2010-2011 Annual ReportOffice of Community and Economic Development
Table of ContentsSTAFF ......................................................................................................
Reports .....................................................................................................................
StaffOffice of Community and Economic Development        California State University, Fresno       Mike Dozier      | Inte...
Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED)OverviewMissionAn on-campus division dedicated to aligning the Universi...
ProgramsFresno State Connect: To further the University’s role in community engagement, the Office ofCommunity and Economi...
economic competitiveness, and healthier, safe and walkable neighborhoods. This will ultimately shapefuture growth trends t...
ValleyInternships.com: Research shows that connecting college students to meaningful internshipopportunities increases the...
o USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture grant submitted March 2011    o HUD Rural Innovation Fund grant submitt...
•   Worked with Valley stakeholders to support the state’s application for additional funding for high-    speed rail in t...
Valley Legacy• 20 partnering agencies• 10 leadership meetings• Midway report published in March 2011 to insure the pilot p...
Cal Valley Tech• Continue to explore funding opportunities for the iHub and its partners. Funding is intended for    align...
TechnologyThis year OCED encountered several opportunities to enhance our use of technology. As systemschanged on campus, ...
Communications/OutreachThe communications team continues to build and fine-tune the communications management system toens...
Through analytics it is clear that these channels provide an additional method of reaching desiredaudiences while creating...
Speaking Engagements07.28.10 CALED Professional Advisory Service, Lompoc, provide three-day review and recommendation of  ...
Contact DatabaseThe database organizes stakeholders by sector and industry. Through various strategies, includingcontact l...
Legislation and Advocacy•   Participated in Fresno County’s One Voice and the Regional Policy Council’s Valley Voice trips...
Sponsorships and Donations• Partnership Board Meeting Sponsors 2010-2011   02.26.10 Kern County Board of Supervisors   05....
APPENDIX ASan Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center                  Invitation                                         ...
SAVE THE DATE!                                    Small Communities Network Workshop #4                                   ...
APPENDIX BSmart Valley Places   Fact Sheet                      21
FACT sheet                                 February 2011Overview                                   concentrated poverty an...
February 2011                                                                                 SAN JOAQUINCompact Cities Pr...
APPENDIX C    Smart Valley PlacesInvitation to Launch Event                             22
The Office of the Provost at California State University, FresnoInvites You to Join Us as We LaunchSmart Valley Places    ...
APPENDIX DCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Presentation - March 11, 2011 Board Meeting                   ...
California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley
The Partnership• Unprecedented public-private partnership   – focused on improving the region’s economic vitality     and ...
History• Partnership was formed June 2005 with  Executive Order by Gov. Arnold  Schwarzenegger• Led by an appointed, diver...
OrganizationThe Partnership Is Focused On Action     Through Ten Work Groups:•   Advanced Communications Services•   Air Q...
The Opportunity• The Partnership’s six major initiatives:   1. Grow a diversified, globally competitive economy supported ...
The Partnership’s Six Initiatives
The San Joaquin ValleyComprises eight countieswith 62 cities
Evolution of the Partnership2009• New Executive Order issued extending the Partnership   indefinitely.• Original $5 millio...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Advanced Communication Services (ACS)Supporting Agency: Great Valley CenterAccomplis...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Air QualitySupporting Agency: The Maddy InstituteAccomplishments:• Obtained millions...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Economic DevelopmentSupporting Agency: California Central Valley EconomicDevelopment...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: EnergySupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Clean EnergyOrganization (SJVCEO)Accompl...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Higher EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Higher Education Consortium(CVHEC)...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: HousingSupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Housing CollaborativeAccomplishments:• ...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: PreK-12 EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Educational LeadershipInstitute (...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Sustainable Planning (formerly Land Use,Agriculture and Transportation work groups)S...
Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Water PolicySupporting Agency: California Water InstituteAccomplishments:• San Joaqu...
AccomplishmentsSecretariat:• Tracking and communication of ARRA funding• Development of the Rural Development Center  (RDC...
Strengths Developed• Recognized regionally as a voice for the Valley: regional,  bi-partisan and inclusive• Large but can ...
Presence in the Valley  Smart                                Rural                    Valley            Outreach         S...
Challenges and Constraints• Perception that we are another layer of governance• Perception of “Fresno-centric”• Resource a...
Lessons Learned• Discuss natural conflicts• Communication and outreach is not a one size fits all model• Board’s direct in...
Recommendations for Board DiscussionFuture work Find fit between our initiatives and the Governor’s,    SAP, major initi...
Planning for the FutureDiscussion Between ChairSwearengin and Board
For updates and more information, visit:        www.sjvpartnership.org   www.facebook.com/sjvpartnership      www.smartval...
APPENDIX EValley Legacy, a Workforce Investment Act grant                 Progress Report                                 ...
Valley LegacyAligning Education with Future Workforce Opportunities
Dear Valley Citizens and Stakeholders,As the San Joaquin Valley is facing difficult economic times, it has become more cri...
Building the FoundationThe California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley(Partnership) was in a prime position to provi...
Transforming Education                                              that is designed to maximize success in passing standa...
University                                                                                               of the Pacific    ...
Deliverable 1                                                                            Central Valley Educational Leader...
Deliverable 2.1                                                                            Central Valley Educational Lead...
Deliverable 2.2Basic Education ProficiencyDigital LiteracyGoalBenefits and opportunities of technology are often unavailab...
Deliverable 3Business Incubation &Entrepreneurship DevelopmentGoalThe goal of the Lyles Center’s grant deliverable is to d...
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Provost report 2010 2011 final-

  1. 1. 2010-2011 Annual ReportOffice of Community and Economic Development
  2. 2. Table of ContentsSTAFF ................................................................................................................................................4OFFICE OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (OCED) .......................................................5 OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................................................... 5 Mission ................................................................................................................................................... 5 Goals ...................................................................................................................................................... 5 Programs................................................................................................................................................ 62010-2011 ACCOMPLISHMENTS .........................................................................................................8 PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................................................... 8 Fresno State Connect ............................................................................................................................. 8 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center ...................................................................................... 8 Smart Valley Places ................................................................................................................................ 9 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley ................................................................................. 9 Valley Legacy ....................................................................................................................................... 11 Small Business Development Center .................................................................................................... 11 Regional Jobs Initiative ........................................................................................................................ 11 Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program.............................................................. 12 ValleyInternships.com.......................................................................................................................... 12 Bulldog Academy ................................................................................................................................. 12 ADMINISTRATION......................................................................................................................................... 12 Improved Efficiencies ........................................................................................................................... 12 Additional Office Space ........................................................................................................................ 12 Technology ........................................................................................................................................... 13 HUMAN RESOURCES..................................................................................................................................... 13 COMMUNICATIONS/OUTREACH ..................................................................................................................... 14 New Programs and Brand Development ............................................................................................. 14 Social Media Development .................................................................................................................. 14 2
  3. 3. Reports ................................................................................................................................................. 15 Print Collateral and Presentation Materials ........................................................................................ 15 Speaking Engagements........................................................................................................................ 16 Contact Database ................................................................................................................................ 17 Websites .............................................................................................................................................. 17 Collaboration Tools .............................................................................................................................. 17 Media Relations ................................................................................................................................... 17 Co-Branding/Joint Communications .................................................................................................... 17LEGISLATION AND ADVOCACY ........................................................................................................................ 18GRANTS/FUNDING ....................................................................................................................................... 18 Grant Research and Dissemination ..................................................................................................... 18 Grants Awarded ................................................................................................................................... 18 Grants Pending .................................................................................................................................... 18 Sponsorships and Donations ................................................................................................................ 19APPENDIX A SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY RURAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER - INVITATION ................................................ 20APPENDIX B SMART VALLEY PLACES - FACT SHEET ......................................................................................... 21APPENDIX C SMART VALLEY PLACES - INVITATION TO LAUNCH EVENT ............................................................... 22APPENDIX D PRESENTATION - PARTNERSHIP BOARD MEETING, MAR 11, 2011 ................................................. 23APPENDIX E VALLEY LEGACY - PROGRESS REPORT .......................................................................................... 24APPENDIX F CAL VALLEY TECH IHUB PROPOSAL ............................................................................................. 25APPENDIX G INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATE PROGRAM - INVITATION ......................... 26APPENDIX H COMMUNICATIONS/OUTREACH - DIAGRAM ................................................................................ 27APPENDIX I OFFICE OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - FACT SHEET ................................................ 28APPENDIX J OFFICE OF COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - PRESENTATION ........................................... 29 3
  4. 4. StaffOffice of Community and Economic Development California State University, Fresno Mike Dozier | Interim Director Christine Nutting | Associate Director Jen Paul | Communications Director Melanie Allen | Administrative Coordinator Angelica Cano | Fiscal / Marketing Assistant Sally Cardell | Grants / Budget Analyst Stacie Dabbs | Public Affairs Manager Shelby Gonzales | Grants / Budget Manager Ismael Herrera | Program Manager Marcia Martin | Communications Coordinator 4
  5. 5. Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED)OverviewMissionAn on-campus division dedicated to aligning the University’s intellectual capacity and innovation-driveneconomic development initiatives to improve the competitiveness and prosperity of the region.Goals • Increase Economic Innovation throughout the eight-county region • Develop effective systems that promote Business and Industry Strategy • Enhance Public Policy in favor of the eight-county region • Create strategic partnerships focused on Community Development • Develop educational programs that empower the Leaders of tomorrowOur role is to link, align and leverage the University and its resources to the needs of the community,which is done through several programs. 5
  6. 6. ProgramsFresno State Connect: To further the University’s role in community engagement, the Office ofCommunity and Economic Development acts as the clearinghouse of information regarding theUniversity’s collective value and instrumental role in the local community and will identify and promoteFresno State’s extensive inventory of knowledge and experts who can fulfill the needs of business.San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center: Acting as a resource hub, the San Joaquin Valley RuralDevelopment Center facilitates technical assistance to underserved rural communities by connectingthem to an array of experts who can provide resources and solutions for fulfilling their communityneeds.Smart Valley Places: Building on the San Joaquin Valley Regional Blueprint and its smart growthprinciples and California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley and its six initiatives, Smart Valley Placesis our region’s road map to creating more transportation choices, equitable-affordable housing, 6
  7. 7. economic competitiveness, and healthier, safe and walkable neighborhoods. This will ultimately shapefuture growth trends that will impact not only the health and prosperity of the region, but the entirestate of California. www.SmartValleyPlaces.orgCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley: Set in motion in 2005 with an executive order fromGov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley is an unprecedentedpublic-private partnership sharply focused on improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of lifefor the 3.9 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home. The Partnership is addressing thechallenges of the region by implementing measurable actions on six major initiatives to help the Valleyemerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity. www.SJVPartnership.orgValley Legacy: The purpose of the Valley Legacy grant is to bring the San Joaquin Valleys K-12 system,higher education, and workforce investment board systems into alignment to better prepare youngpeople for occupations in high-growth industry sectors in the Valley including water technology,renewable energy, food processing, agricultural technology and biotechnology - all industries that areclosely tied to agribusiness, the heart of the regional economy - as well as manufacturing and supplychain management.Small Business Development Center: This is a collaborative partnership between the Office ofCommunity and Economic Development, University of California, Merced, and the Central ValleyBusiness Incubator. Together, these organizations provide an infrastructure to foster Small BusinessDevelopment Center (SBDC) activity, and reach businesses throughout the San Joaquin Valley. SBDCprovides one-on-one business consulting, workshops, research and online learning services.Regional Jobs Initiative: RJI is based on the idea that regional economies are made up of a series ofrelated industries, or clusters, which benefit one another. Since inception, 12 industry clusters havebeen formed with significant backing from industry leaders, supporting public agencies, and otherpartners. Leadership for the RJI coalition is coordinated by the Office of Community and EconomicDevelopment and key staff loaned from participating organizations. www.FresnoRJI.orgCal Valley Tech: CVT, an innovation hub (iHub), is managed by the Central Valley Business Incubator andpartnered with Merced County Department of Commerce, Aviation and Economic Development. Thiscollaboration grew out of the SBDC Partnership between CVBI, the University of California, Merced, andthe Office of Community and Economic Development. The CVT iHub leverages assets such as researchparks, technology incubators, universities, and federal laboratories to provide an innovation platform forstartup companies, economic development organizations, business groups, and venture capitalists. Thisservice gives greater access to key partners and resources for technology transfer and commercializationas well as positions CVT as the sole iHub in the region. There are a total of 12 iHubs throughoutCalifornia. caltechvalley.comIntroduction to Economic Development Certificate Program: A collaborative project between theCalifornia Academy for Economic Development and California State University, Fresno –UniversityBusiness Center, Division of Continuing and Global Education, and Office of Community and EconomicDevelopment. This program is for new professionals entering the field of economic development,existing professionals, elected officials, and community leaders who want to advance their career andbetter serve their community. www.csufresno-econdev.org 7
  8. 8. ValleyInternships.com: Research shows that connecting college students to meaningful internshipopportunities increases the chance they will stay in our community after graduation. By strengtheningthe connection between our local colleges and universities and the San Joaquin Valley businesscommunity, we are creating a mechanism where college students can obtain meaningful internshipswith local employers. ValleyInternships.com is a collaborative effort to facilitate connections betweenthe highly regarded educational institutions and businesses within the Valley region.www.ValleyInternships.comBulldog Academy: Fresno State is nationally recognized and plays a significant role in our community;however, it is difficult for the public to get involved. Who do you contact? Where do you go on campus?The purpose of the Bulldog Academy is to provide a forum where people can come learn about how theUniversity works, what the different functions are for the various colleges, review some of theUniversity’s research and applied knowledge abilities, and show the public its strategic direction.2010-2011 AccomplishmentsProgram DevelopmentFresno State Connect• Program plan has been developed.• Implementation plan has been developed.• University asset inventory is in development; leveraging existing technologies is being explored.• Implementation is in progress.• Website is on hold as University Communications is transitioning website templates.San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center• San Joaquin Valley Redevelopment Center officially launched Feb. 25, 2011, at a Small Communities Network quarterly workshop in Livingston, Calif. (Appendix A) o More than 90 representatives of regional rural communities were in attendance. o The event was video recorded and distributed to regional rural community leaders and stakeholders. To view the recording, click here (note: playlist contains 6 videos).• California Coalition for Rural Housing awarded a $5,000 contract in April 2011 to administer Small Communities Network and connect member communities to technical assistance and resources, as needed. o Facilitated Small Communities Network work group conference calls for regional rural community leaders and stakeholders:  May 11, 2011- Central Valley Health Policy Institute presentation "Exploring the Relationships Between Place and Health Inequity in Californias Heartland"  June 8, 2011- GRID Alternatives presentation “Solar Affordable Housing Program” o Facilitated Small Communities Network quarterly workshop focused on providing regional rural community leaders and stakeholder information, solutions, and innovations on water and wastewater infrastructure, June 24, 2011, Corcoran, Calif.• Activities included in the following grant applications: o James Irvine Foundation grant pending submission July 2011 o EDA Economic Adjustment Assistance grant submitted June 2011 8
  9. 9. o USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture grant submitted March 2011 o HUD Rural Innovation Fund grant submitted February 2011 o USDA Rural Community Development Initiative grant submitted December 2010• Within one year, number of partnering organizations increased from 12 to 24.• 15 rural communities have received some level of technical assistance since October 2010.• 3 organizations provided presentation to a regional Community Service District on next steps for modernizing their water infrastructure.• Monthly planning meetings have occurred since October 2010.• On May 26, 2011, accomplishments were featured during a panel presentation at the “Place Matters” conference hosted by the Central Valley Health Policy Institute in Fresno, Calif.• Marketing materials developed and distributed to limited number of regional rural community leaders and stakeholders.• Website is in development; launch is dependent upon availability of funding.• Continued to assist U.S. Department of Agriculture with resource mapping for rural communities.Smart Valley Places• More than 20 partners including 14 cities and several nonprofit organizations. (Appendix B)• Work plan developed and approved by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).• 14 Cities Planning Projects initiated.• Community Leadership Program initiated.• Invited to and participated in Living Cities Boot camp in Boston, Mass.• Held a Smart Valley Places Launch event with California State University, Fresno, regional partners and funding agencies. (Appendix C)• Website developed and launched; maintenance plan set up with consultant.• Through request for proposal (RFP) process, The Planning Center | DC&E was hired to staff the Smart Valley Places governing body (Compact Executive Committee) through the course of the grant, bringing with it the expertise of Bill Fulton.• Developed Consortium Agreement that was approved by HUD, all 19 members of governing body.• Launched HUD’s Preferred Sustainability Status program in the San Joaquin Valley and processed several requests from Valley partners to make them eligible for additional grant application bonus points.California Partnership for the San Joaquin ValleySecretariat• Awarded a $4 million regional planning grant under the federal Sustainable Communities Initiative in late 2010. Smart Valley Places was officially launched in February 2011 along with 14 Valley cities, four regional nonprofit organizations, California State University, Fresno, the Regional Policy Council and the California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation. See Smart Valley Places section for additional information.• Created and launched the Sustainable Communities Work Group, with leadership provided by the San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council, to address regional land use and transportation issues and challenges.• Established the San Joaquin Valley Housing Collaborative as the new Housing Work Group and assisted with the reorganization of the Board of Directors to assure active regional participation in addressing the Valley’s housing challenges. 9
  10. 10. • Worked with Valley stakeholders to support the state’s application for additional funding for high- speed rail in the Valley.• Initiated monthly conference calls with federal and state legislative staff to discuss issues and challenges of regional importance and maintain open communication between Valley stakeholders and our elected officials.• Invited by California Emerging Technology Fund to apply for a California Public Utilities Commission Regional Consortium grant to further broadband and information technology deployment throughout the Valley. Applying to become Regional Broadband Consortium.• Conducted Partnership Board reboot as all board members were re-appointed or newly appointed. Conducted strategic planning session with the Board.• Implemented the Partnership Communications Plan, which provides a strategy for promoting the efforts and successes of the Partnership throughout the Valley by making presentations to leading public and private organizations, preparing and distributing informational material, and maintaining an up-to-date website and social media sites. Please see the Communications/ Outreach section for additional information.• Coordinated four quarterly Board meetings. (Appendix D)Work Groups• Obtained millions of dollars in funding for the San Joaquin Valley to support air quality goals ($300 million of Prop 1B funding alone).• San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework completed October 2009.• Initiated convergence of interests between five Bay-Delta counties, eight Valley counties, with San Joaquin County serving as “hinge county; historical first – all 12 counties worked proactively together on common water policy issues.• Increased utilization of advanced communications services (ACS) by all residents through several digital literacy programs throughout the Valley.• Built upon ACS infrastructure for telemedicine and eHealth to promote other applications for education and economic development to increase access and affordability.• San Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization formed partnerships and helped Valley jurisdictions receive support from energy block grant funding from the Department of Energy and California Energy Commission.• Valley Clean Air Now “Tune In-Tune Up” program established to reduce mobile source pollutants generated by older "out of tune" cars. Results indicate a cost effectiveness of $1,524 per ton of reduced exhaust emissions.• Conducted three Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conferences in January of 2009, 2010, 2011.• Within the Economic Development Work Group, the Lyles Center executed community college entrepreneurship programs and established a Technology Development unit to work with early stage entrepreneurs.• For the first time in the Valley, brought together higher education institutions to increase college- going rates in the region and generate awareness of higher education opportunities.• Completed regional Preschool Assessment and Planning project. 10
  11. 11. Valley Legacy• 20 partnering agencies• 10 leadership meetings• Midway report published in March 2011 to insure the pilot program was recorded; 500 copy distribution. (Appendix E)• Video produced to promote this collaborative approach to education transformation; distributed through various marketing channels; has had 170 views. To view, click here.• Second video currently in production to capture program participants, their experience in the program and how it has impacted their lives.• Opportunities for sustainability, once the grant ends, are being reviewed with all grant team leaders.• Continued with implementation of a two-year $2 million Workforce Investment Act grant from the governor’s 15% discretionary fund.• Report and video provided to Valley legislators and community stakeholders for educational purposes and to build a foundation for future funding requests.Small Business Development Center• Assisted in promoting training events and resources.• Facilitated Governor’s Business Matchmaking Event in Fresno.• Participated in planning Valley Small Business Awards Luncheon.• Received an additional year of funding to be fiscal administrator for regional Small Business Development Center (SBDC).• Invited to participate in SBDC’s accreditation process.• Worked with Central Valley Business Incubator to expand incubation services throughout the SBDC boundaries.Regional Jobs Initiative• Hosted three RJI Implementation Team Meetings.• Published quarterly industry cluster reports.• Increased cross-cluster collaboration efforts.• Continued to enhance the participation of rural communities within the RJI.• Implementation Team attended two strategic planning sessions for purpose of how to best support the evolution of the RJI.• RJI Network continues to track legislative initiatives and policy development pertinent to Fresno County and the targeted industry clusters.• During the year, a comprehensive core committee was formed for the Tourism Cluster which is made up of members from various agencies and sectors including Aquarius Aquarium Institute, California Restaurant Association – Fresno Chapter, City of Clovis, City of Fresno, Clovis-Fresno Convention & Visitors Bureau, County of Fresno, East Side Municipal Government, Fresno Chaffee Zoo, Fresno Coalition for Arts, Science & History; Fresno Hotel/Motel Association, Fresno State, Fresno Yosemite International Airport, National Parks Service, Shaver Lake Chamber of Commerce, and West Side Municipal Government.• During the year, International Center for Water Technology in partnership with Central Valley Business Incubator secured a Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board grant to continue the work of the Water Cluster. The grant provides funding to continue the annual Career Expo, Supervisor Training, cluster meetings and member recruitment. 11
  12. 12. Cal Valley Tech• Continue to explore funding opportunities for the iHub and its partners. Funding is intended for aligning the activities of Cal Valley Tech iHub with focus on Blue Tech (water and energy), and Agriculture teaching.• Wrote and re-submitted iHub proposal with a focus on Water, Energy and Ag-Tech, July 2010. Proposal was accepted. (Appendix F)• Participated in monthly iHub meetings.Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program• Hosted a successful inaugural program. (Appendix G)• Certified 40 graduates.• Website developed.• Promotion materials developed and distributed.• Coordinated planning for second course to be Oct. 17-20, 2011.ValleyInternships.com• Partnered with International Center for Water Technology to leverage portal.• Donations received to offset development costs.• Website in progress.Bulldog Academy• Program developed.• Implementation plan developed and in progress.• Met with key University leadership.• Presentations in development.• Website in development.• Registration in development.AdministrationImproved EfficienciesDuring the 2010-11 Program Year, OCED standardized operating procedures were updated, with anemphasis on fiscal and marketing /communications processes. Additionally, hired Grants and BudgetAnalyst as the volume of grants we received has increased greatly; we want to ensure we remaincompliant while also preparing for future funding requests. The Associate Director and the Grants andBudget Manager worked diligently to review internal process, design new systems around grantcompliance and internal monitoring, develop a new budget and expense tracking system, create afinancial forecasting system, develop subcontracting management processes for allocating time andcosts, and developed a sponsorship and donation program to allow for, and assist in, managing thesefunds.Additional Office SpaceDue to the receipt of several grants, additional staff became necessary this year. Additional space wasprovided on campus to house the OCED fiscal department. 12
  13. 13. TechnologyThis year OCED encountered several opportunities to enhance our use of technology. As systemschanged on campus, the necessity for new computers became apparent. Most of the office computershad to be updated to be compliant with university standards. Most of the costs were billed to grants sothe fiscal impact was minimal. However, staff reported their ability to do their jobs more efficiently hasincreased. Additionally, a new copier was leased that improved output. However, we were able tonegotiate a cheaper price saving our office several thousands of dollars a year.Human ResourcesThe OCED office recognizes that healthy employees make a successful organization and have adoptedthe following ‘culture statement’: The OCED team prides itself on an entrepreneurial atmosphere, producing Quality work. We are committed to promoting an environment in which perspectives are understood, respected, and valued. An essential component of this atmosphere is teamwork. OCED consists of highly trained, forward-thinking teammates integral to our continued success. Through the free-flow sharing of information in an open and honest manner the team is able to maintain high-quality outcomes and be helpful and supportive to one another.The current and new staff at OCED is recognized throughout the community for their leadership roleswith the various projects. Balancing professional development opportunities for staff is a high priority,as several staff members have recently, or, are currently obtaining advanced degrees. 13
  14. 14. Communications/OutreachThe communications team continues to build and fine-tune the communications management system toensure effective outreach and communications with key stakeholders throughout the Valley. OCED has amultidimensional communications platform that has significantly enhanced outreach, education andcommunity relationship management. (Appendix H)New Programs and Brand DevelopmentThis academic year, numerous new programs were developed and launched. Each program requiredbrand development to ensure clear and effective communications. The Smart Valley Places brand wasdeveloped, and special attention was given as it is part of the California Partnership for the San JoaquinValley’s family of brands. This also is true for the new program ValleyInternships.com. These twoprograms are eight-countywide and support the Partnership’s six initiatives. A logo, website, socialmedia, letterhead, boiler plate, and fact sheet were created for each program.Other new programs include Fresno State Connect, Bulldog Academy, San Joaquin Valley RuralDevelopment Center and the Introduction to Economic Development Certificate Program. In an effort toadhere to communications guidelines of California State University, these programs incorporate theFresno State gold medallion and other university requirements. All these materials were approved byUniversity Communications prior to dissemination.Social Media DevelopmentCurrently, the OCED manages four Facebook profiles: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley,Regional Jobs Initiative, Smart Valley Places, and Coalition for a California Financial Workout Plan. Eachpage has seen an increase in “likes” over the past months, as OCED has tried to ensure moreconnectivity among its various communications outlets. Each has acquired “fans”: Partnership - 404, RJI- 332, SVP - 83 and California Coalition - 60.As of June 1, 2011, Facebook reported 500 monthly active users on the Partnership page alone.Likewise, our last post yielded 334 impressions – or instances – that Facebook users had access to thepost. Data based on June 1, 2010, and June 1, 2011, shows that the California Partnership for the SanJoaquin Valley Facebook page has fans in various countries, including Italy, Costa Rica, Canada, Uruguayand Germany. This is incredibly important as our department looks to expand its impact and scope.OCED also has increased its Twitter presence. Currently, three of our initiatives have profiles on thesocial networking site: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley, Regional Jobs Initiative andSmart Valley Places. We’ve begun using Twitter as a two-way resource – to push out information to ourfollowers as well as connect to similar organizations and news media for relevant issues.Similarly, our department has begun transmitting information in video format. In the last year, both aYouTube and a Vimeo account were created to allow followers to experience our information in amultitude of systems. In the next year, using a combination of all of the aforementioned formats andnetworks, the OCED communications team hopes to connect with a younger demographic and look forand foster opportunities of more interaction with the public. 14
  15. 15. Through analytics it is clear that these channels provide an additional method of reaching desiredaudiences while creating a two-way conversation.Facebook:• www.facebook.com/sjvpartnership• www.facebook.com/fresnorji• www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces• www.facebook.com/cafinancialworkoutplanTwitter:• www.twitter.com/PartnershipSJV• www.twitter.com/FresnoRJI• www.twitter.com/SVP_CAYouTube:• www.youtube.com/OCEDFresnoVimeo:• www.vimeo.com/OCEDFlickr:• www.flickr.com/partnershipwiaReportsTwo annual reports were published during the 2010-2011 academic year: California Partnership for theSan Joaquin Valley and Regional Jobs Initiative. Each report was a comprehensive communication piecewhich discussed activities of the initiative, accomplishments and future plans. Each external stakeholderand community partner was represented and acknowledged for their contribution to the collaborative.Annual reports were disseminated throughout the Valley including to community leaders, academicleaders and public elected officials, and private and public agencies.Print Collateral and Presentation MaterialsAs community outreach and education is one of the primary functions of OCED, significant time wasdedicated to producing print collateral and presentation materials. A key focus this past year was todevelop communication pieces on OCED and how each program aligns, links and leverages to meet theoffice’s five goals. (Appendix I) An overview of OCED and its various programs was developed to increasecommunication and understanding of the office’s role within the university and community. As printmaterial and a PowerPoint presentation (Appendix J), these tools will be essential as OCED continues toapply for grant funding, foundation support and new partnerships.Additional print collateral and presentation materials were developed and distributed for the SanJoaquin Valley Rural Development Center, Smart Valley Places, California Partnership for the San JoaquinValley, Regional Jobs Initiative, ValleyInternships.com, and the Introduction to Economic DevelopmentCertificate Program. 15
  16. 16. Speaking Engagements07.28.10 CALED Professional Advisory Service, Lompoc, provide three-day review and recommendation of Economic Development Program08.09.10 Atwater City Council, Atwater08.19.10 Tulare County Association of Governments, Tulare08.19.10 Clovis Area Brokers, Clovis08.25.10 Economic Development Corporation Business Matchmaking, Fresno10.11.10 Introduction to Economic Development Course, Economic Development Strategy Presentation, Fresno10.13.10 Central California Society for Information Management, Fresno10.21.10 Decision Maker Roundtable Discussion: Strategies for a Resilient and Prosperous Fresno, hosted by the Local Government Commission, Fresno10.22.10 Valley Land Use Conference, Clovis Veterans Memorial Building, Clovis11.09.10 Fresno County Board of Supervisors, Fresno11.10.10 Governors 2010 Small Business Conference, Panel Moderator, Fresno11.18.10 Leadership Clovis, Economic Vitality Day, Fresno - Presentation11.18.10 Leadership Fresno, Regional Collaboration Presentation, Fresno01.04.11 Rural Innovation Fund meeting, Firebaugh01.07.11 Rural Development Center meeting with City of San Joaquin, San Joaquin01.10.11 Agriculture Research Services, Agriculture Technology Innovation Program meeting, Chair01.11.11 Fresno State - Student Affairs Roundtable, Fresno01.13.11 Center for Advanced Research & Technology Annual Showcase, Clovis01.21.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center meeting, City of Tranquility01.27.11 Team Selma meeting, Selma02.01.11 Valley One Voice, Sacramento02.14.11 Testimony before the House Sub-Committee on Rural Development, Washington DC02.16.11 Smart Valley Places launch, California State University, Fresno02.25.11 Small Communities Network/Rural Development Center Launch, Livingston03.04.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center meeting, City of Easton, Easton03.09.11 Stockton Chamber of Commerce REXPO Conference, Moderator, Stockton03.17.11 Career Expo, Fresno03.25.11 San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center Presentation - San Joaquin Valley Regional Policy Council, Fresno Councils of Government, Fresno03.30.11 Federal Agencies Task Force for Strong Communities/Strong Cities, Fresno04.15.11 Mega Region Summit, Panel Presentation, Oakland04.28.11 CALED Conference, Panel Presentation05.06.11 Broadband Conference, Panel Presentation, Clovis05.17.11 Small Business Association Small Business Awards, Introduction of Key Note Speaker05.27.11 Tulare County Economic Development Corporation Annual Meeting, Key Note Speaker06.21.11 Regional Broadband Consortium Meeting, Presentation06.23.11 UC Merced Small Business Development Center Annual Planning Retreat, Participation 16
  17. 17. Contact DatabaseThe database organizes stakeholders by sector and industry. Through various strategies, includingcontact lists for each program and the “sign-up” function through the website, potential stakeholdersmay become involved in various programs. OCED currently has 5,224 stakeholders in the database.Increasing the number of stakeholders is a priority for OCEDWebsitesOCED manages several websites which continue to be improved and connected throughout the cybercommunity. The communications team consistently updates for relevance, including an active calendaras well as a document library with pertinent reports, board agendas and minutes, and additionalresource documents.Additionally, social marketing has been integrated into the websites to insure maximum utility andimpact.Collaboration ToolsIntranets were developed to increase the collaboration and education for the various grants OCEDmanages.Media RelationsTraditional methods of communication efforts with the media will continue including press releases,media advisories, and editorial content and interviews. All OCED programs have received considerablemedia recognition for its work. OCED also has partnered with University Communications to leverageresources and insure maximum impact.08.13.10 3rd Quarter Board Meeting – Tulare County, August 2009.16.10 NSP – not as easy as 1-2-3, Neighborhood Stabilization Program10.14.10 San Joaquin Valley awarded $4M, Smart Valley Places11.17.10 4th Quarter Board Meeting – Madera County, December 311.26.10 Bakersfield Californian. Opinion: Ah, but some Valley cities are trying (Interview in Fresno)03.03.11 1st Quarter Board Meeting – San Joaquin County, March 1103.22.11 Valley Legacy has Successful First Year04.18.11 New coordinator appointed for Smart Valley Places – Compact Executive Committee06.27.11 Media Advisory: California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Board Meeting, Kings County, July 1106.30.11 2nd Quarter Board Meeting – Kings County, July 11Co-Branding/Joint CommunicationsAligning OCED’s communication efforts with other community organizations and with UniversityCommunications is an ongoing objective. By engaging organizations throughout the eight-county region,this will broaden OCED’s outreach and increase the brand’s credibility. OCED will continue to encourageprogram partnerships and co-branding aligned events with appropriate organizations while ensuring thevarious programs are given public recognition for its role. 17
  18. 18. Legislation and Advocacy• Participated in Fresno County’s One Voice and the Regional Policy Council’s Valley Voice trips to Washington, D.C. and Sacramento to advocate for programs and funding to benefit the RJI, the• Partnership and the OCED.• Served as a guest host for several Maddy Forum weekly radio shows on KFSR 90.7FM, the University radio station.• Advocated for several programs and efforts throughout the region with letters of support from OCED, the RJI and/or the Partnership.Grants/FundingWe are pleased to report that OCED generated external support in fiscal year 2010-2011. Please notethat the grants awarded funding goes directly to pay for expenses related to that grant. They do notinfuse additional capital into our office. However, they do offset some fixed costs the OCED bears at apro-rated amount.Grant Research and DisseminationOCED continuously researches grant opportunities for the benefit of OCED, collaborative opportunitiesand community partners. Identified grants are disseminated to partners.Grants Awarded• $1,000,000 – Valley Legacy Grant for Integrated Workforce Development Strategy for Regional Industry Clusters in the San Joaquin Valley. This $2 million grant covers a two-year period at $1 million a year (November 2009 through March 2012). The funding source is Workforce Investment Act and Workforce Investment Area discretionary. OCED receives $270,000 a year to administer the grant; we are in the last year.• $4,000,000 – Smart Valley Places is a regional planning grant provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as part of the federal Partnership for Sustainable Communities to create a regional plan for sustainable development for the San Joaquin Valley. This is a three-year grant administered by OCED in partnership with 14 cities and numerous partners. This grant was launched Feb. 1, 2011.• $5,000 – Small Communities Network• $5,000 – Income for the Introduction to Economic Development Certificate program• $43,000 – Small Business Development CenterGrants Pending• $150,000- (a year, for three years) California Public Utilities Commission Regional Consortium Grant.• $250,000- (a year, for three years) Private funding for the support of unfunded activities of the Partnership and Secretariat from the James Irvine Foundation.• $75,000- Private funding for the sustainability of the San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center from the Wells Fargo Foundation.• $250,000- (a year, for three years) U.S. Economic Development Administration grant for the sustainability of the Partnership, Broadband and San Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center. 18
  19. 19. Sponsorships and Donations• Partnership Board Meeting Sponsors 2010-2011 02.26.10 Kern County Board of Supervisors 05.21.10 Merced County Association of Governments 08.20.10 City of Tulare, City of Visalia, International Agri-Center, Tulare County Association of Governments, Tulare County Economic Development Corporation 12.03.10 Central Valley Independent Network, Madera County Board of Supervisors 03.11.11 Greater Stockton Chamber of Commerce, Kaiser Permanente Central Valley, San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors, Valley CAN• $500 Valley Internships• We are exploring privatization programs, specifically fee-for-service and sponsorships and donations to better use University resources. 19
  20. 20. APPENDIX ASan Joaquin Valley Rural Development Center Invitation 20
  21. 21. SAVE THE DATE! Small Communities Network Workshop #4 Introducing the Rural Development Center February 25, 2011 Livingston, CACalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and CaliforniaCoalition for Rural Housing are proud to sponsor an interactive day designed to shape the future of the RuralDevelopment Center: a consortia of more than 15 partner organizations dedicated to providing technicalassistance and capacity building to small cities and unincorporated communities in the San Joaquin Valley andfoothills. We hope you’ll join us. Registration is free and lunch is included. Rural Development Center Partners• California Association for Local Economic Development• California Coalition for Rural Housing• Center for Economic Research and Education of Central California• Center for International Trade Development, State Center Community College District• Construction Management Program, College of Engineering, Fresno State• Community and Regional Planning Center, Fresno State• Central Valley Business Incubator• Fresno Area Hispanic Chamber of Commerce WHY SHOULD YOU• Fresno County Council of Governments COME TO THIS WORKSHOP?• College of Health and Human Services, Fresno State This workshop will provide a chance to• Office of Community and Economic Development, Fresno State have one-on-one conversations with the• University Business Center, Fresno State above mentioned partners to access essential assistance for your community. The Rural Development Center is still Workshop Sponsors taking shape and the partners’ ultimate goal is that it serves the needs of YOUR communities.Please contact us with any questions or to receive registration information:Felicity Lyons, California Coalition for Rural Housing916-443-4448, felicity@calruralhousing.orgIsmael Diaz Herrera, Office of Community and Economic Development, Fresno State559-294-6023, isherrera@csufresno.edu
  22. 22. APPENDIX BSmart Valley Places Fact Sheet 21
  23. 23. FACT sheet February 2011Overview concentrated poverty andSmart Valley Places is an unemployment with a predominantlyunprecedented consortium of 14 low-skilled and poorly educatedurban cities from throughout the workforce; neglected ruraleight-county region of the San Joaquin communities; severe deficits ofValley, California, in partnership with affordable and diverse housingfour regional nonprofit organizations, opportunities; undiversified andCalifornia State University, Fresno, the uncompetitive urban economies;California Central Valley Economic very poor air quality and significantDevelopment Corporation, and the water supply and quality issues; withSan Joaquin Valley Regional Policy a sprawling growth pattern of low-Council which represents all eight density, auto-dependent suburban-Metropolitan Planning Organizations oriented development that continuesin the San Joaquin Valley. It is to consume significant amounts ofcoordinated by the California irreplaceable farmland. Smart Valley Places represents the commitment that will guide the cities in the SanPartnership for the San Joaquin Valley and much needed capital required to Joaquin Valley for the next 20 plus(Partnership), and driven by the reverse these harsh interdependent years. Through a number of innovativeCompact of 14 San Joaquin Valleycities with populations of 50,000 or realities that have long plagued the components there will be realistic,greater. Building on the Partnership’s San Joaquin Valley and create an sustainable urbanization plans thatStrategic Action Proposal and the San attractive place to live, work and bridge jurisdictions by focusing growthJoaquin Valley Regional Blueprint’s do business. in urban areas to preserve agriculturesmart growth principles, Smart and minimize suburbanization, plusValley Places is the region’s roadmap Outcomes address local and regional mass transit,to creating more transportation With a $4 million Sustainable energy and housing issues.choices, equitable-affordable Communities Initiative Regionalhousing, economic competitiveness, Planning Grant awarded by the Additionally, through the work of theand healthier, safe and walkable U.S. Department of Housing and partnering nonprofit organizations,neighborhoods, ultimately shaping Urban Development in partnership the region will benefit from thefuture growth trends that will impact with the U.S. Department of implementation of a regional plan fornot only the health and prosperity Transportation and the U.S. civic engagement to build technicalof the region, but the entire state of Environmental Protection Agency, understanding of smart growth andCalifornia. the Smart Valley Places consortium implementation capacity amongThe San Joaquin Valley has long will ultimately create a single local leaders, government staff andsuffered as an area of significant integrated plan for regional growth stakeholders, particularly in low- income and minority communities. Smart Valley Places, in conjunction with the substantial federal investment to begin California’s high-speed rail system in the San Joaquin Valley, truly is the region’s opportunity to transform itself and demonstrate that the San Joaquin Valley is the key to California’s healthy, prosperous and sustainable future.
  24. 24. February 2011 SAN JOAQUINCompact Cities Project COUNTY Lodi StocktonLodi: Climate Action Plan and Implementation; MantecaDevelopment Code Update and Implementation; Lower ModestoMokelumne River Watershed Stewardship Plan Implementation STANISLAUS Turlock COUNTY MERCED MADERAStockton: Climate Action Plan, Implementation, and Related COUNTY Merced COUNTYSustainable Programs. FRESNO COUNTYManteca: General Plan, Land Use, Conservation and Safety Element Clovis FresnoUpdate; Climate Action Plan and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory;Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan Update TULARE COUNTYModesto: General Plan Amendments to Land Use and Circulation Elements Visalia TulareTurlock: Comprehensive General Plan Update/EIR; Downtown Design Hanford Porterville KINGS COUNTYGuidelines and Zoning Regulations Update DelanoMerced: Form Based Zoning CodeMadera: Development of Master Infrastructure Plans and Water Management Plan with KERN COUNTYIntegrated Water Reclamation StrategiesClovis: Comprehensive General Plan UpdateFresno: General Plan, Development Code and MEIR Update and I-PLACE3S GIS TechnologyVisalia: Community Outreach Newsletter Distribution and Community Workshops; Third Year General Plan UpdateConsultant Funding; Expanded Light Rail Connectivity PlanTulare: Transit-Oriented Development ProjectPorterville: Economic Development Strategic Plan; Update and Develop New Design Standards and Specifications;High-Density Housing Upzone ProgramHanford: Downtown East Precise PlanDelano: Green Building Program; Healthy Delano and Wellness Element to the General Plan; Sustainable DelanoElement to the General PlanRegional PartnersRegional Policy Council For more information:Community and Regional Planning Center Mike Dozier, DirectorCalifornia Central Valley Economic Development Corporation Office of Community andCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Economic Development California State University, Fresno 5010 N. Woodrow Ave.Community Leadership Partners Suite 200, M/S WC142California Coalition for Rural Housing Fresno, CA 93740Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (559) 294-6021 Office (559) 294-6024 Office FaxLocal Government CommissionAmerican Farmland Trust www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces www.smartvalleyplaces.org
  25. 25. APPENDIX C Smart Valley PlacesInvitation to Launch Event 22
  26. 26. The Office of the Provost at California State University, FresnoInvites You to Join Us as We LaunchSmart Valley Places Smart Valley Places is an unprecedented consortium of 14 urban cities from throughout San Joaquin Valley, four regional nonprofits, and California State University ,Fresno. It is federally funded by a $4 million Sustainable Communities Initiative Regional Planning Grant awarded to the San Joaquin Valley, together with California Central Valley Economic Development Corporation, and the San Joaquin Regional Policy Council, to ultimately create a single integrated plan for regional growth that will guide Valley cities for the next 20 years and beyond.Wednesday, February 16, 20114:30 to 7 p.m.Smittcamp Alumni House at California State University, FresnoMap/DirectionsRegister Now | Space is LimitedPlease register no later than Tuesday, February 1, 2011.Capacity for this event is 120 guests.Registration will only be accepted online.For more information, contactJen Pauljenpaul@csufresno.edu559.294.6021
  27. 27. APPENDIX DCalifornia Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley Presentation - March 11, 2011 Board Meeting 23
  28. 28. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley
  29. 29. The Partnership• Unprecedented public-private partnership – focused on improving the region’s economic vitality and quality of life for the 4 million residents who call the San Joaquin Valley home• Addressing the challenges of the region by implementing measurable actions – on economic, environmental, and social levels to help the San Joaquin Valley emerge as California’s 21st Century Opportunity
  30. 30. History• Partnership was formed June 2005 with Executive Order by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger• Led by an appointed, diverse and experience-rich Board• Engaged hundreds of people in the eight-county San Joaquin Valley to focus on action strategies• Created 10-year Strategic Action Proposal in October 2006• Governor Schwarzenegger and the State Legislature approved $5 million in the State Budget for 2006-2007 to jump-start implementation of the Strategic Action Proposal
  31. 31. OrganizationThe Partnership Is Focused On Action Through Ten Work Groups:• Advanced Communications Services• Air Quality• Economic Development• Energy• Health and Human Services• Higher Education and Workforce Development• Housing• PreK-12 Education• Sustainable Communities• Water Quality, Supply and Reliability
  32. 32. The Opportunity• The Partnership’s six major initiatives: 1. Grow a diversified, globally competitive economy supported by a highly skilled workforce; 2. Create a model K-12 public education system; 3. Develop high-quality health and human services; 4. Attain clean air standards; 5. Implement an integrated framework for sustainable growth; and 6. Build a 21st Century transportation mobility system.
  33. 33. The Partnership’s Six Initiatives
  34. 34. The San Joaquin ValleyComprises eight countieswith 62 cities
  35. 35. Evolution of the Partnership2009• New Executive Order issued extending the Partnership indefinitely.• Original $5 million award expended. Work Groups and Secretariat reviewed ways to streamline and retool work plans.• New administrative staff assumed Secretariat role.2010• Received $2 million Valley Legacy Grant which funds, in part, 7 Work Groups and Secretariat.• Some Work Groups Re-organized.• Adopted Board meeting emphasis on private sector needs.Q1, 2011• Received $4 million Smart Valley Places Grant.• Change in Governor, Board Executive Committee and Board Seats.• Review again SAP, Work Group goals and Conveners.
  36. 36. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Advanced Communication Services (ACS)Supporting Agency: Great Valley CenterAccomplishments:• Increased utilization of ACS by all residents through several digital literacy programs throughout the Valley.• Built upon ACS infrastructure for telemedicine and eHealth to promote other applications for education and economic development to increase access and affordability.Future Goals:• Increase the availability of affordable ACS in rural and other underserved areas by working with providers and organizations.• Seek funding to support new ACS initiatives and programs in order to increase digital literacy and broadband access throughout the Valley.
  37. 37. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Air QualitySupporting Agency: The Maddy InstituteAccomplishments:• Obtained millions of dollars in funding for the San Joaquin Valley to support goals ($300 million of Prop 1B funding alone).• The Valley Clean Air Now’s (“CAN”) “Tune In-Tune Up,” was established to reduce mobile source pollutants generated by older, "out of tune" cars. Early results indicate a cost effectiveness of $1,524 per ton of reduced exhaust emissions.Future Goals:• Achieve U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 by the current date, or as soon as practicable thereafter.• Implement incentive mechanisms to accelerate adoption of air quality mitigation technologies.
  38. 38. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Economic DevelopmentSupporting Agency: California Central Valley EconomicDevelopment Corporation (CCEDC)Accomplishments:• Aggressively promoted Central California as an attractive business location through various trade shows, trade missions, an e-newsletter, the web and a direct mail campaign.• Within the ED Work Group, the Lyles Center executed community college entrepreneurship programs and established a Technology Development unit to work with early stage entrepreneurs.Future Goals:• Foster innovation and entrepreneurial ventures.• Foster growth in the cluster industries.
  39. 39. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: EnergySupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Clean EnergyOrganization (SJVCEO)Accomplishments:• SJVCEO was established in 2007 and incorporated in 2008.• SJVCEO formed partnerships and helped Valley jurisdictions receive support from energy block grant funding from the Department of Energy and California Energy Commission.Future Goals:• Continue to support jurisdictions energy block grant funded efforts.• Host forums with Valley Stakeholders to strengthen the ability of the Valley to compete on competitive clean energy proposals.
  40. 40. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Higher EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Higher Education Consortium(CVHEC)Accomplishments:• Brought together higher education institutions in the Valley for the first time to increase college-going rates in the region and generate awareness of higher education opportunities.• Increased availability of information and resources to students and parents.Future Goals:• Coordinate a regional approach at San Joaquin Valley community colleges to enable students to more easily complete degree requirements at member institutions.• Maintain and grow collaboration among CVHEC participating institutions to continue development of college-going culture.
  41. 41. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: HousingSupporting Agency: San Joaquin Valley Housing CollaborativeAccomplishments:• Hosted Several events throughout the Valley to educate and assist residents and community leaders dealing with the foreclosure crisis and affordable housing issues.• June 2010: SJVHC was approved as a 501 (c)(3) and became the lead for the Partnership Housing Workgroup.Future Goals:• Look for ways to be financial self-sustaining: this may include a fee for membership structure and also will include going after bank foundation grants and other philanthropic funding.• Continue work to stabilize housing economy in the San Joaquin Valley.
  42. 42. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: PreK-12 EducationSupporting Agency: Central Valley Educational LeadershipInstitute (CVELI)Accomplishments:• Held three Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conferences were held in January 2009, 2010 and 2011.• Completed regional Preschool Assessment and Planning project.Future Goals:• Continue annual Exemplary Practices in Education Leadership Conference as need and partner/sponsor support continues.• County offices of education continue to monitor achievement gains and school and district needs, and continue to collaborate on priority academic issues: early childhood education, academic achievement/closing the achievement gap, supporting English Learners, and preparing students for college and careers.
  43. 43. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Sustainable Planning (formerly Land Use,Agriculture and Transportation work groups)Supporting Agency: SJV Regional Policy CouncilAccomplishments:• Developed a SJV Regional Blueprint.• Developed a SJV Regional Goods Movement Action Plan.Future Goals:• Develop a Regional Transit action plan, including prioritization of projects. Identify and secure funding sources.• Facilitate endorsement of Blueprint Roadmap Implementation Strategy. Encourage counties and cities to update local General Plans consistent with Regional Blueprint. Integrate Regional Blueprint principles into related policy activities.
  44. 44. Work Group AccomplishmentsWork Group: Water PolicySupporting Agency: California Water InstituteAccomplishments:• San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework completed October 2009.• Convergence of interests between 5 Bay-Delta counties and 8 San Joaquin counties. San Joaquin County serving as the “hinge” county.Future Goals:• Complete Phase II San Joaquin Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan Framework. Work funded by federal government.• Continue Delta Counties – San Joaquin Valley “finding common ground” water policy engagement.
  45. 45. AccomplishmentsSecretariat:• Tracking and communication of ARRA funding• Development of the Rural Development Center (RDC)• Received award for two major grants• Awarded iHub designation• Developed multi-media platform• Leverage and integrate the Partnership with other initiatives within the Office of Community and Economic Development
  46. 46. Strengths Developed• Recognized regionally as a voice for the Valley: regional, bi-partisan and inclusive• Large but can be agile• Demonstrated accomplishments and early wins• Known for “getting things done”• Excellent cross collaboration• Dedicated, diverse and effective thought leaders, drivers and connectors, aligning their resources toward common goals• Board members represents the goals of the Partnership regardless of their agency or employer• Strong administrative infrastructure in place
  47. 47. Presence in the Valley Smart Rural Valley Outreach SAP – Individual Valley High Legacy Work County Places (46 Speed Rail Grant Groups Support Grant incorporated, 220 (12 sites over 7(14 cities in 8 counties) unincorporated, counties) cities) SECRETARIAT Funded Support Unfunded Support 1. Fiscal management 1. Communications - and reporting internal and 2. Grant external administration 2. Event planning 3. Board and Work Group support 4. Legislative support
  48. 48. Challenges and Constraints• Perception that we are another layer of governance• Perception of “Fresno-centric”• Resource and fiscal constraints – Secretariat – less horizontal support available – Work Groups – less vertical goal implementation and administrative support, i.e. disbanding of the HHS Work Group• Inherent “only child syndrome” – less sharing of toys and the sandbox throughout region and agencies• With so many moving parts, keeping both internal and external communications effective and streamlined can be difficult
  49. 49. Lessons Learned• Discuss natural conflicts• Communication and outreach is not a one size fits all model• Board’s direct involvement and representation with the work groups and grants/initiatives is essential• Need a sustainability plan, including obtaining unrestricted funds• Administrative resources and constraints need to be a fit for the goals of the Board and what it takes to accomplish them
  50. 50. Recommendations for Board DiscussionFuture work Find fit between our initiatives and the Governor’s,  SAP, major initiatives, future direction, relationships to buildCommunications Re-engage Work Groups and Conveners Re-convene the HHS Work Group Board members are Partnership Ambassadors Continue to utilize Secretariat Communications and Summit to position our strength in the minds of stakeholdersLeverage Resources Develop an ad-hoc “Funding/Development Committee” Develop an Advisory Committee Create a Sustainability Plan
  51. 51. Planning for the FutureDiscussion Between ChairSwearengin and Board
  52. 52. For updates and more information, visit: www.sjvpartnership.org www.facebook.com/sjvpartnership www.smartvalleyplaces.org www.facebook.com/smartvalleyplaces
  53. 53. APPENDIX EValley Legacy, a Workforce Investment Act grant Progress Report 24
  54. 54. Valley LegacyAligning Education with Future Workforce Opportunities
  55. 55. Dear Valley Citizens and Stakeholders,As the San Joaquin Valley is facing difficult economic times, it has become more critical thanever before that we as a region continue our collaboration efforts. Through the CaliforniaPartnership for the San Joaquin Valley, the public and private sectors are driving towardimproving the quality of life for our residents. Valley Legacy, a Workforce Investment Areagrant, funded by the Economic Development Department, is another effort that the regionhas entrusted the Partnership to implement while maximizing and leveraging availableresources.Valley Legacy is a year into its two-year development plan. Developing a solid infrastructureand ramping up these programs was a vital step, which is evident by the early successesillustrated throughout this halfway report. These accomplishments are not the Partnership’salone, and, therefore, we do not celebrate them alone. We have the privilege and benefit ofpartnering with passionate individuals and organizations whose work ethic and dedicationfor the Valley is the driving force toward improving our region on multiple fronts. We haveexperts and volunteers investing their time and talents, and they are truly making a difference.Thanks to their efforts, the promise of the Partnership is being fulfilled and the Valley’s futureworkforce is being prepared for unique, challenging opportunities.Mike Dozier, SecretariatOffice of Community and Economic DevelopmentCalifornia State University, FresnoThe WIA grant is funded by:
  56. 56. Building the FoundationThe California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley(Partnership) was in a prime position to provide the necessaryplatform for the implementation of Valley Legacy. Since 2007,the Partnership, its board and the 10 existing work groupshave had demonstrated success by building a multidimensionalprivate/public partnership. With an established infrastructure,common goals, and an existing administration unit in place,the Partnership provided an open system fully prepared tomaximize the Valley Legacy opportunity through synergy andstewardship.A key component of the Partnership is its Secretariat, theadministration unit. The Office of Community and Economic The Office of Community andDevelopment (OCED) at California State University, Fresno Economic Development atserves as the Secretariat, driving initiatives and acting as the California State University, Fresnocommunications hub for the Valley. OCED is the Partnership’s www.csufresno.edu/OCED/index.shtmlExecutive Staff and has a significant role in Valley Legacy.• Ensure action plans are developed and implemented.• Act as the fiscal agent for more than 20 subcontractors and provide administrative services.• Manage all internal and external communications and reporting.• Leverage resources by connecting grant subcontractors to numerous external partners.Through the unity of the Partnership and the executivestaffing of OCED, this grant will assist in the coordination ofeducation and training efforts of the K-12, Higher Education,Economic Development, and Workforce Developmentpartners. Valley Legacy is preparing the Valley’s futureworkforce for high-wage, high-demand jobs in the targetedindustry sectors. This is done through 20 sub contractors,including 7 of our existing Partnership work groups. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 1
  57. 57. Transforming Education that is designed to maximize success in passing standardized tests. That’s a worthy goal; but most students come out of highThe purpose of Valley Legacy is to bring the San Joaquin school with no preparation for careers in the Valley. Most ofValley’s K-12 system, higher education, and workforce those who don’t go on to college end up at some low-paying,investment board systems into alignment to better prepare dead-end job. Some students then go to the County Workforcepeople for occupations in high-growth industry sectors in the Investment Boards (WIBs) which act as a ”second-chance”San Joaquin Valley. system to train people for jobs with career advancement; but the WIBs receive funding to assist only a small percentage• Agribusiness, including food processing and biotechnology of those who apply. What needs to be improved is the “first-• Water technology chance” system.• Renewable energy• Manufacturing High-school students need to graduate with options: the option• Supply chain management to go to a 4-year college; to go to a community college; enter directly into the Valley workforce; or even to start their ownIn the current K-12 system, young people receive an education business. 2 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  58. 58. University of the Pacific Stockton Stockton Adult School Waterford SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY High School Ceres Waterford Ceres STANISLAUSDeliverables Adult School Patterson COUNTY Patterson MERCED High School COUNTYValley Legacy utilized the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Los Banos MADERA Sanger Pacheco COUNTYgrant to develop 12 demonstration projects positioned High School High School Sanger Reedleythroughout the Valley: FRESNO Reedley City College COUNTY1. Sector-Based Articulation: This is a fully coordinated Corcoran TULARE COUNTY academic and training program — from high schools KINGS Pixley through colleges and universities — which provides a Corcoran COUNTY Pixley Adult School High School curriculum with the rigor and relevance needed to yield Delano Union Delano qualified employees with immediate value for targeted Elementary KERN COUNTY industry sectors. Bakersfield Bakersfield Demonstration Sites: College • Corcoran High School • Patterson High School • Sanger High School2. Basic Education Proficiency: There are two workforce- 4. Green Economy & Workforce: This ensures that the readiness programs that address areas of significant green economy and workforce are part of this new deficiency in the Valley: English Language Learners and occupational development in the Valley, consistent with Digital Literacy. the needs of agribusiness, the goals of AB 32 — the Demonstration Sites: Global Warming Solutions Act, the air quality goals of the • Ceres Adult School Partnership and the energy independence goals of the San • Delano Union Elementary Joaquin Valley Clean Energy Organization. • Pacheco High School • Pixley Adult School • Stockton Adult School • Waterford High School3. Business Incubation & Entrepreneurship Development: “The purpose of Valley Legacy is This establishes a network of entrepreneurship development programs; E-Centers will focus on the to demonstrate success and then targeted regional industries. institutionalize this first-chance Demonstration Sites: system throughout the Valley.” • Bakersfield College • Reedley City College Peter Weber, Board Member • University of Pacific California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 3
  59. 59. Deliverable 1 Central Valley Educational Leadership InstituteSector-Based Articulation California State University, FresnoGoalThe purpose of the Sector-Based Articulation project is todemonstrate best practices in high school career and technicaleducation (CTE) programs in high-priority industries. The “We are grateful to have so manyparticipating high schools and programs are: collaborators in this project, including school districts, colleges, local• Corcoran High School (Kings County): Renewable Energy Workforce Investment Agencies, and Ag Manufacturing programs• Patterson High School (Stanislaus County): Agribusiness industry representatives serving as and Logistics and Distribution and Management programs guest speakers, advisory members• Sanger High School (Fresno County): Biotechnology and and field trip sites, and collaborating Ag Manufacturing programs groups helping to provide information and support to the schools andExpected Impact students.”Through the support of a dedicated project coordinator withexpertise in high school career pathways, and the addedresources of collaborating industry representatives, each site will Marcy Masumoto, EdDhave developed and/or enhanced their programs to the greatest Project Directorextent possible. Students are exposed to critical elements of Central Valley Educationaleach of the industries, gaining career-related skills, and learning Leadership Instituteabout the potential job market and requirements for success to California State University, Fresnoenter the workforce and/or higher education.Successful ComponentThe projects are being documented by a university researchteam and will be showcased at the regional 2012 ExemplaryPractices in Education Conference in January and describedin a case study that will identify the critical steps involvedin exemplary articulated career exploration programs. Othereducators will learn from the successes and pitfalls encountered.In addition to the experiences and knowledge participatingstudents will have gained, the case study will be a significantoutcome as high schools face reductions in funding for CTEprograms and increased pressures to focus solely on academics.These programs will be examples to others of what is possiblewith limited resources and time. 4 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  60. 60. Deliverable 2.1 Central Valley Educational Leadership InstituteBasic Education Proficiency California State University, FresnoEnglish Language LearnersGoalThe purpose of this deliverable is to demonstrate best practicesin English language development for English Learners throughEnglish Learner Institutes (ELI) in two high schools and “A unique feature of this workone adult school. The intent of each ELI is to enhance the in the high schools is a ‘studentacademic program for English Learners (EL) to better prepare voice’ leadership component for ELthem for the workforce and/or higher education, with each students who support their peers insite potentially serving as a “demonstration project” for otherschools. attaining higher levels of academic achievement through improvementParticipating schools include: planning and activities that positively• Ceres Adult School (Stanislaus County) impact English Learners on their• Pacheco High School (Merced County) campuses.”• Waterford High School (Stanislaus County)Expected Impact Marcy Masumoto, EdDCentral Valley Educational Leadership Institute at California Project DirectorState University, Fresno, the lead agency, is working with Pivot Central Valley EducationalLearning Partners to strategically improve the systems and Leadership Instituteinstruction for EL in participating sites. Through data analysis California State University, Fresnoand process improvement, and professional development and www.csufresno.edu/cvelicoaching of site and teacher leaders, project staff help theschools make significant changes in their instructional practicesto improve the academic success of EL. Goals are (1) to supporteducators at participating adult and high schools as they workto close the achievement gap, and (2) to support EL students asthey obtain English proficiency and excel academically.Successful ComponentThe local Workforce Investment Agencies in Stanislaus andMerced counties have been partners in this project and haveprovided significant support with enrollment and supportservices for students and their families. They also have providedrelevant career exploration, job preparation and industry-related information to help students understand how to pursuea career and/or higher education, how to look for and apply forjobs, and the value of being bilingual in the workplace. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 5
  61. 61. Deliverable 2.2Basic Education ProficiencyDigital LiteracyGoalBenefits and opportunities of technology are often unavailableto rural communities located in the San Joaquin Valley.National, state and local leaders have expressed concern that “Valley Legacy understands thelarge parts of rural America are losing out on jobs, economic importance of the Internet anddevelopment, emergency preparedness and civic participation high-speed technology trainingbecause of inadequate access to the Internet. To increase the as an effective tool for economicutilization of technology and decrease barriers, Valley Legacyworks to increase the knowledge and use of computers and development. We are honored to bethe Internet in three Valley communities — two rural largely a part of this effort to educate andHispanic communities: Delano, Kern County, and Pixley, train Valley residents with the goal ofTulare County; and one urban community: Stockton, San improving their quality of life.”Joaquin County. Dejeune SheltonExpected ImpactProgram students learn to: access the Internet, creating and Interim Directorusing email accounts and social networking sites; use various Great Valley Centersoftware applications such as Word and Excel; write a business www.greatvalley.orgplan; build a resume; look for work and submit job applicationsonline; set up and use online banking; and enroll andparticipate in distance learning courses to further educationand business training. Desired impacts of the program includeincreased collaboration and communication between localschool districts, Workforce Investment Boards and otherresource organizations; the facilitation of lifelong learning;improved economic status; and an improved general quality oflife. A successful component of this model includes the amountof communication coming from the California Partnershipfor the San Joaquin Valley and the partners involved in ValleyLegacy. Through team meetings, email updates and phone calls,there is a strong understanding of the program, team work,development of new partnerships, and fluid communication,which ensures program success.Successful ComponentThe success of this program is evident through the people itserves. Numerous students have completed the program andnow have computer skills. They can communicate onlinewith family members through webcam, email and use it to dohomework. 6 California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY
  62. 62. Deliverable 3Business Incubation &Entrepreneurship DevelopmentGoalThe goal of the Lyles Center’s grant deliverable is to developand implement two-year demonstration EntrepreneurshipCenter (E-Center) sites. E-Centers will serve to build support “The impact of this effort is significant.for small businesses and business start-ups by providing The Lyles Center, along with eacheducation resources and coaching, mentoring and referral of these sites and communityservices for entrepreneurs in the regions being served. partners, are preparing individualsExpected Impact across the Central Valley to pursueEntrepreneurship is a foundational strategy for economic self-employment, leading to thedevelopment and self-sufficiency in the San Joaquin Valley. It emergence and growth of more smallprovides individuals with a greater degree of control over their business startups; which will lead usemployment situation. Students are motivated to continue their into economic recovery.”education when presented with the opportunity to start theirown businesses. Students, especially those from disadvantagedor underrepresented backgrounds, turn to entrepreneurship as Genelle Taylortheir best opportunity to create success for themselves utilizing Associate Directortheir talents and the best of their abilities. Entrepreneurship Lyles Center for Innovation andprovides the opportunity for self-employment in a region that Entrepreneurshiphas not, historically, attracted Fortune 500 companies. www.lylescenter.comSuccessful ComponentThe Lyles Center established an Entrepreneur Pathway programthree years ago. The Pathway program has been successfulin building curricula, classroom content, and communitysupport for the delivery of knowledge, skills, and actionsfor students seeking self-employment. The program is builtaround curricula and learning that has explicit and standardknowledge delivered in the class setting with programs designedto build entrepreneurial skills. E-Center development is anatural progression from the efforts and relationships alreadydeveloped. Some of the training workshops include: BusinessPlan Overview, Management, Leadership, Operations,Accounting/Bookkeeping and Marketing & Sales/Service. California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley | VALLEY LEGACY 7

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