The brain & drugs

605 views
453 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
605
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The brain & drugs

  1. 1. The Brain & Drugs Including the actions of Cocaine,  Opiates, and Marijuana 
  2. 2. Objectives 1. Understand the basic geography of the brain and its  relationship to function. 2. Know the anatomy and function of the neuron. 3. Understand the chemical synapse including the basic  mechanism of nervous communication. 4. Know the function, components and location of the  reward pathway. 5. Understand the signs and symptoms of use and the  mechanism of action of cocaine, opiates and THC. 6. Apply knowledge to a case study.   
  3. 3. Case Study – Part 1a • Parents of a 33 year old man called 911 after finding their son  lying unresponsive on the floor of the basement • The parents report he is a drug addict and may have used  earlier • Paramedics arrive and get the following vital signs:  – BP: 124/80  – Pulse: 104  – Respirations: 10, shallow  – Pupils: constricted and non‐reactive  – Skin: cool and cyanotic (blue)  – Glucose: 55 mg/dL • Are these vital signs normal? • Are there any other questions you would ask or observations  you should make before you take the patient to the hospital? 
  4. 4. Case Study – Part 1b • BP: 124/80 – prehypertensive but not an emergency • Pulse: 104 – slightly tachycardic • Respirations: 10, shallow – hypoventilating  • Pupils: constricted and non‐reactive ‐ abnormal • Skin: cool and cyanotic (blue) ‐ abnormal • Glucose: 55mg/dL – hypoglycemic  – We did not cover this, but 70‐180 for non‐fasting glucose is  normal • There are many possible questions or observations but you  should be trying to figure out what he took. Do the parents  know? Is there any of it lying around the room? • There is a tourniquet and a needle in the room.   
  5. 5. The Brain • The brain is the center of the  nervous system • Cells in the brain are grouped into  neurons and glia  – Neurons are the functional units  – Glia is a term for a broad class of  supporting cells • The lobes of the brain: Frontal,  Parietal, Occipital, and Temporal • Neurons are connected by  synapses which allow them to  communicate with each other 
  6. 6. The Neuron • Dendrites and soma (cell  body) receive chemical  information from neighboring  neuronal axons • The chemical information is  converted to electrical  currents which travel toward  and converge on the soma • A major impulse is produced  (the action potential) and  travels down the axon toward  the terminal. 
  7. 7. The Synapse and Synaptic Neurotransmission • The action potential traveling down the axon starts a series of events at  the terminal that results in vesicles containing a neurotransmitter, such as  dopamine (the stars), to become exocytosed into the synaptic cleft.  • Once inside the synaptic cleft, the dopamine can bind to specific proteins  called dopamine receptors (in blue) on the membrane of a neighboring  neuron • Occupation of receptors by  neurotransmitters causes various  actions in the cell  • activation or inhibition of enzymes  • entry or exit of certain ions • These actions can be excitatory  or inhibitory 
  8. 8. Reuptake • Neurotransmitters (NTs) in the synaptic cleft are removed by:  – Enzymatic degradation  – Reuptake by specific proteins (in purple) to return the NT to presynaptic terminal  – Diffusion  • Removing the NT is important to prevent constant stimulation of the  receptor   
  9. 9. • Synaptic clefts Neuromodulation  sometimes include  more than two neurons  that allow for  neuromodulators, such  as endorphin (gray), to  act on the same neuron  • Neuromodulators act  on a different receptor,  opiate in this case,  which adds another  signal to the  postsynaptic  membrane  • The sum of all the  signals determines  what occurs in the next  neuron   
  10. 10. The Reward Pathway • There are pathways in the brain that  have been identified for specific  functions such as sight, movement or  reward. • The reward pathway is activated by a  rewarding stimulus such as food,  water, sex and some drugs. • Reward Pathway Components (In  order):  – Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA)  – Nucleus Accumbens  – Pre‐Frontal Cortex • This pathway and many others were  identified by placing probes into rat  brains 
  11. 11. Case Study – Part IIa • En route to the hospital, the paramedics give dextrose and 5.2mg of  Narcan  – Why give dextrose?  – We will discuss Narcan later. • When the patient arrives at the hospital, he is alert and responsive,  new vital signs:  – BP: 117/88  – Pulse: 111  – Respirations: 24  – Pupils: not observed  – Skin: 97.4 °F   – Glucose: 120 mg/dL • Classify these vital signs. • At this point, what do you think the patient took?     
  12. 12. Case Study – Part IIb • Dextrose given to raise blood sugar   • BP: 117/88 ‐ prehypertensive • Pulse: 111 ‐ tachycardia • Respirations: 24 ‐ hyperventilating • Pupils: not observed • Skin: 97.4 ‐ normal • Glucose: 120 mg/dL – normal   • Place your bets on what he took, we will review some  drugs now    
  13. 13. Cocaine  Possible presenting  signs and symptoms:    • A central nervous system    body temperature  stimulant    blood pressure    heart rate • Can be snorted, injected or   confusion  smoked   paranoia   dilated pupils • Is the active ingredient in crack   irritability • Gives a euphoric and energetic   scratching   hallucinations  feeling   short temperament • Risks: Heart attack, respiratory   Anxiety/panic attacks   Sleeplessness  failure, strokes, seizures,   Loss of appetite  abdominal pain, nausea, death    sex drive   Very talkative • 2009: 4.8 million Americans 12    or older had abused cocaine   
  14. 14. Mechanism of Action Of Cocaine • Cocaine (teal) localizes in the reward  pathway of the brain and mimics  dopamine • Cocaine blocks reuptake of dopamine,  leaving more dopamine in the synapse  and causing more receptors to be  activated • Increased activation of the dopamine  receptor results in an abnormally high  firing rate in the post synaptic  terminal • The reward pathway is maximized and  addiction results from prolonged use  and the inability to reproduce cocaine  affect without the drug 
  15. 15. Localization of  Cocaine 
  16. 16. Opiates  Possible presenting  signs and symptoms: • A class of drugs that share a similar     chemical structure originally obtained as   Fade in and out  natural products of the opium poppy plant  wakefulness • Includes: heroin, morphine, fentanyl,   Flushing of skin  oxycodone, methadone, codeine   Dry mouth • Many routes of administration, injection is   Slowed breathing  common   Constricted pupils   “Heavy” extremities  • Creates a feeling of euphoria and   Nod off suddenly  relaxation – a depressant   Unclear thinking • The major risk is depression of breathing   Itching  possibly resulting in death   Vomiting • Mixing opiates together or with stimulants   Nausea  (cocaine) greatly increases the dangers of   Constipation   abuse   • Overdose should be immediately treated  with an opiate antagonist 
  17. 17. Mechanism of Action of Opiates • Opiates act in the dopamine synaptic cleft with three neurons • Opiates activate the opiate receptor causing more dopamine to be  released into the synaptic cleft • Opiates, like cocaine over stimulate the reward pathway causing  addiction 
  18. 18. Marijuana and THC • Marijuana is dried up parts of  the Cannabis sativa hemp plant  Possible presenting • THC is the active ingredient,  signs and symptoms:  delta‐9‐tetrahydrocannabinol    • Method of abuse is usually   Bloodshot eyes  smoking   Compulsive eating   Squinty eyes that may be • It gives a euphoric feeling,  difficult to keep open  distorted perceptions, memory   Dry mouth  impairment and difficulty   Forgetfulness  solving problems   Uncontrollable laughter   Short‐term memory loss • It is the most commonly used   Lethargy  illegal drug in the US   Delayed motor skills   Paranoia   Hallucinations 
  19. 19. THC and the Brain • THC acts with a similar  mechanism to opiates • THC binds to THC receptors  in  the following areas:  – Reward Pathway (VTA, NA) ‐   Pleasure  – Hippocampus – Affecting memory  – Cerebellum – Loss of coordination  and balance 
  20. 20. The Reward Pathway and Drugs • The reward pathway is only one area that  each drug acts • It is what makes the user feel good and can be  involved in the addiction process • Each drug acts on other areas as well, which is  why each can have different affects such as  stimulating or depressing  
  21. 21. Prescription Drug Abuse • Defined as taking a prescription medication that is not  prescribed to you or taking it for reasons or dosages  other than prescribed • Different classes and varieties that are abused include:  – Opiods – Vicodin, Oxycontin, Darvon, Dilaudid, Demerol,  Lomotil  – Depressants – barbituates, benzodiazepines (Valium,  Xanex)  – Stimulants – Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall • It a serious and growing problem  – About 20% of people in the US have used prescription  meds for nonmedical reasons  – Prescription drug abuse now exceeds illicit drug abuse  worldwide 
  22. 22. Case Study – Part 3a • What drug do you think the patient took? • What do you think Narcan is?  
  23. 23. Case Study – Part IIIb • Narcan is a brand name for naloxone, an opiate  antagonist, given for opiate overdoses • The patient says he took too much heroin. • Urine toxicology is positive for opiates and cocaine. • The patient is evaluated by a physician and reports he  has normal neurologic function and normal mentation. • Three hours after getting to the hospital a nurse  reports decreased lung sounds on both sides. • Five hours after getting to the hospital his vital signs  have returned to normal. • The ED and the waiting room are full. What should you  do? Discharge, admit or keep in the ED? 
  24. 24. Case Study – Part IIIc • The attending physician decides to discharge  the patient to his parents. • Five hours after discharge, the patient is once  again found unresponsive in his bed. • Paramedics arrive, find him in asystole,  attempt resuscitation but have no success • Patient is pronounced dead at the scene • How could this have been prevented? 
  25. 25. Case Study – Part IIId • Presence of cocaine in the urine should have  tipped the physician off that there was more to  the story. • Decreased breath sounds was another clue that  should have prompted further evaluation. • Cocaine can cause pulmonary edema and  myocardial infarctions, which is what occurred in  this patient. • The physician did not follow the standards of care  for this situation. 
  26. 26. This is your brain on drugs…  Any Questions? 

×