Cathy Casserly keynote, IIT Design Strategy Conference
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Cathy Casserly keynote, IIT Design Strategy Conference

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  • 1. You became designers because you want to change how things work. And you’re good at that. Whether it’s creating a stool that doubles as a rocking chair (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jamesmcbennett/this-stool-rocks) or a rickshaw that’s more affordable and safer (http://www.flickr.com/photos/d-lab/4316738419/), you’re in the business of changing how things work and how people think about things.
  • 2. You’re uniquely able and positioned to change how your employers and clients work. Designers have a special ability to recognize problems in systems and find ways to improve them. That’s literally what you were hired to do. If change is going to come in your companies and clients, it’s going to start with you.
  • 3. You know the value of sharing ideas with others. One thing I love about working with designers is that I get a team of 1000 for the price of one. I’m getting not just your expertise, but that of everyone you’ve ever worked with and shared ideas with, be it formally or over drinks. Sharing is central to what designers do.
  • If we look at these three assumptions - you’re good at effecting change, you’re well positioned to make change happen in your companies, and you play well with others - an idea starts to emerge. What if you became the instigators to your clients thinking differently about sharing and collaboration? What if the people sitting in this room became the conduits for your clients to collaborate with each other?
  • This presentation can really be summed up in a single idea: something very interesting happens when you expand your pool of collaborators. We all have the group of 5 or 10 people that we bounce ideas off of. But what happens if you think of your pool of collaborators as being more than just your Skype contacts? What if you expand your pool of potential collaborators to everybody?
  • Franklin Stove Benjamin Franklin quote: “ ...As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours, and this we should do freely and generously.” Benjamin Franklin didn’t restrict other people from using his design because he wanted other people to build on it and improve it. His designs are still being iterated on. In that way, he was joining a team of collaborators that’s still collaborating with him today.
  • (Might want to ask how many people in the audience are familiar and tailor accordingly.) Introduction to CC licenses In most countries, ARR is the default But the internet is all about sharing Legally sound way to explicitly give permission for certain types of sharing, reuse, and remixing. It’s the law catching up with how the internet actually works.
  • * Over 100 CC affiliates in over 70 countries • There’s no way to know exactly how many CC-licensed works are in the world, but we estimate around half a billion and growing • We work with lawyers around the world to make CC licenses globally applicable.
  • CC licensing provides for a pool of resources that can be mixed, remixed and combined. Video: We just recently announced four million CC-licensed videos on Youtube Wikipedia: 19 million articles in 270 languages In Open Access repositories that we track, 23+ million articles That doesn’t include all repositories, or every OA journal. The bottom line: each of these fields values from CC licensing, but there’s a greater value in their ability to share with and borrow from each other. Interoperability: Compatible metadata standards, so users can find and sort data across different fields. The complexities of copyright law are only one part of the problem, and CC licensing is one part of the solution.
  • Fiat Put out a call for design ideas. All ideas submitted were published under CC BY, the most open CC license. They can be used by anyone, even Fiat’s competitors. Resulting concept car, Fiat Mio. This car wasn’t produced commercially, but elements from it were used in later releases Quote: "You may have an R&D department, but there are an awful lot of people that think about this differently or are better qualified. Tapping them as resources means that your company can come with up better ideas—and have more insight into how to exploit those ideas, test their viability, and put them into production." -Carl Esposti http://www.inc.com/guides/201109/how-to-crowdsource-your-resarch-and-development.html Transition: This quotation raises an interesting question: where do you draw the line between collaborators and competitors? If you’re sharing your designs with everyone, how do you make money? Transition to:
  • Article in Inc. about the Mio. Quote: "You may have an R&D department, but there are an awful lot of people that think about this differently or are better qualified. Tapping them as resources means that your company can come with up better ideas—and have more insight into how to exploit those ideas, test their viability, and put them into production." -Carl Esposti http://www.inc.com/guides/201109/how-to-crowdsource-your-resarch-and-development.html Transition: This quotation raises an interesting question: where do you draw the line between collaborators and competitors? If you’re sharing your designs with everyone, how do you make money? Transition to:
  • DesignSmash Produces products based on community-generated designs All designs are licensed BY-SA or BY-NC-SA, though they prefer allowing commercial reuse. Quote: “There should be no reason for preventing people with the resources to produce [our] products doing so. They tend to be the people most invested in how the processes of production relate to the quality of the object. They offer excellent and necessary critical feedback.” But the majority of customers don’t have access to the kind of manufacturing equipment DesignSmash has access to. Letting others use the design doesn’t reduce sales; it builds new opportunities. http://opendesignnow.org/index.php/case/designsmash-enlai-hooi/ Transition: Both of these examples illustrate how the economy is changing. How creative people make money is changing. DesignSmash realized that they were more successful when they didn’t have a monopoly on their products than they were when they did. But that doesn’t mean that there’s one solution for everyone. Transition to:
  • Jonathan Worth British portrait photographer; has photographed lots of famous people - Heath Ledger, Jude Law, Jessica Simpson. When he realized that he couldn’t stop people from copying his photos on the internet, he decided to start encouraging them to instead, by CC-licensing them. Are you trying to operate under a model that doesn’t work anymore? http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/35884
  • WikiHouse Designs produced and shared by a community, under a CC license. Parts can be manufactured on a CNC machine, and assembled by a team of two or more people. Growing movement, prototype houses being built around the world. New model for urban development around the world. And it’s only possible because people are willing to share their designs. Quote from Alastair Parvin: “ WikiHouse is a small answer, but it ’ s a bloody big question. ”
  • Change in a company can happen in a lot of different ways. Sometimes it’s a top-down change; more often, it’s a million little good ideas bubbling up.
  • Sometimes change comes from the boardroom, but
  • More often it comes from a room like this, with people trying and experimenting. (Get a cheap laugh by mentioning Boba Fett in the background) Not everyone here can change your company’s course of direction, but everyone can pilot a simple project to show what’s possible when you try open.
  • Hashtag #tryopen We’re going to save your tweets and follow up with you in two months.

Cathy Casserly keynote, IIT Design Strategy Conference Cathy Casserly keynote, IIT Design Strategy Conference Presentation Transcript

  • Try Open Cathy Casserly, Ph.D. CEO, Creative Commons May 15, 2013
  • Speakers like to make assumptions about their audiences. Here are mine.
  • 1. You became designers because you want to change how things work.
  • 2. You’re uniquely able to change how your employers and clients work.
  • 3. You know the value of sharing ideas with others.
  • Carl Jones
  • This presentation can be summarized in a single idea. Something very interesting happens when you expand your pool of collaborators.
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Emerson Alecrim
  • The Case for Letting Your Customers Design Your Products (Sep 20, 2011)
  • DesignSmash
  • Me as supplier doesn’t work. I used to think that my product was photographs, and that was it. It doesn’t work that way. I can’t control my images on the internet. When I stopped trying to do that, it changed the way that I thought about myself and what I do. — Jonathan Worth, photographer
  • Javier Leiva
  • The challenge
  • Eli Sagor
  • Harold Maduro
  • #tryopen
  • CC Cathy Casserly, Ph.D. cathy@creativecommons.org CC BY 3.0
  • Glowbox revisited (literally) http://www.flickr.com/photos/_belial/384657786/ Carl Jones, CC BY-NC 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/ Account of the new invented Pennsylvania fire-places http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Account_of_the_new_invented_Pennsylvania_fire- places_by_Benjamin_Franklin.jpg Benjamin Franklin, Public Domain http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/ Salão do Automóvel 2010 http://www.flickr.com/photos/ealecrim/5132832991/ Emerson Alecrim, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ _DSC6770 http://www.flickr.com/photos/designsmash/5192729534/ Tony Sojka, DesignSmash CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ Ouisharefest | Wikihouse http://www.flickr.com/photos/catorze/8711543790/ Javier Leiva, CC BY 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ The boardroom http://www.flickr.com/photos/esagor/6938330534/ Eli Sagor, CC BY-NC 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/ Sketching http://www.flickr.com/photos/morinoko/6035746823/ Harold Maduro, CC BY-NC 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/