Urban Geographies

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  • Investigating pupils perceptions of what they consider to be a typical seaside landscape.
  • Consider the physical geography of Brighton in order to explain its development as a settlement.
  • By the 1820s, the town had spread beyond the limits of the unenclosed strips which meant that opportunities were available for the grander crescents and terraces. Kemp Town was started in 1823- but not completed until much later, as a result of economic difficulties. Thomas Kemp fled the country to escape his creditors. By the end of the 19th century, these grand houses were already too big and were being converted into flats.
  • The Cultural Quarter- Royal Pavilion, the Brighton Dome, the Theatre Royal and the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery.
  • Urban Geographies

    1. 1. What processes help establish an urban area? How does land use change within Brighton? How has Brighton changed over time? What are the factors responsible for causing change in Brighton? How is the built environment connected to the growth of Brighton as a resort and centre for consumption?
    2. 2. The North Laine : Growth determined Cultural by the field system Gay Quarter Chain store Brighton retail Grand 19th century expansion The Lanes : The original Tudor fishing town Tourist/Expensive The Royal Retail Pavilion and Continued growth the of the city fashionable area
    3. 3. Think about the physical setting...
    4. 4. Tourist/Expensive Retail
    5. 5. ‘The Bohemian Quarter’ Growth determined by the field system
    6. 6. The Fashionable Area
    7. 7. Wealth
    8. 8. ‘Pink Pound’- high levels of income and evidence of both gentrification and cultural landscapes. The high concentration of gay people in Brighton might be unusual, but is not unique. E.g. Canal Street area of central Manchester and parts of Soho in London.
    9. 9. Chain store retail

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