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  • Schedule: Timing Topic 115 minutes Lecture 245 minutes Practice 360 minutes Total
  • Features and Benefits Oracle i Store provides merchants with a complete end-to-end solution for building, deploying, and managing online storefronts. These storefronts will give your company access to new customers and new markets around the world, and can be set up for use in both business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) scenarios. Either way, i Store allows you to give your customers a dynamic and personalized shopping experience which will keep them returning to your Web site frequently. And because i Store integrates with Oracle’s CRM and ERP product suites, it can be used to give your customers access to business-critical information, such as availability of inventory, order status, shipment information, and more. Instructor Note Other points which can be covered if time permits: Robust, scaleable architecture: Built on the industry standard Oracle8 database Customizable look and feel: Supports company branding Configurable product support Sales processes across multiple channels Globalization: Currency, language Special interest stores Notifications
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-1 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-2 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-3 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-4 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-5 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-6 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-7 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Product Catalog and Navigation: Cataloging Products This section deals with how i Store imports, organizes, and displays products. Product items are loaded into Inventory and made available to the i Store administrator on the basis of a publish flag set in Inventory. The administrator then has the task of organizing the catalog and preparing it for display. Catalog Organization The three major components of the i Store hierarchy are: The product item, or the leaf in the organizational tree The section or grouping of product items or sections. There is also a special kind of section, known as a featured section, which consists only of product items. The specialty store, which is a view of the catalog. There can be multiple specialty stores or views of the same catalog for different customers. Note: The section is different from the category as defined in Inventory. These two terms cannot be used interchangeably. While a product item can belong to only one category in Inventory, it can belong to multiple i Store sections.
  • Product Catalog and Navigation: Catalog Display A product can be displayed in multiple ways depending on its location in the product catalog. For example, the same product may need to be displayed in one way in section A and another way in section B. Therefore, every node in the catalog that has products to display specifies a display context to be used by the products under that given section. A display style, or a logical template, is used to vary the appearance of the product, because it can be associated with a product at a specialty store, section, or product level. This enables the merchant to display products very differently. For example, when displaying the products for a selected section, some featured products will be displayed as blocks, but the others will be displayed as line items depending on the display style associated with the product or section. A default style should be associated with the entire store and set in the profile options.
  • Product Catalog and Navigation: Display Styles A style is nothing but a JSP template that has a logical name and certain parameters that characterize it. Each style sheet ultimately maps to a file that contains the actual presentation instructions. Notice that so far, mention has been made of logical templates, not physical templates. Logical templates are handles that point to physical template files, depending on the language and specialty store used. Resolution rules are used at run time to identify the logical and physical templates that will be used for display.
  • Product Catalog and Navigation: Search i Store uses the interMedia search engine, which is a part of the Oracle 8.1.6 platform. The customer can search based on the name and description of products. Because i Store runs off the inventory tables, Search uses the description and long description columns of the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS_T1 table. Once the inventory has been set up, the concurrent program called ibevcsmv.sql must be run to populate the table which contains the searchable data. If the merchant wants to enable searching on additional criteria, the concurrent program must be modified to add the relevant columns and run again. To keep the search data current, the concurrent program must be run at frequent intervals.
  • What Is Catalog Search in i Store 11 i ? Ability to find products in Inventory Customer UI, not Merchant UI Components Intermedia, Inventory, OEM Web Status flag What Can You Search On? Name, description of products Stored in MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS_TL Web status = ENABLED Available in minisite Stored as CLOB, extensible Instructor Note i Store section-level search functionality may be available in later releases. Check the latest version of the Oracle iStore and Oracle iMarketing Implementation Guide on MetaLink for implementation guidelines.
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-8 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Customer Account Management The term “customer” refers to the end user of i Store. A customer may be a person who has registered with the store (account customer) or a person who has literally walked into the store (walk-in or anonymous customer). i Store “recognizes” returning account customers by using cookies. Most e-commerce sites encourage customers to register because this increases the probability that they will return to the site.
  • Customer Account Management The customer account functionality uses the common customer model of the trading community architecture. Whereas registered customers have their own accounts, anonymous users are automatically assigned to a common account. The customer model comprises six major subject areas: Party: Defined as people, organizations, groups, or relationships Account: Defined as a financial roll-up point Contact point: Defined as any electronic point that you could use as a contact, such as telephones, URLs, e-mail addresses, and so on Location: A physical place Relationship: Establishes the relationship between any two parties Participation: Describes the interaction of a party with other parties, including internal organizations
  • Customer Account Management CRM Foundation manages customer accounts. Using the login name, password, e-mail address, and account type, an account is created. There are only two types of accounts: B2C: Users are granted a default role that allows them to access the entire store functionality. B2B: Users are granted a default role, defined by merchant, and restricted to certain operations until the merchant reviews and approves the account. For example, they may browse and add items to the shopping cart, but may not check out until the account is approved. With respect to B2B users, the concept of party must be explained. A party can be a person, a group of persons, or an organization. Relationships exist between parties such that party A can be a representative of party B. Seen in this light, a B2B account may be a corporate account that can further be associated into accounts belonging to multiple individuals, each with his or her own login and password. A person ordering something from a corporate account is actually ordering on behalf of the corporation.
  • Customer Account Management: Merchant Approval Merchant approval is a process in which the merchant can review and verify users’ information and set up accounts. The merchant can choose to approve or to decline an application at any point during the process. If approved, the new user is associated with the company and accounts, with either an administrator role or a user role as chosen by the merchant. If declined, the user is removed from the registration pool.
  • Customer Account Management: Customer Profile The following information is associated with the customer profile. Password and password hint: These are set when the customer registers and can be updated later. i Store performs these functions using APIs exposed by the CRM foundation. Billing and shipping address: The user can have multiple billing and shipping addresses, each associated with a nickname. A B2B user can choose to update both addresses associated with his or her persona and addresses associated with the B2B account. Primary billing and shipping addresses are identified for the purpose of one-click checkout. Payment information: A primary payment method is associated with the customer’s account. For this purpose, a list of payment methods are provided from i Payment. Information about payment instruments is also stored associated with the account. A primary payment instrument is also chosen for one-click shopping. Shipping method: A primary shipping method is associated with the account and is used for one-click shopping. The list of shipping methods is imported from Oracle Shipping. E-mail address: The customer can set and update this information. Because much of this information is of a sensitive nature, the user needs to be authenticated before he or she can access it. The distinction between sensitive information and public information can be made at the JSP level, where a directive requiring authentication can be inserted. Once the user is authenticated, he or she is allowed to access other sensitive pages.
  • Customer Account Management: Cookies Cookies are used to recognize returning customers and are of two types: Browser cookie: Sits on the customer’s machine URL cookie: Is generated by i Store on login and relayed in the URL from page to page In either case, the cookie is used by i Store to identify the user and relay other frequently needed information in the form of name-value pairs. Under the following circumstances, however, a returning user cannot be identified: (For URL cookie) The customer arrives at an i Store page from an external site (For URL cookie) The page times out (For browser cookie) The browser does not carry cookies (For browser cookie) The cookie expires As mentioned earlier, all anonymous customers share the same customer account. In such a case, how does the site differentiate among multiple anonymous users using the site? As long as the anonymous customer is only browsing the site, he or she does not need any special identifier. However, once he or she adds something to a cart, the cart ID is loaded into the cookie and will become the distinguishing factor between two anonymous customers. The main disadvantage with using cookies is that they may become invalid at any time. For example, once an account is deleted, the cookie associated with that account will become invalid. Therefore, before an item of information stored in the cookie is used, a validation check is conducted.
  • Available to Promise (ATP) i Store will allow merchants to set up a specialty store–specific default Inventory lookup mechanism that can be set to look up either locally or in real time, and either in Inventory itself or using i Store templates. An Available to Promise (ATP) API is provided by Inventory and used by i Store at the time of checkout. i Store can keep a count of local inventory. The local inventory will include watermark levels and will be updateable at regular intervals by a scheduled concurrent manager program in the ERP applications. This concurrent manager program will calculate product availability against the actual inventory and update the local inventory numbers. Alternatively, i Store can keep track of shipability days for products (“Product usually ships in X days”). This approach is used by Amazon.com and other e-commerce stores. Note that the product is not reserved in real time. This may be an issue for clients who sell one-of-a-kind items such as art or refurbished goods.
  • Practice 5-9 Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-9 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Order Management Order Management deals with all the processes and functions that relate to the actual buying process. For example, when an item is added to the shopping cart, a quote is created or modified in Order Capture. Order Capture makes a call to the pricing engine using the contents of the shopping cart as qualifiers and receives the list of offers from the pricing engine. The quote is priced using these modifiers. The contents of the shopping cart can be used by TeleSales to generate leads.
  • Order Management: Checkout This process deals with converting the contents of the shopping cart into an order. The following information is processed during checkout: Customer’s Account Type The customer is required to login or register before continuing with the checkout process. Shipping and Billing Addresses In i Store 11 i , multiple billing and shipping addresses can be applied to an order. Further, multiple billing and shipping addresses can be applied to a single line item. i Store also keeps track of addresses used with previous orders, forming an address book from which the customer can easily select frequently used addresses. These addresses are pulled from Accounts Receivable. The addresses entered by the customer are verified through Order Capture. The customer is asked to correct any errors in the addresses.
  • i Store Integration Points: CRM and ERP 1. i Store–Inventory : Inventory schemas are used to store items and create product categories. Those items will be pulled into the i Store’s Merchant UI to publish them on a speciality store and display them in the catalog. 2. i Store– i Marketing : i Store exposes certain APIs to i Marketing about relationships between products. For example, the cross-sell relationship between two products is available to i Marketing in this way. In 11 i , i Store and i Marketing are tightly coupled. Advertisements, recommendations, and other personalized content are made available to i Store from i Marketing. To be able to push a marketing campaign through the store those campaigns and their offer codes (discounts) need to be set up in Marketing Online. 3. i Store–Pricing : All pricing-related information displayed on the catalog is derived using Pricing APIs. 4. i Store–EcFoundation : Roles and privileges are created using EcFoundation. For example, i Store uses JTF APIs to perform user registration. The customer data will be pushed to TCA through JTFs integration with Accounts Receivables. i Store–Configurator : An API is used to integrate i Store and Configurator on the shopping cart. 6. i Store - A/R: When a user views the status of his or her order in the “order tracker” functionality, invoices as well as payments are pulled directly from A/R. 7. i Store - Oracle Shipping: Shipping methods (shown on the checkout pages) are configured in Oracle Shipping. 8. i Store - Order Capture: Orders are placed through Order Capture. i Store also uses Order Capture’s integration to various other modules for functionality used on the shopping cart. When a shopping cart is saved, a quote is created in the Order Capture schema. The quote can be viewed through Order Capture in any CRM application that has an integration point to Order Capture (Oracle Telesales, CallCenter, Contracts). 9. i Store - Order Capture - Order Management: . Orders are sent from i Store to Order Capture to Order Management for fulfillment. Payment authorization for an order can be done online (see above integration with i Payment) or offline after the order is sent to Order Management for fulfillment (by integration of i Payment into A/R). 10. i Store - Order Capture - A/R: Tax calculation is done using A/R APIs through Order Capture. 11. i Store - Order Capture - Shipping: Shipping fulfillment related processing is done using Shipping APIs through Order Capture. 12. i Store - Order Capture – i Payment: Connection to i Payment for credit card authorization is done using Order Capture itself or using APIs exposed by it. In other words, unlike in version 3 i , there is no direct connection to i Payment. 13. i Store - Order Caputre - MRP: ATP inventory check is performed using MRP’s APIs through Order Capture. 14. i Store - Price Engine: i Marketing writes offers to the price engine. i Store accesses these offers by sending known information about the customer to the price engine.
  • Integration Architecture Messaging interfaces replace interface tables that were used in 3 i . The need to push and pull data is no longer there. With the shared schema, you access these tables directly.
  • i Store Dependencies: Mandatory Oracle i Store leverages other Oracle Applications modules to provide extended functionality. The mandatory modules must be set up before i Store can run.
  • i Store ERP Dependencies: Optional i Store is natively integrated to Oracle ERP and CRM applications; they share the same business objects and schemas. Consulting services are available to enhance the following: Sales functionality Shipping and handling charges calculations Defining product relationships and categories (information presentation structure) Setting up the optional modules is not required; however, if they are not set up, then the additional functionality provided by these modules will not be available.
  • Configurator Integration A product item may be identified as configurable or not based on whether it has a bill of materials associated with it of the type known as “Model.” If it does, then a Configure button will appear alongside it. On clicking the button, control is transferred to the Configurator user interface so that the customer can configure the product. After this, control is transferred back to i Store.
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-10 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Practice 5-11 Refer to Practice 5-11 in the Practices chapter.
  • Note Also see the Oracle Order Management User’s Guide and the Oracle Accounts Receivable User’s Guide for additional setups required for i Payment.
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-12 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • i Store Partners and Third-Party Products Oracle has developed strategic partnerships with third-party development companies in order to provide its customers with a complete, end-to-end e-commerce solution. Partners vary by product. Note that taxation in 11 i is done through Accounts Receivable (AR), which in turn integrates with Taxware/Vertex. Similarly, shipping is integrated through Order Capture and Oracle Shipping. Net Perceptions is not shipped with the product, but Oracle does provide the integration hooks.
  • Integration Points Authoring Module: Module that initiates the integration scenario Receiving Module: Module that receives data in the integration scenario Integration Method: Method used to achieve integration: API, read/update of common schema, and so forth APIs are used at the middleware level. JSPs are used at deeper-than-middleware level. Instructor Note Don’t spend a great deal of time going through the detail of the next few slides. Simply highlight the i Store integrations and indicate that participants may want to review this information for the activities.
  • Performing This Practice For detailed instructions, see Practice 5-13 in Appendix D, “Practices and Solutions.”
  • Edu1476 y

    1. 1. iStore 11i Functionality ®Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    2. 2. ObjectivesAfter completing this lesson, you should be able todo the following:• Present the value of iStore 11i• Explain the basic iStore functionality in the customer and merchant user interface• Recognize dependencies and integration points ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant facing user interface• iStore 11i functional areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant facing user interface• iStore 11i functional areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. iStore 11i Features and Benefits Customizable online storefront Feature BenefitBuild, deploy, and Global customer manage e-stores reach End-to-end onlineB2C or B2B models merchant solution Personalized Customer retention shopping CRM/ERP Order/inventory integration management ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. iStore 11i Features and BenefitsFeatures BenefitsRich Product Catalogue • Useful, relevant information • Easy to find and buy products • Merchandizing driven placementConfigurator • Assisted selling • Sell complex productsParticipative and rich • Satisfying customer experienceshopping metaphors • Build communities • Strengthen customer relationshipPersonalization and • Cross-sell and upsellrecommendations* • Improved visits to purchase ratios* through iMarketing ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. iStore 11i Features and BenefitsFeatures BenefitsChannel integration • Leverage assets and processes • Consistent customer experience across contact pointsB2B support • Reach all customer base • Manage channel relationships betterSophisticated • Sticky customersorder capture • Customer-specific pricing, S&H, Tax • Inventory availabilitySpecialty stores • Different stores for different needs • Single operations and reuse of UI, data, and processes ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. iStore 11i Features and BenefitsFeatures BenefitsSelf-Administration • (Business) Customer manages users and its processes • Lower operational cost for bothCustomer Profile • Personalization • Better customer experienceOrder Status, • Better serviceInvoices, and so on. • Cost efficientKnowledge base and • Integrated and cost-effectiveproblem resolution* support* through iSupport ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. iStore 11i Features and BenefitsFeatures BenefitsBusiness user-centric • Easy, efficient, and cost-effectiveStore manager operationsERP-aware application • No square peg in round hole • Easy, maintainable integration to existing business systemsFlexible, open, and • Incorporate value-added features toextensible architecture store • Respond to new opportunities* through iMarketing ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant facing user interface• iStore 11i functional areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. Differences Between 11i and 3iThere is a distinct paradigm shift in the 11iphilosophy. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. Differences Between 11i and 3i Feature iStore 3i iStore 11iArchitecture Stand-alone Dependencies on ERP and CRM productsArchitecture Uses own schema Shares CRM schema, also has own schema to store informationArchitecture Proprietary (for example, Apache, Jserv OAS, JWEB dependent)Architecture View and do methods JSPs, ServletsArchitecture UI components tightly UI separated from other integrated with components database and middleware componentsArchitecture Use p12java to make Use JDBC, Rosetta to make database calls database calls ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. Differences Between 11i and 3i Feature iStore 3i iStore 11iCustomization Only third-party APIs Java and PL/SQL APIs available, covering very limited released with version 2 groundCustomization No known development JDeveloper, Rosetta toolsStore organization Single site Multiple sites, known as minisites, can be administered by the same administratorProduct catalog Products can be loaded Products are loaded into directly into iStore’s inventory and exposed to iStore own schema or on the basis of a publish flag imported from InventoryiMarketing Tightly bundled Separate component, calledintegration through JSP tagsiPayment Direct Through Order Captureintegration ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Differences Between 11i and 3i Feature iStore 3i iStore 11iERP Through interface tables Direct calls to ERP views are usedintegration to retrieve data API calls through Order Capture can add or modify dataConfigurator Patch released in later Direct integration with versions of 3i ConfiguratorPromotions Coupons Offers published to price engine are retrieved on the basis of known information about the customer, shopping cart, and so on.B2B Nonexistent, except for Some components are available andfunctionality shopping cart others can be created through customizationCustomer No common customer Use of Trading Community view, customers can be Architecture’s common customer exported to and model imported from AR ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. Practice 5-1 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers true or false questions about iStore. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. Practice 5-2 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers understanding cookies. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. Overview• iStore 11i Features and Benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer Facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant Facing user interface• iStore 11i Functional Areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. iStore 11i Customer Facing User InterfaceCustomer requirements:• Take and fulfill orders• Make the visit productive• Make customers return often• Use Web as first line of contact but retain consistencyThis topic looks at how iStore fulfills theserequirements. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    19. 19. Customer UI: Product CatalogEncourage repeat users Powerful Search • Persistent cookie to • Simple identify returning • AND/OR users • Restrict search to categoryEasy browsing for users Feature products • Classification in hierarchy • Multiple lists at any • Independent of Inventory level category • Merchant controlled • Rule-based and manual order, including classification iMarketing determined ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. Customer UI: Product Catalog Provide relevant, useful information • Merchant-defined relationships manual and rule driven • Content association with productsSell services Provide customer-specific pricing ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    21. 21. Customer UI: Shopping Features• Foster repeat visits – Express checkout – Saved cart – Shopping lists• Build communities Share cart with others• Support different purchase roles Retriever of a shared cart can place it as order• Do not punish for placing orders over Web Same (or better) prices ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    22. 22. Customer UI: B2B SupportReach both businesses and consumers with thesame store:• Multiple users can transact against the same financial account• Approval based registration for business users*• Payment methods suitable for business customers*• Sharing and e-mail-based routing of carts• Item entry with customer’s part numbers• Detailed account history: invoices, order, and payments*• Specialty stores for different types of users*• Tax-exempt orders ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. Customer UI: Checkout• Smooth buying experience Remembers and uses past addresses, payment instruments• Customized checkout process• Workflow and message enabled• Details: – Tax, S&H charge – Tax-exempt support – Credit card, PO, invoice later – Multiple shipping addresses – Attachments with orders – Shipping instructions – E-mails upon order submission ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Customer UI: Account ServiceLower costs and improve service through self-service:• Self-administration Customer manages its users• Manage own profile• Account related information – Orders – Invoices – Payment history and status ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    25. 25. Guided Practice 5-3 Overview: iStore Walk-in UserThis practice covers the following topics:• Browsing through the product catalog as a walk-in user• Using product search• Adding products to the shopping cart• Performing a checkout ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    26. 26. Guided Practice 5-4 Overview: iStore BC2 UserThis practice covers the following topics:• Creating a registered user• Changing the profile of a registered user• Setting up an order with multiple ship-to addresses ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    27. 27. Guided Practice 5-5 Overview: iStoreB2B UserThis practice covers the following topics:• Creating B2B users• Assigning privileges to B2B users• Verifying B2B user orders ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    28. 28. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer Facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant Facing user interface• iStore 11i functional areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    29. 29. Merchant UI: Store ManagerImprove operationalefficiency:• Business user- centric store manager• Manage product related content• Effectivity dates on almost all items• Rule-based relationships and classification ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    30. 30. Merchant UI: Specialty Stores Set up multiple stores without incurring operational headache: – Different look-and-feel – Restrict products and sections – Different set of store defaults – Exception-based approach Store for Internal General Premier Store Store PartnerDifferent Standard • Partner-specific logopages related • Partner-specificto checkout section; include only in-store for partner Product Catalogs, Templates, Media Files, Store Defaults (org, price list, and so on) ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    31. 31. Merchant UI: Defining End-User Roles• Business-to-business (B2B): – Merchant – Merchant consumer• Business-to-consumer (B2C): – Merchant – End consumer ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    32. 32. Merchant UI: Key Merchant Role Definitions• Merchant users: – Product manager – Executive management – Application administrator• Technical support specialists: – System administrator – Database administrator – Implementation specialist ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    33. 33. Guided Practice 5-6 Overview: iStore Merchant VIThis practice covers exploring the iStore 11iMerchant UI. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    34. 34. Guided Practice 5-7 Overview: Adding Sections and ProductsThis practice covers the following topics:• Adding sections to the store• Adding products to sections• Removing an item ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    35. 35. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer Facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant Facing user interface• iStore 11i Functionalareas functional Areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    36. 36. iStore 11i Functional AreasE-commerce implementations and projects are split upinto functional teams:• Product Catalog and Navigation• Customer Account Management• Order Management ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    37. 37. Product Catalog and Navigation• Catalog organization: – Product – Section – Item – Specialty store• Product items are loaded into Inventory and made available to the iStore administrator on the basis of a publish flag set in Inventory.• An administrator chooses which product to add to each specialty store. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    38. 38. Product Catalog and NavigationA product can be displayed in multiple waysdepending on its location in the product catalog:• Product functional template• Display template• Display style ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    39. 39. Product Catalog and NavigationSection pageP1, P2 displayedas blocksP3, P4 displayedas line itemsP5 displayedas block ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    40. 40. Product Catalog and NavigationMerchant-side functionality:• Create catalog hierarchy from inventory• Associate template and media to sections and items• Include or exclude sections and items from minisite http://hostname:port/html/jtflogin.jsp (ibe_admin)• JavaScript extensively used• Customization not supported ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    41. 41. Product Catalog and NavigationCustomer-side functionality:• Browse the catalog hierarchy for minisites• Display browsing path or visited hierarchy• Display list and selling prices for items• Skip or drill down hierarchy levels http://hostname:port/html/ibezhome.jsp• Support customization (JSP level only)• No JavaScript out of box ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    42. 42. Product Catalog and NavigationCatalog Pricing• When a section has to be displayed, iStore makes a call to the pricing engine to determine the price.• This call is made directly to the pricing engine.• Pricing is dependent on QP. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    43. 43. Product Catalog and Navigation: Search• iStore uses the interMedia search engine, Oracle 8.1.6 platform.• The search function uses descriptions and long descriptions in the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS_TL table.• If the merchant wants to enable searching on additional criteria, he or she must run a concurrent program. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    44. 44. Product Catalog and Navigation: Search• Product information is initially loaded in an iStore table by a batch process.• Updates are done through a database trigger call on the product table.• The iMedia index is created to facilitate search capability of the keywords. This index can be created (and re-created) through SQL*Plus or through OEM, which is bundled in the product suite.• If additional product attributes are to be added in the product search, the batch job and trigger code need to be modified. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    45. 45. Product Catalog and Navigation: SearchINV SCHEMA IBE SCHEMA BROWSER MTL_SY Inter- STEM_I IBE_CT media TEMS _IMEDI Objects A_SEAR for DESC, CH Search LONG Concurrent SYNC $I, $K, DESC & search Program: sql $R, $N ATTR table & DB Tables Triggers IBEVCSMV. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    46. 46. Practice 5-8 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers understanding the Search features. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    47. 47. iStore 11i Functional AreasE-commerce implementations and projects are split upinto functional teams:• Product Catalog and Navigation• Customer Account Management• Order Management ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    48. 48. Customer Account ManagementThe term “customer” refers to the end user of iStore:• Account customer: – Person who has registered – iStore recognizes returning account customers by using cookies• Walk-in or anonymous customer: Nonregistered ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    49. 49. Customer Account ManagementThe customer account functionality uses thecommon customer model of the trading communityarchitecture:• Party• Account• Contact point• Location• Relationship• Participation ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    50. 50. Customer Account Management: Customer ModelWhat is it?• A model that allows groups in the community such as organizations, people, places, and networks relationship to do business together. Customer model is a solution to enter and update customer information in a CRM environment.Who uses it?• Typical users include all users of CRM and ERP customer information. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    51. 51. Customer Account Management: Customer Model Location Party roleContact Point Party site Person Organization Party Party relationship Group Relationship Participation Party account role - Competitor - Partner Account Territory Participates how Organization Product ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    52. 52. Customer Account Management• Customer registration is handled by CRM Foundation. – B2C – B2B• Authentication or login is handled by CRM Foundation’s Security Manager. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    53. 53. Customer Account Management: Merchant Approval• The merchant can approve account applications (B2B).• The merchant assigns an administrator or user role to the applicant. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    54. 54. Customer Account Management: Customer Profile• Password and password hint• Billing and shipping address• Payment information• Shipping method• E-mail address ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    55. 55. Customer Account Management: Express Checkout• With express checkout, a customer can purchase an item without going through a tedious checkout process.• Because the customer account model does not have any provisions for this method of shopping, iStore stores these preferences in its own schema.• There are two APIs to the IBE_CUST_ACCOUNTS table that stores this information, for creating and updating express checkout information. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    56. 56. Customer Account Management: Cookies• Browser cookies sit on the customer’s machine.• URL cookies are generated by iStore on login and are relayed in the URL from page to page.• Cookies identify the user.• Cookies relay other frequently needed information in the form of name-value pairs. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    57. 57. Available to Promise (ATP)• iStore can keep account of local inventory.• iStore can keep track of shipability days for a product.• A product is not reserved in real time.• Once a product is in the shopping cart, the customer must explicitly check availability.• Templates can be modified to do automatic ATP checks. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    58. 58. Practice 5-9 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers Inventory. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    59. 59. iStore 11i Functional AreasE-commerce implementations and projects are split upinto functional teams:• Product Catalog and Navigation• Customer Account Management• Order Management ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    60. 60. Order ManagementOrder Management deals with all the processes andfunctions that relate to the actual buying process.• Shopping cart• Add to cart• Delete from cart• Modify cart• Save cart• Retrieve cart• Convert to shopping list• Share cart ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    61. 61. Order Management: Buying MethodsProducts can be added or bought by:• Clicking the Add to Shopping Cart button and then completing the checkout process• Retrieving a saved cart and then completing the checkout process• Converting a shopping list into a cart and then completing the checkout process• Clicking Express Checkout, which bypasses the checkout process and creates an order ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    62. 62. Order Management: Checkout• Customer account type• Shipping and billing addresses: – Multiple billing and shipping addresses can be applied to an order – Multiple billing and shipping addresses can be applied to a single line item• Delivery options• Tax• Payment ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    63. 63. Overview• iStore 11i features and benefits• Differences between 11i and 3i• iStore 11i Customer Facing user interface• iStore 11i Merchant Facing user interface• iStore 11i functional areas• iStore 11i integrations and dependencies ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    64. 64. iStore 11i Integrations and Dependencies• iStore 11i Integration Points: CRM and ERP• Integration Architecture• iStore Dependencies: Mandatory• iStore Dependencies: Optional• Configurator Integration• iMarketing Integration• iPayment Integration• iSupport Integration• ERP Integration• Third Party Integration ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    65. 65. iStore Integration Points: CRM and ERP Shipping 7 Accounts Pricing 3 6 Receivable EcFoundation (JTF) 4 iStore 1 Inventory Configurator 5 2 iMarketing Oracle 8 Price Engine Marketing iPayment 12 Order 9 Management Material Requirements 13 Order Accounts Planning 10 Capture Receivable Pricing 14 11 Shipping ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    66. 66. Integration Architecture Message-based interfaces make it easy to integrate with: CRM EC Apps Oracle/SAP ERP Tax Shipping OM ReceivablesiMarketing iStore Open API’s NetP and Messaging Inventory MRP Engine iPayment Interfaces Configurator HR iSupportiBill and Pay ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    67. 67. iStore Dependencies: Mandatory• Oracle Inventory: Handles category structure and item information• Oracle Order Management: Keeps records of orders the customer places and the orders’ pricing• Oracle Accounts Receivable: For TCA and tax calculations• Oracle Shipping: For available shipping methods• Oracle Order Capture: Pushes orders to Order Management• CRM Foundation (JTF): Provides user registration and authorization ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    68. 68. iStore ERP Dependencies: Optional• Material Requirements Planning (MRP): Provides product availability information• Advanced Pricing: Provides capability to set up complex pricing conditions ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    69. 69. iStore CRM Dependencies: Optional• iMarketing and Marketing Online: Handles execution of Web marketing campaigns• iPayment: Authorizes and captures credit card transactions• Configurator: Enables customer-configured products• One-to-One Fulfillment: Sends e-mail confirmations to customers• Concurrent Manager: Runs SQL script to use Intermedia search ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    70. 70. Configurator Integration• Integration with Configurator allows the user to build complex products.• Control is transferred to Configurator during the configuration operation. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    71. 71. Configurator• Configurator is used to create product models and to help the buyer assemble related and dependent products in the shopping cart.• You create product models for dependent and related products by building rules for the products in the Configurator developer user interface.• The product models are initially imported from bill of material (BOM) models.• The developer user interface can be used to create a tree structure for the product model.• If a Configurator user interface is associated with an item, the store user interface adds the Configure button or a link. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    72. 72. Configurator Integration Assist users in selecting products by understanding their requirements – Integrated with Oracle Configurator – Seamless experience • Pricing • Order submission Configurator Internet Ed. Order • UI for config Management • Config rules • Config detailsiStore • UI templates • Launch config • BOM info Inventory • Model info Configurator • Config rules Developer ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    73. 73. Practice 5-10 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers using the Configurator. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    74. 74. Guided Practice 5-11 Overview: ConfiguratorThis practice covers the following topics:• Ordering a configurable item• Saving the cart and sending an e-mail notification ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    75. 75. iMarketing• You can use Oracle iMarketing to personalize the store and make recommendations.• You create postings in iMarketing, then create rules that determine the content for a given posting, then modify Oracle iStore 11i templates to make reference to posting tag.• See Oracle iMarketing Concepts and Procedures for details. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    76. 76. iMarketing IntegrationConvert more visits into purchases by: – Intelligent cross-sell and upsell – Targeted recommendations – Targeted promotions – At all places on the site • Visitor information and actions • Information about page displayed iStore iMarketing • Recommended products • User • Rules • Ads, promotions action • Campaigns tracking • Customer segmentation Product Catalog Orders, Installed Base, Pricing, and so on Customer Profile and Interaction History ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    77. 77. iPayment• If you are planning to provide the option of paying with a credit card you may want to set up Oracle iPayment for doing credit card authorization and fund capture.• You can set up authorization to be done at the time the order is placed, or later.• See Oracle iPayment Concepts and Procedures for details on setting up Oracle iPayment. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    78. 78. iPayment Integration Customer purchases product iStore CyberCash CheckFreeCreate Order Order Field-installable iPayment Capture payment systemsAuthorization Capture or Author/Capture Order Accounts Oracle Management Receivables Collections Fulfill Order Invoice for order Collect overdue payments ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    79. 79. iPayment Key Business Flow Order Order iStore Capture Management Authorization Authorization Authorization3rd-party Authorization /Capture iPayment ARsoftware ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    80. 80. iPayment 11i Architecture BEP APIs Field- EC-Application HTTP Req installable Gateway servlet HTTP(S) Adapter HTTP Req BEP APIs CyberCash CyberCash JAVA APIs Interface Interface Checkfree PayNow iPayment HTTP Req servlet Gateway AcctXfer APIs EngineEC-Application EC-Servlet PL/SQL APIs HTTP Req Secure FTP Checkfree ------ Scheduler -Files- ------ iPayment Repository ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    81. 81. Practice 5-12 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers iPayment. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    82. 82. iSupport IntegrationLower costs and improve service through self-service. – Knowledge-base support – FAQ – Create and track service requests (SRs) – View Installed Base and contracts – Seamless integration iStore iSupport Common Services (security, and so on), UI Shared Schema ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    83. 83. iStore Integration with ERP Order Shared Sales AccountsManagement Schema Receivables (OM) • Pricing • Customer/ • Orders/ Field/Mobile contact info order status Sales • Tax info • Sales reps per account iStore • Items • Available • Product to Promise families TeleSales (ATP) • Collateral availability Material Inventory Requirements Planning (MRP) ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    84. 84. Channel Integration Make other channels work with the Web store. – Share cart with a sales representative – Leads and opportunities out of saved carts, Web interactions – Call-me-back – Workflow and message enabled Quotes, Leads, and Oracle Sales OnlineShopping cart Opportunities(save, share) Oppt/lead assignment CSR/Sales Rep* iStore Oracle TeleSales Call-me-back Routing, screen pop with (customer Oracle Telephony warm transfer information) Manager Oracle Customer*Out-of-box integration to OSO and other apps to Carebe delivered in a future release ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    85. 85. Alerts• Oracle Workflow is used to send e-mail confirmations to customers and e-mail alerts to parties that share a shopping cart.• At a minimum, you must set up message text in Workflow for Oracle iStore 11i e-mail notifications. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    86. 86. iStore Partners and Third-Party Products• Java Servlet Development Kit (JSDK) 1.1.8 from Apache Software Foundation• TaxWare (iStore sales tax conversion)• Vertex (tax calculation done in Accounts Receivable); default tax codes can be set in AR if Vertex is not used ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    87. 87. CRM E-Commerce Foundation Products• Functional Order Capture: Communicates with Order Management• Architectural – HTML stack – Common user interface ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    88. 88. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points ReceivingIntegration Point Authoring Module Module MethodScripting: I Series Scripting iSupportGet/display productservice history iStore iSupport JSPObtain recommendationlist iStore, iSupport iMarketing JSP, BeanView orders/invoices/shipments iStore, iSupport Foundation JSPBuy Now feature iSupport iStore JSPData Access Foundationcontrol module (iSupport) iSupport APICall Me integration iSupport, iStore Call Center/OTM APIMerchant approval(integration with iSupport APIRegistration) Foundation, iStoreMerchant approval Foundation iSupport API ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    89. 89. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points ReceivingIntegration Point Authoring Module Module MethodUser groups Foundation iSupport APIUser groups(for channels ) MES iSupport APIInstalled base ServiceConfiguration iSupport APISearch/view SRs Support iSupport ViewsVerify customerentitlements Contracts iSupport APIAssign a supportrep to an SR Service iSupport APICreate a servicerequest and generate Support iSupport API ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    90. 90. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points Authoring ReceivingIntegration Point Module Module MethodService requestmanagement (create, update,escalate, close) Support iSupport APIAttachment to SRsupport FND iSupport APICreate/view servicerequest profile JTF iSupport APISearch knowledge base Service (SMS) iSupport APIE-mail SR receipt tocustomer Workflow iSupport APISearch/view returns Order Capture iSupport ViewsCreate returns Order Capture iSupport ViewsCreate/update personalizedhomepage JTF iSupport APIPublish/subscribe Workflow iSupport API ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    91. 91. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points Authoring ReceivingIntegration Point Module Module MethodSearch/view contracts Contracts iSupport JSPView/update customer profile JTF iSupport APISearch/view solutions inSMS Service iSupport APISearch/view technical library MES iSupport APIBrowse technical library MES iSupport API, JSPView company news, alerts MES iSupport APIView patch Support iSupport APIView configurationinformation iSupport Support UIAssign a supportrepresentative to SR iSupport ServiceCalculate affiliate dues iMarketing Contracts (post-11i) ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    92. 92. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points ReceivingIntegration Point Authoring Module Module MethodCreate a service requestand generate SR number iSupport ServiceCreate an affiliatecontract iMarketing ContractsDetermine “standard"entitlement level iSupport ServicePull posting iStore, Affiliate site iMarketingQuery departmentlevel/organization SRs iSupport ServiceUpdate/install base iSupport ServiceUpdate/escalate SR iSupport ServiceReconcile bill payments Accounts Receivable iPaymentVoid an authorizationfor an order Order Management iPaymentCredit an affiliate account iMarketing Accounts Receivable ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    93. 93. CRM to CRM E-Commerce Integration Points ReceivingIntegration Point Authoring Module Module MethodObtain authorizationand capture funds Collections iPayment APIProcess order in OMand capturepayment in ARbased on orderreceived in iStore iStore, OC, OM, AR iPayment APIInvoice authorization andcapture of payments AR iPayment APIProcess ordersusing credit cards OM, OC API iPayment ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    94. 94. SummaryIn this lesson, you should have learned how to:• Present the value of iStore 11i• Explain the basic iStore functionality in the customer and merchant user interface• Recognize dependencies and integration points ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.
    95. 95. Practice 5-13 Overview CheckpointThis practice covers understanding iStore dependencies. ® Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2001. All rights reserved.

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