What if we treated
violence like a disease?
Charlie Ransford
Senior Researcher, Cure Violence
UIC School of Public Health
New Scientific Understanding of Violence
Violence has the 3 characteristics of an epidemic disease
1. Violence clusters - ...
Child Abuse Victims Becoming Abusers
30%
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
Community Violence Increases Post War
(WW1 & WW2)
Com...
Social Learning
Modeling
Mirror Neurons
Social Norms
Scripts
Neurological Effects
Desensitization
Hyper-arousal
Stress
Mod...
Cure Violence Epidemic Control Model
Using trained public health workers to detect
and mediate potentially lethal conflict...
Cure Violence Use of Crime Data
Shootings & Killing 2007-2010 Shootings & Killing 2011
Cure Violence Model Proven Effective
3 Independent Multi-year Evaluations
City
(study period)
# of Sites
Evaluated
Reducti...
CANADA
MEXICO
BRAZIL
TRINIDAD
COLOMBIA
SOUTH
AFRICA
YEMEN
KENYA
EGYPT
IRAQ
ENGLAND
JAMAICA
PUERTO RICO
ISRAEL/
PALESTINE
A...
Charlie Ransford
ransford@uic.edu
CureViolence.org
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Charlie Ransford - Cure Violence

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Charlie Ransford - Cure Violence

  1. 1. What if we treated violence like a disease? Charlie Ransford Senior Researcher, Cure Violence UIC School of Public Health
  2. 2. New Scientific Understanding of Violence Violence has the 3 characteristics of an epidemic disease 1. Violence clusters - like a disease Cholera Violence 2. Violence spreads - like a disease Influenza Violence 3. Violence is transmitted - through exposure, modeling, social learning, and norms.
  3. 3. Child Abuse Victims Becoming Abusers 30% 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Community Violence Increases Post War (WW1 & WW2) Combat Nations Non- Combat Nations #of Nations Increase Decrease No Change 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 1 2Chronic Exposure No/Low/Moderate Exposure Chronic Exposure to Community Violence Associated with Perpetration Exposure to Violence Perpetration of Violence Probabilityof PerpetratingViolence
  4. 4. Social Learning Modeling Mirror Neurons Social Norms Scripts Neurological Effects Desensitization Hyper-arousal Stress Modulating Factors Dose Prior immunity Context Age 1 2 3 4 What Is Known About The Transmission of Violence?
  5. 5. Cure Violence Epidemic Control Model Using trained public health workers to detect and mediate potentially lethal conflicts Using highly trained outreach workers to identify those at highest risk for violence and provide treatment to change behavior over the short and long-term Reversing social pressure so that violence is no longer expected and accepted 1. Detect & Interrupt Transmission 2. Change Behavior of Highest Risk 3. Change Norms
  6. 6. Cure Violence Use of Crime Data Shootings & Killing 2007-2010 Shootings & Killing 2011
  7. 7. Cure Violence Model Proven Effective 3 Independent Multi-year Evaluations City (study period) # of Sites Evaluated Reduction in Shootings Chicago (2000-2008) Baltimore (2007-2010) New York (2009-2011) 7 4 1 -41% to -73% -34% to -44% -20% 1 1 2 Compared to previous rate Compared to expected value based on control trend 1 2
  8. 8. CANADA MEXICO BRAZIL TRINIDAD COLOMBIA SOUTH AFRICA YEMEN KENYA EGYPT IRAQ ENGLAND JAMAICA PUERTO RICO ISRAEL/ PALESTINE ADAPTATION PARTNERS EXPLORING PARTNERSHIPS HONDURAS SYRIA Cure Violence Model Being Replicated Across the Globe 8 countries, 22 cities UNITED STATES (15 cities)
  9. 9. Charlie Ransford ransford@uic.edu CureViolence.org

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