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BEING LUCKY.
TRANSMEDIA AND CO-CREATION
PRACTICES IN MUSIC VIDEO-CLIPS

Gemma San Cornelio & Antoni Roig, Universitat Ober...
SUMMARY

1. Background
2. Framework research on creative practices and participation in
new media
3. Objectives
4. Case st...
BACKGROUND

The recording industry under a continuous pressure to re-invent
itself
(Sterne, 2006; Bull, 2007; Jacobson, 20...
BACKGROUND
Connection with our previous and current research in creative
practices and participation in new media:
• CREAT...
BACKGROUND
•
•
•

Social networking (myspace, facebook…)
Collective financing
Open licences and remix

•

Personalization ...
OBJECTIVES

- To identify the participatory dimensions of a music video
project with transmedia qualities.
- To analyze th...
Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY

9/12/13
Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY

9/12/13
Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY

Project timeline
10/06/2013
Open Call

10/07/2013
Call deadline

5/08/2013
Remixed vid...
Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY
“Evolution of Get Lucky” as a participatory
project:
- Pre-defined rules.
- Creative vi...
METHODOLOGY

• Project analysis focusing on the actors’ perspectives
• Considering the set of videos received
• Analyzing ...
ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

-

Closed proposal, personal project of the artist (iconic)
Crowdsourcing in video (not in the music...
ANALYSIS AND RESULTS
- Aesthetics uniformization in both decades: 60’s identical
videos with psychodelic references, natur...
CONCLUSIONS AND FURTHER RESEARCH

- Collaborative aesthetics are not necessarily connected with
fragmentary or differentia...
Questions?
gsan_cornelio@uoc.edu
aroigt@uoc.edu

9/12/13
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BEING LUCKY. TRANSMEDIA AND CO-CREATION PRACTICES IN MUSIC VIDEO-CLIPS

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This presentation aims at exploring transmedia literacies in music through the research of co-creation of online music videos. More specifically, our objective is to analyze the aesthetics of crowdsourced music projects in order to find out specific features. In other words, we would like to analyze whether there is something akin to a ‘collaborative aesthetic’ in the production of collaborative music videos, beyond the ordinary features of internet music videos, such as simplicity, unweightness and lo-res aesthetic (Vernalis, p. 243). We will focus on the project “Evolution of Get Lucky”, a crowdsourced project promoted by the musician PV NOVA in 2013, how set up a call for producing and sending cover versions of the popular Daft Punk song ‘Get Lucky’, reworking it to fit in different temporal frameworks. The result of the project is a video that contains fragments of the song interconnecting different past and future moments in the history of popular music.

Drawing from our current research on co-creation and participation in new media creative practices (San Cornelio & Gómez, 2014; Roig et al, 2013), where we combine theoretical conceptualization of the different approaches to co-creation, with an ethnographic approach to creative communities (conditions for participation, ownership, motivations, rewards) and relevant case studies, we will deal with the aesthetic and narrative aspects of crowdsourced projects as an exponent of user-generated transmedia content (Scolari, 2013). Preliminary observations of the case point to a playful appropriation of pop history through co-creation, showing that “audio artifacts and technologies apparently invoke a cultural nostalgia typical for a specific time and age” (Van Dijck, 2004).

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Transcript of "BEING LUCKY. TRANSMEDIA AND CO-CREATION PRACTICES IN MUSIC VIDEO-CLIPS "

  1. 1. BEING LUCKY. TRANSMEDIA AND CO-CREATION PRACTICES IN MUSIC VIDEO-CLIPS Gemma San Cornelio & Antoni Roig, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya Transmedia Literacy - IN3 –UOC, December 10, 2013 9/12/13
  2. 2. SUMMARY 1. Background 2. Framework research on creative practices and participation in new media 3. Objectives 4. Case study: PV Nova’s Evolution of Get Lucky 5. Methodology 6. Analysis and results 7. Conclusions and further research 9/12/13
  3. 3. BACKGROUND The recording industry under a continuous pressure to re-invent itself (Sterne, 2006; Bull, 2007; Jacobson, 2010; Magaudda, 2011) • First cultural industry where specific technocultural changes are experienced: file sharing, mobility, remixing practices, streaming services, etc. • Changes in the materiality of music : need to introduce added value and adapt to emerging practices of consumption. 9/12/13
  4. 4. BACKGROUND Connection with our previous and current research in creative practices and participation in new media: • CREATIVE research project, funded by MICINN (HAR2010-18982) • Modding practices and co-creative communities. • Fanworks. • Participatory production (transmedia, filmmaking) • DIY video production • Music and participatory practices 9/12/13
  5. 5. BACKGROUND • • • Social networking (myspace, facebook…) Collective financing Open licences and remix • Personalization of music experience • Multimedia/Transmedia/Interaction/Apps Calls to collaboration (Co-creation) in processes: • Lyrics • Crowdsourced Music videos • Album personalization • Fan Contests (versions) • Social experiences in music listening (i.e. Soundcloud) • Contributing as a performer or a composer in a collective endeavour • Arrange and perform versions of yet unreleased tracks • 9/12/13
  6. 6. OBJECTIVES - To identify the participatory dimensions of a music video project with transmedia qualities. - To analyze the aesthetics of a crowdsourced music video project. - To consider the role of remix practices as a form of literacy (Manovich, 2008; Lessig, 2005) - To analyze the features of playful re-appropriation of pop history through co-creation: connections to different notions of cultural nostalgia. 9/12/13
  7. 7. Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY 9/12/13
  8. 8. Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY 9/12/13
  9. 9. Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY Project timeline 10/06/2013 Open Call 10/07/2013 Call deadline 5/08/2013 Remixed video Interactive video Linear edited music video Annotated sound file Downloadable file Linear edited music video 9/12/13 Game-like experience
  10. 10. Case study: EVOLUTION OF GET LUCKY “Evolution of Get Lucky” as a participatory project: - Pre-defined rules. - Creative visual freedom - Open call with a tight deadline. - Notion of “experience” - No decision-making. - No contest. - Linear and closed edition process. - Sense of belonging 9/12/13
  11. 11. METHODOLOGY • Project analysis focusing on the actors’ perspectives • Considering the set of videos received • Analyzing the ones selected for the final cut • Looking at most successful decades • Aesthetics analysis /cultural references • Interviews with the artist and participants • Comments and feedback in sharing platforms 9/12/13
  12. 12. ANALYSIS AND RESULTS - Closed proposal, personal project of the artist (iconic) Crowdsourcing in video (not in the music) Publics participation (137 videos in total, 38 selected videos) Most successful decades (more videos received): 1960, 2020 (followed by 1950’s) - Nostalgia and projection to the future. - ‘Retro music’ connected with the years that followed IIWW (Reynolds 2011) 9/12/13
  13. 13. ANALYSIS AND RESULTS - Aesthetics uniformization in both decades: 60’s identical videos with psychodelic references, nature and hippies. 2020’s abstracted, post-apocalyptical and excessive use of image filters). Only 2 of them were selected for the final cut. - 70-80-90 are the less successful decades, but the videos sent capture the musical clues present in the audio track. - Musical base remix influences visual interpretation, more than the cultural and musical references regarding a specific decade. - The absence of local cultural (French) references. 9/12/13
  14. 14. CONCLUSIONS AND FURTHER RESEARCH - Collaborative aesthetics are not necessarily connected with fragmentary or differentiated interpretations. - Nostalgia and visions of future seem to be equally motivating cultural interpretations. - Crowdsourcing connected with remix cultures can be used as a powerful tool in literacy, e. g. in terms of stylistic assignments. - Exploring motivations for participants in crowdsourcing can help modelling successful experiences. 9/12/13
  15. 15. Questions? gsan_cornelio@uoc.edu aroigt@uoc.edu 9/12/13
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