Foster Youth to College Initiative
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Foster Youth to College Initiative

on

  • 599 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
599
Views on SlideShare
539
Embed Views
60

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 60

http://ohioreach.wikispaces.com 60

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Did you ever act out negative feelings about family life at school? How did you want to be treated by staff at school – teachers, guidance counselors….
  • For this topic, I am going to share a horror story: What I am thinking that teachers might need in order to live out the heart of your message is a roadmap / role-play / example."What does it look like when a teacher responds to the needs of a foster youth in middle school in a way that is LESS than helpful?"and"What does it look like when they do it right?"
  • Jump activity – not only do THEY (youth) need to know, but WE (adult supporters) need to know: the steps to take, the order to take them in, and the resources available Hand them gameboard
  • College preparation starts in high school – who is the young person’s educational advocate? Whose job is it to care about our education?
  • Improving Postsecondary Education and Training Preparation, Access & Completion for Students in Foster Care   “ 10” Actions Independent Living Personnel, Social Workers, High School Counselors/Advisors, and Caregivers/Foster Parents Can Take to Make a Difference!
  • Improving Postsecondary Education and Training Preparation, Access & Completion for Students in Foster Care   “ 10” Actions Independent Living Personnel, Social Workers, High School Counselors/Advisors, and Caregivers/Foster Parents Can Take to Make a Difference!
  • Jump activity – not only do THEY (youth) need to know, but WE (adult supporters) need to know: the steps to take, the order to take them in, and the resources available Hand them gameboard
  • Dragon Lady Lyons was my high school English teacher.I was the only Junior in Senior English class, because I had always (since elementary school) been ahead in that subject.Every English teacher I had before Mrs. Lyons was an Easy A. But maintaining an A+ average in Dragon Lady Lyons class was anything but easy. She made you work for it -- and I did.It was HER letter to the University of Kentucky that convinced Randy Mills that I had what it takes to succeed in college as a 16-year-old student. Randi Mills served as College Admissions Counselor at the University of Kentucky. When I came in as an uncertain 16-year-old whose credits deemed her worthy of entering college, Randy sprang into ACTION.- He bypassed the one credit I needed (Math) to enter college.- He walked me down the hallway to Financial Aid and told them: "This girl needs GRANTS -- she has NO family income!"It was because of his availability and advocacy that I was not only admitted into college, but ended up with a Bachelors and Masters degree.
  • College preparation starts in high school – who is the young person’s educational advocate?
  • NAME THAT RESOURCE
  • Break it down into simple steps – so it’s not overwhelming
  • Print sample copies of Financial Aid Release Form & Cashier’s Statement
  • Print sample copies of Financial Aid Release Form & Cashier’s Statement
  • - ETV Student Applicants must be a current, or former foster youth who: Was in foster care on their 18th birthday and aged out at that time; OR Was adopted from foster care with the adoption finalized AFTER his/her 16th birthday; OR Will have his/her foster care case closed between the ages of 18 and 21. - Be a U.S. citizen or qualified non-citizen. - Be at least 18, but younger than 21, to apply for the first time. - Have been accepted into or be enrolled in a degree, certificate or other accredited program at a college, university, technical, vocational school. - To remain eligible for ETV funding, students must show progress toward a degree or certificate.
  • Print sample copies of Financial Aid Release Form & Cashier’s Statement
  • Print sample copies of Financial Aid Release Form & Cashier’s Statement
  • Print sample copies of Financial Aid Release Form & Cashier’s Statement
  • Jump activity – not only do THEY (youth) need to know, but WE (adult supporters) need to know: the steps to take, the order to take them in, and the resources available Hand them gameboard

Foster Youth to College Initiative Foster Youth to College Initiative Presentation Transcript

  • A Foster Youth’s Journey…from Middle School to Post-Secondary Education
  • Middle School Experience• Did family problems negatively impact on your school experience / attendance?• Did you ever feel judged or labeled?• Did you have adults in your life that you could turn to with problems?
  • Best and Worst Practices• What does it look like when a school-related staff member responds to the needs of a foster youth in middle school in a way that is LESS than helpful?• "What does it look like when they do it right?"
  • Extra-Curricular Activities
  • High School Experience• How many school changes did you have?• Did the schools use the same textbook?• Did your credits transfer?
  • Barriers to College Preparation• Foster youth attend five high schools on average• 65% percent change schools mid-year• With each transfer, lose 4-6 months of progress• Only 15% enrolled in college prep courses in high school
  • Recommendations from Casey Family Programs• Expect students in foster care to be successful in school and prepare them for postsecondary education or training.• Know your students coming from foster care, meet their caregivers and social workers, and commit to school stability for the student whenever possible.• Arrange for students to participate in course work and activities that maximize their postsecondary education and training options.
  • Recommendations from Casey Family Programs• Arrange for career/vocational assessments, work experiences, and career exploration type experiences.• Help students learn about and apply for colleges and/or training programs that are of interest and appropriate (academically, financially, career wise, supportive, geographically, etc.) – follow through with the enrollment process.
  • • Steps to take• Order to take them in• Resources available
  • Best and Worst Practices• Who, if anyone helped you during your time in high school to prepare for college?• What more could have been done to help you to prepare in order to succeed?
  • Tips On Choosing A College• College visits• “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket”• Out-of-state tuition is much higher• Consider housing situation (dorm vs. apartment)• Does this school have an Ohio Reach Liaison?
  • Name That Logo
  • • Ohio Reach is a statewide initiative to increase the number of foster care youth who enroll in and graduate from college.• Part of how we do this is by establishing Foster Care Liaisons at Ohio universities and community colleges.
  • Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) Available for Former Foster Youth At Community CollegesEligibility RequirementsETV eligibility form Students must provide Financial Aid Office with that form. Financial Aid office must double-check that student is listed on their roster as eligible for OCOG. The amount will reflect $0, but the Ohio Board of Regents will override that after receiving the ETV notification.
  • Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) If School Doesn’t Know About the OCOG Or How to Apply ItQuestions About the OCOG?Contact the Ohio Board of RegentsFinancial Aid Help Desk1-888-833-1133http://regents.ohio.gov/sgs/ocog
  • Students complete an online application once a year at www.statevoucher.org
  • Ohio ETV Program Home Page
  • What Can ETV pay for?* ETV funds pay for college and vocational school related costs. However, with fewer funds to award, ETV’s first priority is to award funds to remaining tuition, books. An effort is ALWAYS made to supersede loans when possible.• Then, if not paid by other stipends, ETV attempts to pay requests for rent, living expenses, and computers. Almost every student’s situation is different.For more information on the federal definition of “cost of attendance,” visit www.ed.gov/policy.
  • What Forms Are Required for OH ETV?1. Financial Aid Release Form: Student should take the ETV to the financial aid office, where it is completed and faxed to OH ETV.2. Cashier’s Statement: Student should take the ETV to the cashier/bursar’s office, where it is completed and faxed along With dated copy of the student’s ITEMIZED BILL for that term. Students cannot be funded without completed ETV forms and a current school bill.
  • Students can check on thestatus of their paperwork.
  • Students can view checkdisbursements made to them or a third party.
  • Staying in touch with OFA to receive/maintain ETV1. Stay in touch with OFA: If they lose touch with a student after 5 attempts by phone and email, the youth’s application is “made inactive” until OFA hears from them.2. Keep track of user name/password: Students should watch their STATUS Page, which shows them term by term, what forms and transcripts are received or missing. They can see what checks have been issued for them, or to them, term by term.Students can update their personal information 24/7, so that they will get their checks at the right place, and OFA can write and call them monthly.
  • Board GameOh io Reach
  • College Experience• What was your biggest challenge?• What are you most proud of?