Performance Management for HR Practitioners - Week 5

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  • Welcome - Andy
  • Agenda - Andy
  • Palm to Palm  We all have a tendency to reject, deny, or oppose ideas when we feel pressured to accept them. Here is a jolt that explores this built-in defense mechanism Synopsis  Participants use the automatic responses of bodies and minds to being pressured in order to make a point about better ways to deal with people. Purpose  To demonstrate innate human characteristics about resistance to pressure Training Topics  Communication Leadership Change management Participants  One and more Time  2 minutes for the activity 3 to 5 minutes for the debriefing Facilitator’s Note  A recorded version of this jolt is included on the website for this book, www.pfeiffer.com/go/jolts. You may use this to give the instructions to the participants. Flow  Give these instructions to the participants: Please listen to these instructions and follow along.Place your hands in front of your chest, palm to palm.First, I am going to count to three. When I say “Three,” I want you to push your right palm forcefully against your left palm.Are you ready? Here we go: One, two, three . . . push. . . .(Pause for 5 seconds.)Thanks. You may relax now. Debriefing  Ask the participants whether their palms ended up on the left side of their body or remained in the middle of their bodies. (Most participants will say their palms remained in the middle.) Point out that if their palms remained in the middle it must mean that their left palms pushed back. Ask the participants why they think this happened when this outcome that was not a part of the instructions. Explain to the participants that this activity is focused on what happened to their left palms and that you are not that interested in what happened with their right palms.    Probe the participants with additional questions and examples around this mysterious outcome to elicit the following learning points. Learning Points  1. People automatically resist when they feel they are being pushed. 2. This automatic reaction cuts across the entire range of human experience. Field Notes  If some participants in the room are familiar with this jolt, ask them to play along. This is important because participants may imitate others rather than follow directions. If too many participants do this, your learning points will not be as powerful or useful.
  • Learning Points:At the end of this lesson, you will be able to:• Explain the importance of each phase in relation to the overall performance management process• Identify the supervisor/manager responsibilities in each phase• Explain the practitioner’s role in each phase
  • Learning Points:The performance management process contains three phases:1. Planning2. Monitoring and developing3. Rating and rewarding
  • Learning Points:• The second phase of the performance management process is the monitoring and developing phase. This phase constitutes all of the time between the creation of the performance plan and the execution of the final performance rating.• The purpose of this phase is to ensure that employees are on track to meet the elements and standards in their performance plan.• In this phase, supervisors/managers have opportunities to coach their employees and positively modify their behavior. Of course, supervisors/managers will be offering informal feedback to their employees throughout the cycle.• During this phase, supervisors/managers should meet with each employee for a formal mid-year review.
  • Learning Points:• Even though the employee’s job objectives provide a road map for the employee to succeed, they should not go unsupervised for the rest of the year. The supervisor/manager should regularly communicate with and provide encouragement, constructive feedback, and appreciation to all employees. • The midterm review meeting is a requirement and an opportunity to formally check in on employees.• Developing employees can grow a team’s skills. • Identify any deficiencies in performance with the employee and discuss any corrective measures.
  • Learning Points:As in the other phases of the performance management process, supervisors/managers have certain responsibilities in the monitoring and developing phase. The actions they must take include:• Conduct a mid-year review meeting. • Look for challenges and training opportunities to develop their employees’ skills.• Aid employees’ pursuits toward both the performance plan and overall career development.• Adjust the performance plan.
  • IDPs usually take account of three main development-need categories that relate to anemployee's job, career or personal interest. 􀂃 Job-related development—Development needs associated with a job function may beaddressed by corporate training programmes that can be applied to the whole workforce, forexample, training and development associated with the introduction of new technology.However, PDPs emphasise individual development needs that relate directly to the job and arelikely to be different from those of another employee holding a similar role.􀂃 Career-related development—Career-related development is an acknowledgement by boththe organisation and the individual that an employee's responsibilities are unlikely to remainstatic. Progression in the company or elsewhere in the sector will take place during theemployee's working life.􀂃 Personal development—personal development needs may also be addressed in a PDP andcan include development of personal communication or teamworking skills. Equally, they canbe related to a personal interest that may have no apparent relevance to the employee'scurrent job. At HP Bulmer, the learning resource centre provides support for employees whomay wish to study a foreign language that may only be used on an annual holiday to theMediterranean.􀂃 Rather than operating in isolation, IDPs usually form a part of a wider performancemanagement framework. This may include job profiles, competency frameworks andperformance review procedures.Learning Points:• When supervisors/managers work with an employee to identify short- and long-term goals, they can take the time to create an IDP. The IDP allows the employee to not only identify long-term goals and the short-term goals that will allow the employee to achieve the long-term goals, it also allows the employee to identify what methods he or she will use to achieve these goals. This could include a number of different types of training:o In-house trainingo On-the-job trainingo Off-site trainingo Individual supervisory training• Depending on what the employee’s goals are and what training is readily available, the combination of sources will vary
  • By monitoring continually, unacceptable performance can be identified at any time during the appraisal period.Learning Points:• If an employee is failing to perform adequately, supervisors/managers can work with you to develop a PIP for that employee. The PIP provides a formal opportunity to let an employee know that his or her performance is lacking in certain areas and to create a plan to improve that performance.• The PIP should not only indicate what the problem areas are, but it should include a road map for improving performance. As usual, these guidelines need to be clear, observable, and measurable.• Lastly, the PIP needs to include a time frame in which these improvements need to be made.
  • Learning Points:• Within-Grade Increases (WGIs) advance an employee to the next step within his or her current grade. They can be used only when an employee’s performance falls within an acceptable level of performance.• If an employee drops below the satisfactory rating, a WGI denial or delay is supposed to take effect automatically.• If the current performance is not accurately reflected in the most recent performance review (rating of record), supervisors/managersare required to prepare a more current (and accurate) rating of record.
  • Learning Points:During the monitoring and developing phase, your role as support for supervisors/managers includes:• Provide guidance on preparing for and conducting a mid-term review.• Work with the employee development specialists to guide supervisors/managers in selecting and enrolling in performance enhancing training.• Generate a PIP if necessary, with input from supervisors/managers.
  • Learning Points:The performance management process contains three phases:1. Planning2. Monitoring and developing3. Rating and rewarding
  • Learning Points:The culmination of the performance management cycle is the year-end review. At this time, the supervisor/manager meets with his or her employees and rates their performance based on how well they met the objectives laid out in the performance plan
  • Tip: Emphasize positive contributions during formal reviews while grounding discussion of weaknesses in suggestions for improvement.Focus on StrengthsFocusing on performance strengths has one of the strongest impacts on the employee’s contribution to the agency mission of all manager actions. This focus reinforces performance-enhancing behavior and helps employees to identify where to contribute to the organization.The Danger of Formal ReviewsEmphasis on performance weaknesses—in the absence of specific, targeted feedback for improvement—will diminish employee engagement and effort, reducing enterprise contribution substantially.Learning Points:• Every aspect of the performance management process is set up so that results can be measured. The rating phase allows for the formal measurement of the elements in the performance plan. The rating phase allows an organization to measure how well it achieved the goals it set out to accomplish.• Additionally, the performance rating allows an organization to quantify its success (or failure).• Employees are paid based on their performance rating, in order to promote continued success. This sums up the performance management process. It is completely transparent: Employees know what is expected of them at the start of the year, and they know how to achieve success. When they do achieve success, they are rewarded accordingly.• Similarly, the supervisor/manager knows what the employees are being held responsible for, and how successful those employees are in achieving their goals.
  • Learning Points:During this phase, supervisors/managers have an assortment of responsibilities:• Conduct an end-of-year meeting with the employee• Provide a rating on each performance element on which the employee has had an opportunity to perform• Prepare a written narrative• Clearly communicate to the employee each rating that has been assigned and the reasons behind eachThe end-of-year meeting is not a planning meeting for the next cycle. It is used only to provide an appraisal of the prior year’s performance. Planning for the next year will not happen until next year’s performance management cycle begins.
  • Learning Points:During this phase, supervisors/managers have an assortment of responsibilities:• Conduct an end-of-year meeting with the employee• Provide a rating on each performance element on which the employee has had an opportunity to perform• Prepare a written narrative• Clearly communicate to the employee each rating that has been assigned and the reasons behind eachThe end-of-year meeting is not a planning meeting for the next cycle. It is used only to provide an appraisal of the prior year’s performance. Planning for the next year will not happen until next year’s performance management cycle begins.
  • One of the most important things to remember in taking notes is to date them so they reflect when you met with an employee or when you noted a particularly good or bad instance of performance. Keep track of specific examples of poor performance on work assignments. Doing so will make it easier for you to explain what’s wrong with the employee’s performance through the use of examples. Note how you expressed your performance expectations and how the employee responded to the counseling. Once an opportunity period (see Step Two for an explanation of an opportunity period) has begun, you will need to make notes of all routine meetings with the employee. In addition, you may need to keep a record of when assignments were given to the employee and what instructions were provided.
  • KevinNoSome do, some do notOnly managers and executivesYes, most everyone doesIt is mandatoryOther
  • KevinNot until the next performance cycleAt mid-year/mid-cycle reviewC. QuarterlyWhenever external or internal events require an adjustment (e.g. in training budget)
  • KevinNeverAround the mid-year reviewsAt the end of the performance cycleWhenever a problem arisesOther
  • .
  • Performance Management for HR Practitioners - Week 5

    1. 1. Performance Management for HR Practitioners Week 5: The PerformanceManagement Process – Part 2 Instructor: Kevin Galliers S
    2. 2. Week 5 AgendaS Logistics, Last Week and S Practitioner’s Role - Guide. p. 102 Introductions S Rating and Rewarding Phase -S Monitoring and Developing Guide, pp. 108-111 Phase - Guide p. 93-95 S HR Practitioner Scenario / StoryS IDPs - Guide, p. 99 S Interactive Chat: How do youS Performance Improvement keep IDPs from gathering dust Period - Guide, p. 100 on the shelf?S Delay/ Denial of Increase S Q&A - Guide, p. 101 S Summary – Guide, p. 125 S Week 5 Assignments
    3. 3. LogisticsS Let’s continue to be interactive: S Submit questions in the chat box - our expert will field them, during and/or at the end S We have a designated time for chat as wellS If you have any technical difficulties, use the chat window S Direct it to “Bryce Bender” (not “all participants”)S We are recording each session S After the session, you will be able to find a link to the archived version of the webinar on the Week 5 page of the course group on GovLoopS Don’t forget your reading, discussion and partner reflection!
    4. 4. Introductions: Your Host Steve Ressler GovLoop, Founder and President
    5. 5. Introductions: Your Instructor Kevin Galliers Human Resources Consultant, U.S. Office of Personnel Management
    6. 6. Put Your Hands Together
    7. 7. Lesson ObjectiveS At the end of this lesson, you will be able to: S Explain the importance of each phase in relation to the overall performance management process S Identify the supervisor/manager responsibilities in each phase S Explain the practitioner’s role in each phase
    8. 8. The Performance Management Process Coaching and Coaching and Feedback Feedback Coaching and Feedback
    9. 9. What is the Monitoring and Developing Phase?S Monitoring: S Check in with your employees to gauge how they are progressing with their performance plansS Developing: S Provide feedback that will enable your employees to complete their performance plan S Adjust the performance plan as needed during the year Monitoring and Developin g
    10. 10. Supervisor/Manager Activities During This PhaseS Regularly communicate with and provide encouragement, constructive feedback, and appreciation to all employeesS Offer each employee an opportunity to provide input on accomplishments relative to the performance elements and standards MonitoringS Identify any deficiencies in and Developin performance with the employee and g discuss any corrective measures
    11. 11. Supervisor/Manager Responsibilities in Monitoring and Developing PhaseS Conduct a mid-year review meetingS Look for challenges and training opportunities to develop employees’ skillsS Aid employees’ pursuits toward both performance plan and overall career developmentS Address performance deficiencies Monitoring and Developin g
    12. 12. Individual Development PlanS IDPs allow employees to plan out their career path and identify necessary training, such as: S In-house training S On-the-job training S Off-site training S Individual supervisory training Monitoring and Developin g
    13. 13. Performance Improvement PeriodS Is a formal notice used when an employee’s performance is unacceptableS Is required prior to taking an adverse action under 5 CFR Chapter 43S Classifies the performance expectations in the standard when necessary (Be as specific as possible) MonitoringS Informs the employee of what he or she must do to and Developin improve g
    14. 14. Delay/Denial of Within-Grade IncreaseS Is required when an employee’s performance drops below the fully successful level of performanceS May require the supervisor to prepare a more accurate, up-to-date rating of record if the older one is out-of-date Monitoring and Developin g
    15. 15. Practitioner’s Role in Monitoring and DevelopingS Provide guidance on preparing for the mid-year review meetingS Generate a PIP if necessary Monitoring and Developin g
    16. 16. The Performance Management Process Coaching and Coaching and Feedback Feedback Coaching and Feedback
    17. 17. Rating and Rewarding PhaseS The performance management cycle ends with the end- of-the year reviewS The employee’s performance is rated and the employee may be rewarded accordinglyS The performance rating is based on the success an employee has had meeting his or her performance plan Rating and Rewarding
    18. 18. Purpose of Rating and Rewarding PhaseS The rating phase allows for a formal measurement of the elements contained in the performance planS The end-of-year review assesses how well an employee met his or her objectivesS Rewarding successful employees reinforces that Rating and behavior and encourages future Rewarding success
    19. 19. Supervisor/Manager ResponsibilitiesS Conduct an end-of-year meeting with the employeeS Recommend a rating for each performance element on which the employee has had an opportunity to performS Prepare a written narrativeS Communicate clearly the final rating to the Rating and employee once it has been approved Rewarding
    20. 20. Tips for Employee Self-Assessment S Employees should prepare a self-assessment using the following guidelines: S Restate your understanding of performance elements. S Highlight your most significant achievements for the rating cycle S Make connection between what you did, the result, and why that mattered to the organization S Note challenges faced how you fare Rating and S Address each performance element Rewarding S Provide supporting documentation
    21. 21. Scenario / StoryS Alice had pretty good luck with her subordinates having good performance, until Chester started turning in poor quality work the past month. As a trusted colleague, Alice approaches you to ask if she should be taking “supervisory notes.” Should Alice be taking supervisory notes? If so, what type of information is worth including in these notes?
    22. 22. Let’s Hear From You! Poll 1: Self-AssessmentsDo employees in your organization write self-assessments at the end of the performance cycle?
    23. 23. Let’s Hear From You! Poll 2: Development How often do managers and employeesin your organization review and/or revise their IDPs?
    24. 24. Let’s Hear From You! Poll 3: Poor PerformersWhen do managers come to you for help as an HR practitioner when dealing with poor performers?
    25. 25. Questions? Ask the expert!Submit your questions in the chat window. S
    26. 26. Key PointsS The monitoring and developing phase involves assessing the employees’ performance and addressing developmental needsS Effective performance management meetings are the result of advance preparation and thought.S Employees should be encouraged to write and submit a self-assessment.
    27. 27. Week 5 Assignments Attend Webinar ✓ Complete Readings o “How to Write a Great Individual Development Plan” (Blog Post) o “Why Is No One Talking About the Pink Elephant in the Room (Or Are They)?” (Blog Post) o “Crowdsource Your Performance Reviews” (Blog Post) Engage in Group Discussion (Thursday, March 28 at 2p ET) Submit Reflection to Class Partner by Friday COB Look for next week’s Email
    28. 28. Thank YouPlease send questions or course feedback toAndrew@GovLoop.com S

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