Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Charting the Path to Total Worker Health ™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started

763

Published on

In this 60 minute live webinar for State of Wellness, in partnership with HPLive.org and HPCareer.Net, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH’s) Office for Total Worker Health™ …

In this 60 minute live webinar for State of Wellness, in partnership with HPLive.org and HPCareer.Net, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH’s) Office for Total Worker Health™ and the NIOSH-funded Centers of Excellence to Promote a Healthier Workforce will unveil the latest tools and guidance for integrating health protection and health promotion. This web-based suite of resources will prepare practitioners tasked with the goal of protecting and promoting the health of their workforce and their communities with an innovative strategy for improving worker safety, health and well-being, both on and off the job.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
763
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Charting the Path to Total Worker Health™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started August 22, 2014 HPLive.org Webinars The findings and conclusions in this presentation have not been formally disseminated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy
  • 2. LCDR Heidi Hudson, MPH Office for Total Worker HealthTM National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Nicole Champagne, EdD University of Massachusetts Lowell The Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace Dede Montgomery, MS, CIH Oregon Health & Science University Oregon Healthy WorkForce Center Jennifer Hall, EdD University of Iowa Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence Jack Dennerlein, PhD Northeastern University Harvard Center for Work, Health and Wellbeing Featured Presenters
  • 3. • OSHA Act of 1970. SEC. (2) (b) . . . “to assure so far as possible every working man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources . . .” • NIOSH mission: “generate new knowledge in the field of occupational safety and health and to transfer that knowledge into practice for the betterment of workers.” – Scientific research, guidance and authoritative recommendations, information dissemination, and workplace health hazard evaluations • NIOSH is dedicated to preserving and enhancing the Total Health of Workers
  • 4. The Total Worker Health™ Approach Total Worker Health™ is a strategy integrating occupational safety and health protection with health promotion to prevent worker injury and illness and to advance health and well-being.
  • 5. Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace (CPH-NEW) Harvard School of Public Health Center for Work, Health and Wellbeing Oregon Healthy WorkForce Center (OHWC) University of Iowa Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence (HWCE) 5
  • 6. Example of Integration An example: Providing ergonomic consultations for work conditions within interventions that also include arthritis self-management strategies 6
  • 7. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/letsgetstarted.html
  • 8. Making the Business Case http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/business.html • Why Do I Need to Integrate Health Protection and Health Promotion? • How Can It Help My Business or Workplace? • Future Steps
  • 9. Infographic: Top Reasons to Create a New Pathway for a Safer and Healthier Workforce http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/topreasons/
  • 10. Simple Steps to Get Started http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/steps.html 1. NIOSH Essential Elements of Effective Workplace Programs and Policies for Improving Worker Health and Wellbeing 2. Ideas You Can Implement Right Now to Integrate Health Protection and Health Promotion 3. Worksheet to Help You Get Started on Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation
  • 11. Assessment Tools http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/tools.html 1. Integration of Health Protection and Health Promotion: Rationale, Indicators, and Metrics (Sorensen et al, 2013) 2. CDC Worksite Health ScoreCard (HSC) 3. NIOSH Organization of Work Measurement Tools for Research and Practice 4. NIOSH Quality of Worklife Questionnaire 5. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 33 6. American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine’s Corporate Health Achievement Award 7. CDC Workplace Health Assessment
  • 12. Guidelines for Integrated Approaches http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/tools.html 1. The Whole Worker: Guidelines for Integrating Occupational health and Safety with Workplace Wellness Programs, State of California Commission on Health and Safety and Workers’ Compensation (CHSWC); 2010 2. Healthy Workplace Participatory Program by Center for Promotion and Health in the New England Workplace (CPH-NEW); 2013 3. SafeWell Practice Guidelines: An Integrated Approach to Worker Health Version 2.0 by the Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Work, Health, and Well-Being; 2012
  • 13. Organizations Advancing Integrated Approaches: Promising Practices for Total Worker Health http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/practices.html
  • 14. Experience Total Worker Health live and in-person! www.eagleson.org/twh www.eagleson.org/hfw
  • 15. Stay Connected For the latest news on Total Worker Health Sign up for our quarterly eNewsletter, TWH in Action! http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/TWH/newsletter/ Join the Conversation! Follow us Twitter @NIOSH_TWH Join the NIOSH Total Worker Health Group on LinkedIn Email us at TWH@cdc.gov
  • 16. Breakout Session 2014 Iowa Governor’s Safety & Health Conference Cedar Rapids, IA ; November 7, 2013 Charting the Path to Total Worker Health™: A Practitioner’s Guide to Getting Started August 22, 2014 Presented by: Jenny Hall, EdD, MCHES Associate Director for Outreach UI Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence jennifer-l-hall@uiowa.edu HWCE Resources for a Healthier & Safer Workforce www.hwce.org
  • 17. Purpose & Outline • Introduce the University of Iowa Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence (HWCE) • Provide an overview of HWCE online resources for implementing workplace programs on issues relevant to Total Worker Health™ www.hwce.org
  • 18. NIOSH Total Worker Health™ Centers of Excellence Mission: Improve the health of workers in Iowa and nationally through integrated health promotion and health protection research, collaboration, and dissemination of successful interventions. Outreach Program Goals  Identify and promote Total Worker Health™ best and promising practices  Serve as a state and national resource center for integrated employee health, wellness and safety programs, practices and policies Target small employers and those with limited resources UIHWCE www.hwce.org
  • 19. HWCE Online Resources The HWCE is committed to providing employers with online, evidence-based information and tools to help build a healthier and safer workforce.  Monthly Healthier Workforce eBulletin  HWCE Website  Calendar of Events & Professional Development Opportunities  Social Media Channels  Pinterest  Twitter  Facebook  Videos (video series will be available in 2015) www.hwce.org
  • 20. Monthly eBulletin Sign up at www.hwce.org We translate research and promote promising practices in comprehensive, integrated workplace safety and wellness programs. Bulletin topics guide web content, tools and resources.
  • 21. HWCE Website www.hwce.org New and improved website will launch by October 1, 2014 www.hwce.org
  • 22. Program Support www.hwce.org
  • 23. Background & Relevance www.hwce.org
  • 24. Workplace Programs www.hwce.org
  • 25. Ideas for Implementation www.hwce.org
  • 26. More Ideas for Implementation www.hwce.org
  • 27. TWH Considerations www.hwce.org
  • 28. Total Worker Health Approaches www.hwce.org
  • 29. Resources & Supporting Literature www.hwce.org
  • 30. Future Topics for Bulletins & Website  Aging Workforce  Diabetes  Financial Literacy  Mental Health (depression and anxiety)  Musculoskeletal Disorders  Stress Management Programs and Activities  Work-Life Balance www.hwce.org
  • 31. Presentations & Publications www.hwce.org
  • 32. HWCE Current Website Sign-up at www.hwce.org to stay connected and receive notice of official website launch www.hwce.org
  • 33. Current Program Support www.hwce.org
  • 34. HWCE on Pinterest www.hwce.org Follow Iowa Total Worker Health on Pinterest
  • 35. HWCE on Facebook & Twitter Follow us @UIHWCE on Twitter Like the “Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence” on Facebook www.hwce.org
  • 36. Employer Tip of the Week Shared through Twitter @UIHWCE and Facebook (Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence) www.hwce.org
  • 37. In Closing… Get Connected with the HWCE  Sign up for the HWCE Healthier Workforce eBulletin at www.hwce.org  Follow us on Twitter @UIHWCE  Like us on Facebook at Healthier Workforce Center for Excellence  Follow us on Pinterest at Iowa Total Worker Health  Join us at upcoming conferences  1st International Symposium to Advance Total Worker Health in Bethesda, MD on Oct. 6-8, 2014  2nd Annual Quad Cities Health Initiative Wellness Conference in Bettendorf, IA on Nov 4, 2014  25th Annual Art & Science of Health Promotion: What’s Next in Health Promotion? in San Diego, CA on April 1-3, 2014 www.hwce.org
  • 38. For More Information… Contact: Jenny Hall, EdD, MCHES Associate Director for Outreach jennifer-l-hall@uiowa.edu 319-335-4200 www.hwce.org
  • 39. CPH-NEW Healthy Workplace Participatory Program Toolkit A new online toolkit to improve the health, safety, and wellbeing in the workplace How your organization will benefit? http://bit.ly/18yrMv8 Why a participatory approach? http://bit.ly/1dLNqOv The science behind the program. http://bit.ly/IBtgIT Presenter: Nicole Champagne, Ed.D. University of MA Lowell
  • 40. Healthy Worksite Training Series Introduction to the Healthy Worksite website Get ready for program start-up Build your program team Data and assessment Using the IDEAS tool for participatory intervention planning: steps 1 and 2 Using the IDEAS tool: steps 3, 4, 5 Using the IDEAS tool: step 6, 7 and evaluation http://www.uml.edu/Research/Centers/CPH-NEW/Healthy-Work- Participatory-Program/Webinars.aspx
  • 41. Implement and evaluate models for improving worker health by combining: • Worksite health promotion (WHP) • Workplace safety and health (OSH) Promote participatory approaches that engage all levels of an organization in the design of effective, sustainable workplace interventions CPH-NEW’s goals include: (From NIOSH Total Worker Health™ Mission)
  • 42. Why a participatory workplace process? Employee health self- efficacy Increased program sustainability Increased confidence to change unhealthy conditions Insights derived from workers’ perspective Find (other) root causes of physical & psychosocial stressors Find (other) root causes of unhealthy behaviors Reflect own experiences, needs and language of the intended program participants Increased decision latitude Increased social support
  • 43. www.uml.edu/cphnewtoolkit Dual committee program structure • Engages employees in setting priorities and developing solutions • Improves organizational communication and collaboration IDEAS intervention planning process • Integrates ergonomics with health promotion initiatives • Develops a contextual business case for health and safety interventions, one intervention at a time • Establishes a sustainable process for continuous health/safety improvement CPH-NEW Healthy Workplace toolkit promotes a healthy organization:
  • 44. Design Team Steering Committee Recommended participatory program structure Roles of Steering Committee (SC) & Design Team (DT) Action & feedback Action & feedback • Forms DT & provides necessary resources • Invites DT to develop and propose interventions • Selects most feasible/desirable interventions • Develops or extends interventions to middle management & staff (with help from DT) • Helps promote & evaluate all interventions • Identifies & prioritizes employee health issues • Comes up with ideas for workplace interventions • Proposes best intervention ideas to SC • Helps promote & evaluate all interventions • Helps refine interventions, as needed
  • 45. Step 1 Identify Problems & Contributing Factors Step 2 Develop Objectives & Activities Step 3 Set Selection Criteria Step 4 Apply Selection Criteria Step 5a/5b Rate/Select Intervention Alternatives Step 6 Plan and Implement Interventions Step 7 Monitor & Evaluate Intervention How Does the IDEAS Tool Work? Designing interventions with IDEAS is an iterative process Intervention, Design, and Analysis Scorecard
  • 46. www.uml.edu/cphnewtoolkit How to Use the Website Program start up guides and tutorials • Readiness and resource self-assessment • Committee formation • Assessment and problem identification • Intervention planning • Develop and evaluate solutions/interventions IDEAS intervention planning tool for integrated health protection/health promotion
  • 47. CPH-NEW Healthy Worksite Participatory Program Website
  • 48. Interactive Tools Worksheets and Quick Reference Guides for Facilitators Online Readiness Survey
  • 49. A CPH-NEW Research-to-Practice (R2P) Toolkit to promote Total Worker HealthTM Toolkit was field tested 2010-2012 4 New England employer organizations Evaluated ease of use, satisfaction, effectiveness Toolkit addresses 3 shortcomings of conventional workplace HP programs: – Little sense of employee ownership, participation – Little attention to conditions of job demands – Activities can be event driven, lack sustainability www.uml.edu/centers/CPH-NEW
  • 50. SUCCESSS STORY Examples of interventions designed at one field test site…. Resident education materials for move-ins New uniforms to address overheating Work order process and policy changes New hiring addressed staffing issue Email for all maintenance technicians Note: Study site continued the program after the end of the study.
  • 51. Raised awareness – Employee health, wellness, and safety Improved communication – Between workers and supervisors New ideas for interventions – Made change happen, solution-driven “If this group was not around, our ideas would not be heard as much and less would be accomplished.” --DT member at study site Impacts to Organization
  • 52. Design Team – New skills- problem solving, communication – Feelings of value, pride, and respect – Team building, meeting other co-workers “He looked forward to the meetings and felt empowered to go and have a say in things.” -- Manager at study site Personal Impacts
  • 53. Structured process Uncovers root causes Leads to more complete solutions Engages/empowers employees Builds self-efficacy Main Reasons for Using the IDEAS Tool
  • 54. Resources for workplace health promotion professionals: The SafeWell Guidelines Glorian Sorensen (PI) Jack Dennerlein, (Co-PI) Deborah McLellan, (SafeWell PI) 22 August 2014
  • 55. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu PI: Glorian Sorensen Co PI Jack Dennerlein Manager: Lorraine Wallace Be Well, Work Well Integrated approaches for health care workers 2007- All the Right Moves Integrated approaches for construction workers 2011- SafeWell Disseminating integrated programs to small, medium businesses 2011 - 56
  • 56. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu SafeWell Practice Guidelines 57 • SafeWell Practice Guidelines: An Integrated Approach to Worker Health • Purpose: To provide a real-world model of evidence- based guidelines and tools for TWH programs • Built on 20 years of research and informed by those who practice integrated approaches. available at: http://centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu
  • 57. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu What’s in the Guidelines? • Chapter 1: Providing the foundation: Organizational leadership and commitment and employee participation • Chapter 2: Program planning • Chapter 3: Implementation • Chapter 4: Evaluation and continual improvement 58
  • 58. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Chapter 1: Providing the foundation 59 • Culture of Health • Eliminate work hazards (physical and psychosocial) • Worker health and safety is business success • Multiple levels of management • Top management has to demonstrate commitment • Mid-levels are on the front line
  • 59. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Systems approach to worker health and safety McLellan D et al, 2012 60
  • 60. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Making the Business Case: Talking points • Integrated approaches have been shown to: • Improve health behaviors1,2 • Improve employee participation in programs3 • Reduce occupational injury rates4 • Improve working conditions5 • Improve health and safety programs5 1. Sorensen, Cancer Causes Ctrl 2002; 2. Sorensen, AJPH 2005; 3. Hunt, Hlth Educ Beh 2005; 4. Maniscalco, JOEM 1999; 5. LaMontagne, OEM 2004; 6. Pronk, JOEM , 2013;61
  • 61. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Chapter 2: Program planning Appoint a program planning team • Assess organizational resources and needs • Health and Safety Assessment • Communicate • Strategic plan using integrated approaches • Communicate 62
  • 62. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Chapter 3: Implementation • Involves conducting activities of the program plan • For the SafeWell approach, implement • On physical environmental, organizational, individual levels; • And link health promotion, safety and health, and employee benefits and supports • Examples: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh 63
  • 63. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Implementation example – WellWorks II • Selected outcomes • Reducing hazardous respiratory exposures • Reducing smoking rates • Carbon monoxide (CO) analysis activity1 • Identify high CO levels • Provides feedback for smokers • Flags exposure to CO at worksites 1 Available in SafeWell Guidelines, Chapter 3, Appendix 1, Page 141 64
  • 64. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Chapter 4: Evaluation and Continuous Improvement 65 Evaluate for.. • Accountability • Decision-making • Improvement • Surveillance • longitudinal analysis • knowledge discovery Approaches • A team across departments • Integrated data management • Costs, benefits, ROI • Milestones • Communicate
  • 65. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Specific resources 66 • Appendix 1.1: Soliciting Employee Advisory Board (EAB) members and EAB job description (examples from the WellWorks-2 Project) • Appendix 2.1: Selecting vendors: Topics and questions • Appendix 2.2: Example of a baseline occupational safety and health audit • Appendix 2.3: SIMS Checklist • Appendix 2.4: Example of an injury/exposure investigation form • Appendix 2.5: JourneyWell Dimensions of Corporate Wellness Scorecard • Appendix 2.6: Examples of questions for individual worker interviews to understand their experience specifically on worksite hazards and risks. • Appendix 2.7: Example of an Assessment Report Outline • Appendix 3.1: Sample SafeWell programs • Appendix 3.2: Workplace health promotion and health protection tools and resources
  • 66. www.centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu Acknowledgements and links • Developed in partnership with • Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health Care (Robert McLellan) • HealthPartners (Nico Pronk) • Partners Health Care (Dean Hashimoto) • Funded by NIOSH Total Worker HealthTM U19OH008861 • Distributed by NIOSH at • http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/twh/ • http://centerforworkhealth.sph.harvard.edu/resources/ safewell-resources 67
  • 67. Oregon Healthy Workforce Center • Oregon Health and Science University – Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences – Division of Health Promotion and Sports Medicine • Portland State University, Occupational Health Psychology Program • Labor Education and Research Center, University of Oregon • Kaiser Center for Health Research Dede Montgomery montgomd@ohsu.edu
  • 68. OHWC Research • Employs randomized control trial design • Team-based & technology-based • Work populations: – Homecare – Construction – Corrections – Young Workers http://www.ohsu.edu/ohwc/projects/
  • 69. http://www.croetweb.com

×