Psm behavior tier 2 8212

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  • Primary prevention focuses on preventing the development of new cases of problem behaviors by focusing on all students and staff, across all settings. We expect that primary/school-wide/universal implementation will result in about 80% of students gaining the necessary behavioral and social skills necessary to be successful in school.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Be sure to emphasize that Needs don’t just exist with at-risk students. AIG students needing to be challenged is a problem as well that needs to be addressed. The difference would be that you would not be completing paperwork to document as you would with at-risk population.
  • Secondary prevention focuses on reducing the number of existing cases of problem behaviors by establishing efficient and rapid responses to problem behavior. Secondary prevention is only implemented after the successful implementation of S-W PBIS and should result in an additional 15% of students learning necessary skills.Batsche, G.M. (August, 2010). We know what RtI is, now what do we do with it? Critical elements for successful implementation. Presented at the Response to Intervention (RtI) Summer 2010 Institute: Building a Context for Excellence, Macomb ISD, Clinton Township, MI. Retrieved from http://www.misd.net/rti/6A%20‑Batsche%20Critical%20Elements%20for%20Success%20keynote.pdf
  • Be sure to emphasize that Needs don’t just exist with at-risk students. AIG students needing to be challenged is a problem as well that needs to be addressed. The difference would be that you would not be completing paperwork to document as you would with at-risk population.
  • Generally, students who would benefit from secondary supports demonstrate low-level problem behavior, have 2-5 office referrals, and demonstrate behavior across settings. (If behavior is in one location, it might be an issue with the environment, rather than the student.)
  • Direct assessment is another tool that can be utilized to measure behaviors. This tool is a direct assessment of the frequency of the a behavior across settings and across time. So, looking at this data what can we tell about when Shamel has the most difficulty with negative comments to peers?
  • Another form of direct assessment is a duration recording. This allows you to document the length of incidents for behaviors that might not occur frequently but last for a considerable amount of time, such as tantrums.
  • Sometimes it can be difficult to focus on one behavior, as many students present a variety of challenging behaviors. It is important to prioritize which behavior is having the most significant impact on the student and select that particular behavior to begin the intervention process.
  • This is an example of a students behavior, in which the student demonstrates several challenging behaviors. After some data collection, it is evident that the behavior the student demonstrates most often is leaving his assigned area. Considering the frequency is just one way to prioritize student behaviors. Remember to always address behaviors that are safety issues immediately with a crisis plan if necessary.
  • Setting events are environmental, personal, situations, or daily events that impact student behavior. They may or may not immediately precede the behavior, but are none-the-less a factor associated with the particular behaviors the student demonstrates.
  • This is an example of Setting Event data. We can see from this particular graph that having missed the bus or not having breakfast, which may be related issues, are common setting events associated with the behavioral challenges we observe.
  • Predictors of the occurrence or non-occurrence of the problem behavior Typically occur immediately before the problem behaviorWhen, Where, With whom, ActivityTime of dayPhysical SettingPeople presentTypes of interactions (demands, directives, etc.)
  • This is not an exhaustive list of antecedents, rather it is an example of data that can be collected.Often teachers will say “There is no pattern. The behavior happens all the time. It’s unpredictable.” It is important to know that it is extremely rare to see a behavior happen exclusively during one time period or one class or one activity. Rather, we tend to see the teacher is correct, the behavior does happen “all of the time,” however, when we collect the data we can see patterns emerge. Very often we can see one antecedent is more frequently associated with the behavior. While it is not 100% of the time, even accounting for only 20-30% of the time can help us know where to intervene. In this example, which antecedent is most often associated with the problem behavior we observe?
  • When we are talking about functional based approaches to behavior, consequences do not refer to punishments that follow behaviors. Rather, they are any particular outcome that happens immediately after the behavior. They are responses that allow the student to access something or avoid something. Even things we might not immediately recognize as a consequence can be enough to encourage a student to continue demonstrating a particular behavior.
  • This is an example of a graph containing the consequences a student experienced after demonstrating problem behavior. While calling a students name might not immediately seem like attention, it might be sufficient attention for that particular student. In this example, when the student demonstrated the behavior the teacher responded by calling the students name, which suggests the student is motivated by attention. Further, we can see the time-out response is relatively low, which suggests that the student is not trying to escape the classroom activities. So when ever you are collecting data about consequences be mindful of what each of the responses is either giving access to or helping a student escape.
  • Behavior communicates needNeed is determined by observing what happens prior to and immediately after behaviorKids engage in behavior for two reasons: to get what they want or avoid what they don’t want.Their behavior is based on their learning history. The behavior has worked in the past.Remember, there is no universal reinforcing or aversive stimulus. What we may find aversive, many find reinforcing, thereby inadvertently reinforcing inappropriate behavior. This is why we MUST observe what happens prior to and immediately after the inappropriate behavior.
  • Now that we have worked through the components of determining the function of the behavior, we need to write a statement that helps us make sense of the data. A hypothesis statement will help us to predict when the problem behavior is likely to occur and will guide our intervention and support efforts.
  • A hypothesis statement has four parts: where, context/antecedent, behavior, and the proposed function.
  • People engage in behaviors for a reason. When we understand functions we can try to guess what a person is trying to get or avoid. What is Robert trying to get or avoid?
  • It is not possible to determine function of a student’s challenging behavior simply by describing the behaviorChoose an appropriate interventionConnect the FUNCTION with the interventionAsk: Will this intervention meet the functional need?Ex. If the function of the behavior is to access adult attention:Intervention should prevent access to adult attention for inappropriate behaviorsIntervention should provide access to adult attention for appropriate behaviorsChoose an appropriate replacement behaviorNew or alternative behavior taught to the student as a replacement option for the problem behavior.Key points:It is probably more efficient for the student to engage in the problem behaviorReplacement behavior must allow student access to same functional need but more efficiently
  • Based on this data about consequences, if you were selecting an reinforcement component for a behavior plan, which reinforcement would be most effective?
  • Time to define hypothesis. Why are the behaviors occurring? This leads to more solvable solutions.
  • Ready for hypothesis and solution building
  • The TIPS model provides a framework for developing solutions. There are five main areas for intervention, not including safety.
  • Same problem, changing reinforcer to match hypothesis is good.
  • Ready for hypothesis and solution building
  • Ready for action planning
  • Psm behavior tier 2 8212

    1. 1. Problem Solving Training for Behavior Tier 2 Secondary Interventions 1
    2. 2. Overview• Data Decision Rules• Behavior Basics• Data Tools• Classroom Implementation• Targeted Social Skill Instruction• Check In- Check Out 2
    3. 3. Expectations• Be Responsible – Return promptly from breaks – Be an active participant• Be Respectful – Turn off cell phone ringers – Listen attentively to others• Be Kind – Participate in activities – Listen and respond appropriately to others‟ ideas
    4. 4. Attention Signal• Trainer will raise his/her hand• Participants will raise their hand and wait quietly
    5. 5. Group Activity• Create a picture or visually document to describe where your school is with Problem Solving Implementation. – Accomplishments – Challenges 5
    6. 6. Core – Tier 1 GOAL: 100% of students achieve at high levels Tier I: Begins with clear goals: 1.What do we expect all students to know, understand and do as a result of our instruction? 2.How will we know if these goals are met? 3.How will we respond when students do not meet the goals with initial instruction? 4.How will we respond when some students have already met the goals?(Batsche, 2010) 6
    7. 7. Questions your team needs to consider at Tier 1…– What types of Behavioral Needs are not being addressed by our Behavior Core at an effectiveness rate of 80%?– What data do we need to look at to determine this?
    8. 8. Supplemental – Tier II < 20% of student Core + Supplemental To Achieve Benchmarks 1.Where are the students performing now? 2.Where do we want them to be? 3.How long do we have to get them there? 4.How much do they have to grow per year/month to get there? 5.What resources will move them at that rate? 6.How will we monitor the growth of students receiving supplemental instruction?(Batsche, 2010) 8
    9. 9. Questions your team needs to consider at Tier 2…• What types of Behavioral Needs are occurring for 10-15% of your population?• What additional supports are needed to ensure success for students not responding to the core?• What data are needed to respond to the questions above?
    10. 10. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model 10
    11. 11. DATA DECISION RULES 11
    12. 12. WHO is appropriate for Secondary interventions?• Universal Behavior Screening Data • 2-5 office referrals
    13. 13. How can we use data?• Can be used by teams to determine set points where students will be referred for additional support• Individual schools must determine the timeframes for data decisions (2 – 5 ODRs per 9 weeks)
    14. 14. Data Decision Rules Examples... 6 or more ODR referrals Tertiary Prevention:2-5 ODR Referrals Specialized Individualized Secondary Prevention ~5% Systems for Students with Specialized Group High Risk Behavior Systems for Students with At Risk Behavior ~15% Other data decision rules: -# referrals -# minor incident referrals0-1 ODR Referral -absences -teacher concern Primary Prevention -behavior screening results School wide and Classroomwide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~ 80% of Students
    15. 15. Data Decision Rule Examples Continued…• Any student that is absent more than 3 days in one month (or one 4 week period) will be referred for intervention• Any student who receives 2 or more ODRs within a 9-week period will be referred for intervention• Any student who fails one or more classes will be invited to join a small group related to classroom success
    16. 16. Using ODRs to evaluate your Workbook pg. 2 continuum of supports IF... FOCUS ON... More than 40% of students receive one or more office referrals More than 2.5 office referrals per student School Wide System More than 35% of office referrals come from non-classroom settings More than 15% of students referred from non-classroom settings Non-Classroom System More than 60% of office referrals come from the classroom 50% or more of office referrals come from less than 10% of classrooms Classroom Systems More than 10-15 students receive 5 or more office referrals Targeted Group Interventions / Classroom Systems Less than 10 students with 10 or more office referrals Less than 10 students continue rate of referrals after receiving targeted group settings Individual Student Systems Small number of students destabilizing overall functioning of school
    17. 17. Team Time• Discuss and document your data decision rules. Visit the PSM wiki •Click on pages/files (right tab) •Look for Data decision team planning, then select download
    18. 18. BEHAVIOR BASICS 18
    19. 19. To correctly matchappropriate interventions to problem behaviors, teams will rely on the science of behavior.
    20. 20. TIPS – Step 1 Identify the Problem 20
    21. 21. How do we identify the problem? DATA COLLECTION & TOOLS 21
    22. 22. Measurable or Not? Not MeasurableMeasurable oppositional lazy talking out swearing inattentive out of area defiant on task rude bothering fighting
    23. 23. Objective DescriptorsObjective Subjective Talking during seatwork Disobedient Seldom Repeatedly Passing notes Hurrying through work Once or twice a week Five times each day Leaning back in chair Sometimes Bothering a neighbor Continuously Every ten minutes Bizarre Tapping pencil on desk Twice each period
    24. 24. Data Considerations: Clear Definition of Problem Behavior The ―Stranger Test‖•Is the description of the behaviorclearly defined?•Would a stranger’s descriptionmatch yours?•If a stranger read yourdescription, would they be able toidentify the problem behavior? Developed by the Behavior Specialist Team of Wake County Public Schools
    25. 25. Data Considerations: Data to CollectHow often does How the behavior extreme Frequency occur? is it? Intensity Duration How long Under what Context does it circumstances last? does it occur? Developed by the Behavior Specialist Team of Wake County Public Schools
    26. 26. Data Collection Strategies• What is already collected? – Anecdotal notes by teacher – Office referrals – Disciplinary actions• What else can be collected? – Products from Consequences – Behavior Contracts – Checklists – DBRs – Direct Observation – Interviews
    27. 27. Direct Assessment – Frequency Counts Behavior Counting Name ____Shamel ____ Week of __Nov 5, 200X______ Behavior to be counted ____Negative Comments to Peers: (Get out of my face. ) Mon. Tue. Wed. Thurs. Fri. TotalArrival IIII IIIII II II IIIII IIIII I 40 IIIII IMath I I I 3Science II I III IIII I 11Art IIII IIIII IIIII III IIIII IIII I 24Reading I II III 6
    28. 28. Direct Assessment – Duration Recording Record the elapsed time, usually in minutes, from onset to conclusion of target behavior. Be sure to indicate the date, and the activity in which the student was engaged when the target behavior began to escalate. Student Name: ___Shamel __ Week of / Day : __Nov 15, 200X____ Target Behavior: Tantrum (screams, lays on floor, throws items) Transition Large Group Small Group Individual Work Read Aloud Read Silently In Crowds Library Specials Specific Subject Behavior IncidentBriefly describe, making sure to note date, time, and any circumstances you think noteworthy.#1 9:45-10:15, Mon, Nov 15Group was doing read aloud#2 9:35-10:15, Tue, Nov 16Went to an assembly in thegym#3 9:28-10:05, Fri, Nov 19#3Oral vocabulary test
    29. 29. Behavior• What is the challenging behavior?• What can you observe? – What does it look or sound like?• Prioritize• Choose one 29
    30. 30. 30 Behavior 25 20# of incidents 15 10 5 0 refusing to cursing peers Leaving assigned participate area 30
    31. 31. Setting Events• What environmental, personal, situational or daily events impact the behavior? – Eating/Sleeping routines – Medical/Physical problems – Familial and staff interactions• Do not immediately precede problem behavior 31
    32. 32. Setting Events Setting Event 18 16 14 12# of incidents 10 8 6 4 2 0 Exhibits/reports sickness No breakfast Missed the bus Visit with mom 32
    33. 33. Antecedent• What happens immediately before the behavior?• Predicts problem behavior• When, Where, With whom, Activity – Time of day – Physical Setting – People present – Types of interactions (demands, directives, etc.) 33
    34. 34. Antecedent2520151050 Reading Math Social Specials Small Direct Studies Group Instr 34
    35. 35. Consequence• What happens immediately after the behavior?• Gives student a reason to repeat the problem behavior• Not related to punishment 35
    36. 36. Consequence: Pink=Attention Maintained; Purple= Escape 45 40 35 Redirection Calling name 30 Outisde conference# of incidents 25 Reminder 20 Ignore Time-out 15 10 5 0 Redirection Calling Outisde Reminder Ignore Time-out name conference 36
    37. 37. Function …• People behave for a reason - we call this “function”• Function: • Does he/she get something? • Tangibles, attention, stimulation, people, etc. • Does he/she avoid or escape something? • People, activities, embarrassment, tasks, etc. 37
    38. 38. Only Two Basic Functions Problem Behavior Escape/ Obtain/Get Avoid Something Something Stimulation/ Tangible/ Social Sensory Activityfrom Horner & Adult Peer Sugai at www.pbis.org
    39. 39. TIPS – Step 2 Develop Hypothesis 39
    40. 40. Hypothesis Statements Information about the problem behavior is used to write a hypothesis statement that helps us predict when the problem behavior is likely to occur and the function of that behavior. 40
    41. 41. Hypothesis Statements When Estes is ___________ and __________ (happens), he where/setting context/antecedent typically responds by _________ to gain/avoid __________. behavior function Hypothesis:When Estes is in language arts and the teacher is providing direct instruction he typically responds by making verbal noises (ex. Burping) to access peer and teacher attention. 41
    42. 42. Activityhttp://www.sonoma.edu/cihs/classroom/mod_3/lesson1.html http://www.sonoma.edu/cihs/classroom/mod_3/lesson1.html Write a hypothesis statement about http://www.sonoma.edu/cihs/classroom/mod_3/lesson1.html http://www.sonoma.edu/cihs/classroom/mod_3/lesson1.html Robert‟s behavior 42
    43. 43. Identifying the function helps us :• Choose an appropriate intervention – Will this intervention meet the functional need?• Choose an appropriate replacement behavior – Alternative behavior taught to the student – What you want the student to do instead – Must meet functional need 43
    44. 44. Which reinforcement would be most effective: a behavior plan that gives student lunch with the teacher or a “drop an assignment” pass? 45 40 35 30 Redirection# of incidents 25 Calling name Outisde conference 20 Reminder Ignore Time-out 15 10 5 0 Redirection Calling Outisde Reminder Ignore Time-out 44 name conference
    45. 45. TIPS – Step 3 Discuss and select Solutions 45
    46. 46. Some Secondary Solutions…-Small Group Social Skills Instruction-Check In/Check Out (CICO or BEP)
    47. 47. TargetedSocial SkillsInstruction
    48. 48. Students learnappropriate behavior in the same way a childwho doesn’t know howto read learns to read— through instruction, practice, feedback, and encouragement.
    49. 49. Teaching Behavior• Inappropriate behavior is viewed as a skill deficit• Social skills training teaches students a process or strategy to resolve problems.• Teaching behavior is used when a student needs to replace problem behavior with a more desirable behavior.
    50. 50. Two Types of Social Skill Deficits• Skill deficits (cannot do) – Direct teaching approach • Coaching, modeling, behavior rehearsal• Performance deficits (will not do) – Incentive-based management approach • Prompting, cuing, reinforcement • Prompted social initiations • Home and school rewards • Individual and group contingencies
    51. 51. Assessment of Social Skills• Skill based deficit – Provide strong incentive to observe if student can perform under such conditions.
    52. 52. Assessment of Social Skills• Performance based deficit – Motivational deficit • Observe if student performs skill following introduction of motivational strategy. • motivation=value*belief in ability*get reward promised (Vroom, 1964) – Discrimination deficit • Student frequently performs skill, but fails to perform under specific circumstances. • Oblivious to social cues or social demands of situation.
    53. 53. Social Skills Instruction• Direct instruction – Skill based approach• Social problem solving – Strategy based approach• Opportunistic teaching (not enough alone) – Prompt students who have missed an opportunity to practice a skill – Provide correction when skill is incorrectly or inappropriately demonstrated – Debrief when student uses inappropriate behavior in place of appropriate social skill
    54. 54. To effectively teachsocial skills you must ALWAYS determine what you want the student to do INSTEAD
    55. 55. Social Skill Areas• Cooperation skills• Assertion skills• Friendship skills• Empathy skills• Self-control skills• School and classroom skills
    56. 56. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups• Select & group students with similar needs• Determine staff responsible• Determine best time for instruction• Select curricula & write lessons• Communicate with teacher and parents• Evaluate effectiveness
    57. 57. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups• Select & group students with similar needs – Type of problem behavior – Intensity of problem behavior – Age/Developmental Level – Gender – Develop Group Behavior Management Plan
    58. 58. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups• Determine staff responsible – Consider size of group and type of problem behavior when assigning staff to (co) lead• Determine best time for instruction – Lunchtime, After/Before School, Rotating Schedule, intervention block
    59. 59. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups Workbook Pg, 8• Select curricula & write lessons – Consider students‟ developmental level – Commercial curricula, online lessons, or custom lessons – Materials needed – Meeting space requirements/limitations Tell, Show. Practice, Assess and Repeat
    60. 60. Generalization Strategies• Provide a range of useful skill variations.• Teach in the targeted setting.• When teaching, include peers the target student is likely to encounter in the problem setting.• Use a number of adults when teaching.• Continue teaching for a sufficient amount of time.
    61. 61. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups• Communicate with teacher and parents – Written parent permission best practice – Determine how teacher(s)/parent(s) can encourage/participate (homework)
    62. 62. Social Skills Instruction for Small Groups• Evaluate effectiveness – Pre/Post Data Comparison – Teacher/Parent Feedback – Student Assessment
    63. 63. Researched Based SS Curriculums
    64. 64. Second Step Video
    65. 65. Team Time• Using your ODR data determine which social skills lessons and groups are most needed at your school, list• when will lessons be taught• how will team ensure instruction is occurring• Evidence of lessons• Possible reinforcers for participation
    66. 66. Assessing Social Skills lessons Visit the PSM wiki •Click on pages/files (right tab) •Look for Social Skills Observation Checklist, then select download
    67. 67. Check-In Check-Out (CICO, aka BEP)
    68. 68. CICOFeatures:• Research-based intervention effective with 75% of students who participate• Students identified and receive support within a week• Check-in and check-out daily with an adult at school• Regular feedback and reinforcement from teachers• Family component• Daily performance data used to evaluate progress
    69. 69. 10 Critical Features of CICO/BEP1. Linked directly to school-wide expectations and/or academic goals2. Continuously available for student participation3. Implemented within 3 school days of determination that the student should receive the intervention4. Can be modified based on assessment and/or outcome data5. Includes structured prompts for „what to do‟ in relevant situations
    70. 70. 10 Critical Features of CICO/BEP continued…6. Results in student receiving positive feedback from staff7. Includes a school-home communication exchange system at least weekly8. Orientation materials provide information for a student to get started on the intervention9. Orientation materials provide information for staff/ subs./ volunteers who have students using the intervention10. Opportunities to practice new skills are provided daily
    71. 71. BehaviorEducationProgram (aka…CICO) DVD
    72. 72. Why does the CICO work?• Improved structure • Prompts throughout the day for correct behavior • System for linking student with at least one adult• Increase in contingent feedback • Feedback occurs more often and is tied to student behavior • Inappropriate behavior is less likely to be rewarded• Elevated reward for appropriate behavior • Adult and peer attention• Linking school and home support• Organized to morph into a self-management system
    73. 73. Is My School Ready to Implement a CICO System?• School-wide system of behavior support in place (SET Score 80% or higher)• Staff buy-in for implementation of the CICO• Administrative support – Time & money allocated• No major changes in school climate – e.g. teacher strikes, administrative turnover, major changes in funding• CICO implementation a top priority
    74. 74. How Do You Build Student and Staff “buy-in” for the CICO?• Give CICO program a high profile in your school• Promote CICO as positive support not punishment• Collaboratively involve referring teachers in CICO process• Provide regular feedback to staff, students, and families
    75. 75. Is It Really Resistance For Intervention? Before Implementing a Secondary Intervention, You Must Ask: Is the Student Receiving anAdequate “DOSE” of the UniversalIntervention?
    76. 76. Team TimeUse your workbook to begin planning forSocial Skills and CICO implementation.
    77. 77. TIPS – Step 4 Develop and Implement Action Plan 77
    78. 78. Creating a Behavior Goal• Clear goal needs to be set that can be evaluated using data• Goals can be measured in the following ways: – % reduction – Absolute reduction – Satisfaction level 78
    79. 79. Tips for Writing Behavior Goals• Use the baseline data as a guide for where you want behavior to go• Intervention must match the goal statement• Achievable and age appropriate (in comparison to peers)• Must include a time frame 79
    80. 80. Example Behavior Goal_______________ will (increase or decrease)(Student Name) (select one)_________________________ by or to _________________ (Behavior) (% or number)by _______________. (date/timeframe) 80
    81. 81. 3 Questions that Action Plan must Answer • What are you doing? • Who is doing it? • By when? 81
    82. 82. TIPS – Step 5 Evaluate and Revise Action Plan 82
    83. 83. How do we Progress Monitor for Behavior? DBRs• Daily Behavior Report = DBR• The DBR involves a brief rating of target behavior over a specified period of time• Additional examples at• http://www.interventioncentral.org/index.php/ tools/197-behavior-report-card-generator 83
    84. 84. Characteristics of DBRThe DBR involves a brief rating oftarget behavior over a specifiedperiod of time– behavior(s) is specified– rating of the behavior(s) typically occurs at least daily– obtained information is shared across individuals (e.g., parents, teachers, students)– the card is used to monitor • the effects of an intervention • as a component of an intervention (Chafouleas, Riley-Tillman & McDougal, 2002) 84
    85. 85. How are DBR data summarized? 10.9 Class on Time0.80.70.60.50.4 Completed0.3 Work0.20.1 0 Positive Participation 85
    86. 86. DBR Considerations• Measures perception of behavior• “3 to 7” not “he is a 7”• No absolutes in Social Behavior• Rater Effects 86
    87. 87. Do we have a problem?(Example of the PSM process for Behavior
    88. 88. Team Initiated Problem Identify Solving Problems(TIPS) Model Evaluate and Develop Revise Hypothesis Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Develop and Select Implement Solutions Action Plan
    89. 89. Problem Statements• Write a “problem statement” that specifies the precise nature of the problem• The more Ws (what, when, where, who, why) you incorporate into the problem statement, the more precise the problem statement will be• The more precise the problem statement, the easier it will be to generate a solution that “fits” the problem
    90. 90. Problem-Solving Action Plan Write your Precise Problem Implementation and Evaluation Statement here. Precise Problem Statement, Solution Actions (e.g., Goal withTimeline, based on review of data Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Who? By Fidelity & Outcome (What, When, Where, Who, Reward, Correction, When? Measures, & Updates Why) Extinction, Safety) We have 8 students with 2- ODRs from Sept. to Nov. for Re-teach primarily disrespectful SS 11/1/10 JM will earn 80% of Responsibility lessons behaviors in the morning Implement CICO his daily points on his reading class and afternoon Reinforce on-task JA 11/3/10 daily progress reportsocial studies class in order to behaviors with DPR per day for 4/5 days per access peer and adult All 11/3/10 week by 12/18/10 attention. teachers
    91. 91. Team Initiated Problem Identify Solving Problems(TIPS) Model Evaluate and Develop Revise Hypothesis Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Develop and Select Implement Solutions Action Plan
    92. 92. Solutions – Generic Strategies• Prevent – Remove or alter “trigger” for problem behavior• Define & Teach – Define behavioral expectations; provide demonstration/instruction in expected behavior (alternative to problem behavior• Reward/reinforce – The expected/alternative behavior when it occurs; prompt for it, as necessary• Withhold reward/reinforcement – For the problem behavior, if possible (“Extinction”)• Use non-rewarding/non-reinforcing corrective consequences – When problem behavior occurs Although not a “solution strategy,” Safety may need to be considered (i.e., procedures that may be required to decrease likelihood of injuries or property damage)
    93. 93. Trevor Test Middle School Problem statement: We have 8 students with 2-5 ODRs from Sept. to Nov. for primarilydisrespectful behaviors n the morning reading class and afternoon social studies class in order to access peer and adult attention.Prevent “Trigger”Define & Teach Reteach Respect lessons Implement CICO to provide more frequent feedback and instruction about respectful behaviors.Reward/Reinforce Reward students earning 80% of points on DPRWithhold RewardCorrective consequenceOtherSafety
    94. 94. Problem-Solving Action Plan Write Solutions Implementation and Evaluation here. Precise Problem Statement, Solution Actions (e.g., Goal withTimeline, based on review of data Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Who? By Fidelity & Outcome (What, When, Where, Who, Reward, Correction, When? Measures, & Updates Why) Extinction, Safety) JM has received 2 ODRsduring the first grading period Re-teach Respect SS 11/1/10 JM will earn 80% offor disruptive behaviors in the lessons Implement CICO his daily points on his classroom during reading daily progress report possibly motivated by Reinforce respectful JA 11/3/10 behaviors with DPR per day for 4/5 days per attention. All 11/3/10 week by 12/18/10 teachers
    95. 95. Team Initiated Problem Identify Solving Problems(TIPS) Model Evaluate and Develop Revise Hypothesis Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Develop and Select Implement Solutions Action Plan
    96. 96. Problem-Solving Action Plan Documen Document t Implementatio Goal n here. here. Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, Solution Actions (e.g., Goal withTimeline, based on review of data Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Who? By Fidelity & Outcome (What, When, Where, Who, Reward, Correction, When? Measures, & Updates Why) Extinction, Safety) JM has received 2 ODRsduring the first grading period Re-teach SS 11/1/10 All 8 students will earnfor disruptive behaviors in the Responsibility lessons Implement CICO 80% of daily points on classroom during reading their daily progress possibly motivated by Reinforce on-task JA (cico) 11/3/10 behaviors with DPR report per day for 4/5 attention. All 11/3/10 days per week by teachers 12/18/10
    97. 97. Team Initiated Problem Identify Solving Problems(TIPS) Model Evaluate and Develop Revise Hypothesis Action Plan . Collect and Use Data Discuss and Develop and Select Implement Solutions Action Plan
    98. 98. CICO Avg Points Per Day1009080706050 CICO Avg Points Per Day40302010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    99. 99. Problem-Solving Action Plan Evaluate here. Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Solution Actions Goal withTimeline, Statement, based on review of (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prom Who? By Fidelity & Outcome data pt, Reward, Correction, Ext When? Measures, & Updates (What, When, Where, Who, W inction, Safety) hy) JM has received 2 ODRs 11/1during the first grading period Re-teach SS 11/1/10 JM willstudents are 5 earn 80% offor disruptive behaviors in the Responsibility lessons Implement CICO his meeting 80%on his daily points goals classroom during reading dailyconsistently and progress report possibly motivated by Reinforce on-task JA 11/3/10 might benefit from behaviors with DPR permaintenancedays per day for 4/5 plans. attention. week by 12/18/10 are All 11/3/10 Three students teachers not making progress. Consider modifying plan and/or adding additional interventions.
    100. 100. Problem Solving Practice• Use your disciplinary data to practice the problem solving process.• Use the TIPS problem solving worksheet to assist you with the process.
    101. 101. Implementation Inventory• Evaluates all three levels of implementation• Considers Systems, Data, and Practices• Goal is 80% in each area• Use this evaluation to continue to develop and strengthen all three levels of your problem solving model. 101
    102. 102. Are we done YET??• Using your Action Plan document complete the section on Behavior Tier 2.• Complete the evaluation.• Thank you!!! 102

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