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Landscape                            Conclusions Introduction                Result   Applications                   Theor...
Landscape                                  Conclusions Introduction                      Result   Applications            ...
Landscape                                                        Conclusions Introduction                        Result   ...
Landscape                                         Conclusions Introduction                        Result        Applicatio...
Landscape                                    Conclusions Introduction                             Result   Applications   ...
Landscape                                         Conclusions Introduction                     Result       Applications  ...
Landscape                               Conclusions Introduction                  Result    Applications                  ...
Landscape                                  Conclusions Introduction                     Result   Applications             ...
Landscape                                 Conclusions Introduction                    Result      Applications            ...
Landscape                                     Conclusions Introduction                             Result       Applicatio...
Landscape                                                     Conclusions Introduction                           Result   ...
Landscape                                 Conclusions Introduction                   Result    Applications               ...
Landscape                            Conclusions Introduction                     Result   Applications                   ...
Landscape                                     Conclusions Introduction                       Result    Applications       ...
Landscape                                  Conclusions Introduction                   Result     Applications             ...
Landscape                                 Conclusions Introduction                     Result     Applications            ...
Landscape                                 Conclusions Introduction                    Result    Applications              ...
Landscape                                 Conclusions Introduction                     Result    Applications             ...
Landscape                                Conclusions Introduction                      Result    Applications             ...
Landscape                              Conclusions Introduction                 Result   Applications                  The...
Landscape                                  Conclusions Introduction                   Result     Applications             ...
Elementary Landscape Decomposition of    the Quadratic Assignment ProblemThanks for your attention !!!GECCO 2011 (Theory t...
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Exact Computation of the Expectation Curves of the Bit-Flip Mutation using Landscapes Theory

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Presentation at GECCO 2011 (Dublin). Theory track.

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Transcript of "Exact Computation of the Expectation Curves of the Bit-Flip Mutation using Landscapes Theory"

  1. 1. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future Work Exact Computation of the Expectation Curves of the Bit-Flip Mutation using Landscapes Theory Francisco Chicano and Enrique AlbaGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 1 / 22
  2. 2. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkMotivation Bit-flip MutationMotivation and Outline • Research Question: what is the expected fitness of a solution after bit-flip mutation? • We answer this question with the help of landscape theory Review of Bit- Flip Mutation Main result: Applications Conclusions expected fitness and future work Background on landscape theoryGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 2 / 22
  3. 3. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkMotivation Bit-flip MutationBit-flip Mutation Operator • Given a probability p of inverting one single bit… 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 • Special cases 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 p=0: no change 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 p=1/2: random sol. p=1/n: average 1 flip 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 p=1: complement 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 3 / 22
  4. 4. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkMotivation Bit-flip MutationBit-flip Mutation Operator• A different point of view: p is the probability of flipping a bit, H is the Hamming distance Prob=p2(1-p)(n-2) H=2 H=1 Prob=p(1-p)(n-1) If 0 < p < 1 the mutation can reach any solution in the search space (with different probabilities) H=k H=3 Prob=pk(1-p)(n-k) Prob=p3(1-p)(n-3)GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 4 / 22
  5. 5. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkMotivation Bit-flip MutationBit-flip Mutation Operator • The fitness expectation after a mutation, E[f]x, can be computed as: Alternatives y’ f(y’) • Exact inefficient computation Prob(x,y’) • Approx. efficient x computation • Exact efficient computation Sum over the search space!!! Set of solutions E[f]x = Prob(x,y) · f(y) + Prob(x,y’) · f(y’) + ... = z∈X Σ Prob(x,z) · f(z) • We compute E[f]x avoiding the sum using landscape theoryGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 5 / 22
  6. 6. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkLandscape Definition Elementary Landscapes Landscape decompositionLandscape Definition • A landscape is a triple (X,N, f) where X is the solution space The pair (X,N) is called N is the neighbourhood operator configuration space f is the objective function • The neighbourhood operator is a function s0 5 N: X →P(X) 2 s1 s3 2 • Solution y is neighbour of x if y ∈ N(x) 3 s2 s5 • Regular and symmetric neighbourhoods 1 0 s7 • d=|N(x)| ∀x∈X 4 s4 s6 0 • y ∈ N(x) ⇔ x ∈ N(y) 6 s8 • Objective function s9 7 f: X →R (or N, Z, Q)GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 6 / 22
  7. 7. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkLandscape Definition Elementary Landscapes Landscape decompositionElementary Landscapes: Formal Definition • An elementary function is an eigenvector of the graph Laplacian (plus constant) Adjacency matrix Degree matrix • Graph Laplacian: s0 s1 s3 s2 Depends on the s5 configuration space s7 s4 • Elementary function: eigenvector of Δ (plus constant) s6 s8 s9 EigenvalueGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 7 / 22
  8. 8. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkLandscape Definition Elementary Landscapes Landscape decompositionElementary Landscapes: Characterizations • An elementary landscape is a landscape for which Depend on the problem/instance Linear relationship where def • Grover’s wave equation EigenvalueGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 8 / 22
  9. 9. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkLandscape Definition Elementary Landscapes Landscape decompositionLandscape Decomposition • What if the landscape is not elementary? • Any landscape can be written as the sum of elementary landscapes f < e1,f > < e2,f > X X X • There exists a set of eigenfunctions of Δ that form a basis of the function space (Fourier basis) e2 Non-elementary function Elementary functions f Elementary (from the Fourier basis) < e2,f > components of f e1 < e1,f >GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 9 / 22
  10. 10. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkLandscape Definition Elementary Landscapes Landscape decompositionExamples Problem Neighbourhood d k 2-opt n(n-3)/2 n-1 Landscapes Elementary Symmetric TSP swap two cities n(n-1)/2 2(n-1) Graph α-Coloring recolor 1 vertex (α-1)n 2α Max Cut one-change n 4 Weight Partition one-change n 4 Problem Neighbourhood d Components Sum of elementary inversions n(n-1)/2 2 Landscapes General TSP swap two cities n(n-1)/2 2 Subset Sum Problem one-change n 2 MAX k-SAT one-change n k QAP swap two elements n(n-1)/2 3GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 10 / 22
  11. 11. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleBinary Search Space • The set of solutions X is the set of binary strings with length n 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 • Neighborhood used in the proof of our main result: one-change neighborhood: Two solutions x and y are neighbors iff Hamming(x,y)=1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 11 / 22
  12. 12. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleLandscape Decomposition: Walsh Functions • If X is the set of binary strings of length n and N is the one-change neighbourhood then a Fourier basis is where Bitwise AND Bit count function (number of ones) • These functions are known as Walsh Functions • The function with subindex w is elementary with k=2 j, and j=bc (w) is called order of the Walsh functionGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 12 / 22
  13. 13. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleExpectation for Elementary Landscapes • If f is elementary, the expected value after the mutation with probability p is: • Sketch of the proof: if g is elementary and =0 Order of the function E[g]x = z∈X Σ Prob(x,z) · g(z) H=2 H=1 = Σ p (1-p) k k (n-k) λk g(x) H=3GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 13 / 22
  14. 14. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleAnalysis • Analysis of the expected mutation p=0 → fitness does not change p=1 → the same fitness When f(x) > When f(x) < j j j j p=1/2 → start from scratch p=1 → flip aroundGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 14 / 22
  15. 15. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleExpectation for Arbitrary Functions • In the general case f is the sum of at most n elementary landscapes • And, due to the linearity of the expectation, the expected fitness after the mutation is: Average value of Ω2j over the whole search spaceGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 15 / 22
  16. 16. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleAnalysis • Analysis of the expected mutation • Example (j=1,2,3): p≈0.23 → maximum expectation p=1/2 → start from scratch The traditinal p=1/n could be around hereGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 16 / 22
  17. 17. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkBinary Space Expectation for ELs General result ExampleExample • One example: ONEMAX For p=1/2: E[onemax]x = n/2 For p=0: E[onemax]x = ones(x) For p=1: E[onemax]x = n – ones(x) For p=1/n: E[onemax]x = 1 + (1-2/n) ones(x)GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 17 / 22
  18. 18. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkSelection Mutation OthersSelection Operator • Selection operator Mutation Expectation Expectation Minimizing Mutation X • We can design a selection operator selecting the individuals according to the expected fitness value after the mutationGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 18 / 22
  19. 19. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkSelection Mutation OthersMutation Operator • Mutation operator • Given one individual x, we can compute the expectation against p 1. Take the probability p for which the expectation is maximum 2. Use this probability to mutate the individual • If this operator is used the expected improvement is maximum in one step (see the paper by Sutton, Whitley and Howe in the GA track!)GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 19 / 22
  20. 20. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkSelection Mutation OthersOther Applications • The expected fitness after mutation can be applied in: • Genetic Algorithms: traditional bip-flip mutation operator • Simulated Annnealing: neighborhood • Iterated Local Search: perturbation procedure • Variable Neighborhood Search: perturbation operator • Runtime analysis: for one iteration of the previous algorithmsGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 20 / 22
  21. 21. Landscape Conclusions Introduction Result Applications Theory & Future WorkConclusions & Future Work Conclusions• We give a very simple and efficient formula for the expected fitness after bit-flip mutation• In elementary landscapes the dependence of the expectation with p is a simple monomial centred in ½• The result is generalized to any arbitrary function, provided that we have the elementary landscape decomposition.• Using the expected fitness, new operators can be designed (two examples are outlined) Future Work• Expressions not only for the expected value, but for higher-order moments (variance, skewness, kurtosis, etc.)• Expressions for probability of improvement after a bit-flip mutation• Design new operators and search methods based on the results of this work• Connection with runtime analysisGECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 21 / 22
  22. 22. Elementary Landscape Decomposition of the Quadratic Assignment ProblemThanks for your attention !!!GECCO 2011 (Theory track) July 2011 22 / 22
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