Transition townsjune2010

712 views

Published on

Slide pack to accompany 3 hour session: an introduction to social entrepreneurship, including key advice + useful tools and resources

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
712
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Large scale impact: disruptive innovations Foremost social entrepreneur of the 20th century etc.
  • Explanation of methodology + SSE support Plus, a local, niche solution…..from someone who has gained (and given) significant personal development and additional benefits along the way
  • Recruitment + no barriers to participation; ensures diverse mix of people from all backgrounds, age / gender / ethnicity
  • Programme lasts a year Cohort - like-minded people, reduce isolation; trust + relationships Between 12 and 18 people Peer and practitioner-led: no teachers, no textbooks
  • Action learning cycle - underpins the programme: practical, not theoretical
  • Personal development and support combined with organisational development / support Learning / business support
  • Available on request (download or hard copy)
  • WHO ARE THEY? ‘Beneficiaries’, ‘users’, ‘clients’ ; Career changers (corporate; public sector); Young people / graduates; Silver radicals; Third sector professionals and volunteers; Everyone? What do we look for? (personal) Responsibility; Prone to action / not risk-averse; Innovative / creative; Visionary: have clear mission; Pragmatic; Persistent / committed; Resourceful / adaptable / opportunistic; + Engagement with community they are aiming to serve
  • More generally: habitat. Third Sector. Set up a variety of different legal structures depending on their mission, finance, and governance.
  • VISION, MISSION, VALUES
  • Vision : Defines the desired or intended future state the organisation is trying to make happen: its ultimate objective. Mission : Defines the fundamental purpose of an organisation, concentrating on the present. Defines the methods used and the people served. Values : Beliefs that are shared among the stakeholders of an organisation, particularly in relation to how it operates.
  • Personal injustice / experience Restlessness with status quo Identified problem / ‘wrong’ Identified opportunity / market niche Seeking purpose / meaning Faith (Inspirational) role model(s) [biographical vs. career]
  • Soon to be 400.
  • Soon to be 400.
  • Friends, fools + family
  • Soon to be 400.
  • People management (trustees/directors, volunteers, funders/investors, stakeholders (and beneficiaries)
  • PURPOSE what are you hoping to achieve? who proposed the idea? (vested interest) does it fit with mission, vision, values, strategy etc? will it add value / bring benefits? FORM FOLLOW FUNCTION Driven by what you’re trying to do / activity (see next slide) Who to lead? REALISTIC? Often partnerships are too ambitious / too much of a rush to deliver Are verbal commitments above and beyond what is possible? INVOLVE RIGHT PEOPLE Right skills / qualities Trust / relationships Similar culture / size / experience? (culture clash is most common barrier) WRITING Particularly re. Roles, responsibilities, reporting, conflict resolution etc And money! How formal (letter, MOU, SLA etc…) The spirit of partnership is not a substitute for accountability Don’t overcomplicate
  • Administration Advocacy / development Delivery
  • Administration Advocacy / development Delivery
  • Administration Advocacy / development Delivery
  • Administration Advocacy / development Delivery
  • Large scale impact: disruptive innovations Foremost social entrepreneur of the 20th century etc.
  • Large scale impact: disruptive innovations Foremost social entrepreneur of the 20th century etc.
  • Large scale impact: disruptive innovations Foremost social entrepreneur of the 20th century etc.
  • Transition townsjune2010

    1. 1. PEOPLE POWERED
    2. 3. Definition of Social Entrepreneur + = Credit: Pamela Hartigan - Schwab Foundation
    3. 4. Michael Young <ul><li>Open University </li></ul><ul><li>Labour Manifesto 1945 </li></ul><ul><li>Consumers’ Association </li></ul><ul><li>Which? Magazine </li></ul><ul><li>Language Line (TIS) </li></ul><ul><li>& 50+ others </li></ul><ul><li>School for Social Entrepreneurs </li></ul>
    4. 5. Sheenagh Day Maison Bengal Ros Spearing Ebony Horse Club Tokunbo Ajasa-Oluwa Catch22 Magazine
    5. 6. What does SSE do? And how?
    6. 7. … and wants to make it happen An entrepreneurial individual who is driven, committed, prone to action, persistent, engaged with their community, personally motivated, practical, resourceful, [ and needs no formal qualifications….] Has an innovative idea for social change…
    7. 8. So joins the SSE learning programme Expert Witnesses Project Visits Peer learning
    8. 9. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ACT RECALL and REFLECT INSIGHTS UNDERTAKE NEXT ACTION NEXT STEPS
    9. 10. … which has an associated impact on the effectiveness of their organisation Mentoring One to one tutoring and business advice Tailored support, knowledge, and skills development for the individual … Peer group Practitioner contacts/info Action learning
    10. 11. SSE information <ul><li>Learning programmes running for 10+ years </li></ul><ul><li>Over 500 SSE Fellows around the UK have completed programmes; 200+ current students </li></ul><ul><li>Active schools in 10 locations (incl. London, Belfast, East Mids, Fife, Liverpool, Cornwall) </li></ul><ul><li>Operates as social franchise (best practice + quality system) </li></ul><ul><li>International developments in progress (SSE Australia running / + China, Canada etc) </li></ul>
    11. 12. All schools / programmes 1998 - 2010 +3
    12. 13. SSE evaluation <ul><li>85% of organisations established at SSE are still in existence: strong survival rate </li></ul><ul><li>60% report increased turnover after attending SSE; on average, a five-fold increase </li></ul><ul><li>88% experience a growth in confidence and skills to lead their organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Over 50% make 10 or more useful contacts that they attribute directly to SSE </li></ul><ul><li>Over half of SSE Fellows’ organisations gain more than 50% income from trading </li></ul><ul><li>For every 10 Fellows, 34 jobs and 70 volunteering positions are created </li></ul>
    13. 14. The difference: <ul><li>What is a social entrepreneur ? A social entrepreneur is someone who works in an entrepreneurial manner, but for primarily social benefit. Driven by a social mission, they aim to address unmet needs to improve people’s lives. </li></ul><ul><li>What is a social enterprise ? </li></ul><ul><li>A social enterprise is a business with primarily social objectives, whose surpluses are reinvested in the business or in the community, rather than being driven by the need to maximise profit for shareholders or owners. </li></ul>VERB NOUN
    14. 15. Social entrepreneurs’ habitat Private Business Public Sector Social Entrepreneurs Voluntary & Community Sector Social Enterprise Third Sector
    15. 16. MISSION (and motivation)
    16. 17. Mission:Why does it matter? <ul><li>Distinguishes social entrepreneurs in absence of purely financial motive </li></ul><ul><li>Crucial first step for planning / evaluating </li></ul><ul><li>Communication to people (internal / external) </li></ul><ul><li>Aid decision-making / avoid drift </li></ul>
    17. 18. Vision, mission, values… <ul><li>Vision : Desired or intended future state </li></ul><ul><li>Mission : Fundamental purpose of org (methods used, people served) </li></ul><ul><li>Values : Beliefs shared among stakeholders </li></ul>
    18. 19. Motivation?
    19. 20. Needs and stakeholders <ul><li>Market research : is the need unmet? </li></ul><ul><li>Who are your stakeholders ? [stakeholder analysis] </li></ul><ul><li>Competitors (aka collaborators; aka partners) </li></ul>
    20. 21. MONEY
    21. 22. Sustainability
    22. 24. Funding types <ul><li>Trading: selling, retail, trading </li></ul><ul><li>Earning: contracting, procurement </li></ul><ul><li>Government: local, regional, national, EU </li></ul><ul><li>Lottery: BLF, HLF, Awards for All </li></ul><ul><li>Trusts & Foundations: UK + international </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate Support: CSR, pro bono </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Giving: donations, philanthropy </li></ul><ul><li>Social Investment: loan, patient capital </li></ul><ul><li>+ other resources: in-kind, volunteering.... </li></ul>
    23. 25. Mission-Money Matrix majority activity stay out! proceed with caution prime target on mission off mission more money less money
    24. 26. Recession Matrix? minority activity? stay out (where possible) proceed with (less) caution dreamland on mission off mission more money less money
    25. 27. Money, money, money.... <ul><li>Financial management </li></ul><ul><li>P + L; cashflow; forecasting </li></ul><ul><li>Costing + pricing (full recovery) </li></ul><ul><li>Financial reporting </li></ul>
    26. 28. MEASUREMENT
    27. 29. The other bottom line <ul><li>Proving </li></ul><ul><li>Improving </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative (theory of change) </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul>
    28. 31. MANAGEMENT / MANPOWER
    29. 33. Partnership: key questions <ul><li>What is the purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>What form should it take? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the shared aims realistic? </li></ul><ul><li>Who should be involved? </li></ul><ul><li>How formal should it be? </li></ul>
    30. 34. Partnership continuum cooperation Types of activity more less complexity and intensity Sharing info for mutual benefit Referrals Informal support Separate goals, resources, structures
    31. 35. Partnership continuum cooperation coordination Types of activity more less complexity and intensity Sharing info for mutual benefit Referrals Informal support Separate goals, resources, structures Event / short-term project Some planning/ division of roles Some shared resources, risks & reward Individual identities maintained
    32. 36. Partnership continuum cooperation coordination collaboration Types of activity more less complexity and intensity Sharing info for mutual benefit Referrals Informal support Separate goals, resources, structures Event / short-term project Some planning/ division of roles Some shared resources, risks & reward Individual identities maintained New structure with common goals All partners contribute resources + gain rewards Longer commitment + durable partnerships
    33. 37. Partnership continuum cooperation coordination merger collaboration Types of activity more less complexity and intensity Sharing info for mutual benefit Referrals Informal support Separate goals, resources, structures Event / short-term project Some planning/ division of roles Some shared resources, risks & reward Individual identities maintained New structure with common goals All partners contribute resources + gain rewards Longer commitment + durable partnerships Most complex Complete integration Most difficult to achieve Least common Multiple variables
    34. 39. Top tips <ul><li>JFDI </li></ul><ul><li>Charm (networks + relationships) </li></ul><ul><li>Mission before structure </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion (always on) </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Look after yourself </li></ul>
    35. 40. Key organisations <ul><li>SSE: www.sse.org.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Regional SE bodies </li></ul><ul><li>Social Enterprise Coalition: www.socialenterprise.org.uk </li></ul><ul><li>UnLtd: www.unltd.org.uk </li></ul><ul><li>www.socialenterpriseambassadors.org.uk </li></ul>
    36. 42. www.sse.org.uk http://del.icio.us/SSE @SchSocEnt www.slideshare.net/SSE [email_address] +44 (0)20 8981 0300 “ SSE is the UK’s most important contribution to social entrepreneurship” - Pamela Hartigan
    37. 43. Suggested reading <ul><li>Everyday Legends: the stories of 20 great UK Social Entrepreneurs by James Baderman and Justine Law (WW Publishing, 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Forces for Good by Leslie Crutchfield & Heather McLeod Grant (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Your Chance to Change the World: the No-Fibbing Guide to Social Entrepreneurship by Craig Dearden-Phillips (DSC, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>The Meaning of Social Entrepreneurship by Greg Dees (Duke Uni, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>The Power of Unreasonable People by John Elkington and Pamela Hartigan (HBS, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>The Rise of the Social Entrepreneur by Charles Leadbeater (Demos, 1997) </li></ul><ul><li>The Social Entrepreneur by Andrew Mawson (Atlantic Books, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Entrepreneurship: new models of sustainable change by Alex Nicholls et al (OUP, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership in the Social Economy by Charlotte Young and Fiona Edwards-Stuart (SSE, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>OTS think pieces + Social Enterprise in Public Services (Smith Institute) </li></ul>
    38. 45. Where does it all begin? <ul><li>Sumeria? </li></ul><ul><li>Medieval Europe? </li></ul><ul><li>Rochdale? </li></ul><ul><li>Oxford? </li></ul><ul><li>Bethnal Green? </li></ul>
    39. 46. (Why) is it growing? <ul><li>Political </li></ul><ul><li>disillusionment </li></ul>Ethical consumerism Wellbeing agenda Mobile, networked society Structural, finance, support options Meaning + purpose at work Political support? Autonomy / self-employment
    40. 47. Who are they? <ul><li>‘ Beneficiaries’, ‘users’, ‘clients’ </li></ul><ul><li>Career changers - corporate - public sector </li></ul><ul><li>Young people / graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Silver radicals </li></ul><ul><li>Third sector professionals and volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone? </li></ul>

    ×