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Gregory miller cr_sfinalpres

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  • 1. The Objectification of Men in the Media
    Gregory Miller
  • 2.
  • 3. Tracy Sylka, professor of psychology at Ohio State University conducted a study to examine the effects of increasingly muscular men in the media.
    Surveyed 285 college men to find what they thought of the media’s presentation of the male body.
    Case Study
  • 4. The majority of the men reported feelings of pressure from the media to look a certain way.
    Many felt that weight training had become an interference in their lives, due to the image they felt they needed to maintain.
    Many also reported developing eating disorders after obsessing over protein consumption and cutting out carbs altogether.
    The Findings?
  • 5. According to a study by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, there are an estimated 3 million steroid users in the US.
    An overwhelming four out of five users are non-athletes taking the drugs for the “sole intention of improving physical appearance.”
    Some Facts
  • 6. An estimated 10% of men have what doctors would qualify as an eating disorder, though the numbers are most likely higher given that men often will not answer honestly in studies surrounding diet and weight.
    Of these 10%, one study found that only 20% were gay men, meaning that the typical heterosexual male is just as likely, far more even, to be negatively influenced by the media’s portrayal of masculinity.
    Eating Disorders.
  • 7. In 1997, American men spent:
    $4 billion on exercise equipment and health club memberships
    $3 billion on grooming aids and fragrances
    $800 million on hair transplants
    In 1996, American men spent: $500 million on male cosmetic surgery procedures
    $300 million on procedures such as pectoral implants, chin surgery, and penis enlargement
    $200 million on procedures such as liposuction and rhinoplasty (nose jobs)
    Financial Breakdown
  • 8. Thanks, Calvin Klein.
  • 9. Sex sells.
  • 10. Ken, Then (1976) and Now (2008)
  • 11. Hair, Then and Now
  • 12. Fabio, Man of the Moment
  • 13. All about the clothes.
  • 14. “The marketing images in question show less skin than you see any summer day at the beach.” -Public statement for Abercrombie & Fitch in response to a controversy over an ad.
    The Response
  • 15. So this is masculinity?
  • 16. Dolce & Gabbana
  • 17. Taboo?
  • 18. Double standard.
  • 19. Gay?
  • 20. Conflicting Messages: The Runway
  • 21. Vivienne Westwood, Milan Spring 2009
  • 22. “They're less fertile, more weight-obsessed and 'non-essential to parenting'. No wonder men are confused about modern masculinity.” –Elizabeth Day, The Guardian (June 3, 2008)
    Some Final Words