CCNA 3 Chapter 8   Spanning Tree Protocol By Your Name
Objectives <ul><li>Redundant topologies </li></ul><ul><li>Spanning Tree Protocol </li></ul>
Redundancy Redundant networking topologies are designed to ensure that networks continue to function in the presence of si...
Redundant Topologies <ul><li>A goal of redundant topologies is to eliminate network outages caused by a single point of fa...
Redundant Switched Topologies
Broadcast Storms
Multiple Frames Transmission
MAC Database Instability In a redundant switched network ,  it is possible for switches to learn the wrong information. A ...
Spanning   Tree Protocol
Bridging Loops for Redundancy
Spanning   Tree
Spanning-Tree Costs
Spanning-Tree Operation <ul><li>One root bridge per network .   </li></ul><ul><li>One root port per nonroot bridge . </li>...
Selecting the Root Bridge Bridge protocol data unit  (BPDU)
Spanning-Tree Port States
Spanning-Tree Recalculation A switched internetwork has converged when all the switch and bridge ports are in either the f...
Rapid Spanning   Tree Protocol <ul><li>Clarification of port states and roles  </li></ul><ul><li>Definition of a set of li...
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Spannig tree

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Spannig tree

  1. 1. CCNA 3 Chapter 8 Spanning Tree Protocol By Your Name
  2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Redundant topologies </li></ul><ul><li>Spanning Tree Protocol </li></ul>
  3. 3. Redundancy Redundant networking topologies are designed to ensure that networks continue to function in the presence of single points of failure.
  4. 4. Redundant Topologies <ul><li>A goal of redundant topologies is to eliminate network outages caused by a single point of failure. </li></ul><ul><li>All networks need redundancy for enhanced reliability. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Redundant Switched Topologies
  6. 6. Broadcast Storms
  7. 7. Multiple Frames Transmission
  8. 8. MAC Database Instability In a redundant switched network , it is possible for switches to learn the wrong information. A switch can learn that a MAC address is on a port when it is not.
  9. 9. Spanning Tree Protocol
  10. 10. Bridging Loops for Redundancy
  11. 11. Spanning Tree
  12. 12. Spanning-Tree Costs
  13. 13. Spanning-Tree Operation <ul><li>One root bridge per network . </li></ul><ul><li>One root port per nonroot bridge . </li></ul><ul><li>One designated port per segment . </li></ul><ul><li>Nondesignated ports are unused . </li></ul>
  14. 14. Selecting the Root Bridge Bridge protocol data unit (BPDU)
  15. 15. Spanning-Tree Port States
  16. 16. Spanning-Tree Recalculation A switched internetwork has converged when all the switch and bridge ports are in either the forwarding or blocked state.
  17. 17. Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol <ul><li>Clarification of port states and roles </li></ul><ul><li>Definition of a set of link types that can go to forwarding state rapidly </li></ul><ul><li>Allowing switches, in a converged network, to generate their own BPDUs rather than relaying root bridge BPDUs </li></ul>The Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, IEEE 802.1w, will eventually replace the Spanning Tree Protocol, IEEE 802.1D.
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