Digital Agenda for Europe
Delivering Digital Growth And Jobs
Franck Boissière
DG CONNECT - F1: Growth & Jobs
22 October 20...
“Every European Digital”
N. Kroes
“Every European Digital”
N. Kroes
Why ICT matters
"Endorsing the cloud"
could add 0,1-0,4% of
GDP growth to the EU.

ICT = 6% of
EU GDP

ICT investment
→50%...
Digital Performance: EU v global competitors

5
Digital Agenda

2013 Scoreboard

 Basic Broadband virtually
everywhere – Fast broadband >30
Mbps reaches 54% of EU
 Inte...
Pillars - Digital Agenda for Europe
Digital Single Market

Interoperability & Standards
Trust & Security
Fast and ultra-fa...
The Digital Single Market – borderless EU economy
Fragmented
National
Frameworks

Digital Single
Market
So close and yet so far away
SMEs selling online remains a rare sight
What does a Connected Continent mean for…
…ICT companies & startups?
• The chance to innovate and develop – knowing operat...
It's not just Telcos - the whole economy needs the ICT sector fixed.
Energy and Utilities
2%
Hospitality, Hotels
and Leisu...
The demand for telecoms services will keep growing

Global mobile traffic
2010- 2018

This means low investment is becomin...
Interoperability & Standards
Promote standard-setting
rules

Propose legislation on ICT
interoperability

Member States to...
Trust and Security

40% citizens not assured to
spread data over internet

38% citizens not assured to pay over
internet

...
Very fast internet supply and demand
Correlation Fixed Broadband Penetration and Competitiveness

WEF's Global Competitive...
Speeding up Public Sector Innovation
E-gov:
15-20%
reduction in
admin costs

Savings but
maintained
service levels

E-proc...
Cloud Computing
Over €100 BL impact on
GDP pa
3.8m jobs
by 2020

Change of paradigm

Cloud

Cloud computing
strategy
1) Be...
Entrepreneurship and digital jobs and skills
ICT investment

More infrastructure +
e-readiness/skills

GDP increase

More ...
Computer skills

Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
Grand Coalition

5 Policy Clusters
Some Current Pledges
 ICT TRAINING:
 Online ICT learning platform (Academy Cube)
 Smart grid training, etc.
 NEW LEARN...
Public investment in ICT R&D

Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
Beyond R&D&I: An industrial agenda for key enabling technologies
Full implementation of updated DAE - Impacts

5% expected increase of European
GDP by 2020

1.2 million jobs to be created...
Stakeholder Engagement

Going Local 2013

DAE Member State implementation survey
National Digital Agendas
Digital Agenda – widely emulated in the EU
National Digital Agenda or compatible CY, EE, FI, DE, IT, LT, MT, NL,
policy fr...
Regional
Digital Agendas
Many regional and local
authorities have implemented
digital strategies
They reflect key DAE prio...
DAE

DAE

DAE
NDA

NDA

NDA

NDA
RDA

RDA

RDA
Development of digital strategies at national and
regional/inter-regional/transnational level.

Region

Region
Region
Regi...
Regional Digital Agenda Seminar: March 2014
with Committee of the Regions

The opportunity for regions across Europe to me...
Thank you
ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda

DigitalAgenda
blogs.ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/
@DigitalAgendaEU
http://ec.europa....
Interoperability & Standards
Promote standard-setting
rules

Propose legislation on ICT
interoperability

Member States to...
Interoperability & Standards
Promote standard-setting
rules

Propose legislation on ICT
interoperability

Member States to...
Interoperability & Standards
Promote standard-setting
rules

Propose legislation on ICT
interoperability

Member States to...
Digital Agenda for Europe
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  • A more nuanced analysis shows that in terms of inclusion, the European model provides better social cohesion policies but demonstrates weaknesses in providing the right conditions for gainful employment for large shares of its population. As mentioned earlier, the welfare state model predominating in Europe has managed to provide relatively good social protection during economic downturns by creating social safety nets. However, at the same time, the strong and persistent effects of the financial and economic crisis coupled with comparatively stronger rigidities in the labour markets of several European countries have resulted in sharp increases in unemployment, of a long-term nature in many cases, thus depriving a wide segment of the population of gainful employment. Moreover, the severe fiscal imbalances in several European countries, especially those hit more strongly by the economic crisis, are placing increasing stress on the capacity of governments to support the existing models, calling into question their sustainability unless comprehensive reforms are implemented. The gap in creating a knowledge-based economy is evident in all four pillars that make up the smart sub-index, where the EU clearly falls short compared to other advanced economies. Given the strong interconnections and complementarities among the four pillars necessary to create a truly smart economy, addressing these weaknesses will require a coordinated effort in all four dimensions.
  • NeelieKroes said: "I am glad that basic internet is now virtually everywhere in the EU, but we can't get stuck playing yesterday's game. The data shows that the biggest problem this year is the lack of investment in very fast networks, and a continuing lack of a real telecoms single market. The problem is clear and our response via a single telecoms market package will be too." Key findings in the European Commission's Digital Agenda (DAE) Scoreboard include:Internet progress: Basic Broadband is now virtually everywhere in Europe – satellite performance has improved, helping to cover the 4.5% of population not covered by fixed basic broadband. The Commission is now focused on getting better take-up of satellite where this can bridge remaining gaps.Fast broadband now reaches half the population - 54% of EU citizens have broadband available at speeds greater than 30 Mbps.Internet access is increasingly going mobile - 36% of EU citizens access the internet via a portable computer or other mobile device (access via mobile phone is up from 7% in 2008 to 27% in 2012). 4th generation mobile (LTE) coverage tripled to 26% in one year.Problem areas: Only 2% of homes have ultrafast broadband subscriptions (above 100 Mbps), far from the EU's 2020 target of 50%. 50% EU citizens have no or low computer skills – neither the amount nor the level of ICT user skills has improved over the last year. 40% of companies recruiting or trying to recruit IT specialists have difficulties in doing so and the current number of vacancies for ICT specialists has been projected to grow to 1 000 000 by 2015. The recently launched Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs will target actions toward closing this gap.Other findings:More and more have tried internet – the proportion of EU citizens having never used the internet is continuing its steady decline (down 2 percentage points to 22%). However around 100 million EU citizens have still never used the internet, declaring too high costs, lack of interest, or lack of skills as the main barriers.70% now use the internet regularly at least once a week, up from 67% last year; 54% of disadvantaged people use the internet regularly, up from 51% last year. Roaming prices in 2012 have fallen - by almost 5 euro-cents, mainly after the 1st July 2012 Roaming regulation. eCommerce is growing steadily, but not cross-border - 45 % of individuals use the internet to buy goods and services, a moderate increase from 43% one year ago; very few buy across borders. eGovernment is now undertaken by most firms and citizens – 87% of enterprises use eGovernment and the proportion of citizens using eGovernment has also increased over the last year to 44% (both up by 3 percentage points).Research spending increased slightly despite budgetary restraints. Public R&D investment in ICT increased by 1.8% or €122 million to €6.9 billon; private R&D investment in ICT also increased, but the growth of 2.7% was not enough to recover last year's decrease.
  • The Digital Agenda contains 101 actions, in 7 pillars, which will help to reboot the EU economy and enable Europe's citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies.The DAE is not just about ticking-off items from a long list, it is about using technologies to make a real difference.  The DAE contains 13 specific goals which encapsulate the change we want to achieve:the entire EU to be covered by broadband by 2013.the entire EU to be covered by broadband above 30 Mbps by 202050 % of the EU to subscribe to broadband above100 Mbps by 202050 % of the population to buy online by 201520 % of the population to buy online cross-border by 201533 % of SMEs to make online sales by 20155the difference between roaming and national tariffs to approach zero by 2015to increase regular internet usage from 60 % to 75 % by 2015, and from 41 % to 60 % among disadvantaged people.to halve the proportion of the population that has never used the internet from 30 % to 15 % by 201550 % of citizens to use eGovernment by 2015, with more than half returning completed formsall key cross-border public services, to be agreed by Member States in 2011, to be available online by 2015to double public investment in ICT R&D to € 11 bn by 2020to reduce energy use of lighting by 20% by 2020
  • Too many barriers still block the free flow of online services and entertainment across national borders. The Digital Agenda will update EU Single Market rules for the digital era. The aims are to boost the music download business, establish a single area for online payments, and further protect EU consumers in cyberspace.
  • In the EU, the majority of eCommerce continues to takes place at national level. In 2012, 41% of individuals made purchases from national sellers, up from 39% in 2011. The proportion of individuals in the EU making purchases from other EU member states remained low (11%) - marginally higher than in 2011 (10%). Looking at the trend over time it can be seen that while gradual progress is being made towards the Digital Agenda target of 20% of individuals buying online from other EU Member States, it is clear that if this trend continues, the target will only be met by around 2020, rather than the current target date of 2015. It should however be taken into account that measurement of progress towards this target is based on self-reporting by consumers and on the assumption that consumers can between domestic and cross-border transaction; which is not always the case. This may lead to under-reporting of cross-border buying. Furthermore, above a certain volume retail sales across borders are not the most efficient strategy for companies. There is an incentive for companies to establish a physical presence in countries where they have significant online sales, thus turning what was cross-border eCommerce into domestic eCommerce, suggesting that there may also be a limit to the growth of cross-border eCommerce.
  • The percentage of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) selling online is progressing slowly, gaining around one percentage point every two years. In 2011, 15% of SMEs in EU27 received orders via "computer mediated networks". Behind the latter concept there are two different technologies: web-sales and EDI (electronic data interchange or XML formats). Web-sales is the main channel, used by 12% of SMEs, and the majority (9% of EU SMEs) use only this channel. 3% use both web-sales and EDI and 3% use only EDI.
  • In the face of the deep crisis affecting its economy and society, Europe needs to tap into new sources of growth in areas that will reinforce its competitiveness, drive innovation and create new job opportunities. As the world moves rapdily towards an Internet-based economy, directly affecting everything from traditional services such as banking and insurance to new sectors such as online retail, and from industrial production to energy supply, ICT is increasingly seen as a source of the smart, sustainable and inclusive growth envisaged in Europe 2020. However, Europe lacks a genuine single market for electronic communications. The Union is fragmented into distinct national markets and as a result Europe is losing out on a major source of potential growth. The European Commission therefore welcomes the conclusions of the 2013 Spring European Council, calling for measures to create a Single Telecoms Market as early as possible. INSimplifying regulation: so operators can offer services anywhere in Europe following a single notificationSpectrum: more coordination so pan-EU business models and companies can exist. Standardised access products: to allow companies to obtain similar access to fixed networks in countries where they do not have their own network, and facilitate seamless provision of digital services across EuropeOpen internet: ensure net neutrality while maximising innovation, competition and consumer choice. Mobile roaming: companies can avoid regulation if they phase out roaming from 1/7/2014. No incoming call chargesEuropean fixed calls: companies must charge fixed calls to other EU countries as if a long-distance domestic call, unless specific objectively cost-recovery is required. Consumer protection:new rights to plain language contracts, with more comparable information, guaranteed internet speeds, and greater rights to switch provider or contract if desiredNOT INNo single telecoms regulatorNo Eurotariff termination ratesNo change to definition of electronic communications services providerNo pan-European spectrum licenseNo strait-jacket for internet (can be different speeds for different needs – but no blocking, throttling, lying)
  • Top ICT firms have fared well throughout the crisis. Telecommunication service providers made up the largest component of the top 250 ICT firms, followed by equipment manufacturers. ICT sector growth has not gone un-noticed by investors, as the sector remains a key area of focus for venture capitalists.
  • The gap between the impressive growth in traffic and the much lower growth in data revenues is having a clear impact on the sector. Between 2010 and 2012, revenues from data services increased by 8%. By contrast, the proportion of the European population using a mobile phone to access the Internet nearly doubled, going from 14% to 27% in 2012 and the demand in traffic has been doubling every year. The volume of mobile data traffic in Europe is expected to grow more than tenfold in the period from 2010 to 2015 and global growth surged by an estimated 350% between 2010 and 2012 (Figure). It is estimated that, in 2012 alone, mobile data traffic increased by 69%, with 3G data representing almost 50% of the total and with an acceleration of LTE traffic (+207% y-o-y growth). In 2012 a fourth-generation (4G) connection generated 19 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection and although 4G connections represent only 0.9% of mobile connections they account for 14% of mobile data traffic.
  • The internet is a great example of interoperability – numerous devices and applications working together anywhere in the world. Europe must ensure that new IT devices, applications, data repositories and services interact seamlessly anywhere – just like the internet. The Digital Agenda identifies improved standard-setting procedures and increased interoperability as the keys to success.
  • Only 12% of European web users feel completely safe making online transactions. Threats such as malicious software and online fraud unsettle consumers and dog efforts to promote the online economy. The Digital Agenda proposes a number of practical solutions, including a coordinated European response to cyber-attacks and reinforced rules on personal data protection.
  • To attract Europe's best minds to research, world class infrastructure and adequate funding are crucial. The best research ideas must be turned into marketable products and services. Currently, EU investment in ICT research is still less than half US levels. The Digital Agenda seeks to maintain Europe's competitive edge through increased coordination and elimination of Europe's fragmented efforts.E.g. of Italy NHS savings - digital prescriptions alone €2bn
  • In October 2010, the TClouds (Trustworthy Clouds) project was started, funded by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme. The project's goal is to research and inspect the legal foundation and architectural design to build a resilient and trustworthy cloud-of-cloud infrastructure on top of that. The project also develops a prototype to demonstrate its results.
  • Over 50% of Europeans use the internet daily – but 30% have never used it at all! Moreover, disabled persons face particular difficulties in benefiting fully from new electronic content and services. As ever more daily tasks are carried out online, everyone needs enhanced digital skills to participate fully in society. The Digital Agenda tackles the digital divide.
  • Digital skills are fundamental to an effective use of ICT. As such every year the Commission collects data on the digital skills of the EU population through its survey of ICT use by individuals and households. Digital skills are measured by asking individuals if they have ever performed certain computer and/or internet related activities. Low, medium and high skills are then calculated by whether individuals have performed 1 or 2, 3 or 4, or 5 or 6 of the listed internet or computer activities. In 2012, data were collected on computer skills only. In the EU, 67% of individuals had some level of computer skills, unchanged from 2011: 26% of individuals had high skills (-1 p.p. over 2011), 25% medium skills (unchanged) and 16% low skills (+2 p.p.). 33% had none of the defined skills. As such almost 50% of the EU population still has little or no computer skills (low skills + none of the defined skills74). While no data on internet skills is available for 2012, data from 2011 show that similar to computer skills around 70% of the population (73%) have internet skills. However, the distribution of skills is more shifted towards low (30%) and medium (32%): only 11% had high level skills. Given the growing necessity for digital skills in Europe – in particular, the projected 90% of jobs that will soon require some digital skills - it seems much needs to be done to improve the digital skills levels of EU citizens, and the perception of more than half of the labour force that their current digital skills are not sufficient were they to look for another job.
  • "Regular" (at least once a week) use of the internet increased by 2 p.p., from 68% in 2011 to 70% in 2012, in the EU27; showing continued steady progress towards the Digital Agenda key performance target for regular use of 75% by 2015. Indeed, forward projection of the linear trend in regular internet user in the EU indicates that the key performance target for regular internet use will be met before 2015. Frequent (daily) use of the internet grew by 3 p.p. between 2011 and 2012 in the EU27, from 56% to 59%; showing that not only is the proportion of the population going regularly online increasing, but that it is increasingly becoming a daily activity.
  • Following the Employment Package  of April 2012 VP Kroes called for the formation of a multi-stakeholder partnership, the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs,  to tackle the twin issues of a projected shortfall of up to 900,000 ICT professionals in Europe by 2015, exacerbated by a decline in computing science graduates. Hence, its aim is to increase the overall supply of digitally skilled professionals and to better match supply and demand of digital skills.On 4-5 March 2013 the Commission launched the Grand Coalition at a Conference in Brussels, which was hosted by  President José Manuel Barroso Vice Presidents Neelie Kroes and Antonio Tajani, Commissioners László Andor and AndroulaVassiliou as well as Richard Bruton, Irish Minister for Jobs, Entreprise and Innovation.The Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs will deliver concrete actions, which can be implemented in the short-term and have high local impact. It will build on on-going programmes and best practices that could be scaled-up. The following are some of the objectives of the actions:Improve the image and attractiveness of ICT careersOffer training packages co-designed with the ICT industryOffer more aligned degrees and curricula at vocational and university level education that will respond to the needs of the students and the industryImprove recognition of qualifications across countries by stimulating take-up of a European certification scheme for digital skills of ICT professionals, based on the existing e-Competence FrameworkReduce labour market mismatches by stimulating mobilityStimulate digital entrepreneurship by liaising with Startup Europe, a single platform for tools and programmes supporting people wanting to set up and grow web start-ups in EuropeThe Grand Coalition will help accelerate and intensify efforts initiated by European policies, such as the Digital Agenda for Europe, the e-Skills Strategy, the Employment Package, the Opening up Education Initiative, the Rethinking Education Strategy, the Youth Opportunities Initiative, and the EU Skills Panorama.
  • MOOC - Massive open online course
  • GBAORD - Government budget appropriations or outlays for research and development In 2011, public investment in ICT R&D suffered from the budgetary restraints in member states, increasing by only 1.8%, compared to a required annual growth of 5.5 % between 2007 and 2020 in order to reach the target. Although recent estimates for the previous years have been slightly revised up, the result is that public R&D in ICT is currently roughly 3 % below the required trajectory. It is also interesting to note that the share of ICT in publicly funded research continues to increase, reaching 7.3%. Indeed, it is thanks to this increased share that public R&D in ICT rose at all and did not fall like overall public R&D. Regarding business R&D in ICT4, in 2010 it recovered a bit from the 7.4% fall of the previous year, growing by 2.7% according to provisional estimates. However, this partial recovery obviously was not yet sufficient to return to pre-crisis levels.
  • Key Transformative Action: Pool public and private resources for micro- and nano-electronics behind a common industrial strategyFocus and develop Public Private Partnerships in photonics, robotics and Future InternetAction plan for electronics industry in EuropeInvest in High Performance Computing
  • The Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE) aims to reboot Europe's economy and help Europe's citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies. It is the first of seven flagships initiatives under Europe 2020, the EU's strategy to deliver smart sustainable and inclusive growth.The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy.The Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE) aims to help Europe's citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies. It is the first of seven flagships initiatives under Europe 2020, the EU's strategy to deliver smart sustainable and inclusive growth. Full implementation of this updated Digital Agenda would increase European GDP by 5%, or 1500€ per person, over the next eight years, by increasing investment in ICT, improving eSkills levels in the labour force, enabling public sector innovation, and reforming the framework conditions for the internet economy. In terms of jobs, up to one million digital jobs risk going unfilled by 2015 without pan-European action while 1.2 million jobs could be created through infrastructure construction. This would rise to 3.8 million new jobs throughout the economy in the long term.
  • The Digital Agenda for Europe aims to help Europe's citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies.DAE's actions concern many actors and therefore requires active involvement of various stakeholders, including ICT sector companies, a wide range of other industries and non-governmental organizations active in fields impacted by ICT (such as health, transport, energy, culture etc.), governments and local authorities, as well as potentially all citizens.
  • 20 out of 27 Member States have adopted or are in the process of adopting National Digital Agendas (NDA) or equivalent policy frameworks. At the same time more and more regional and local authorities have implemented successful digital strategies.
  • The Digital Agenda has given impetus for all Member States to review their policy frameworks. Some have done this in the form of strategies called "Digital Agendas", others have adopted policy frameworks that are largely compatible, among them Slovenia. A third group has opted for a coordinated approach of different initiatives without a single overarching strategy.Whatever the form, it is important to underline that all countries have followed and set up concerted strategies to address the digital challenges.
  • Both at the national and regional level the initiatives often reflect key priorities in the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE), such as investment in broadband infrastructure, ICT enterprises, e-Government, e-Health, inclusion and accessibility.
  • Regional Cooperation - Cooperation between regional players - public, private and third sector – can result in digital strategies better targeted at local needs and implemented more effectively.
  • Regional Cooperation - Cooperation between regional players - public, private and third sector – can result in digital strategies better targeted at local needs and implemented more effectively.
  • The main objective of the meeting in March would be to highlight concrete innovative approaches and make sure we bring to everyone's attention the full breath of the DAE.
  • The internet is a great example of interoperability – numerous devices and applications working together anywhere in the world. Europe must ensure that new IT devices, applications, data repositories and services interact seamlessly anywhere – just like the internet. The Digital Agenda identifies improved standard-setting procedures and increased interoperability as the keys to success.
  • The internet is a great example of interoperability – numerous devices and applications working together anywhere in the world. Europe must ensure that new IT devices, applications, data repositories and services interact seamlessly anywhere – just like the internet. The Digital Agenda identifies improved standard-setting procedures and increased interoperability as the keys to success.
  • The internet is a great example of interoperability – numerous devices and applications working together anywhere in the world. Europe must ensure that new IT devices, applications, data repositories and services interact seamlessly anywhere – just like the internet. The Digital Agenda identifies improved standard-setting procedures and increased interoperability as the keys to success.
  • Digital Agenda for Europe

    1. 1. Digital Agenda for Europe Delivering Digital Growth And Jobs Franck Boissière DG CONNECT - F1: Growth & Jobs 22 October 2013
    2. 2. “Every European Digital” N. Kroes
    3. 3. “Every European Digital” N. Kroes
    4. 4. Why ICT matters "Endorsing the cloud" could add 0,1-0,4% of GDP growth to the EU. ICT = 6% of EU GDP ICT investment →50% productivity growth Internet usage X2 every 2-3 years, Wireless connected devices: doubling from 25 to 50BL, 2015-20 Mobile data traffic: x12-14, 2012-18 Digitalized SMEs produce 10% more, grow and export twice and create twice the jobs ordinary ones do Internet has contributed to 21% of GDP growth across the G20 from 2005 to 2010 GROWTH 4 million ICT workers, grow 3% p.a. even in crisis But Europe lacks 1 million ICT specialists
    5. 5. Digital Performance: EU v global competitors 5
    6. 6. Digital Agenda 2013 Scoreboard  Basic Broadband virtually everywhere – Fast broadband >30 Mbps reaches 54% of EU  Internet access increasingly going mobile - 36% of EU citizens use portable devices  50% have no or low computer skills – 40% of companies have difficulties recruiting IT specialists  1,000,000 ICT vacancies by 2015  eCommerce growing steadily, but not cross-border 99,9%
    7. 7. Pillars - Digital Agenda for Europe Digital Single Market Interoperability & Standards Trust & Security Fast and ultra-fast Internet access Research and innovation Enhancing digital literacy, skills and inclusion ICT-enabled benefits for EU society
    8. 8. The Digital Single Market – borderless EU economy Fragmented National Frameworks Digital Single Market
    9. 9. So close and yet so far away
    10. 10. SMEs selling online remains a rare sight
    11. 11. What does a Connected Continent mean for… …ICT companies & startups? • The chance to innovate and develop – knowing operators can't block or throttle your bright ideas • A connected home market where your innovations can grow and succeed • A more aligned spectrum market – for wireless services and gadgets that work perfectly across the EU …big businesses? • Communications that serve all your sites – without multiple providers and contracts • New innovations: -Secure communications -Top-quality videoconferencing -Speedy cloud computing • Broadband that is reliable, pervasive, fast • An economic boost worth €90 bn / year …citizens? More choice & more telecoms providers competing in your country The right to choose a "bundle" you can use across the EU – without unfair roaming charges The guaranteed right to the full, open Internet – no blocked services Easier, more consistent consumer protection – wherever you are …telecoms providers? • A stronger sector for a connected continent …Europe? • The chance to work between countries with consistent • 21st century digital infrastructure – like they rules, regulators & remedies have in the US and Asia • Easier to plan and bid across borders • More growth and jobs from the broadband • The chance to think big and compete globally boost • The chance to provide innovative services • More competitiveness for every sector that • Stable, consistent rules for investment depends on connectivity – from transport to  More fast broadband for more Europeans television. #ConnectedContinent
    12. 12. It's not just Telcos - the whole economy needs the ICT sector fixed. Energy and Utilities 2% Hospitality, Hotels and Leisure Wholesale and 3% Distribution 3% Natural Resources Construction 2% 1% Educational Services 1% Retail Trade 3% Healthcare 4% Consumer 33% Transportation 5% Manufacturing 8% ICT spending by industry segment 2012 Services 8% Financial Services 10% Government Telecom 8% 9% Source: OCDE, Internet Economy Outlook 2012 #ConnectedContinent
    13. 13. The demand for telecoms services will keep growing Global mobile traffic 2010- 2018 This means low investment is becoming a chronic problem. Regulators bear some responsibility to make investment easier
    14. 14. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
    15. 15. Trust and Security 40% citizens not assured to spread data over internet 38% citizens not assured to pay over internet Citizens not assured! 16% enterprises experienced threats to their internet-based systems Trust Risks of Disruption of critical networks and online business activities. Local approaches not sufficient
    16. 16. Very fast internet supply and demand Correlation Fixed Broadband Penetration and Competitiveness WEF's Global Competitive Index score 5.8 Sweden 5.6 Finland Japan 5.4 5.2 US UK Belgium Austria Germany 4.8 Netherlands France Luxembourg 5 Denmark Korea Ireland Estonia 4.6 Czech Rep. Poland 4.4 Portugal Spain Lithuania Italy Hungary 4.2 Bulgaria Slovakia Cyprus Slovenia Malta Latvia Romania 4 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 Fixed broadband lines per 100 population A 10% increase in the broadband penetration rate results in 1 to 1.5% increase in annual GDP per-capita. Faster broadband = higher GDP growth. (Czernich et al. University of Munich, 2009)
    17. 17. Speeding up Public Sector Innovation E-gov: 15-20% reduction in admin costs Savings but maintained service levels E-procurement savings: €100bn per year ICT Investments Extra resources for investments Re-use of PS data: €140bn economic value E-health savings e.g. Italy €12.4bn (11.7% of NHS expenditure)
    18. 18. Cloud Computing Over €100 BL impact on GDP pa 3.8m jobs by 2020 Change of paradigm Cloud Cloud computing strategy 1) Better standards, no lock in, certification 2) Safe and fair contract terms and conditions 3) EU Cloud Partnership (public, common procurement requirements)
    19. 19. Entrepreneurship and digital jobs and skills ICT investment More infrastructure + e-readiness/skills GDP increase More ICT use across ALL sectors Higher total productivity Take-up of online services More innovation (also in management, logisti cs…), new products
    20. 20. Computer skills Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
    21. 21. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
    22. 22. Grand Coalition 5 Policy Clusters
    23. 23. Some Current Pledges  ICT TRAINING:  Online ICT learning platform (Academy Cube)  Smart grid training, etc.  NEW LEARNING:  Support industry/education provider collaboration  Launch MOOC for secondary teachers  CERTIFICATION:  Support roll-out of common eCompetences framework  MOBILITY:  Launch mobility assistance services  AWARENESS RAISING:  GetOnline Week
    24. 24. Public investment in ICT R&D Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
    25. 25. Beyond R&D&I: An industrial agenda for key enabling technologies
    26. 26. Full implementation of updated DAE - Impacts 5% expected increase of European GDP by 2020 1.2 million jobs to be created in infrastructure construction in the short term, rising to 3.8 million jobs throughout the economy in the long term Growth & Jobs
    27. 27. Stakeholder Engagement Going Local 2013 DAE Member State implementation survey
    28. 28. National Digital Agendas
    29. 29. Digital Agenda – widely emulated in the EU National Digital Agenda or compatible CY, EE, FI, DE, IT, LT, MT, NL, policy framework adopted PT, RO, ES, SE, FR, (CH, TR) National Digital Agenda or compatible BE, BG, CZ, GR, HU, LV, SI, policy framework under way (NO) Coordinated or aggregated/combined approach of specific digital national AT, DK, IE, LU, PL, SK, UK initiatives, but no single overarching strategy
    30. 30. Regional Digital Agendas Many regional and local authorities have implemented digital strategies They reflect key DAE priorities: • investment in broadband infrastructure • ICT enterprises • e-Government • e-Health, inclusion and accessibility. European Union Regions
    31. 31. DAE DAE DAE NDA NDA NDA NDA RDA RDA RDA
    32. 32. Development of digital strategies at national and regional/inter-regional/transnational level. Region Region Region Region
    33. 33. Regional Digital Agenda Seminar: March 2014 with Committee of the Regions The opportunity for regions across Europe to meet, share best practices and exchange innovative ideas.
    34. 34. Thank you ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda DigitalAgenda blogs.ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/ @DigitalAgendaEU http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/ http://www.daeimplementation.eu
    35. 35. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
    36. 36. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
    37. 37. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
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