0
The Power of Storytelling
Office Depot Foundation
Weekend in Boca Civil Society Leadership Symposium
Carol L. Cone
Global ...
BatKid
2
Why Storytelling?
3
1. An Interconnected world
4
2. Competition is Fierce
5
3. Generation C
Creation
Curation
Connection
Community
6
4. New Media Environment
7
How do you Distinguish Yourself?
Identify Your
Origin Story
Create a
Powerful Brand
Engage Your
Audience
Tell a
Compelling...
Create a Powerful Brand
9
Discover Your Brand Meaning
Three Dimensional Brand Value Proposition
CONVINCE THE
HEAD
Rational
Focused and distinct
Rele...
UNICEF Believe in Zero
“We spent two years defining the meaning of
our brand and focus on childhood survival. We
used the ...
College Forward’s Brand Transformation
“We didn’t give our brand much thought. It
seemed good enough at first , but it did...
Ready, Set, Storytell!
 Focus on Real People and let them tell their own stories
 Give them a real name, age, location
...
Identify Your Origin Story
14
DonorsChoose.org
Charles Best
"Honestly, my dreams had a pretty
small-bore aperture," he says. "I
wanted to help New York ...
Kiva Co-Founder Jessica Jackley
16
Tell a Compelling Story
17
American Heart Association
Go Red for Women
18
Go Red for Women: Just a Little Heart Attack
Insert video
19
American Lung Association
Insert video
20
Engage Your Audience
21
Movember Foundation
21 Mo growing countries
4,026,562 participants
£ 345 Million
22
Make-A-Wish BatKid
1 wish
2 weeks
600,000 tweets
1.7 billion Twitter impressions
23
Storytelling Best Practices
24
Storytelling Tips
25
DO
• Set goals for the story – how do you want
people to feel?
• Define your message – having clarity...
Ready, Set, Storytell!
 Focus on Real People and let them tell their own stories
 Give them a real name, age, location
...
“A Picture is Worth…”
27
Go to Where your Audience is….
28
Real People
29
Troy Library: Sometimes you just have to be
outrageous…
30
Insert video
31
Thank You
Carol Cone
Twitter: @carolcone
Email: Carol.Cone@Edelman.com
Learn more online:
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  • On Friday, November 15, 2013, five-year-old cancer fighter Miles, aka #SFBatKid, got his wish to become a superhero with the help of Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation and a social media campaign created by Clever Girls Collective.San Francisco was transformed into Gotham, complete with bat signal and Police Chief Greg Suhr's plea for help. Miles, in full Batgear, and a grown-up Batman rescued a damsel tied to cable car tracks, stopped the Riddler's bank robbery, paused to eat a burger, then thwarted the Penguin's attempt to kidnap beloved SF Giants mascot, Lou Seal. To cap the day, Mayor Lee presented Miles with a key to the city.Tens of thousands of supporters lined the streets to cheer for Miles. And online? Those ranks swelled to hundreds of thousands. Well-wishers including President and First Lady Obama; famous Batman actors Val Kilmer, Christian Bale, and Ben Affleck; other celebrities including Britney Spears and Enrique Iglesias; sports teams including the San Francisco Giants, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors; and even an astronaut at the International Space Station. They sent their encouragement via tweets, Instagram photos, and Facebook updates—and the president notably congratulated Miles via his first ever Vine video, saying: "Way to go, Miles. Way to save Gotham!"Thanks to social media, "regular" people also added their voices to the chorus of support for Miles, and created an electronic outpouring of emotion that generated an estimated 1.7 billion social impressions.The Story:Batkid wish was starting to spread through word of mouthPresident of media agency Clever Girls Collective heard about the wish through a small blurb on a San Francisco blog (SFist) and approached Make-A-Wish offering assistance and the chance for Clever Girls Collective to gain some notoriety.Make-A-Wish Greater Bay AreaExecutive Director Patricia Wilson accepted the offer to help, and Clever Girls Collective set to work creating a plan, securing Twitter accounts @SFWish and @PenguinSF. Using Batkid’s itinerary, it planned key plot points using the @PenguinSF twitter handle and planned which photos, videos and other media it would include and when. Clever Girls Collective also came up with the #SFBatKid hashtag and began seeding it with 6,000 key San Francisco “influencers” and Twitter users. The idea was to ensure that #SFBatKid would begin treading as early as possible. On the day of Batkid’s adventure, two staffers from Clever Girls Collective were also embedded with his entourage, snapping pictures and videos and posting them from the various Twitter accounts associated with the day. Meanwhile, the rest its staffers were back at its offices doing their best to reply to Twitter users, especially high-profile ones.
  • Our world is more interdependent than ever. Borders have become more like nets than walls, and while this means that wealth, ideas, information and talent can move freely around the globe, so can the negative forces shaping our shared fates. 
  • Source: The Nonprofit Almanac 2012
  • Today’s Consumer Behavior: Generation CThe consumers shaping what matters in content and culture today look very different from the ones many of us grew up as or thinking about. This generation has grown up living digital lives. This has fundamentally changed their relationship with media and technology — and with brands. They don’t want to be talked at, but they do want to be invited in to the discussion. They thrive on creation, curation, connection and community. As a result, we call them Gen C. The behaviors of Gen C have less to do with the year they were born and more to do with their attitude and mindset. For example, while 80% of people under 35 are Gen C, only 65% of Gen C is under 35 [1].Gen C cares more about expressing themselves than any generation before. They’re using social networks and content platforms to define their sense of self. They are what they discover, read, watch, share, “like”, +1, comment on and retweet. More than half of Gen C use the internet as their main source of entertainment, and 66% spend the same or more time watching online video as watching television [2].Conversation drives Gen C, especially when it’s aligned with their interests. They are hungry for content that they can share and spread, no matter where it comes from: other people, content providers, brands. They expect their friends to do the same. They use online interactions to learn about news, entertainment, products and services. We find that that applies even to YouTube specifically. 50% of Gen C reports talking to friends about it after watching a YouTube video. 51% say that watching a YouTube video about a product or service has impacted their purchase decision. Overall, this is a more networked psychographic than we’ve ever seen. The majority -- 85% -- of Gen C relies on peer approval for their buying decisions [2]. The under 35 set will be 40% of the population by 2020. But more importantly, by then, we’ll all likely be Gen C. So figuring out how to connect with this generation today is critical.
  • Three Dimensional Brand Value Proposition - DEFINEConvinces the head: Provides a rational explanation of what the organization stands for, the powerful idea that is focused, relevant and sets it apart. Jocelyne’s notes: People are more willing to support an organization once they understand what it stands for and its relevance in their lives. Effective nonprofits rationally articulate a unique and differentiated idea that explains what their organization does better than others. Then, they go further and demonstrate how this core concept is relevant to their supporters.Touch the heartLayer on the emotional and personal cause constituents care about and believe in, one that inspires action.Jocelyne’s notes: A BNB goes beyond institutional survival to serve a higher purpose. It puts a larger cause and the outcomes they seek ahead of its organizational needs. While this approach may seem risky, it can act as a magnet for those who are passionate about the issue at the core of a nonprofit’s mission.Engage the handsGive constituents opportunities to engage and join a community of supporters and champions to help make a differenceJocelyne’s notes: People believe what they are told only if their experience is consistent with that message. Stakeholders want the chance to get involved with the entire organization. When asking for support, offer a variety of ways to engage them. Knowing that people like to be around other people who share the same beliefs and care about similar issues, a BNB creates a sense of community, both inside and outside the organization. It unites groups of strangers in an experience of kinship by fostering shared experiences and commitments.
  • HEAD – Differentiates the organizationSaved more children’s lives than any other organizationUNICEF discovered the rational meaning of its brand to convince the heads of its constituentsHEART – Cause, emotional & personal connectionUNICEF next built the emotional campaign that would resonate with the heart.  “Believe in Zero: whatever it takes to save a child” became the emotional cause backing the redesigned brand meaning. It provided a new personal connection between supporters and UNICEF.  The more focused brand meaning enabled supporters to realize that they were not simply donating to the organization; instead, they were helping to save the life of a child.  HANDS - Rallying flag, call to action benefit, a communityBelieve in ZeroUNICEF then created various platforms such as The Tap Project, a dynamic consumer engagement effort in which restaurants ask their patrons to donate $1 or more for the tap water they usually enjoy for free.  The funds raised supported UNICEF’s efforts to bring clean and accessible water to millions of children around the world.  Over 60 million days of safe drinking water have been provided to children in need.Caryl Stern: “For me it was the privilege of saving children's’ lives; not the job of saving lives.”The US fund for UNICEF had never spoken with one voice, one message.The power of a well defined brand to provide clear direction.“It helped us to think on a scale and at a level we never thought of” – JoyA single minded focus on children's services and volunteerism.By simplifying the message, we emboldened all. The staff was grateful for the clarity.This required a complete shift in mindset. It wasn’t just about coming up with new, clearer messaging. It was going to take a totally different approach to branding. We needed to move from whatever it takes to get a donation to whatever it takes to save a child; from giving to joining; from donors to members from an emotional reaction to shared values. The new brand platform shifted its orientation from a monologue with UNICEF at the center to a dialogue around a higher purpose.
  • College Forward Case Study“Our brand is not just a way to communicate, its what we do how we live and breathe within our organization and engage our stakeholders at every touch point.” – Lisa Fielder, Cofounder of College Forward“As soon as we defined our brand, the impact was almost immediate. Grant proposals got award letters: Congratulations you’ve won.”
  • Every entrepreneur experiences a moment when it becomes painfully clear that the status quo just isn't good enough. For Best, that moment came in 2000 on a rainy January morning just before dawn, when, as a 25-year-old, first-year history teacher in a public school in the Bronx, he was stuck at a Kinko's making photocopies of a chapter from the American classic Little House on the Prairie for his students. Best was the son of privilege: He had grown up in Manhattan and was educated at the exclusive St. Paul's boarding school and later, Yale. As a teacher in a high-poverty neighborhood, he saw how pitifully few resources were made available to low-income students. At the same time, he says, "I’d listened to my colleagues in the teachers’ lunchroom. I could tell they were passionate, fired-up people who had great ideas for strategies and projects to help kids learn better. They just didn’t have the resources. I was frustrated, but I also knew it was a frustration felt by teachers all over the city."So Best launched DonorsChoose.org, applying what was then a brand-new concept--crowdfunding--to help teachers get basic classroom supplies. His first site was rudimentary. He sketched out the design for each page with pencil and paper and hired a programmer to build it for $2,200. His back office was so primitive that Best had to run every credit-card number by hand. "I wasn't much of a techie," he admits. "I've since gotten a wee bit more sophisticated about these things." Unsure if his plan would work, Best secretly funded the first 10 projects all by himself.Although word of the site quickly spread, DonorsChoose's early trajectory is unlikely to become a business-school model. "Honestly, my dreams had a pretty small-bore aperture," he says. "I wanted to help New York City teachers so they would never have to be in Kinko's at 5 a.m. again." By day, he taught history, and during his lunch hour, he telephoned journalists, foundations, and philanthropists. “I tried to talk to anyone who could help me,” he says. “Mostly, people just hung up. But I am very, very persistent."It's raised $225 million and helped more than 175,000 teachers fund over 400,000 projects that have aided the education of more than 10 million students. Best, 38, may have the sunny, humble manner of a small-town pastor, but he has an audacious vision: to harness the uncontrolled and sometimes anarchic power of the crowd to create sustained political pressure that will force systemic improvements. "We want to use our site to galvanize people to give," Best says, "but also to take important steps toward real change.“Source: http://www.fastcompany.com/3025597/donorschoose-hot-for-teachers
  • Kiva is a non-profit organization with a mission to connect people through lending to alleviate poverty. Leveraging the internet and a worldwide network of microfinance institutions, Kiva lets individuals lend as little as $25 to help create opportunity around the world.100% of every dollar you lend on Kiva goes directly towards funding loans; Kiva does not take a cut. Furthermore, Kiva does not charge interest to our Field Partners, who administer the loans.Kiva is primarily funded through the support of lenders making optional donations. We also raise funds through grants, corporate sponsors, and foundations.Since Kiva was founded in 2005:1,164,939 Kiva lenders$558,778,525 in loans98.94% Repayment rateKiva works with:246 Field Partners450 volunteers around the world76 different countries
  • From 30 Mo Bros in Melbourne, Australia in 2003 to 4 million Mo's by 2013, Movember, through the power of the moustache, has become a truly global movement that is changing the face of men's health. Movember has created its brand to represent the following values: Fun,Accountable,Caring,Collaborative,Humble,Innovative,Remarkable Experiences,Change AgentCampaign Strategy & Goals:We will get men to grow moustaches and the community to support them by creating an innovative, fun and engaging annual Movember campaign that results in:    •   Funds for men's health program investment    •   Conversations about men's health that lead to:              -  Greater awareness and understanding of the health risks men face              -  Men taking action to remain well              -  When men are sick they know what to do and take actionSocial Mission Overview:•Movember supports world class men’s health programmes that combat prostate andtesticular cancer and mental health challenges.• With their ‘Mo’s’ men raise vital funds and awareness for prostate and testicular cancerand mental health.• More than four million Mo Bros and Mo Sistas have participated across 21 countries worldwide.577 projects related to men’s health have been supported since 2003.
  • On Friday, November 15, 2013, five-year-old cancer fighter Miles, aka #SFBatKid, got his wish to become a superhero with the help of Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation and a social media campaign created by Clever Girls Collective.San Francisco was transformed into Gotham, complete with bat signal and Police Chief Greg Suhr's plea for help. Miles, in full Batgear, and a grown-up Batman rescued a damsel tied to cable car tracks, stopped the Riddler's bank robbery, paused to eat a burger, then thwarted the Penguin's attempt to kidnap beloved SF Giants mascot, Lou Seal. To cap the day, Mayor Lee presented Miles with a key to the city.Tens of thousands of supporters lined the streets to cheer for Miles. And online? Those ranks swelled to hundreds of thousands. Well-wishers including President and First Lady Obama; famous Batman actors Val Kilmer, Christian Bale, and Ben Affleck; other celebrities including Britney Spears and Enrique Iglesias; sports teams including the San Francisco Giants, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors; and even an astronaut at the International Space Station. They sent their encouragement via tweets, Instagram photos, and Facebook updates—and the president notably congratulated Miles via his first ever Vine video, saying: "Way to go, Miles. Way to save Gotham!"Thanks to social media, "regular" people also added their voices to the chorus of support for Miles, and created an electronic outpouring of emotion that generated an estimated 1.7 billion social impressions.The Story:Batkid wish was starting to spread through word of mouthPresident of media agency Clever Girls Collective heard about the wish through a small blurb on a San Francisco blog (SFist) and approached Make-A-Wish offering assistance and the chance for Clever Girls Collective to gain some notoriety.Make-A-Wish Greater Bay AreaExecutive Director Patricia Wilson accepted the offer to help, and Clever Girls Collective set to work creating a plan, securing Twitter accounts @SFWish and @PenguinSF. Using Batkid’s itinerary, it planned key plot points using the @PenguinSF twitter handle and planned which photos, videos and other media it would include and when. Clever Girls Collective also came up with the #SFBatKid hashtag and began seeding it with 6,000 key San Francisco “influencers” and Twitter users. The idea was to ensure that #SFBatKid would begin treading as early as possible. On the day of Batkid’s adventure, two staffers from Clever Girls Collective were also embedded with his entourage, snapping pictures and videos and posting them from the various Twitter accounts associated with the day. Meanwhile, the rest its staffers were back at its offices doing their best to reply to Twitter users, especially high-profile ones.
  • Transcript of "Carol Cone - The Power of Storytelling"

    1. 1. The Power of Storytelling Office Depot Foundation Weekend in Boca Civil Society Leadership Symposium Carol L. Cone Global Practice Chair Edelman Business + Social 1
    2. 2. BatKid 2
    3. 3. Why Storytelling? 3
    4. 4. 1. An Interconnected world 4
    5. 5. 2. Competition is Fierce 5
    6. 6. 3. Generation C Creation Curation Connection Community 6
    7. 7. 4. New Media Environment 7
    8. 8. How do you Distinguish Yourself? Identify Your Origin Story Create a Powerful Brand Engage Your Audience Tell a Compelling Story 8
    9. 9. Create a Powerful Brand 9
    10. 10. Discover Your Brand Meaning Three Dimensional Brand Value Proposition CONVINCE THE HEAD Rational Focused and distinct Relevant TOUCH THE HEART Emotional and personal Serves a higher purpose ENGAGE THE HANDS Actionable Invites people in 10
    11. 11. UNICEF Believe in Zero “We spent two years defining the meaning of our brand and focus on childhood survival. We used the new focus as an energy force, as a guide to everything we did.” - Caryl Stern, President & CEO U.S. Fund for UNICEF Whatever it Takes to Save a Child…. 11
    12. 12. College Forward’s Brand Transformation “We didn’t give our brand much thought. It seemed good enough at first , but it didn’t take long to realize that it was truly doing us a disservice.” “Our brand is not just a way to communicate; it’s what we do, how we live and breathe within our organization and engage our stakeholders at every touch point.” - Lisa Fielder, Executive Director, College Forward 12 2010: $1.8 million2006: $200,000Revenue:
    13. 13. Ready, Set, Storytell!  Focus on Real People and let them tell their own stories  Give them a real name, age, location  Grab attention quickly: 4 – 10 seconds at the start  Keep it short: as short as 6 words, or up to 2 minutes  Be emotional: evoke anger, happiness, conflict, pride, sadness, tension and a happy ending  Be a mirror: have a moment in the story that people can identify with – with a mother, child 13 People you serveYour founder or history People who support you (donors and volunteers) Tell a story about…
    14. 14. Identify Your Origin Story 14
    15. 15. DonorsChoose.org Charles Best "Honestly, my dreams had a pretty small-bore aperture," he says. "I wanted to help New York City teachers so they would never have to be in Kinko's at 5 a.m. again." By day, he taught history, and during his lunch hour, he telephoned journalists, foundations, and philanthropists. “I tried to talk to anyone who could help me,” he says. “Mostly, people just hung up. But I am very, very persistent.“ 15
    16. 16. Kiva Co-Founder Jessica Jackley 16
    17. 17. Tell a Compelling Story 17
    18. 18. American Heart Association Go Red for Women 18
    19. 19. Go Red for Women: Just a Little Heart Attack Insert video 19
    20. 20. American Lung Association Insert video 20
    21. 21. Engage Your Audience 21
    22. 22. Movember Foundation 21 Mo growing countries 4,026,562 participants £ 345 Million 22
    23. 23. Make-A-Wish BatKid 1 wish 2 weeks 600,000 tweets 1.7 billion Twitter impressions 23
    24. 24. Storytelling Best Practices 24
    25. 25. Storytelling Tips 25 DO • Set goals for the story – how do you want people to feel? • Define your message – having clarity helps with creativity • Identify your target audience – who are you trying to reach? Millennials, Boomers, first time donors, volunteers? • Find story leads and interview them • Craft the story  Open with a hook  Overcome adversity  Solve a problem  Create a connection DON’T • Talk about the organization • Use a laundry list of programs/services • Use numbers… “1 in 5 kids are food compromised”  
    26. 26. Ready, Set, Storytell!  Focus on Real People and let them tell their own stories  Give them a real name, age, location  Grab attention quickly: 4 – 10 seconds at the start  Keep it short: as short as 6 words, or up to 2 minutes  Be emotional: evoke anger, happiness, conflict, pride, sadness, tension and a happy ending  Be a mirror: have a moment in the story that people can identify with – with a mother, child 26 People you serveYour founder or history People who support you (donors and volunteers) Tell a story about…
    27. 27. “A Picture is Worth…” 27
    28. 28. Go to Where your Audience is…. 28
    29. 29. Real People 29
    30. 30. Troy Library: Sometimes you just have to be outrageous… 30 Insert video
    31. 31. 31 Thank You Carol Cone Twitter: @carolcone Email: Carol.Cone@Edelman.com Learn more online:
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