Columbus Accounting Show Power Point Michelel Cramer 102909

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Michelle Cramer's presentation to CPAs at the Columbus Accounting Show.

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Columbus Accounting Show Power Point Michelel Cramer 102909

  1. 1. WAKE UP!<br />Why You Need to Pay Attention to the Nonprofit Sector and <br />Understand the Power of Philanthropy <br />Presented by:<br />Michelle Cramer, CFRE<br />President & CEO, CRAMER & ASSOCIATES<br />Columbus Accounting Show<br />October 29, 2009 <br />
  2. 2. AGENDA<br /><ul><li>Nonprofit Statistics
  3. 3. United States
  4. 4. Ohio
  5. 5. Why You Should Get Involved With A Nonprofit
  6. 6. Business / Corporate Benefits
  7. 7. Personal Benefits
  8. 8. Choosing The Right Board Opportunity For You
  9. 9. Tips For Maximizing Your Board Opportunity
  10. 10. In the Workplace
  11. 11. Networking
  12. 12. Personal Strategies</li></li></ul><li>Over 1.5 Million Nonprofits<br />In the United States<br />Source: The Urban Institute<br />
  13. 13. Quick Facts About Nonprofits in the United States<br /><ul><li>In 2007, Nonprofits reported:
  14. 14. Over $1.4 trillion in total revenue
  15. 15. Nearly $1.3 trillion in total expenses
  16. 16. Nearly $2.6 trillion in total assets</li></ul>Source: The Urban Institute<br />
  17. 17. 2007: Total Revenue <br />$1.4+ Trillion<br />Source: The Urban Institute<br />
  18. 18. Giving USA: The Numbers<br />2008 Contributions: $307.65 billion by source of contributions<br />($ in billions – All figures are rounded)<br />Bequests<br />$22.66<br />7%<br />Foundations<br />$41.21<br />13%<br />Corporations<br />$14.50<br />5%<br />Individuals<br />$229.28<br />75%<br />Source: Giving USA<br />
  19. 19. Sources ofContributions - 2008<br /><ul><li>Total giving = $307.65 billion
  20. 20. Decrease of 2.0 percent (-5.7 percent adjusted for inflation)
  21. 21. First decline in giving since 1987, and only decline attributed toeconomic climate. The 1987 drop was related to tax-law changes
  22. 22. Individuals remain the single most important source
  23. 23. Individuals + charitable bequests = 82 percent of total
  24. 24. Foundation grantmaking = 13 percent of the total
  25. 25. Individual + Bequest + Family Foundations = 88 percent
  26. 26. Corporate giving is an estimated 5 percent of the total
  27. 27. Consistent with the trend of the past decade</li></ul>Source: Giving USA<br />
  28. 28. Changes in giving by sourceCurrent $<br />Source: Giving USA<br />
  29. 29. Total giving, 1968–2008<br />$ in billions<br />Inflation-adjusted dollars<br />Current dollars<br />Recessions in dark gray: 1969–70; 1973–75; 1980; 1981–82; 1990–91; 2001; 2007–2008<br />Source: Giving USA<br />
  30. 30. Types of recipients of contributions, 2008 Total = $307.65 billion ($ in billions)<br />Environmentand Animals$6.582%<br />InternationalAffairs$13.304 %<br />Grants toIndividuals*$3.71 1%<br />Gifts toFoundations$32.65 11%<br />Arts, Culture, and Humanities$12.794%<br />Unallocatedgiving<br />$19.396%<br />Public-Society Benefit$23.888%<br />Health $21.647 %<br />Religion $106.89 35%<br />Education$40.94 13%<br />HumanServices<br />$25.88 9%<br />*Foundation grants awarded to individuals <br />Source: Giving USA<br />
  31. 31. Types of recipients of contributions, 2008 <br /><ul><li>Religion remains the largest single recipient at 35 percent of total
  32. 32. After religion, next highest categories are:
  33. 33. Education 13 percent
  34. 34. Foundations 11 percent
  35. 35. Human services 9 percent
  36. 36. Unallocated includes gifts to government agencies, public schools (not public school foundations), or new charities; grants to international organizations; and differences in fiscal year</li></ul>Source: Giving USA<br />
  37. 37. Changes in giving by recipient organizationCurrent $<br />2007–2008<br />2006–2007<br />Source: Giving USA<br />
  38. 38. Ohio <br />Growth of Nonprofit Sector<br />1998- 2008<br /><ul><li>501 (c) (3) public charities:
  39. 39. 25,762 to 39,481: 54% Increase
  40. 40. Largest growth in small nonprofits: 66% increase
  41. 41. Religious organizations not registered
  42. 42. Ohio has the 5th largest nonprofit increase per capita in the U.S.
  43. 43. Decrease among other 501 (c) organizations:
  44. 44. Fraternities, chambers, labor and agriculture orgs.</li></ul>Source: National Center for Charitable Statistics<br />
  45. 45. Why You Should Get Involved With A Nonprofit<br />
  46. 46. Volunteering In The United States<br /><ul><li>Approximately 26.4% of Americans over the age of 16 volunteer
  47. 47. This number has remained relatively constant since 2003
  48. 48. Volunteering is predicted to rise in the next 5 – 10 years due to Millennials and Gen-Xers</li></ul>Source: 2008Population Survey<br />
  49. 49. Why Get Involved<br />Business / Corporate Benefits of Nonprofit Involvement<br /><ul><li>Establishes and reinforces business / corporate identity
  50. 50. Builds customer loyalty
  51. 51. Increases networking opportunities
  52. 52. Helps employee recruitment and retention
  53. 53. Provides professional development opportunities
  54. 54. Positions the business or corporation as a supporter of the community </li></li></ul><li>Why Get Involved<br />Persoanl Benefits of Nonprofit Involvement<br /><ul><li>Establishes and reinforces personal brand/reputation
  55. 55. Increases networking opportunities
  56. 56. Employment / career opportunities
  57. 57. Provides professional development opportunities
  58. 58. Opportunity to learn strategy / “big picture” thinking
  59. 59. Personal fulfillment </li></li></ul><li>Choosing The Right Board Opportunity For You<br />
  60. 60. Choosing The Right Board For You<br /><ul><li>Passion for the cause
  61. 61. Ability to fulfill requirements
  62. 62. Board Meetings
  63. 63. Retreats
  64. 64. Financially
  65. 65. Skills / expertise the board needs
  66. 66. Health of the organization </li></li></ul><li>Choosing The Right Board For You<br /><ul><li>How to find board opportunities
  67. 67. Use internal resources
  68. 68. Do your homework
  69. 69. Research organizations – Annual report
  70. 70. Board of Directors
  71. 71. Major donors
  72. 72. Talk it up . . . .Ask Others
  73. 73. Use personal network </li></li></ul><li>Tips For Maximizing Your Board Opportunity<br />
  74. 74. TIPS<br />Maximizing Your Board Opportunity <br />“IN THE WORKPLACE”<br /><ul><li>Don’t keep your board involvement a secret
  75. 75. Create some buzz
  76. 76. Share with marketing department / newsletter
  77. 77. Research company giving policies – foundation
  78. 78. Circulate information about the board happenings
  79. 79. Events, invitations, successes
  80. 80. Recruit volunteers / supporters when appropriate
  81. 81. Include in your professional development plan
  82. 82. Tell your clients / customers </li></li></ul><li>TIPS<br />Maximizing Your Board Opportunity <br />“NETWORKING”<br /><ul><li>Networking & Relationship Building
  83. 83. Create strong relationships with board & staff
  84. 84. Take extra time to get to know fellow board members
  85. 85. Use directories provided by nonprofit organizations to expand your database
  86. 86. Use events as opportunities to host colleagues / friends / clients
  87. 87. Get to know the “champions” of organization </li></li></ul><li>TIPS<br />Maximizing Your Board Opportunity <br />“PERSONAL STRATEGIES”<br /><ul><li>Dedicate yourself to a ‘primary’ board or cause
  88. 88. Serve in various roles
  89. 89. Move up to leadership
  90. 90. Brandyourself with board
  91. 91. Do not over-extend yourself</li></li></ul><li>TIPS<br />Maximizing Your Board Opportunity <br />“PERSONAL STRATEGIES”<br /><ul><li>Determine best role for you to help the organization
  92. 92. Ask executive director / board chairperson
  93. 93. Set personal goals re: your desired efforts / contributions to the organization
  94. 94. Actions speak louder: Perform to the best of your abilities
  95. 95. Be Visible, Present & Active
  96. 96. Develop a credible reputation in the world of volunteer nonprofit leadership </li></li></ul><li>TIPS<br />Maximizing Your Board Opportunity <br />“PERSONAL STRATEGIES”<br /><ul><li>Be the organization’s best PR agent – spokesperson
  97. 97. Follow through on things you say you will do
  98. 98. Exit gracefully and professionally </li></li></ul><li>Suggested Reading <br /><ul><li>Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy – Giving USA Foundation
  99. 99. The Board Member’s Guide to Fundraising – Fisher Howe
  100. 100. Boards the Make A Difference – John Carver
  101. 101. Make a Name for Yourself – Robin Fisher Roffer
  102. 102. Doing Good Better: How to be an Effective Board Member of a Nonprofit Organization – Edgar StoeszandChestarRaber
  103. 103. The Power Of Nice – Linda Kaplan Thaler</li></li></ul><li>THANK YOU!<br />Become a fan on Facebook<br />Follow us on Twitter: CramerAssoc<br />CramerFundraising.com<br />Michelle@CramerFundraising.com<br />888.926.GIVE<br />614.766.GIVE<br />

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