Agile Program Management Best Practices

31,371 views
30,697 views

Published on

Pete Behrens presents a critical dependency to effective program management - the organization. He evaluates three key variables of focus, communication and transparency in the organization and how the organizational structure prevents or allows these elements to emerge.

Published in: Business, Technology
6 Comments
29 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
31,371
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
235
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1,881
Comments
6
Likes
29
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Agile Program Management Best Practices

  1. 1. Agile Program Management Best Practices Pete Behrens Agile Organization & Process Coach © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC pete@trailridgeconsulting.com 303.819.1809
  2. 2. Pete Behrens Agile Organization & Process Coach  Certified Scrum Trainer  Certified Scrum Coach  Guide enterprise organizations in transitioning to an agile organization implementing agile methods  Services for agile assessment, alignment, training and coaching Previous Experience  Led development of the requirements management solution RequisitePro – a core product in the IBM Rational product line – using the Rational Unified Process (RUP)  Consulted with EDS leading development of large data warehouse solutions using Rapid Application Development (RAD) © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 2
  3. 3. Program Management Program Management is the process of managing several related projects or a portfolio of products Organization Process Product © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 3
  4. 4. Executive Summary Effective Agile Program Management has less to do with Process than it does the Organization © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 4
  5. 5. Executive Summary Organizati ove Proces r on s That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 5
  6. 6. Executive Summary Organizati ove Proces r on s Individuals and Process over Interactions and Tools That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. www.agilemanifesto.org - 2001 © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 5
  7. 7. Executive Summary To effectively scale agility to a large complex programs - the organization is the key © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 6
  8. 8. When an organization is small... focus communication transparency ...are free. © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 7
  9. 9. Can’t we just scale it through Program Management? Program Manager © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 8
  10. 10. In large organizations... CIO, CTO, VP Engineering Product Line Product Line Product Line Manager Manager Manager Functional Functional Functional Usability Manager Manager Manager Engineering DBA PMO Infrastructure ...focus is challenged. Quality Assurance © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 9
  11. 11. In large organizations... 2000 Communication Paths 1500 1000 500 0 2 6 8 10 30 50 Number of People ...communication breaks down. © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 10
  12. 12. In large organizations... ...transparency becomes opaque. © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 11
  13. 13. Organization Problems lead to Program Problems  Lack of Focus  Lost Communication  Little Transparency Leads to...  Lack of Predictability  Too many Dependencies  Unknown Risks  Low Quality © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 12
  14. 14. Conway’s Law Organizations which design systems are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication Organization structures of these organizations. Architecture http://www.melconway.com/law © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 13
  15. 15. Organizational Flexibility is Key Organization communication complexities are manifested in solution design Larger organizations are more rigid Organizational flexibility is the key to building effective design solutions http://www.melconway.com/law © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 14
  16. 16. Agile Context Lean and Agile Principles Scrum Project & Product Leadership & Team Practices XP Development & Test Practices © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 15
  17. 17. Why was Scrum Created? TEAMS solve problems better than individuals Teams solve problems better incrementally in short TIMEBOXES © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 16
  18. 18. Why was Scrum Created? TEAM © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC TIMEBOX 17
  19. 19. Why was Scrum Created? TEAM focus communication transparency © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC TIMEBOX 18
  20. 20. Team members get direction from multiple sources Work Products s act tice ice s Prac Product B est Owner Work Architect UI Designer Products Scrum Master Work Products Technical Writer Developer Best Prac es tices actic Pr Tester Work Products © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 19
  21. 21. Architect Multiple Scrum Teams Technical Writer Developer Scrum Tester Master r Product Owner Tester Developer Architect eveloper UI Designer Tester Tester Scrum Master Developer Archite Developer Developer oduct Technical wner Writer Developer Tester Developer Scrum Tester Master Architect © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 20
  22. 22. Team Work Products Focus Single Backlog Pipeline Product Owner Team Architect UI Designer Characteristics Best Practices Scrum • Small Master • Dedicated Technical • Cross-functional Developer Writer • Co-located • Shared Focus Tester © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 21
  23. 23. Communication Fewer Roles Increases Communication Source: 2004 Patterns of Effective Organizations by Neil Harrison © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 22
  24. 24. Communication Fewer Roles Increases Communication Source: 2004 Patterns of Effective Organizations by Neil Harrison © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 22
  25. 25. Communication Sharing Work across Roles Increases Communication Source: 2004 Patterns of Effective Organizations by Neil Harrison © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 23
  26. 26. Communication Sharing Work across Roles Increases Communication Source: 2004 Patterns of Effective Organizations by Neil Harrison © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 23
  27. 27. Transparency Product & Release Cycle Drives Release Vision Release Sprint & Daily Cycle Release Scope Planning And Boundaries Sprint Review Planning & Adapt Feedback Develop & Test © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 24
  28. 28. Transparency ✓ Define a Quarterly release plan ✓ Align team sprint cycles within that plan ✓ Share team sprint reviews monthly © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 25
  29. 29. Shared Sprint Review Every team in the program presents its sprint results and release update © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 26
  30. 30. APM Case Study Companies R&D Organization with over 500 people developing a suite of retail applications installed in most of the largest retail chains across the globe. IT Organization with over 300 people developing applications to support their B2B office product distribution and warehouse. R&D Organization with over 250 people developing a SaaS CRM platform and suite of applications supporting many Fortune 1000. R&D Organization with over 125 people developing a suite of applications for elementary education assessment through PDA devices. IT Organization with over 40 people developing applications to support their corporate and personal relocation business © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 27
  31. 31. What do we need to do? focus ✓ Solidify and focus teams ✓ Funnel projects and work items to teams ✓ Limit work to available teams communication ✓ Reduce the number of roles in the organization ✓ Share work across all roles more evenly transparency ✓ Create quarterly release plans ✓ Align team sprint cycles with a shared review © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 28
  32. 32. Executive Summary APM is taking the high- performing team environment found in a single team/product environment and scaling it across a larger organization and product portfolio without the loss of productivity, predictability or © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC quality. 29
  33. 33. Summary  Effective Agile Program Management requires...  Focus - Teams that are more stable in structure but more flexible in the work products they produce  Communication - An organization with fewer roles and more distributed responsibility  Transparency - A shared sprint cycle with a regular shared release planning and tracking review © 2009 Trail Ridge Consulting, LLC 30

×