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Seattle Girls' School Parent and Guardian Series: Media Literacy
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Seattle Girls' School Parent and Guardian Series: Media Literacy

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Presentation in conjunction with screening of MissRepresentation (http://missrepresentation.org/). How does the media influence girls? See the connection between media, girls' obsession with …

Presentation in conjunction with screening of MissRepresentation (http://missrepresentation.org/). How does the media influence girls? See the connection between media, girls' obsession with perfection and niceness, their tendency for relational aggression and unhealthy friendships, women's pressures to juggle everything from career to love to children, frightening statistics around the beauty and cosmetic surgery industry, and lack of women in leadership.

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  • Adolescence 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Target Audience: All Parents, Guardians, Mentors, etc.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Consumer cycle Perceived obsolescence Capitalism Depends on you feeling inadequate
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 1. Stereotype - A preconceived or oversimplified generalization about an entire group of people without regard for their individual differences. While often negative, stereotypes may also be complimentary. Even positive stereotypes can have a negative impact however, simply because they are broad generalizations. The stereotypes we hold form the basis of our prejudices. 2. Prejudice - A conscious or unconscious negative belief about a whole group of people and its individual members. When the person holding the prejudice also has and uses the power to deny opportunities, resources or access to a person because of their group membership, there is discrimination. 3. Discrimination - Prejudice plus the power. Discrimination can take many forms, including racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, ageism, etc. Many acts of discrimination build up over time, perpetuated against one relatively less powerful social group by a more powerful social group, lead to a group of people being in a state of oppression. 4. Oppression - The systematic subjugation of a group of people by another group of people with access to social power, the result of which benefits one group over the other and is maintained by social beliefs and practices. Because oppression is institutionalized in our society, target group members often believe the messages and internalize the oppression. 5. Internalized Oppression - The "buying into" the elements of oppression by the target group. When target group members believe the stereotypes they are taught about themselves, they tend to act them out and thus perpetuate the stereotypes which reinforces the prejudice and keeps the cycle going.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Alternative aggression defines any behavior that expresses anger in ways other than direct words or physical aggression. It has been happening for years among girls, but only recently has the literature come more into the mainstream with books like Odd Girl Out and Queen Bees and Wannabes and movies like Mean Girls.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • More than 20% of teens have sex before the age of 14.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 12/19/11 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee

Transcript

  • 1. Seattle Girls ’ School Parent/Guardian Information Series Media Literacy Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee http://sites.google.com/site/seattlegirlsschoolinfoseries/home
  • 2. Agenda
    • Media – Why Is This Happening
    • The Myths of Media
    • The Results of the Myths
    • What Can We Do?
    • Discussions
    • Resources
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 3. Disclaimers and Other Food for Thought Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 4. Media Why is This Happening? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 5. Myths of Media
    • The Pretty Girl
    • The Good Girl
    • The Perfect Girl
    • The Powerful Girl
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 6. Where Do These Myths Lead? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 7. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 8. The “Good Girl” in Conflict Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 9. Alternative Aggression
    • Relational Aggression
    • Indirect Aggression
    • Social Aggression
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 10. Friends and Frienemies Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 11. Why Girls Say They Keep Frienemies Around
    • I don ’ t want to make it worse.
    • Maybe I am doing something to make them treat me this way.
    • They ’ re my connection to other friends.
    • My other friends won ’ t support me.
    • When they ’ re not being awful, they ’ re actually awesome, fun, and nice.
    • I don ’ t want to be alone.
    • There ’ s nothing I can do about it.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 12. Why Women Say They’ d Rather Stay in an Abusive Relationship
    • I don ’ t want to make it worse.
    • Maybe I am doing something to make him treat me this way.
    • He ’ s my source of income, home, and support for our kids.
    • My family and friends tell me I should stay and work it out.
    • When he ’ s not being awful, he ’ s kind, nurturing, and wonderful.
    • I don ’ t want to be alone.
    • There ’ s nothing I can do about it.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 13. The “Good Girl” in the Workplace and Home Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 14. Women make up almost half the working population of the United States. And yet:
    • Women make 78 cents to a man ’s dollar.
    • The wage gap has been closing at a rate of less than half a penny a year.
    • If equal pay for women happened right now, across the board, women would gain $319 billion in 2008 dollars.
    • Unequal pay kicks in shortly after college graduation, when women and men should, absent discrimination, be on a level playing field.
    • Women still are segregated into "pink-collar" jobs that are lower skill and lower pay. For example, women make up 87% of child care workers and 86% of the health aides.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://sites.google.com/site/sgsprofessionaloutreach/)
  • 15. Women and Leadership in the U.S.
    • Women make up 51% of the population.
    • Women comprise 17% of Congress
    • The 2010 mid-term election was the first time women have not made gains in Congress since 1979.
    • 34 women have ever served as governors (compared to 2319 men).
    • 67 other countries have had female presidents and prime ministers.
    • The U.S. is 90 th in the world in terms of women in national legislatures (below Cuba, China, Iraq and Afghanistan).
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://sites.google.com/site/sgsprofessionaloutreach/)
  • 16. Beauty Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee) The “Pretty Girl” on Beauty
  • 17. “ Pretty” Scary…
    • 53% of 13 year old girls are unhappy with their bodies.
    • That number increases to 78% by age 17.
    • 65% of women and girls have an eating disorder.
    • U.S. women spend $12,000 and $15,000 a year on beauty products and salon services.
    • The number of cosmetic surgical procedures performed on youth under age 19 more than tripled from 1997 to 2007.
    • The average facelift costs $11, 429 (enough to pay for 5 years at community college and 2 years at a state university).
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://sites.google.com/site/sgsprofessionaloutreach/)
  • 18. What Can We Do? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 19. What can parents do?
    • Teach the difference between “good” and self sacrificing.
    • Talk about or compliment something besides her looks.
    • Value the quality of her relationships, not the quantity.
    • Help her develop strong interaction and social skills.
    • • Encourage and help her to make informed choices.
    • Engage in media with her and talk to her about it.
    • Role-Play difficult conversations with her.
    • Give her healthy outlets for her feelings.
    • Give her access to women mentors.
    • Respect and nurture her true self.
    • Share your stories.
    • Model the way.
    • Stay Involved.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 20. Teach Media Literacy
    • Engage in media intentionally with your girls. Watch TV and movies with her, and talk about them.
    • Know what media your girls are engaging in without you. What are they telling/teaching her?
    • Know how she is spending your/her money. What companies are getting positive reinforcement through dollars?
    • Have explicit conversations about bias, difference, and oppression.
    • Reinforce your values in words and actions.
    • Balance: Your values, her autonomy, shared rules and guidelines.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://sites.google.com/site/sgsprofessionaloutreach/)
  • 21. Undoing Gender Bias Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 22. Resources
    • Joshua M. Aronson, Ph.D., “Improving Achievement & Narrowing the Gap,” Learning and the Brain Conference, Cambridge, MA, November 2003
    • Allan G. Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference.
    • John Medina, Talaris Research Institute, various studies on theory of mind and power.
    • Miss Representation , documentary film on media and women
    • United Nations Population Fund Statistics on Gender Equality as of 2005 http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2005/presskit/factsheets/facts_gender.htm
    • Learning to be critically literate of mass media http://www.medialit.org/
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 23. Gender Specific Resources
    • JoAnn Deak, Ph.D., Girls Will Be Girls: Raising Confident and Courageous Daughters, How Girls Thrive
    • John Medina, Talaris Research Institute, various studies on early gender differences in competition and play
    • Northwest Girls Coalition, Protective Factors for Middle School Girls - What can Parents Do?
    • Mary Pipher, Ph.D., Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls
    • Rachel Simmons, Odd Girl Out, Odd Girl Speaks Out, Curse of the Good Girl
    • Harriet R. Tenenbaum, “Gender Achievement Motivation,” Learning and the Brain Conference, Cambridge, MA, November 2003.
    • Rosalind Wiseman, Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends & Other Realities of Adolescence, Queen Bee Moms and Kingpin Dads
    • Naomi Wolf, The Beauty Myth.
    • Naomi Wolf, Promiscuities .
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)