaster Recovery Survey
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)    D...
We have Partnered with lots of Organizations     in Conducting Surveys (some listed)     7th Ward Neighborhood Center     ...
Images of Data Collection:Pontchartrain Park & Gentilly Woods (Pontilly),                January 2008 We worked with the P...
Images of Data Collection:          Interviewing Door-to-Doorin Tremé and the Seventh Ward, Summer 2009
Images of Data Collection:Young Men Olympians Social Aid & Pleasure Club         (Central City), January 2009   We worked ...
Images of Data Collection:Interviewing with the Vietnamese-language  Questionnaire at a Respondent’s Home      in Village ...
Images of Data Collection:Renaissance Village, FEMA Trailer Park, July 2007   We worked with the resident leaders of Renai...
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)   Hy...
Hypotheses: Individual & Collective Resources               and Recovery                               Individual-Level Re...
Compensating Collective (“Institutional”) Resources:        The Verba-Nie-Kim Hypotheses.                                 ...
Hypotheses: Storm Damage, Resources, and Recovery: Individual & Collective Paths to Hurricane Recovery
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)  Ind...
Individual Level Regressions: Social Capital, Higher Social Status, Low Damage, & Resources Promote                 Recove...
Individual Level: Social Capital Reduces Stress:                     Church Attendance is most effective                  ...
LSU Post-Katrina Research    on Disaster Recovery & Community ResilienceIn Partnership with New Orleans Community Leaders ...
Civic Engagement in                  Selected Social Groups                   Civic Engagement in Selected Social Groups  ...
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)     ...
With a large enough N (7,000), we can aggregate (average) data   to geographical districts and conduct aggregate analyses....
Repopulation Data (from Postal deliveries)             Can be analyzed with our aggregated survey data. Sources: HUD; USPS...
Blight Data can be analyzed in the same way.Sources: HUD; USPS;City of New Orleans
Aggregate Level:                   Social Capital and Higher Social Status promote                    Repopulation and red...
For instance, Church MembershipIs associated with Reduced Violent CrimeSurvey Data (N = 2,648) & Police Reports, Aggregate...
Aggregate Level:          Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime:                       1. Bivariate Correla...
Aggregate Level:Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime:        2. Standard Multivariate Regressions         ...
Aggregate Level:Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime:              3. Spatial Regressions                F...
LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience    (Supported by the National Science Foundation)Par...
The Neighborhoods Partnership Network (NPN)              A nonprofit, citywide network of neighborhoods.  We have collabor...
The Neighborhoods Partnership Network (NPN):   Neighborhood Associations that Responded to our Survey              Note: S...
Example of Blight Reduction:    1. Storm Damage       Source: City of New Orleans
Example of Blight Reduction:2. Blight (average over time)      Source: U.S. Postal Service, HUD
Example of Blight Reduction:3. Blight Reduction in the Flooded Areas            Source: U.S. Postal Service, HUD
Example of Blight Reduction:4. Demolitions by the City in 2011   Sources: U.S. Postal Service, HUD; City of New Orleans
Example of Blight Reduction:                    Social Capital’s Effect on Reducing Blight:                             1....
Example of Blight Reduction:              Social Capital’s Effect on Reducing Blight:               2. Multiple Regression...
Example of Blight Reduction:  Neighborhood Associations’ Effect on Reducing Blight:               3. Multiple Regressions ...
Analyses for “Sweet Home New Orleans:”   Where did Musicians from Flooded Areas Move?
Analyses for “Sweet Home New Orleans:”    Musicians have a harder time Earning a Living
The “Roots of Music”   After-school music program for middle school kids.     Social Action Research: Building social capi...
Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans: Where did people from Flooded Areas Move?
Vietnamese and Jewish Community Leaders       Comparing Notes on Recovery Strategies.Item: It’s not all “Culture.” Lots of...
NOLA YURP (Young Urban Rebuilding Professionals) “Brain Gain:”             Where are they from?    New Young Leader survey...
LSU Post-Katrina Research  on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience     (Supported by the National Science Foundation)A...
Some of the people and groups                     We have filmed and plan to film7th Ward                                 ...
A few of the community leaders we have filmed                         Al Petrie, Lakeview   Katherine Prevost, Upper 9th W...
LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience    (Supported by the National Science Foundation)Com...
Community Strategies and Resources              for Recovery 1• Increasing organizational capacity and  autonomy.  – Use o...
Community Strategies and Resources               for Recovery 2• Greater strategic sophistication.  – Creating “Critical M...
Community Strategies and Resources            for Recovery 3• Increasing citizen participation.   – People who had never p...
Community Strategies and Resources               for Recovery 4• Emergence of new Umbrella Groups from  outside the organi...
Community Strategies and Resources              for Recovery 5• New recovery resources from “Outside-inside”  the communit...
Cautions and Implications for          Future Policy and Actions 1• Lower and middle- status citizens must be  able to ove...
Cautions and Implications for           Future Policy and Actions 2• Citizens must overcome government  resistance to thei...
Cautions and Implications for          Future Policy and Actions 3• Communities must find ways to sustain  participation b...
LSU Post-Katrina Surveys      in Baton Rouge:      Impact on the Community;     Helping cope with the Disaster            ...
Half the households in Baton Rouge housed Evacuees       … almost entirely relatives and friends.       Evacuees Staying i...
Two thirds of people in Baton Rouge did       volunteer relief work – most more than once.      Most of them volunteered w...
Social Capital and Stress        People with the best social networks were initially most       stressed because they were...
LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience   (Supported by the National Science Foundation)     ...
Weil, LSU Post-Katrina Survey - 120409 - Doug Ahler's Class
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  1. 1. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  2. 2. LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience Data Basis: 7,000 interviews in main Household Survey over 10,000 total interviews, all surveysca. 100 interviews with Neighborhood Association Leaders Ethnographic research with over 200 groups over 100 Filmed interviews, with ca. forty more planned
  3. 3. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience Maps of Flooding & Damage Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  4. 4. Mapped from U.S. Geological Survey Data
  5. 5. Mapped from City of New Orleans Data
  6. 6. Source: LSU Disaster Recovery Survey
  7. 7. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Data Collection Challenges Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  8. 8. We have Partnered with lots of Organizations in Conducting Surveys (some listed) 7th Ward Neighborhood Center DeSaix Area Neighborhood Association LouisianaRebuilds.info RALLY Foundation Lower 9th Ward NBH Empowerment Acorn, Baton Rouge Desire Area Residents Council Network Assn Rand Acorn, New Orleans Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana Lutheran Disaster Response Red Cross, New Orleans Mary Queen of Vietnam Catholic Church & American Red Cross Faith Temple Church of God The Holy Ghost CDC Red Cross, St. Bernard Parish Backbeat Foundation, Inc Family Road of GBR Mater Dolorosa Church Renaissance Village Council Bard College FEMA McKendall Estates Homeowners Assoc. Roots of Music Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Miracle Faith Healing and Deliverance Organizing First Baptist Church of Houma Temple Save the Children USA Beacon of Hope Resource Center Freret Neighborhood Center Mount Nebo Bible Baptist Church Second Gretaer Mount Sinai MBC Broadmoor Development Corporation Gentilly Civic Improvement Association Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Shir Chadash Synagogue Broadmoor Improvement Association Gert Town Enterprise Econ Redevelopment Neighborhoods Partnership Network Spring Lake Neighborhood AssociationCampus-Community Partnerships, Tulane Gert Town Revival Intiative Neighbors United Association St. Dominic Catholic Church Capital Area Human Services District GNOCDC - GNO Community Data Center New Orleans Bible Fellowship B.C. St. Gabriel the Archangel in New Orleans N.O. Social Aid and Pleasure Club Task Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans GNO Fair Housing Action Center Housing Force St. Louis King of France Catholic Church Catholic Charities Hands On Baton Rouge New Orleans Times-Picayune St. Maria Goretti Catholic Church Catholic Communtiy Services Hands On New Orleans New Orleans United Way St. Paul AME Church Central Carrollton Association Harmony Outreach Services NOLA YURP Initiative St. Peter Claver Catholic Church Central City Partnership Hollygrove Neighbors NOLACPP, Citizen Participation Project Sugar Hill FEMA Trailer Park Central City Renaissance Alliance Holy Cross Neighborhood Association Nonprofit Central Sweet Home New OrleansChabad Lubavitch of Louisiana - Metairie Institute of Southern Jewish Life Northshore Jewish Congregation Temple Sinai Chabad Lubavitch of Louisiana - Uptown Jeremiah Group Operation Brothers Keeper [Red Cross] Touro Synagogue Christian Unity Baptist Church Jericho Road Operation Nehemiah Terrebonne Readiness Assistance Coalition Churches Supporting Churches Jewish Family Service Our Lady of Prompt Succor Church Trinity Christian Community City-Works Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans Oxfam America United Jewish Communities Claiborne-University Neighborhood Assn Jewish Womens Archive Plymouth Rock Baptist Church United Methodist Hope Ministries PNOLA: The Phoenix of N.O. United Way for the Greater New Orleans Community Center of St. Bernard Katrina Aid Today (Tulane/Gravier) Area Concordia LLC Kids with Cameras Policy Link Urban Conservancy + Stay Local! Congregation Anshe Sphard Lakeview Civic Improvement Association Pontilly Neighborhood Association Ursuline Academy Congregation Beth Israel Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Orgs PRC Compassion WWOZ Congregation Gates of Prayer Louisiana Delta Service Corps [Americorps] Providence Community Housing Hurricane Response, Renaissance Village Young Men Olympians Social Aid & Pleasure Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church Louisiana Family Recovery Corps Puentes Club
  9. 9. Images of Data Collection:Pontchartrain Park & Gentilly Woods (Pontilly), January 2008 We worked with the Pontilly Neighborhood Association, who brought in 40 lawstudent volunteers from around the country. We went door-to-door with them, doing the survey, and shared the results with the community.
  10. 10. Images of Data Collection: Interviewing Door-to-Doorin Tremé and the Seventh Ward, Summer 2009
  11. 11. Images of Data Collection:Young Men Olympians Social Aid & Pleasure Club (Central City), January 2009 We worked with the Young Men Olympians, the oldest Social Aid & Pleasure Club, celebrating its 125th anniversary, and student volunteers from New Orleans colleges. We shared a meal & danced to the Free Agents Brass Band.
  12. 12. Images of Data Collection:Interviewing with the Vietnamese-language Questionnaire at a Respondent’s Home in Village De l’Est, Summer 2009
  13. 13. Images of Data Collection:Renaissance Village, FEMA Trailer Park, July 2007 We worked with the resident leaders of Renaissance Village, served a Jambalaya dinner, brought in a New Orleans brass band … and conducted the survey with the help of 30 resident volunteers.
  14. 14. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Hypotheses About Recovery:Individual and Collective Resources Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  15. 15. Hypotheses: Individual & Collective Resources and Recovery Individual-Level Resources Yes No High to Medium level of High level of Recovery. Recovery. Yes e.g. Vietnamese community; e.g. Jewish community SAPC members Collective Resources High to Medium level of Low level of Recovery. Recovery.(Social Capital) No (Rare: High Individual-Level Resources usually permit formation of Collective e.g. Renaissance Village Resources, as needed)
  16. 16. Compensating Collective (“Institutional”) Resources: The Verba-Nie-Kim Hypotheses. 100 People With Collective Resources Collective Resources help People Compensate for the Lack of Individual-Level People with Resources Individual-Level Resources (only) 0 Source: Sidney Verba, Norman H. Nie, Jae-on Kim, Participation and Political Equality: A Seven-Nation Comparison. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1978, page 85. (Plus own diagram.)
  17. 17. Hypotheses: Storm Damage, Resources, and Recovery: Individual & Collective Paths to Hurricane Recovery
  18. 18. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Individual-Level Data Analyses Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  19. 19. Individual Level Regressions: Social Capital, Higher Social Status, Low Damage, & Resources Promote Recovery and reduce Negative Outcomes. Stay or Return Personal Depressed, Social Social State of Spiritual Punitive to N.O. Recovery Stress Anxious Hopeful Solidarity Conflict Health Theology TheologyDemographic Age .08** -.01 .01 .03* -.02 .05** -.08** -.13** -.01 -.05** Female .04** -.01 .14** .11** .03+ .02 -.03* -.01 .07** -.02 Education .01 .00 -.02 .09** .03 -.01 -.05** .16** -.09** -.13** Estimated Income -.01 .11** -.08** -.04+ -.04* -.06** -.03 .14** -.03+ .01 Unemployed -.07** -.11** .08** .06** -.04* -.03* .03* -.05* .00 .03 Married w Children .00 .01 .01 .01 .00 .04* -.02 .01 .01 -.01 Black .09** -.07** -.14** -.19** .03+ .04** -.05** -.07** .21** -.03 Time since Katrina .07** .07** -.02 -.03 -.02 .03+ .07** -.01 .01 -.03+Damage & Resources Damage to Residence -.13** -.33** .12** .11** .00 -.01 .00 -.04+ .01 .05** Damage to Business -.08** -.07** .02 .03+ .00 .00 -.02 -.05* -.01 .06** Have Resources for Repair .08** .23** -.13** -.09** .08** .04* -.03* .12** -.01 -.04**Social Capital Associational Involvement .05+ .02 -.08** -.04+ .02 .07** .03 .03 .10** .00 Civic Leadership .02 -.01 .10** .08** .04 .06** .11** .00 -.02 .09** Informal Socializing -.03 .03+ -.02 -.02 .01 .09** .01 .17** .03+ -.04* Social Trust .11** .04** -.14** -.13** .14** .19** -.08** .03 .03+ -.12**Faith-Based Social Capital Church service attendance -.05** -.03+ -.06** -.11** -.04* .00 -.02 -.01 .24** -.10** Spiritual Theology .07** -.01 .09** .08** .20** .37** .08** .02 - - Punitive Theology -.05** -.04** .24** .15** -.07** -.03+ .27** -.06** - - Adj R-Sq .08 .30 .20 .13 .08 .24 .14 .20 .16 .06
  20. 20. Individual Level: Social Capital Reduces Stress: Church Attendance is most effective Angry Trouble concentrating80% 50% 40%60% 30% 20%40% 10%20% 0% No flood damage Up to 8 feet Over 8 feet No flood damage Up to 8 feet Over 8 feet Attend Church Every Week Less Attend Church Every Week Less
  21. 21. LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community ResilienceIn Partnership with New Orleans Community Leaders (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Total Number of interviews = ca. 7,000 Comparison of Selected Groups Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  22. 22. Civic Engagement in Selected Social Groups Civic Engagement in Selected Social Groups (Showing percentage points above or below New Orleans average)20%15%10% 5% 0%-5%-10% FEMA Vietnamese Black Church White High Income High Jewish SAPC Trailers Member Education Member
  23. 23. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Aggregate Data Analyses Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  24. 24. With a large enough N (7,000), we can aggregate (average) data to geographical districts and conduct aggregate analyses. We use Census Tracts, the finest (smallest) district size we can, consistent with reliable averages per district.
  25. 25. Repopulation Data (from Postal deliveries) Can be analyzed with our aggregated survey data. Sources: HUD; USPS; Valassis &Greater New Orleans Community Data Center
  26. 26. Blight Data can be analyzed in the same way.Sources: HUD; USPS;City of New Orleans
  27. 27. Aggregate Level: Social Capital and Higher Social Status promote Repopulation and reduce Negative Outcomes. Correlations Correlations Repopulation Damage Blight CrimeAssociational Involvement Associational Involvement Civic Engagement Civic Engagement Perform Service Perform Service Attended public meeting Attended public meeting Social Trust Social Trust Education Education Income Income Disadvantage Index Disadvantage Index Percent Black Percent Black -.30 -.20 -.10 .00 .10 .20 .30 .40 -.50 -.25 .00 .25 .50
  28. 28. For instance, Church MembershipIs associated with Reduced Violent CrimeSurvey Data (N = 2,648) & Police Reports, Aggregated to Neighborhood Level (N = 62)
  29. 29. Aggregate Level: Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime: 1. Bivariate Correlations Survey Data (N = 6,945) & Aggregate Data at Tract Level (N = 182) Bivariate Correlations All White BlackNatural Log (Ln) Rates Combined Murder Assault Combined Murder Assault Combined Murder AssaultAssociational Involvement -.414** -.327** -.383** -.388** -.412** -.336** -.248** -.050 -.276**Civic Engagement -.444** -.355** -.396** -.357** -.336** -.301* -.280** -.094 -.290**Church member -.283** -.219** -.359** -.425** -.361** -.439** -.297** -.231* -.396**Church service attendance .086 .143 -.059 -.204 -.232 -.184 -.118 .020 -.332**Social Trust -.596** -.508** -.525** -.512** -.429** -.485** -.386** -.237* -.344**Inter-Racial Trust -.258** -.199** -.299** -.274* -.194 -.289* -.019 .027 -.157ACS 2005-09 Median household income -.646** -.565** -.622** -.497** -.448** -.539** -.547** -.324** -.482**Disadvantage Index (from ACS 2005-09) .522** .489** .335** .370** .486** .307* .308** .159 .032ACS 2005-09 Pct Non-Hispanic Black .549** .559** .405** .396** .514** .320** .124 .146 -.057ACS 2005-09 Pct Age 15-34 .016 .112 -.007 -.077 .052 -.044 .002 .085 -.062ACS 2005-09 Pct Vacant Housing Units .486** .342** .391** .434** .253* .461** .401** .220* .180
  30. 30. Aggregate Level:Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime: 2. Standard Multivariate Regressions Survey Data (N = 6,945) & Aggregate Data at Tract Level (N = 198) Multiple Regressions Combined Crime Rate (Natural Log) Wh Bl InterAct ACS 2005-09 Median household income -.012 -.011 ACS 2005-09 Pct Population 25+ HS or Less .053 .053 .055 ACS 2005-09 Unemployed over Age 16 -.121+ -.121+ -.128+ -.113+ -.099 ACS 2005-09 Pct Below Poverty level .101 .100 .105 .105 .124+ .134* .189 .166+ .134* ACS 2005-09 Pct Age 15-34 -.097+ -.097+ -.095+ -.111* -.125* -.108* -.234* -.082 -.110* ACS 2005-09 Pct Married-couple family -.088 -.088 -.092 -.100 ACS 2005-09 Pct Vacant Housing Units .153+ .151* .150* .143* .105+ .156** .103 .225** .156** Mean Blight 2006-2010 (USPS-HUD) -.003 ACS 2005-09 Pct Owner Occupied -.209+ -.210+ -.216* -.236* -.324** -.252** -.302+ -.273** -.254** ACS 2005-09 Pct Non-Hispanic Black .163+ .162+ .163* .209** .208** .162* .113 .097 .162* Associational Involvement .011 .012 Civic Engagement -.057 -.058 -.049 Family is Rooted in New Orleans -.009 -.010 Church member -.147* -.147* -.150* -.149** -.155** -.171** -.022 -.264** -.173** Church service attendance .030 .029 .029 Social Trust -.346** -.347** -.349** -.354** -.316** -.315** -.355** -.279** -.318** Inter-Racial Trust .083 .083 .087 .075 Church member x Race Interaction -.017 Adjusted R-Sq .613 .616 .624 .627 .625 .610 .521 .436 .608
  31. 31. Aggregate Level:Church Membership’s Effect on Reducing Violent Crime: 3. Spatial Regressions Factors Influencing Crime Rates in Orleans Parish, 2007-2009 Survey Data (N = 6,945) & Aggregate Data at Tract Level (N = 182) Regression Models, Testing for Spatial Auto-correlation: t-Statistics or z-values Natural Log (Ln) Rates Combined Murder Assault Constant 4.813** 1.925+ 3.506** Spatial Lag 13.024** 9.740** 10.662** ACS 2005-09 Pct Below Poverty level 2.149* 2.305* ACS 2005-09 Unemployed over Age 16 -3.360** ACS 2005-09 Pct Age 15-34 -1.197 ACS 2005-09 Pct Vacant Housing Units 4.181** 2.362* ACS 2005-09 Pct Owner Occupied -1.004 -3.812** ACS 2005-09 Pct Non-Hispanic Black 3.096** 4.024** 3.327** Church member -3.343** -2.914** -4.293** Social Trust -3.594** -2.227* -2.968**
  32. 32. LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation)Partnerships: “Social Action” Research Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  33. 33. The Neighborhoods Partnership Network (NPN) A nonprofit, citywide network of neighborhoods. We have collaborated with NPN on an organizational survey, and created a multi-level data set.
  34. 34. The Neighborhoods Partnership Network (NPN): Neighborhood Associations that Responded to our Survey Note: Some Neighborhood Associations overlap with Others
  35. 35. Example of Blight Reduction: 1. Storm Damage Source: City of New Orleans
  36. 36. Example of Blight Reduction:2. Blight (average over time) Source: U.S. Postal Service, HUD
  37. 37. Example of Blight Reduction:3. Blight Reduction in the Flooded Areas Source: U.S. Postal Service, HUD
  38. 38. Example of Blight Reduction:4. Demolitions by the City in 2011 Sources: U.S. Postal Service, HUD; City of New Orleans
  39. 39. Example of Blight Reduction: Social Capital’s Effect on Reducing Blight: 1. Multiple Regressions Factors Influencing Blight Reduction in Greater New Orleans, 2007-2010 Survey Data (N = 6,945) & Aggregate Data at Tract Level* (N = 108) Multiple Regressions 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12Citys Damage Assessment -.309* - - .480** .440**Storm Repairs completed .123 .188 .145 .291** .266** .250**Have Resources for Repair -.164 -.186+ -.141 .226* .224* .225* .210* .209*Median household income -.217 -.052Median Home Value .398* .258+ .566** .557** .545** .565**Disadvantage Index -.005 -.298*Pct Non-Hispanic Black .056 -.097 .106 .423** .436** .443** .381** .278* .138 .138 .138Source of $ - Government Agencies .054 .063 .032 -.152 -.135 -.135Source of $ - My own money -.139 -.143 -.132 -.131 -.125 -.163+ -.169+ -.169+ -.153+ -.161+Source of $ - Insurance .136 .067 .071 -.073 -.098 -.001 .029Associational Involvement .259 .263 .259 .168 .157 .182+ .206* .299** .351** .351** .377** .327**Civic Engagement -.027 .021 -.019Adj RSq .387 .342 .387 .365 .368 .358 .291 .199 .176 .168 .159 .161*Blight Reduction in Flooded tracts that had (a) over 10% blight, and (b) were not housing projects that the government demolished& rebuilt.
  40. 40. Example of Blight Reduction: Social Capital’s Effect on Reducing Blight: 2. Multiple Regressions with Spatial Lag Factors Influencing Blight Reduction in Greater New Orleans, 2007-2010 Survey Data (N = 6,945) & Aggregate Data at Tract Level* (N = 108) Regression Models, Testing for Spatial Auto-correlation: t-Statistics or z-values 8 8a 8b 8c 8d 8e 8fConstant 3.707** 2.921** 3.111** 3.310** 3.382** 3.391** 3.157**Spatial Lag 6.263** 6.306** 6.465** 6.801** 6.716** 7.097**Have Resources for Repair 2.381* 1.574 1.385 1.328 1.290 1.511Disadvantage Index -2.227* -1.693+ -1.509 -1.484 -1.161Pct Non-Hispanic Black 2.348* 1.022 1.004 .931Source of $ - Government Agencies -1.627 -1.133 -.990Source of $ - My own money -1.847+ -1.933+ -1.858+ -1.756+ -1.820+ -1.855+ -1.725+Source of $ - Insurance -.833 -.761Associational Involvement 2.832** 2.254* 2.161* 2.404* 2.240* 3.214** 3.239***Blight Reduction in Flooded tracts that had (a) over 10% blight, and (b) were not housing projects thatthe government demolished & rebuilt.
  41. 41. Example of Blight Reduction: Neighborhood Associations’ Effect on Reducing Blight: 3. Multiple Regressions LSU/NPN Survey of Neighborhood Association Leaders (N = 67) and LSU Disaster Recovery Survey (N = 7,000) Regressions (with Fixed Controls) Blight Reduction Wet areas: all Wet areas: NBOs only 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5Damage Assessment .277+ .189 .328* .259+ .318*Median household income .006 .074 .021 .101Unemployed -.457* -.302+ -.442* -.438* -.222 -.433*Pct Black .324 .308* .302 .260 .344* .394+ .383* .384+ .294 .409*Married with Children .328+ .341* .333+ .364*Pct Owner Occupied -.276 -.316+ -.281 -.327+Disadvantage Index -.168 -.243 -.149 -.262Associational Involvement .271 .411** .260+ .291+ .407** .199 .437** .222 .218 .401**Family is Rooted in New Orleans .179 .254 .268 .341+Church service attendance -.215 -.090 -.248 -.083Cooperation with Other Organizations: Count .090 .274* .180 .160 .281* .025 .202 .144 .047 .215+Organizational Activities: Blight (q 41) .321* .240* .242* .295* .223+ .361** .308* .262* .353** .267*Organization Structural Assets (Block Capts) .117 .157 .148 .217+Adj R-Sq .602 .567 .607 .560 .553 .658 .577 .641 .621 .582
  42. 42. Analyses for “Sweet Home New Orleans:” Where did Musicians from Flooded Areas Move?
  43. 43. Analyses for “Sweet Home New Orleans:” Musicians have a harder time Earning a Living
  44. 44. The “Roots of Music” After-school music program for middle school kids. Social Action Research: Building social capital for the kids and their families, while conducting our survey of their parents. Organizing meeting at Café du Monde Mardi Gras, February, 2010.during JazzFest, 2008. Derrick Tabb, at right, Program We marched in 5 top parades & the SaintsDirector & snare drummer for the Rebirth Brass Band. victory parade, and played at Jazzfest.
  45. 45. Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans: Where did people from Flooded Areas Move?
  46. 46. Vietnamese and Jewish Community Leaders Comparing Notes on Recovery Strategies.Item: It’s not all “Culture.” Lots of it is Strategy and Planning that others can adapt.
  47. 47. NOLA YURP (Young Urban Rebuilding Professionals) “Brain Gain:” Where are they from? New Young Leader survey completed in 2010 with “504ward” N=426. Data collected summer, 2008.
  48. 48. LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation)Adding a Documentary Film to the Study Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  49. 49. Some of the people and groups We have filmed and plan to film7th Ward Improvement Association Membership and/or Committee Mtgs, Jewish FederationAbram Himelstein, Rachel Breunlin, Neighborhood Story Greg Phares, former EBR Sheriff of GNO Project, the Porch Harrison Ave Marketplace, Lakeview Membership Mtg, Lakeview Community ImprovementAllison Plyer, GNOCDC - Greater New Orleans Hubert Dixon (others), The Porch Association Community Data Center Iray Nabatoff, Community Center of St. Bernard Nonprofit Central in NOLAArlene Barron, Leslie Fishman, Jewish Community Center Jennifer Weishaupt, Jennifer Farwell, Mid-City Purim, Uptown Jewish Community CenterAudrey Browder, Central City Partnership & Pontilly Neighborhood Organization (MCNO) Ray Nichols, Gonzo Civic Volunteer Disaster Recovery Center Jessica White, Barbara Johnson, 504ward Rev. Danny C. Digal, Our Lady of Prompt Succor ChurchBobby Garon, Alan Bissinger, Michael Wasserman, & Joe Sherman, Carol Dotson, Hollygrove Rita LeGrand, Lakeview Blight inspections & Julie Wise Oreck, Jewish Federation of GNO enforcement John Koeferl, Holy Cross NACapacity College, NPN Ronald Baptiste, McKendall Estates Homeowners Assn Jordan Hirsch, Sweet Home New OrleansCapacity College, NPN Saundra Reed, Keisha Brown Robinson, Central City Katherine Prevost, Bunny Friends NACapacity College, NPN Renaissance Alliance Kevin Brown, Evelyn Turner, Trinity Christian CommunityChalmette Tomato Festival, OLPS - Hollygrove Seabrook Neighborhood AssociationCheryl Diggins, Melia LANO Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs, Second Line ParadeCity Council Mtg, Master Plan, Dist B (Sundays) LaToya Cantrell, Hal Roark, Broadmoor ImprovementClients, Sweet Home New Orleans Association Steven Bingler, Concordia - Nexus tour of French QuarterDena Gerber, Jewish Family Service LimmudFest - Main day, Jewish Community Steven Bingler, Concordia - sit-down interviewDenise Thornton, Tina Marquardt, Connie Uddo, Milissa Lisa Smith, Unmet Needs Committee, Red Cross Tamara Jackson, SAPC Task Force Peace March Orzolek, Beacons of Hope/St. Pauls Homecoming LJ Goldstein, Renee Heinlein, David Freedman, Jewish Tamara Jackson, Social Aid & Pleasure Club Task Force Center Community Tet Vietnamese New Year celebration, Mary Queen ofDerrick Tabb, Roots of Music, various LJ Goldstein, Renee Heinlein: Seder planning, Krewe du Vietnam Catholic ChurchDerrick Tabb, Roots of Music: NOMTOC Parade Jieux Timolynn Sams, Neighborhood Partnership NetworkDerrick Tabb, Roots, Parading in Neighborhoods to Loren Pickford, Musician, Sweet Home Client Tony Fernandez, St Bernard Deputy Sheriff & Parish Recruit & show need Mardi Gras Indians, I, Dryades & 2nd, Central City, MG President OLPSDiem Nguyen, Mary Tran, Mary Queen of Vietnam CDC Day Victor Gordon, Clara Carey, King Wells Sr., PontillyErich Sternberg & Richard Lipsey, Jewish Federation of Mardi Gras Indians, II, St Josephs Day Association Greater BR Mardi Gras Indians, III, Background w Harrison family YMO, 9Times, Prince of Wales, Social Aid & PleasureErin Patton, family were caterers in Chalmette Clubs Mary LeBlanc, Arcenia Crayton, & Wilbert Ross,Fr. Vien, Mary Queen of Vietnam Catholic Church Renaissance Village Youth Think Tank, Work with Audrey at Central CityGert Town Partnership Mary W Rowe, New Orleans Institute, City-WorksGill Benedek, Moishe House Zack Rosenburg, St. Bernard Project Meg Lousteau, VCPORA (French Quarter)Gill Benedek, Neighborhood Partnership Network Membership and/or Committee Mtgs, BroadmoorGlenn Stoudt, Al Petrie, Lakeview Community Improvement Association
  50. 50. A few of the community leaders we have filmed Al Petrie, Lakeview Katherine Prevost, Upper 9th WardDenise Thornton, Beacon of Hope Allan Bissinger, Jewish Federation Audrey Browder, Central City Sue Press, Ole & New Style Fellas SAPC, Treme
  51. 51. LSU Post-Katrina Research on Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation)Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
  52. 52. Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery 1• Increasing organizational capacity and autonomy. – Use of Committees, Block Captains, etc. – Doing own Data Collection. – New technologies, like Mapping, Data Bases. – Use of Volunteers. – Taking the initiative and not waiting for outside help.
  53. 53. Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery 2• Greater strategic sophistication. – Creating “Critical Masses” or “Tipping Points” – Branding – Community planning • E.g., Broadmoor, Vietnamese, Jews
  54. 54. Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery 3• Increasing citizen participation. – People who had never participated before• A new Relations among Neighborhood Cooperative Associations (N = 56) Orientation 100% among 80% community 60% leaders 40% – 91% of 20% Neighborhood leaders affirmed 0% that relations There are other See your relationships Your organization with other neighborhood organizations whose roles with other neighborhood compares activities and groups as cooperative, strategies with leaders are overlap with your rather than competitive organizations in other cooperative organization neighborhoods, in order to learn from each others’ experiences
  55. 55. Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery 4• Emergence of new Umbrella Groups from outside the organizational eco-system they work with – Convening Groups. – Find areas of common concern on which they can work together. – Find synergies on issues that would otherwise produce competition/conflict. – Learn from each other. Barbara Lacen Keller teaching NPN’s Capacity College
  56. 56. Community Strategies and Resources for Recovery 5• New recovery resources from “Outside-inside” the community – Extra-Regional, National, & International assistance from within the communities – Vietnamese Community • Houston & West Bank Neighbors – Jewish Community • National & Baton Rouge organizations – Cultural Community • Assistance to Musicians from Musicians
  57. 57. Cautions and Implications for Future Policy and Actions 1• Lower and middle- status citizens must be able to overcome elite resistance to their participation. – Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs as Community Leaders Prince of Wales Social Aid & Pleasure Club
  58. 58. Cautions and Implications for Future Policy and Actions 2• Citizens must overcome government resistance to their participation, as well as avoid being “captured” by government. – New “hardball” tactics: • Broadmoor’s Plan • Vietnamese Landfill issue – Sharing new techniques: • “Capacity College” – Avoiding Government “Capture:” • Autonomy of Neighborhood Associations
  59. 59. Cautions and Implications for Future Policy and Actions 3• Communities must find ways to sustain participation beyond the euphoric period of recovery, into the more mundane tasks of further improvement that are often more technical rather than popular in nature. – Issue of Expertise & Leadership
  60. 60. LSU Post-Katrina Surveys in Baton Rouge: Impact on the Community; Helping cope with the Disaster (supported by NSF) Total Interviews = 2,960 in 3 waves:•September 27 to November 29, 2005 (N=1,349)•February to April, 2006 (N=1,008)•March to April, 2007 (N=603)
  61. 61. Half the households in Baton Rouge housed Evacuees … almost entirely relatives and friends. Evacuees Staying in Your Residence Whom Did People House?* Staying Now Stayed Earlier No One Total Staying Relatives Friends Others100% 60% 50% 75% 40% 30% 50% 20% 25% 10% 0% Total Staying Friends & Others 0% Relatives Oct-2005 Feb-2006 Jun-2006 Oct-2006 Feb-2007 *Multiple mentions possibleFactoid: Southern Louisiana has some of the densest social networks in America. Question: •Where would disaster evacuees have gone if this had happened some other place? •Hint: The Authorities would have to figure that out…
  62. 62. Two thirds of people in Baton Rouge did volunteer relief work – most more than once. Most of them volunteered with Religious Organizations. Did Volunteer work to Help Evacuees - Did Volunteer work to Help Evacuees with Religious Organization No answer More than 2% Once with No Church None 34% 24% 37%More than Once Once with 54% Church 7% Once 12% Worked, but not w Church 30%
  63. 63. Social Capital and Stress People with the best social networks were initially most stressed because they were most involved in relief work. They also recovered the fastest. Afraid to Walk Alone at Night Feel Depressed, Angry Legend0.4 0.4 Associational0.3 0.3 Involvement Civic0.2 Leadership 0.2 Faith-Based0.1 Engagement 0.1 0 Informal Socializing 0-0.1 Social Trust-0.2 -0.1 Inter-Racial Trust-0.3 -0.2 Aug-00 Dec-01 May-03 Sep-04 Feb-06 Jun-07 Jul-05 May-06 Mar-07
  64. 64. LSU Post-Katrina Researchon Disaster Recovery & Community Resilience (Supported by the National Science Foundation) Rick Weil Department of Sociology, LSU fweil@lsu.edu www.fweil.com
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