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Animal Farm PPT from World of teaching Animal Farm PPT from World of teaching Presentation Transcript

  • AnimalAnimalFarmFarmBy George OrwellBy George Orwell“All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others.”Allegory - Satire - Fable
  • George OrwellGeorge OrwellBritish Author & JournalistBritish Author & Journalist 1903-19501903-1950 Born in IndiaBorn in India At that time India was a part of the BritishAt that time India was a part of the BritishEmpire, and Blairs father, Richard, held a postEmpire, and Blairs father, Richard, held a postas an agent in the Opium Department of theas an agent in the Opium Department of theIndian Civil Service.Indian Civil Service. The Blair family was not very wealthy - OrwellThe Blair family was not very wealthy - Orwelllater described them ironically as "lower-upper-later described them ironically as "lower-upper-middle class". They owned no property, had nomiddle class". They owned no property, had noextensive investments; they were like manyextensive investments; they were like manymiddle-class English families of the time, totallymiddle-class English families of the time, totallydependent on the British Empire for theirdependent on the British Empire for theirlivelihood and prospects.livelihood and prospects. Noted as a novelist and critic, as well as aNoted as a novelist and critic, as well as apolitical and cultural commentatorpolitical and cultural commentator One of the most widely admired English-One of the most widely admired English-language essayists of the 20th centurylanguage essayists of the 20th century Best known for two novels critical ofBest known for two novels critical oftotalitarianism in general, and Stalinism intotalitarianism in general, and Stalinism inparticular:particular: Animal FarmAnimal Farm Nineteen Eighty-FourNineteen Eighty-Four“Liberty is telling people what they do not want to hear.”
  • 19841984 The novel, published inThe novel, published in1949, takes place in 19841949, takes place in 1984and presents an imaginaryand presents an imaginaryfuture where a totalitarianfuture where a totalitarianstate controls every aspectstate controls every aspectof life, even peoplesof life, even peoplesthoughts. The state isthoughts. The state iscalled Oceania and iscalled Oceania and isruled by a group known asruled by a group known asthe Party; its leader andthe Party; its leader anddictator is Big Brother.dictator is Big Brother.
  • George Orwell and His BeliefsGeorge Orwell and His Beliefs Orwell was a person who had a reputation for standing apartOrwell was a person who had a reputation for standing apartand even making a virtue of his detachment.and even making a virtue of his detachment. This “outsider” position often led him to oppose the crowd.This “outsider” position often led him to oppose the crowd. Orwell’s beliefs about politics were affected by his experiencesOrwell’s beliefs about politics were affected by his experiencesfighting in the Spanish Civil War.fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He viewed socialists, communists, and fascists as repressiveHe viewed socialists, communists, and fascists as repressiveand self-serving.and self-serving. He was skeptical of governments and their willingness toHe was skeptical of governments and their willingness toforsake ideas in favor of power.forsake ideas in favor of power.Interesting Fact:Interesting Fact:George Orwell’s real name was Eric Blair.George Orwell’s real name was Eric Blair.
  • Why Animals?Why Animals? In explaining how he came to writeIn explaining how he came to write Animal FarmAnimal Farm,,Orwell says he once saw a little boy whipping aOrwell says he once saw a little boy whipping ahorse and later he wrote,horse and later he wrote, ““It struck me that if only such animals became awareIt struck me that if only such animals became awareof their strength we should have no power over them,of their strength we should have no power over them,and that men exploit animals in much the same wayand that men exploit animals in much the same wayas the rich exploit the [worker].”as the rich exploit the [worker].”
  • George Orwell in IndiaGeorge Orwell in India He was born in India andHe was born in India andspent his early yearsspent his early yearsthere since his father heldthere since his father helda post there.a post there. He was a lonely boy whoHe was a lonely boy wholiked to make up storiesliked to make up storiesand talk with imaginaryand talk with imaginarycompanions.companions. As an adult, he workedAs an adult, he workedfor the Imperial Police infor the Imperial Police inBritish occupied India.British occupied India.
  • What is Animal Farm?What is Animal Farm? A masterpiece of political satire,A masterpiece of political satire,Animal FarmAnimal Farm is a tale of oppressedis a tale of oppressedindividuals who long for freedomindividuals who long for freedombut ultimately are corrupted bybut ultimately are corrupted byassuming the very power that hadassuming the very power that hadoriginally oppressed them.originally oppressed them. The story traces the deplorableThe story traces the deplorableconditions of mistreated animalsconditions of mistreated animalswho can speak and who exhibitwho can speak and who exhibitmany human characteristics. Aftermany human characteristics. Afterextreme negligence by their owner,extreme negligence by their owner,the animals revolt and expel Mr.the animals revolt and expel Mr.Jones and his wife from the farm.Jones and his wife from the farm. The tale of the society the animalsThe tale of the society the animalsform into a totalitarian regime isform into a totalitarian regime isgenerally viewed as Orwellsgenerally viewed as Orwellscritique of the communist system incritique of the communist system inthe former Soviet Union.the former Soviet Union.Interesting Fact: Orwell initially struggledInteresting Fact: Orwell initially struggledto find a publisher forto find a publisher for Animal FarmAnimal Farm..
  • Significance TodaySignificance Today But why – now that Soviet CommunismBut why – now that Soviet Communismhas fallen and the Cold War is over –has fallen and the Cold War is over –doesdoes Animal FarmAnimal Farm deserve ourdeserve ourattention? The answer lies in the powerattention? The answer lies in the powerof allegory. Allegorical fables, becauseof allegory. Allegorical fables, becausethey require us to make comparisonsthey require us to make comparisonsand connections, can be meaningful toand connections, can be meaningful toany reader in any historical period. Theany reader in any historical period. Thestory ofstory of Animal FarmAnimal Farm will alwayswill alwayshave lessons to teach us about thehave lessons to teach us about theways that people abuse power andways that people abuse power andmanipulate others.manipulate others. Orwells chilling story of the betrayal ofOrwells chilling story of the betrayal ofidealism through tyranny andidealism through tyranny andcorruption is as fresh and relevantcorruption is as fresh and relevanttoday as when it was first published intoday as when it was first published in1945.1945.
  • Children’s Book? – No!Children’s Book? – No! AfterAfter Animal FarmAnimal Farm was published in 1945, Georgewas published in 1945, GeorgeOrwell discovered with horror that booksellers wereOrwell discovered with horror that booksellers wereplacing his novel on children’s shelves. Accordingplacing his novel on children’s shelves. Accordingto his housekeeper, he began traveling fromto his housekeeper, he began traveling frombookstore to bookstore requesting that the book bebookstore to bookstore requesting that the book beshelved with adult works. This dual identity — asshelved with adult works. This dual identity — aschildren’s story and adult satire — has stayed withchildren’s story and adult satire — has stayed withOrwell’s novel for more than fifty years.Orwell’s novel for more than fifty years.
  • The FableThe Fable The fable is one of the oldestThe fable is one of the oldestliterary forms - much, much olderliterary forms - much, much olderthan the novel or the short story. Athan the novel or the short story. Afable is usually short, written infable is usually short, written ineither verse or prose, and conveyseither verse or prose, and conveysa clear moral or message. Thea clear moral or message. Theearliest fables still preserved dateearliest fables still preserved dateback to 6th Century Greece B.C.E.back to 6th Century Greece B.C.E.The author of these fables, Aesop,The author of these fables, Aesop,used animal characters to stand forused animal characters to stand forhuman "types." For example, a foxhuman "types." For example, a foxcharacter might embody the humancharacter might embody the humancharacteristics of cunning andcharacteristics of cunning andcleverness. Though Aesops animalcleverness. Though Aesops animalfables were ostensibly aboutfables were ostensibly aboutanimals, they were reallyanimals, they were reallyinstructional tales about humaninstructional tales about humanemotions and human behavior.emotions and human behavior.
  • Animal FablesAnimal Fables The most popular animal fables ofThe most popular animal fables ofthe 20th Century are thethe 20th Century are the Just SoJust SoStoriesStories (1902) written by Rudyard(1902) written by RudyardKipling. Kiplings fables wereKipling. Kiplings fables wereadapted by Disney in the movieadapted by Disney in the movieThe Jungle Book.The Jungle Book. OrwellOrwelladmired Kipling and theadmired Kipling and the Just SoJust SoStoriesStories would seem to havewould seem to haveinfluenced the form ofinfluenced the form of AnimalAnimalFarmFarm. Orwell took the short animal. Orwell took the short animalfable and expanded it to the lengthfable and expanded it to the lengthof a short novel in the form of anof a short novel in the form of anallegoryallegory..
  • AllegoryAllegory The narrative has a literal and a symbolic meaning. MostThe narrative has a literal and a symbolic meaning. Mostfables have two levels of meaning. On the surface, the fablefables have two levels of meaning. On the surface, the fableis about animals. But on a second level, the animals standis about animals. But on a second level, the animals standfor types of people or ideas. The way the animals interactfor types of people or ideas. The way the animals interactand the way the plot unfolds says something about theand the way the plot unfolds says something about thenature of people or the value of ideas. Any type of fiction thatnature of people or the value of ideas. Any type of fiction thathas multiple levels of meaning in this way is called anhas multiple levels of meaning in this way is called anallegoryallegory..
  • Allegory (cont’d)Allegory (cont’d) Animal FarmAnimal Farm is stronglyis stronglyallegorical, but it presents a veryallegorical, but it presents a verynice balance between levels ofnice balance between levels ofmeaning. On the first level, the storymeaning. On the first level, the storyabout the animals is very moving.about the animals is very moving.You can be upset when Boxer isYou can be upset when Boxer istaken away by the horse slaughterertaken away by the horse slaughtererwithout being too aware of what hewithout being too aware of what hestands for. But at the same time,stands for. But at the same time,each of the animals does serve as aeach of the animals does serve as asymbol. The storys second levelsymbol. The storys second levelinvolves the careful critique Orwellinvolves the careful critique Orwellconstructed to comment on Sovietconstructed to comment on SovietRussia.Russia.Boxer
  • Allegory (cont’d)Allegory (cont’d) Yet there is no reason thatYet there is no reason thatallegory must be limited toallegory must be limited totwo levels. It is possible totwo levels. It is possible toargue thatargue that Animal FarmAnimal Farmalso has a third and morealso has a third and moregeneral level of meaning. Forgeneral level of meaning. Forinstance, the pigs need notinstance, the pigs need notonly represent specificonly represent specifictyrannical soviet leaders.tyrannical soviet leaders.They could also be symbolsThey could also be symbolsfor tyranny more broadly:for tyranny more broadly:their qualities are thereforetheir qualities are thereforenot simply the historicalnot simply the historicalcharacteristics of a set ofcharacteristics of a set ofactual men but are theactual men but are thequalities of all leaders whoqualities of all leaders whorely on repression andrely on repression andmanipulation.manipulation.Squealer, Snowball, & Napoleon
  • SatireSatire In aIn a satiresatire, the writer, the writerattacks a serious issue byattacks a serious issue bypresenting it in a ridiculouspresenting it in a ridiculouslight or otherwise poking funlight or otherwise poking funat it. Orwell uses satire toat it. Orwell uses satire toexpose what he saw as theexpose what he saw as themyth of Soviet socialism.myth of Soviet socialism.Thus, the novel tells a storyThus, the novel tells a storythat people of all ages canthat people of all ages canunderstand, but it also tellsunderstand, but it also tellsus a second story— that ofus a second story— that ofthe real-life revolution.the real-life revolution.Soviet Coat of Arms
  • IronyIrony IronyIrony results when there is a disparityresults when there is a disparitybetween what an audience wouldbetween what an audience wouldexpect and what really happens.expect and what really happens.Orwell uses a particular type of irony –Orwell uses a particular type of irony –dramatic irony. He relies on thedramatic irony. He relies on thedifference between what the animalsdifference between what the animalsunderstand and what we, theunderstand and what we, theaudience, can conclude about theaudience, can conclude about thesituation at Animal Farm.situation at Animal Farm. We know just what the animals know,We know just what the animals know,but we can see so much more of itsbut we can see so much more of itssignificance than they can. Thesignificance than they can. Theconclusions we reach that the animalsconclusions we reach that the animalsnever quite get to – that the pigs arenever quite get to – that the pigs aredecadent, corrupt, and immoral – aredecadent, corrupt, and immoral – areall the more powerful because weall the more powerful because wearrive at them ourselves, without thearrive at them ourselves, without thenarrator pointing these things outnarrator pointing these things outdirectly.directly.Napoleon overindulging himself.Snowball below the commandments.
  • Irony (cont’d)Irony (cont’d) Orwell uses dramatic irony toOrwell uses dramatic irony tocreate a particularly subtlecreate a particularly subtlesatire.satire. SatireSatire stages astages acritique of an individual,critique of an individual,group, or idea bygroup, or idea byexaggerating faults andexaggerating faults andrevealing hypocrisies. Therevealing hypocrisies. Thedramatic irony ofdramatic irony of AnimalAnimalFarmFarm achieves this aimachieves this aimindirectly. We see theindirectly. We see thehypocrisy that the animalshypocrisy that the animalsdont and thereforedont and thereforeunderstand in this backwardunderstand in this backwardfashion that the book is deeplyfashion that the book is deeplycritical of the pigs.critical of the pigs.
  • When History and Literature MergeWhen History and Literature Merge Critics often consider Animal Farm toCritics often consider Animal Farm tobe an allegory of the Russianbe an allegory of the RussianRevolution. In the early 1900s,Revolution. In the early 1900s,Russia’s Czar Nicholas II faced anRussia’s Czar Nicholas II faced anincreasingly discontented populace.increasingly discontented populace.Freed from feudal serfdom in 1861,Freed from feudal serfdom in 1861,many Russian peasants weremany Russian peasants werestruggling to survive under anstruggling to survive under anoppressive government. By 1917,oppressive government. By 1917,amidst the tremendous suffering ofamidst the tremendous suffering ofWorld War I, a revolution began. InWorld War I, a revolution began. Intwo major battles, the Czar’stwo major battles, the Czar’sgovernment was overthrown andgovernment was overthrown andreplaced by the Bolshevik leadershipreplaced by the Bolshevik leadershipof Vladimir Lenin. When Lenin died inof Vladimir Lenin. When Lenin died in1924, his former colleagues Leon1924, his former colleagues LeonTrotsky, hero of the early Revolution,Trotsky, hero of the early Revolution,and Joseph Stalin, head of theand Joseph Stalin, head of theCommunist Party, struggled forCommunist Party, struggled forpower. Stalin won the battle, and hepower. Stalin won the battle, and hedeported Trotsky into permanentdeported Trotsky into permanentexile.exile.Czar Nicholas IIVladimir LeninJoseph StalinLeon Trotsky
  • Joseph StalinJoseph Stalin Once in power, Stalin began, withOnce in power, Stalin began, withdespotic urgency and exalteddespotic urgency and exaltednationalism, to move the Soviet Unionnationalism, to move the Soviet Unioninto the modern industrial age. Hisinto the modern industrial age. Hisgovernment seized land in order togovernment seized land in order tocreate collective farms. Stalin’s Fivecreate collective farms. Stalin’s FiveYear Plan was an attempt to modernizeYear Plan was an attempt to modernizeSoviet industry. Many peasants refusedSoviet industry. Many peasants refusedto give up their land, so to counterto give up their land, so to counterresistance Stalin used vicious militaryresistance Stalin used vicious militarytactics. Rigged trials led to executions oftactics. Rigged trials led to executions ofan estimated 20 million governmentan estimated 20 million governmentofficials and ordinary citizens. Theofficials and ordinary citizens. Thegovernment controlled the flow andgovernment controlled the flow andcontent of information to the people, andcontent of information to the people, andall but outlawed churches.all but outlawed churches.Joseph Stalin
  • Napoleon = Joseph StalinNapoleon = Joseph Stalin NapoleonNapoleon Boar who leads the rebellion againstBoar who leads the rebellion againstFarmer JonesFarmer Jones After the rebellion’s success, heAfter the rebellion’s success, hesystematically begins to control allsystematically begins to control allaspects of the farm until he is anaspects of the farm until he is anundisputed tyrant.undisputed tyrant. Joseph StalinJoseph Stalin The communist dictator of the SovietThe communist dictator of the SovietUnion from 1922-1953 who killed allUnion from 1922-1953 who killed allwho opposed him.who opposed him. He loved power and used the KGBHe loved power and used the KGB(secret police) to enforce his ruthless,(secret police) to enforce his ruthless,corrupt antics.corrupt antics.
  • Farmer Jones = Czar Nicholas IIFarmer Jones = Czar Nicholas II Farmer JonesFarmer Jones The irresponsible owner of theThe irresponsible owner of thefarmfarm Lets his animals starve and beatsLets his animals starve and beatsthem with a whipthem with a whip Sometimes shows randomSometimes shows randomkindnesskindness Czar Nicholas IICzar Nicholas II Weak Russian leader during theWeak Russian leader during theearly 1900searly 1900s Often cruel and brutal to hisOften cruel and brutal to hissubjectssubjects Displays isolated kindessDisplays isolated kindess
  • Snowball = Leon TrotskySnowball = Leon Trotsky SnowballSnowball Boar who becomes one of theBoar who becomes one of therebellion’s most valuable leaders.rebellion’s most valuable leaders. After drawing complicated plansAfter drawing complicated plansfor the construction of a windmill,for the construction of a windmill,he is chased off of the farmhe is chased off of the farmforever by Napoleon’s dogs andforever by Napoleon’s dogs andthereafter used as a scapegoat forthereafter used as a scapegoat forthe animals’ troubles.the animals’ troubles. Leon TrotskyLeon Trotsky A pure communist leader who wasA pure communist leader who wasinfluenced by the teachings of Karlinfluenced by the teachings of KarlMarx.Marx. He wanted to improve life forHe wanted to improve life forpeople in Russia, but was drivenpeople in Russia, but was drivenaway by Lenin’s KGB.away by Lenin’s KGB.
  • CharactersCharacters Old MajorOld Major An old boar whose speech aboutAn old boar whose speech aboutthe evils perpetrated by humansthe evils perpetrated by humansrouses the animals into rebelling.rouses the animals into rebelling. His philosophy concerning theHis philosophy concerning thetyranny of Man is namedtyranny of Man is namedAnimalism.Animalism. He teaches the animals the songHe teaches the animals the song“Beasts of England”“Beasts of England” Dies before revolutionDies before revolution Karl MarxKarl Marx The inventor of communismThe inventor of communism Wants to unite the working classWants to unite the working classto overthrow the government.to overthrow the government. Dies before the RussianDies before the RussianRevolutionRevolution
  • Who is Karl Marx?Who is Karl Marx? Many of the ideals behind theMany of the ideals behind theSoviet revolution were based onSoviet revolution were based onthe writings and teachings of Karlthe writings and teachings of KarlMarx. A German intellectual whoMarx. A German intellectual wholived in the mid-1800s, Marxlived in the mid-1800s, Marxbelieved that societies are dividedbelieved that societies are dividedinto two segments, a working classinto two segments, a working classand an owner class. The workingand an owner class. The workingclass creates all the products,class creates all the products,while the owner class enjoys allwhile the owner class enjoys allthe benefits of these products.the benefits of these products.This class division leads toThis class division leads toinequality and oppression of theinequality and oppression of theworking class. Marx’s objectiveworking class. Marx’s objectivewas to create a classless societywas to create a classless societyin which the work is shared by allin which the work is shared by allfor the benefit of all, and hefor the benefit of all, and hebelieved revolution was the way tobelieved revolution was the way toachieve this goal.achieve this goal.
  • Characterization in FablesCharacterization in Fables We already know that aWe already know that a fablefable is a narration intended to enforce a useful truth.is a narration intended to enforce a useful truth.Fables have two important characteristics. First, they teach a moral or lesson.Fables have two important characteristics. First, they teach a moral or lesson.In Animal Farm, the moral involves Orwell’s views about Soviet politics.In Animal Farm, the moral involves Orwell’s views about Soviet politics.Second, the characters are most frequently animals. These animal charactersSecond, the characters are most frequently animals. These animal charactersoften function as a satiric device to point out the follies of humankind. Thoughoften function as a satiric device to point out the follies of humankind. ThoughOld Major, Snowball, and Napoleon may represent Karl Marx, Leon Trotsky,Old Major, Snowball, and Napoleon may represent Karl Marx, Leon Trotsky,and Joseph Stalin, many of the story characters are much more general. Someand Joseph Stalin, many of the story characters are much more general. Someanimals are grouped together as a single character—“the sheep,” “the hens,”animals are grouped together as a single character—“the sheep,” “the hens,”and “the dogs.” Orwell also capitalizes on the traits generally associated withand “the dogs.” Orwell also capitalizes on the traits generally associated withparticular animals, such as sheep as followers and dogs as loyal.particular animals, such as sheep as followers and dogs as loyal.
  • Squealer & BoxerSquealer & Boxer Squealer    Squealer     A big mouth pig who becomes Napoleon’sA big mouth pig who becomes Napoleon’smouthpiece. Throughout the novel, he displaysmouthpiece. Throughout the novel, he displayshis ability to manipulate the animals’ thoughtshis ability to manipulate the animals’ thoughtsthrough the use of hollow, yet convincingthrough the use of hollow, yet convincingrhetoric.rhetoric. Represents the propaganda department thatRepresents the propaganda department thatworked to support Stalin’s image; the membersworked to support Stalin’s image; the membersof the department would use lies to convinceof the department would use lies to convincethe people to follow Stalin.the people to follow Stalin. Boxer    Boxer     A dedicated but dimwitted horse who aids inA dedicated but dimwitted horse who aids inthe building of the windmill but is sold to a glue-the building of the windmill but is sold to a glue-boiler after collapsing from exhaustion.boiler after collapsing from exhaustion. Represents the dedicated, but trickedRepresents the dedicated, but trickedcommunist supporters of Stalin. Many stayedcommunist supporters of Stalin. Many stayedloyal even after it was obvious Stalin was aloyal even after it was obvious Stalin was atyrant. Eventually they were betrayed, ignored,tyrant. Eventually they were betrayed, ignored,and even killed by him.and even killed by him.BoxerSquealer
  • Jessie & MosesJessie & Moses JessieJessie The farms sheepdog, she keeps tabsThe farms sheepdog, she keeps tabson the pigs and is among the first toon the pigs and is among the first tosuspect that something is wrong atsuspect that something is wrong atAnimal Farm.Animal Farm. Moses    Moses     A tame raven and sometimes-pet ofA tame raven and sometimes-pet ofJones who tells the animals storiesJones who tells the animals storiesabout a paradise called Sugarcandyabout a paradise called SugarcandyMountain.Mountain. Moses represents religion. Stalin usedMoses represents religion. Stalin usedreligious principles to influence peoplereligious principles to influence peopleto work and to avoid revolt.to work and to avoid revolt.JessieMoses
  • More CharactersMore CharactersPilkingtonPilkingtonJones neighbor, he finds a way to profit from Animal Farm by forming anJones neighbor, he finds a way to profit from Animal Farm by forming analliance with the pigs.alliance with the pigs.MurielMurielA goat who believes in the rebellion, she watches as Animal Farm slipsA goat who believes in the rebellion, she watches as Animal Farm slipsaway from its founding principles.away from its founding principles.MollieMollieA vain horse who resists the animal rebellion because she doesnt want toA vain horse who resists the animal rebellion because she doesnt want togive up the petting and treats she receives from humans. Mollie representsgive up the petting and treats she receives from humans. Mollie representsvain, selfish people in Russia and throughout the world who ignored thevain, selfish people in Russia and throughout the world who ignored therevolution and sought residence in more inviting countries.revolution and sought residence in more inviting countries.BenjaminBenjaminThe most cynical of all the animals, the farms donkey doubts the leadershipThe most cynical of all the animals, the farms donkey doubts the leadershipof the pigs but is faithfully devoted to Boxer. Benjamin represents all theof the pigs but is faithfully devoted to Boxer. Benjamin represents all theskeptical people in Russia and elsewhere who weren’t sure revolution wouldskeptical people in Russia and elsewhere who weren’t sure revolution wouldchange anything.change anything.The SheepThe SheepNot tremendously clever, the sheep remind themselves of the principles ofNot tremendously clever, the sheep remind themselves of the principles ofanimalism by chanting "four legs good, two legs bad."animalism by chanting "four legs good, two legs bad."The DogsThe DogsNapoleon’s private army that used fear to force the animals to work; they killedNapoleon’s private army that used fear to force the animals to work; they killedany opponent of Napoleon. The dogs represent Stalin’s loyal KGB (secretany opponent of Napoleon. The dogs represent Stalin’s loyal KGB (secretpolice). The KGB were not really police, but mercenaries used to forcepolice). The KGB were not really police, but mercenaries used to forcesupport for Stalin.support for Stalin.
  • Animalism = CommunismAnimalism = Communism AnimalismAnimalism Taught my Old MajorTaught my Old Major No rich, but no poorNo rich, but no poor Better life for workersBetter life for workers All animals are equalAll animals are equal Everyone owns theEveryone owns thefarmfarm CommunismCommunism Invented by Karl MarxInvented by Karl Marx All people are equalAll people are equal Government ownsGovernment ownseverythingeverything People own thePeople own thegovernmentgovernment
  • Animal Farm RevolutionAnimal Farm Revolution= Russian Revolution= Russian Revolution Animal Farm RevolutionAnimal Farm Revolution Was supposed to make lifeWas supposed to make lifebetter for all, but . . .better for all, but . . . Life was worse at the end.Life was worse at the end. The leaders became theThe leaders became thesame as, or worse than thesame as, or worse than theother farmers (humans) theyother farmers (humans) theyrebelled against.rebelled against. Russian RevolutionRussian Revolution Was supposed to fix theWas supposed to fix theproblems created by theproblems created by theCzar, but . . .Czar, but . . . Life was even worse afterLife was even worse afterthe revolution.the revolution. Stalin made the Czar lookStalin made the Czar looklike a nice guy.like a nice guy.
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