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    VDP Concept Note VDP Concept Note Document Transcript

    • Village Development Partnership Concept Note Prepared by:Corporate Social Responsibility and International Affairs Bureau (CIB), Population and Community Development Association (PDA) Last edited: January 2009
    • Executive SummaryThe Village Development Partnership (VDP) is an integrated rural development project model being appliedby the Population and Community Development Association (PDA), one of Thailand’s most established andwell-known NGO’s. By combining PDA’s diverse developmental expertise and extensive rural network withthe financial and human resources of a sponsoring partner (particularly companies, although individuals andorganizations can also be effective), the VDP provides a structured approach towards sustainable povertyalleviation.The VDP addresses issues in the five development areas of: social development, economicdevelopment, environment, health, and education. By placing initial emphasis on social and economicdevelopment however, a foundation is created from which further development can be sustained.Community empowerment, in the form of an elected, gender balanced Village Development Committee,ensures that the community understands, manages, and leads its own development. Business skillstraining and access to micro-credit (through the Village Development Bank) provides villagers with theopportunity to start or expand income-generating activities; loan repayments then go towards increasing theavailable pool of credit and funding further development activities.Once a suitable village and sponsoring partner are selected, PDA guides the village through the start of theVDP process with 7 steps in Phase I: Institutional Development and Planning: 1. Building a common understanding 2. Forming the Village Development Committee (VDC) 3. Training the VDC 4. Community Needs Assessment (CNA) and Preliminary Planning 5. Eye-opener Trip 6. Finalizing Development Plan 7. Submitting Development PlanThe output from these steps is a clearly articulated idea of the future village the community would like tohave, prioritized goals and activities, and an implementation plan which breaks down the steps andresources necessary to achieving the desired village. Implementation begins in Phase II.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 2 of 24January 2009
    • There are 5 steps in Phase II: Implementation of Development Activities: 1. Tree Planting and Establishment of Village Development Bank 2. Barefoot MBA 3. Barefoot MPH 4. School Lunch Farm 5. Water for Health and Wealth 6. Other ActivitiesPhase III: Monitoring and Evaluation: Throughout the VDP, PDA staff regularly visit the village todiscuss issues with the various committees and councils, provide advice, and request updates on activities.PDA’s Research and Evaluation Division (RED) staff will be engaged in program evaluation and impactassessment.Through the VDP, rural communities develop the knowledge, skills, and capacity to analyze and respond totheir needs. Once a community has become experienced with the social and economic institutions of theVillage Development Committee and Village Development Bank, it possesses the tools and fundsnecessary to sustain its own future development out of poverty and low quality of life.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 3 of 24January 2009
    • Table of ContentsBackground ........................................................................................................................... 5  1.1.  Overview of PDA .................................................................................................................5  1.2.  Corporate Social Responsibility in Rural Development ..................................................6 2.  Rationale of the Village Development Partnership project ................................... 7  2.1.  Social development: community empowerment ..............................................................7  2.2.  Economic development: providing credit and business skills .......................................8  2.3.  Environment ........................................................................................................................8  2.4.  Health ...................................................................................................................................9  2.5.  Education...........................................................................................................................10 3.  Selecting the village ................................................................................................ 11 4.  Phase I: Institutional Development and Planning ................................................ 12  4.1.  Building a common understanding .................................................................................12  4.2.  Forming the Village Development Committee (VDC) .....................................................12  4.3.  Training the VDC ...............................................................................................................14  4.4.  Community needs assessment (CNA) and preliminary planning ................................15  4.5.  Eye-opener trip ..................................................................................................................15  4.6.  Finalizing development plan ............................................................................................16  4.7.  Submitting development plan ..........................................................................................17 5.  Phase II: Implementation of Development Activities ........................................... 18  5.1.  Tree Planting and establishment of Village Development Bank ...................................18  5.2.  Barefoot MBA ....................................................................................................................19  5.3.  Barefoot MPH ....................................................................................................................20  5.4.  School Lunch Farm...........................................................................................................20  5.5.  Water for Health and Wealth ............................................................................................20  5.6.  Other activities ..................................................................................................................21 6.  Phase III: Monitoring and Evaluation ..................................................................... 22 7.  Expected Outcomes ................................................................................................ 23 8.  Partner Participation in the VDP ............................................................................ 24 PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 4 of 24January 2009
    • Background1.1. Overview of PDAFounded in 1974, PDA is one of Thailands most diverse Non-Government Organizations (NGO). Operatingfrom Bangkok and 18 regional development centers and branch offices in rural Thailand, PDAs programsare based on the belief that local people are best suited to shape and sustain their own development. PDAhas pioneered grassroots growth that is marked by extensive villager involvement not only as beneficiaries,but also as planners, managers, and leaders.PDA was first active in promoting family planning in urban and rural areas of Thailand at a time whenknowledge of and access to such services were scarce. PDA recruited and trained respected members ofurban and rural neighborhoods to distribute and provide information on affordable contraceptives directly totheir communities. Between 1974 and 2006 PDA helped to lower the average number of children perhousehold from 7 to 1.2 and to reduce the national population growth rate from 3.3% to 0.5%. Othercampaigns addressed the reproductive health of specific target groups such as factory workers, hill tribevillagers, and adolescents.Since that initial focus on reproductive health, PDA programs now encompass a variety of developmentsectors such as integrated rural development, water resource development, local institution building,medical and health services, population control and AIDS care activities, income generation andoccupational training, education, and forestry and environmental conservation. PDA has established itselfas an innovative and effective development NGO with an impressive record of successes andaccomplishments.The development of a nation can be achieved only when the quality of life for all Thai people is improved toan adequate standard. One of PDA’s prime tenets is that the community as a whole, in all sectors of society- private, public, and non-profit - can join together in a new push for social improvement. PDA is proud tohave contributed to improving the standard and quality of life in Thailand; however, we endeavor to continueour struggle in rural areas where government efforts at the local and national levels have not yet been ableto effectively address a growing disparity in quality of life.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 5 of 24January 2009
    • 1.2. Corporate Social Responsibility in Rural DevelopmentThe Village Development Partnership (VDP) is a project that can effectively partner a rural Thai communitywith individuals, families, organizations, or companies. That being said, PDA believes that the VDP modellends itself naturally as a project for businesses that are interested in pursuing sustainable and effectiveCorporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities.Businesses of all sizes are realizing the need to respond to stakeholder requests to act in a sociallyresponsible manner and not focus exclusively on a financial bottom line. A quick scan through news mediashows that companies are coming under increased scrutiny regarding their CSR actions, or lack thereof.Social contribution activities by companies are increasingly expected to have genuine and sustainableimpacts that stem from fundamental principles or philosophies, rather than being superficial acts of charitywhich may be interpreted as public relations exercises.While a company’s CSR strategy may try to accomplish many objectives, one of the most effective areastowards which a company can contribute financial resources and employee expertise is poverty alleviation.The fundamental processes necessary to running a successful enterprise such as planning, resourcemanagement, and identification of opportunities, find very similar parallels in the development andimplementation of the Village Development Partnership (VDP). Furthermore, by combining key businessskills with the development expertise and on-the-ground network of an NGO partner such as PDA, acompany is best able to maximize the impact of its CSR contributions.A socially responsible company receives recognition from stakeholders, company employees, and potentialconsumers and business partners for its efforts. In today’s demanding business environment, differentiationfrom competitors is constantly becoming more difficult and more expensive. Being able to draw on wellconceived and implemented CSR provides companies with a novel and innovative way to garner recognitionand distinguish themselves in the marketplace.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 6 of 24January 2009
    • 2. Rationale of the Village Development Partnership projectThe Village Development Partnership (VDP) project is a holistic approach to development and contributes tofive major development areas: social, economic, environment, health, and education.2.1. Social development: community empowermentThrough its experience in rural development, PDA has learned that effective and sustainable povertyreduction programs must begin through the engagement of the involved communities. Communities musthave full ownership and have every opportunity to participate in the planning and implementation ofdevelopment projects; PDA’s role is to guide villagers in how to articulate their needs.The VDP effectively creates this engagement by helping the community establish an elected VillageDevelopment Committee at the very beginning of the process. The election ensures that the whole villagecommunity participates in, and feels ownership for, the project right from the start. The elected individualsgenerally come from various backgrounds and act as representatives, allowing every villager to articulatehis/her needs.The Village Development Committee consists of sub-committees which represent all generations. Each ofthe sub-committees must have equal male and female representation which helps to firmly instill theconcept of gender equality. Youth Council meeting Meeting of the Council of EldersVillagers are involved at every step of the VDP project. They are responsible for carrying out their ownCommunity Needs Assessment and for generating ideas. This is effective as the villagers know theirspecific needs better than PDA or the sponsoring partners. Every rural Thai community exists withindifferent surroundings and different circumstances. This means that while the general areas of development(e.g. economic, health, education, and environment) are consistent from village to village, the particularneeds and priorities of each community are unique and must be supported as such.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 7 of 24January 2009
    • 2.2. Economic development: providing credit and business skillsMany poorer villagers do not own land and therefore do not have collateral for credit. The lack of access tocredit at the village level is a significant inhibitor to the ability to increase income. This can deny individualsthe opportunity to borrow money at market rates to begin and/or expand business activities. Borrowingthrough existing informal channels can often only be done at exorbitant interest rates resulting in restrictiveloan repayments.A central component of the VDP project is the Village Development Bank (VDB). It is an important sourceof credit for income generation activities as well as a system that encourages the practice of saving. Theinitial capital for the bank is established through the community activity of tree-planting, whereby funds fromthe partner are contributed as capital for the VDB in exchange for each tree planted.The communal nature of the bank means that all villagers have the opportunity to benefit. Default onrepayments is often lower than in conventional systems since there are social pressures that arise fromdepriving fellow community members of the right to borrow, as well as personal “face and image” issues. Inmany existing VDP’s, community savings quickly exceed the initial capital with which the VDB was started,indicating the success the program has had in changing villagers’ saving behaviors.PDA staff also provides villagers with basic business skills training and we encourage partners to share theirexpertise, skills, and advice, to help villagers ensure that their micro-businesses are a success. Ice-cream vendor Prepared food stall Organic pig raising2.3. EnvironmentIn addition to tree-planting, many community activities organized within the framework of the VDP contributeto improving the environment. Examples from PDA’s past development projects include canal recovery,building sanitary latrines, waste collection and garbage recycling, bio-diesel production, and the building ofpiped water systems.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 8 of 24January 2009
    • Community tree-planting Canal clearing in Ratchaburi Province2.4. HealthHealth is still a major concern in rural areas. In 2006, PDA carried out a health survey in 8 rural primaryschools in the South of Thailand and found that the majority of children had health problems including dentalproblems, lice, or malnutrition. Activities carried out as part of the VDP may include health checks andeducation in local schools as well as the improvement of medical care facilities. If communities with theproject area have any prevalent medical problems such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes, or hypertension, the VDPcould also institute education, prevention, and treatment programs targeting those specific ailments. School health check as part of a VDPPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 9 of 24January 2009
    • 2.5. EducationAs a community develops economically, one effect is an increase in the rate of secondary schoolattendance. To keep pace with economic improvement in a community, the VDP can target developmentalprograms related to education such as: improvement of local primary and secondary schools, scholarshipfor children from poor families, Information Technology training for children and adults, and the creation ofschool lunch farms to improve childhood nutrition and student performance.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 10 of 24January 2009
    • 3. Selecting the villagePDA staff are continually building relations with villages in the areas surrounding the 18 PDA centers inThailand. PDA decides if a village is suitable for participation in the Village Development Partnership basedon the following criteria: • Geographical location, if sponsoring partner has expressed a preference • Desire of village to collaborate • Needs of the village • Size of the village, to match the size of the donation • Specific resources, opportunities, or challenges which may match the partner’s competencies • Existing communication infrastructure within a village. PDA has found that successful partnership with a village is highly dependent on the community having a solid communication infrastructure as well as receptive individuals who are respected and influential, even if just at an informal level. These key individuals are important to obtain the buy-in of villagers for project collaboration. • Past collaboration with PDA. This is a good entry point into the village since existing relationships help facilitate further collaboration. Examples include village children in Buriram province who attend the PDA-founded Lamplaimat Pattana School, and villagers who work in PDA associated businesses and factories.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 11 of 24January 2009
    • 4. Phase I: Institutional Development and PlanningOnce a village has been selected and the partner has decided to commit to the project, the VDP enters itsinstitutional development and planning phase: 1. Building a common understanding 2. Forming the Village Development Committee (VDC) 3. Training the VDC 4. Community Needs Assessment (CNA) and preliminary planning 5. Eye-opener trip 6. Finalizing development plan 7. Submitting development plan4.1. Building a common understandingPDA staff visit the village and organize meetings, during which the VDP concept is introduced. Villagersand PDA staff discuss VDP objectives, activities, outputs and expected outcomes. The number of meetingsdepends on the villagers’ needs and ability to understand the VDP concept and procedures.4.2. Forming the Village Development Committee (VDC)The VDC is constituted of four sub-committees: the Village Development Bank Committee (VDB), theVillage Youth Council (VYC), the Village Council of Elders (VCE), and the Village Health Committee (VHC).PDA staff support the villagers in organizing elections the sub-committees. VDC will take a lead role in theprocess of continuing to understand and respond to the needs of their community. It will also establish theVillage Development Bank, an important source of credit for income generating activities and a system thatwill encourage the practice of saving. Village Development Committee VDC Village Development Village Youth Village Council of Village Health Bank Council Elders Committee VDC VYC VCE VHCPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 12 of 24January 2009
    • The forming of the sub-committees provides a way of giving opportunities to and drawing out naturalleaders/change agents in the community. Committees formed through PDA’s support are different in thatmembers are elected as opposed to appointed and usually do not have previous connections or highstanding in local society. Members usually turn out to be dedicated, hardworking people invested in thedevelopment of own community having been engaged for their commitment to helping their community atlarge rather than serving personal benefit.Village Development Bank (VDB)The VDB committee is in charge of setting up and running the village development bank, which will providefunds to commence community activities and a source of credit to carry out or expand business activities.Village Youth Council (VYC)Youth in the village between 14-24 years will elect 8 representatives. VYC will manage affairs pertaining toyouth and to integrate youth into community development. They will also coordinate environmental activitiessuch as the tree planting to establish the VDB, and will be provided with training and financial support toestablish youth run businesses.Village Council of Elders (VCE)The role of the eight highly experienced village elders is to achieve program buy-in.Village Health Committee (VHC)VHC is constituted of eight individuals who can be health care educators, youth and other villagers. Its roleis to execute various activities to promote health care and sanitation more effectively.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 13 of 24January 2009
    • 4.3. Training the VDCAfter elections, PDA staff provide coaching to each sub-committee so that each understands its roles andresponsibilities.VDC training • Community Needs Assessment process • Managing people; mobilizing people into groups • Documenting information • Planning activities • Writing proposals • Thinking in a clear; purposeful way about rural development planning • Public speaking and presenting themselves to donors and potential donors • Coordinating effectively with local organizations and Tambon Administration Organization (TAO)VDB training • Business planning • Savings, risk management and the use of profits • Indicators of successful and efficient micro-credit business • Gender issues in business • Leadership and team work • Networking • Case studies for specific industries such as food, textiles and handicraftsVYC training • Democracy, transparency and gender equality • Managing youth affairs • Launching new initiatives for youth and elderly • Initiating business ventures for youthVHC training • Basic health care for various groups; • Launching new initiatives for health care and health education • Health fund managementPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 14 of 24January 2009
    • 4.4. Community needs assessment (CNA) and preliminary planningPDA staff facilitates a multi-day brainstorming session during which villagers create an overarching CNAdevelopment plan. The CNA provides a unique opportunity for the community to understand its situationand determine future objectives, as well as map out what the community can do to realize these objectives.This learning process is a crucial building block towards long-term self-sustainability and away fromdependence on outside donors.The 32 community members in VDC facilitate this process which involves the whole village. Villagersexchange ideas about priority needs and goals, what changes are viable in the community, who will beresponsible, and what the appropriate activity rollout schedule is.In the preliminary planning, a focus group discussion is facilitated in order to obtain primary data about theoverall situation of their village. The objective of this activity is to engage community members in assessingthe current climate within their village and then to set a plan for how they would like to improve theirsituation.Topics discussed are: • Quality of life • Economic: e.g. income, main and secondary occupations, labor, employment, debt burden • Social: e.g. population, education, health • Environmental: e.g. access to potable water • Health: e.g. common diseases in the village • Education: e.g. access to and condition of schools and daycare centersThe resulting output from this initial brainstorming session will be a community map and identification ofbasic needs for quality of life and economic improvement.4.5. Eye-opener tripThe VDC members, community leaders and other villagers travel to villages where the VDP project hasbeen successfully implemented. This allows them to gather new ideas and observe successful businessactivities. It is an opportunity to see projects first-hand and speak to members of other communities tounderstand how these activities can be implemented successfully.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 15 of 24January 2009
    • 4.6. Finalizing development planFollowing the eye-opener trip villagers return to their community and undertake a detailed communityplanning session. The final outputs of this meeting are lists of activities/projects proposed by the village.The participants differ from each other in aspects of age, gender, career and social role. The meetingcomprises a total of 3 sessions:Session 1: Our village todaySession 2: Future desired villageSession 3: Review of village future activities and conclusionSession 1: Our village today • Introduction of participants • Sharing of behavioral data • Village tales by elderly leaders • Formation of 3 subgroups to discuss “our village today” • Presentation of “our village today” by each subgroup • Discussion in the whole group to summarize the conclusion of “our village today”Session 2: Future desired village • Discussion about “future desired village” in the same subgroups • Presentation on “future desired village” by each subgroup • Discussion in the whole group to list activities which should be promoted to achieve the “future desired village”Session 3: Review of village future activities and conclusion • Review of future village activities; focus on a question: is it essential to perform these project activities? • Prioritization of future village activities • Classification of activities and grouping into similar types • Wrap-up sessionPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 16 of 24January 2009
    • The result of this detailed planning stage is a Village Development Plan of Implementation, which is dividedinto 3 categories: • Work plan of activities that the community can begin to implement on its own • Work plan on activities which require support from the local government administration for implementation • Work plan on activities which require support from both public and private organizations for implementationActivities in each work plan are prioritized and mapped out along an implementation schedule. Even thoughthese work plans often include activities that are out of the scope of PDA’s projects, we continue to play afacilitating role by helping communities to find additional necessary resources and to present projectsstrategically about how to develop provides opportunities for local governance to recognize communities’real needs and interests. This activity gives villagers a completely new experience in being able tounderstand and shape their community in a way that they determine to be most valuable to them. This is aunique approach in community empowerment and has sustainable impact well beyond the company’ssupport as communities learn the process for determining their own needs as they change.4.7. Submitting development planThe Village Development Committee submits the finalized development plan to the partner through theintermediary of PDA staff, and the program moves into the Implementation of Development Activities phase.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 17 of 24January 2009
    • 5. Phase II: Implementation of Development ActivitiesOnce institutions have been established with the community, PDA will guide VDC in planning andimplementing the community development activities. With the institutions now in place, the activities will beongoing with little outside assistance – that is, funds from the VDB and other activities will go towardssustaining the activities described below in addition to activities determined necessary by the villagers in thefuture.The steps of implementation are: 1. Tree planting and establishment of Village Development Bank 2. Barefoot MBA 3. Barefoot MPH 4. School Lunch Farm 5. Water for Health and Wealth 6. Other activities5.1. Tree Planting and establishment of Village Development BankThe implementation phase commences with a community activity in tree planting as a means of facilitatingthe establishment of the VDB. In this activity, funds are contributed to as capital for the VDB in exchangefor each tree planted by the community. The VYC helps with the coordination of this activity.The VDB will provide funds to commence community activities and a source of credit to carry out or expandbusiness activities. PDA provides training support on running the VDB to ensure long-term sustainability andgrowth of this new financial community institution.Before the VDB can begin operations, the VDB committee must discuss and establish the policies and rulesof their bank. While there is a suggested PDA template for many of these details, it is the specificrequirements of the village and its inhabitants that will decide exactly how the VDB operates. Issues whichneed to be decided upon include: • Membership (requirements, types, rights) • Micro-credit structure (participation requirements, stock/share purchases, monthly dues, dividends, liquidation of shares) • Loans (application screening process, business training, fund release process, payment terms of loan principal and interest, interest rates) • Savings accounts (minimum deposits, interest rates) • Days and hours of operationPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 18 of 24January 2009
    • Some typical features of the Standard PDA model for a VDB are: • Each household (regardless of number of individuals) is considered a membership • A one-time membership fee is paid to the VDB, in exchange for shares in the bank equal to the fee • The VDB is open to transact business once a month • Members must save a fixed monthly amount (for which they receive 6% interest p.a.) • Only members of the VDB in good standing are eligible for one loan at a time, for which they are charged interest of 1% per month (equivalent to 12% interest p.a.) A loan must be guaranteed by 2 guarantors, although no financial collateral is required. • The maximum loan amount is usually THB 20,000 for a maximum loan period of 1 year.Once the VDB committee, with guidance from PDA staff, has decided on governing policy, rules, regulations,and procedures, they must present them to the VDB members at large (the general community). Only afterthe members have granted their consent and approval can the VDB committee adopt a given set ofgoverning standards.Because the VDB structure is more technically complex than many other aspects of the VillageDevelopment Partnership model, the training and support provided to the VDB committee by PDA staff isessential, as is continuing follow-up support. This additional economic capacity building ensures long-termsustainability and growth of this new financial community institution.5.2. Barefoot MBAThis is a new program activity. The main purpose of the Barefoot MBA is to provide business training toindividuals and groups, especially those who receive loans from the VDB, and to enable them to start orexpand income generation activities. The training program helps the villagers learn about how to operatesmall enterprises effectively from basic business skills (e.g. administration, management, book keeping),case studies, and apprenticeship training with successful business owners. A study tour may be organizedto nearby districts or provinces to help the villagers obtain more ideas of business activities to operate.While business trainings are provided to the VDC members and the villagers, these trainings are in factbased on the needs of the villagers, and the provision of trainings is not systemic.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 19 of 24January 2009
    • 5.3. Barefoot MPHThis is a new program activity. The Barefoot MPH aims to train groups of expert patients, community basedhealth workers and youth of increasing expertise to meet prevention and treatment needs at the communitylevel. The Barefoot MPH equips numerous community members with the most basic health informationtargeting community-specific key health concerns, and builds higher level skill with gradual trainings forsmaller group. Specifically, the program is a 3-tiers training to develop ‘community health educators’ amongthe students, teachers, women and other villagers. Tier-1, comprises general overview training of commondiseases, symptoms, and treatments. Tier-2, the health care educators are trained to be effectivecommunicators and in more in-depth knowledge of diseases and able to help those in Tier-1. Tier-3 trainsthe health educators even further to the point where they are able to assist health careprofessionals/physicians while serving as village health educators.5.4. School Lunch FarmThe main aim of this program is to offer a sustainable solution to children malnutrition and food shortage atschool as well as at home. School farms will be established to produce vegetables, herbs, mushrooms andin some locations fish to provide for daily school lunches, and any surplus can be sold to the community inexchange for rice or money to be invested in raw materials and maintenance for the next crop cycle. Schoolfarms are environmentally friendly, utilizing organic fertilizers and rainwater-based irrigation systems.School communities reap tangible benefits from the farms in terms of income and a steady supply of freshfood, but they also feel a heightened sense of self-sufficiency and empowerment. The entire communityparticipates and takes ownership of the program: village members volunteer their labor on the farms,parents prepare the lunches, and students cultivate the crops and raise the animals, with guidance andtraining from the parents and teachers. Farming is integrated into the school curriculum: students aregraded on their care of the farms, learn about responsibility, and build the skills that may open doorways tofuture livelihoods.5.5. Water for Health and WealthBecause many Thai villagers rely on water for rice farming, insufficient water is an economic constraint forthem. The Water for Health and Wealth program is an integral element of the VDP to create sustainableand self-maintained water systems as well as additional sources of income. A loan fund from the VDB isused to cover the cost of construction materials for large rain-water catchment tanks, which are thenavailable for individual and communal use, depending on the needs of the community. The villagers providean in-kind donation of labor to support the project and PDA provides technical training and assistancethroughout the construction process. Villagers pay a small service charge for the water and the collectiveamount covers the loan repayment as well as maintenance costs. Villagers are encouraged to growPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 20 of 24January 2009
    • vegetable and flower plots to generate income. Once the loan is repaid, the fund revolves to allow morevillagers to build catchment tanks and eventually to create a self-managed pipe distribution network for thecommunity.5.6. Other activitiesWith the establishment of the VDB the Village Development Committee can then begin organization ofactivities that were previously identified in the implementation plan. For projects requiring outside funding,technical support, and/or other assistance, village members are encouraged to actively identify potentialsources of support.Some community development activities which PDA has previously worked on or observed in othercommunities include: • Social Development o Youth development o Women’s empowerment and gender equality training o Democratic process, civil society, and transparency training o Child daycare refurbishment • Economic Development o Rice-mill cooperative o Vegetable bank o Intergenerational loan funds • Environment o Garbage recycling bank o Environmental education o Bio-diesel production o Additional tree planting • Health o Health examinations o Dental care and treatment o Eye care and treatment o School hygiene program o HIV/AIDS education • Education o Scholarships (grade school, high school, and university) o Mobile Teacher/Mentor o IT skills developmentPDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 21 of 24January 2009
    • 6. Phase III: Monitoring and EvaluationOne of the responsibilities of the PDA staff will be to provide oversight to ensure that VDP institutions areoperating properly. Because the majority of VDP villages are located within 30km of a PDA centre, PDAstaff regularly visit to discuss issues with the various committees and councils, provide advice, and requestupdates on activities. One of PDA’s strengths is its ability to monitor the “pulse” of communities in which itworks. This information, along with updates on new activities or developments, is then summarized andpresented to sponsors in a yearly brief, or upon request.PDA’s Research and Evaluation Division (RED) staff will be engaged in program evaluation and impactassessment. Measurements and qualitative data sources used in the process include: • Log of activities conducted in the village: e.g. training sessions and visits (every 6 months) • Minutes of Village Development Committee meetings (every 6 months) • Accounts of the VDB: number of members, share sales, total savings, loan amounts and repayment rates, etc. (every 6 months) • If there is a school in the village, data will be collected on children’s height, weight and condition of teeth (every 6 months) Among the tools which PDA uses to track the villagers perceived quality of life is “The Bamboo Ladder”, aself-assessment scale. Villagers assign themselves a rating for the past, present, and future, in thecategories of Income, Physical Health, Mental Health, and Quality of Life. Over time, these assessmentshelp to form a general overview of the successes or shortcomings of the community development activities,as perceived by the villagers and can be used to reassess or modify the initial VDP Implementation Plan.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 22 of 24January 2009
    • 7. Expected OutcomesThe Village Development Partnership is expected to improve both the economic and social lives of themembers of the selected village by enabling them to implement activities that the community itself hasidentified as most needed.The partnership will communicate to community members the importance of community empowerment, asthese villagers will have learnt the process of identifying their own needs, now and in the future, and willhave the necessary confidence, skills, and knowledge to improve their own situation.Important community institutions will have been established in the form of the Village DevelopmentCommittee and its components. The VDC will take a lead role in the process of understanding andresponding to the needs of their community. The project will also establish the Village Development Bank,an important source of credit for income generating activities and a system that encourages the practice ofsaving.Finally, the villagers will have a new, more positive outlook on life in their community. Having developed avision of how things can be improved and the concrete steps necessary to achieve that vision, the village,their sponsoring partner, and PDA can create real improvement in quality of life.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 23 of 24January 2009
    • 8. Partner Participation in the VDPPDA encourages the sponsoring partner, whether individual members or as a whole, to be an active part ofthe Village Development Partnership project. This involvement can begin with joining the villagers duringthe Community Needs Assessment process and continue through to the launch and implementation ofcommunity development activities. By being directly involved in the learning experience together with thevillagers, the partner will develop a fuller understanding of the project itself and community development.The following is a non-exhaustive list of some of the VDP activities in which the partner could participate,dependant on area of expertise or simply interest level: • Idea generation/advice for micro-finance businesses and enterprise development: help provide business ideas and other methods of income generation for villagers • Advisory committee for village bank: assist in advising and training of the village bank committee, helping it to run smoothly and efficiently through improved management • Training for youth: provide financial and business training to youth in areas such as basic accounting, marketing, basic cost-benefit analysis, as well as proposal writing and presentation skills. In addition, other life skills training can be integrated i.e. the importance of education, anti- drug message, sex & HIV/AIDS education, and civil society and democratic participation • Community activities: participate in the initial tree-planting activity to raise capital for the Village Development Bank, and other subsequent community activitiesThese activities can also be scaled up for a greater degree of participation from the partner.PDA Village Development Partnership Concept Note Page 24 of 24January 2009