Business engaging the UK charity sector
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Business engaging the UK charity sector

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  • RP Focusing now on individual organisations, rather than the whole sector, it’s useful to look at a typical structure. The exact structure will depend on the organisation’s legal status but, for the sake of simplicity we’ll look at a standard charity. There is a Board of Trustees who are responsible for the strategic direction of the charity and overseeing it’s administration and management. A bit like a board of a company and indeed many charities are also incorporated as a company limited by guarantee.

Business engaging the UK charity sector Business engaging the UK charity sector Presentation Transcript

  • Working with Voluntary & Community Organisations Richard Piper Georgina Anstey 14 th September 2011
  • This session
    • Perceptions
    • The “sector”
    • Funding
    • Major trends
    • Jargon
    • The typical charity
    • Behaviours and motivations
    • Engaging with them
  • Perceptions
  • Civil Society General Charities Co-operatives Universities Housing associations Employee-owned businesses Independent schools Sports clubs Faith groups Building societies Clubs & Societies Trade Unions Political parties
  • Civil Society & Voluntary Sector Civil Society Voluntary & Community Sector Universities Housing Associations Independent Schools Sports clubs Charities Unincorporated organisations Employee owned businesses Trade unions Co-operatives 171,000 Political parties
  • Small … and beautiful?
    • Over 50% are ‘Micro’ organisations
    • but they account for <1% of total income
    • 438 organisations (0.3%) are ‘Major’
    • accounting for nearly 44% of total income
  • Civil Society & Voluntary Sector Civil Society Voluntary & Community Sector Universities Housing Associations Independent Schools Sports clubs Charities Unincorporated organisations Employee owned businesses Trade unions Co-operatives 171,000 Political parties ?
  • What do VCOs do?
    • Provide services
    • Influence knowledge, opinion or policy
    • Make grants
    • Support other charities/organisations
  • Most ‘popular’ causes
    • Activities
    • Social services
    • Culture & recreation
    • Development
    • Religion
    • Beneficiaries
    • Children / youth
    • Public at large
    • Elderly people
    • People with disabilities
  • Funding Source of Income 2007 / 08 £bn Individual giving 13.1 Statutory sources 12.8 Internally generated 4.1 Trusts and foundations 3.0 Private sector 2.0 National Lottery 0.5 Total 35.5 Source: UK Civil Society almanac 2010 NCVO
  • Current trends
    • The Multi-crunch
    • Economic downturn, public spending, natural resources
    • Coalition Government policy
    • Big Society, public service delivery, localism
    • Technology and Power
    • Open data, impact, hierarchies falling
  • Jargon Quiz
  • Example charity structure & context Trustee Board CEO/ Co-ordinator Staff/Volunteers Beneficiaries Staff/Volunteers Funders Target Audience Regulator Service Users
  • Behaviour & Motivations
    • Competition
    • Slow-moving
    • Lack of arbiter of decisions – profit (money) not the goal
    • Committed
    • Passionate – stubborn – independent - anti-establishment – anti-business
  • Engagement: Barriers
    • Hugely busy, need to see absolute relevance
    • Suspicion of planning, hand-to-mouth, wait for a crisis
    • Resistance and right to resist, identity, independence
    • Complexity: of purpose, of stakeholders
    • Founder-syndrome and other egos
    • Anti-business – culture, fear, values
  • Engagement: Solutions
    • Busy: prove the relevance
    • Anti-planning: play ‘firefighting’ card
    • Resistance: listen
    • Complexity: acknowledge it, don’t try to tidy it up and pretend it’s simpler than it really is
    • Egos: find allies, don’t fight fire with fire!
    • Anti-business: don’t be their stereotype
  • Keep in touch
    • Richard Piper [email_address]
    • Georgina Anstey [email_address]
    • Useful resources on NCVO website
    • www.ncvo-vol.org.uk