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Writing standards hs day2_participant[1] Writing standards hs day2_participant[1] Presentation Transcript

  • Day 2 October 18, 2011 WRITING STANDARDS WORKSHOP FOR HIGH SCHOOL
    • Examine a rigorous lesson using the Writing Standards Instructional Procedure.
    • Demonstrate, step-by-step, techniques for developing a strong persuasive response using the Writing Process.
    • Explore several sentence-manipulating mini-lessons.
    • Mini-lessons “Who Says that Middle School Writing Can’t Be Fun?”
    OBJECTIVES
    • Reflection on NCTE Policy Brief
    • Due October 18
    • Provide a short reflection on ways you will incorporate and implement what you have learned about effective writing practices.
    • Things that make you go Ummmm!??!
    • How will this policy brief impact your writing instruction?
    FOLLOW-UP ASSIGNMENT View slide
  • REVIEW OF BEST PRACTICES FOR TEACHING WRITING
    • Create an inviting classroom.
    • Establish Writing Workshop routines that meet
    • everyday.
    • Teach Writer’s Craft techniques using the Writing
    • Process and students’ developmental writing needs .
    • 4 . Provide opportunities for authentic writing .
    • Provide diverse reading materials modeling the
    • importance of craft and ideas (mentor or stimulus
    • text).
    View slide
  • REVIEW OF BEST PRACTICES FOR TEACHING WRITING
    • Make teacher and peer response an ongoing and integral part of writing instruction.
    • Provide opportunities for discussions including conferences, peer conferences and author’s chair.
    • Students should revise after conferring with peer readers.
    • 10 . Create a safe environment for students to
    • share their work.
  • THE BEST OF THE BEST…
    • Conduct effective writing mini-lessons on a targeted craft or skill by structuring it so that students may:
    • Observe
    • Discuss
    • Simulate
  • ACTIVITY: WRITING NOTEBOOK OR FOLDER Where are student folders stored? How is evidence of the writing process shown in student work? How is the work graded or assessed?
  • DEVELOPING A RIGOROUS WRITING LESSON Changes to FCAT Writing 2012 NGSSS Writing Application NGSSS Conventions NGSSS Writing Process
  • DEVELOPING A RIGOROUS WRITING LESSON NGSSS End Products NGSSS Writing Process put into practice Resources
    • Vicki Spandel (2005) coined the phrase “sentence stalking” to identify any text that can teach a writer about any aspect of writer’s craft.
    • Look for great mentor text in:
    • McDougal Littell Literature anthology
    • Professional writing
    • Well-written student sentences
    FINDING MENTOR TEXT
  • THINGS TO CONSIDER DISTRICT RESOURCES
    • Pacing Guide Week 14
    • Match passages from the
    • literature anthology to
    • targeted skill(s).
    • 3. Consider the End Product
  • MODEL 9 TH GRADE WRITING LESSON
  • MENTOR TEXT OR STIMULUS TITLE
    • Read and analyze the mentor text
    STEP 1
    • Locate the author’s main claim. Find examples of opinion statements and examples where the author supports his claim with experience and observations.
    • Find 2 examples where Mathabane effectively uses the rhetorical device of parallelism in the essay.
    • Analyze the essay for persuasive techniques.
    • Summarize the argument in this article.
    READ AND ANALYZE THE MENTOR TEXT
    • Develop a general idea
    STEP 2
  • ACTIVITY: AT YOUR TABLE GROUP DISCUSS POSSIBLE ISSUES. JOT DOWN IDEAS. Banning cells phone use on school property Banning junk food sales on school property Texting while driving Choose an issue you feel strongly about. Write a persuasive essay in which you explain the issue and attempt to persuade your reader to agree with your point of view.
    • On your paper identify a Goal – Issue – Audience you would like to write about.
    • Prewriting
      • Listing
    • Planning
      • Using graphic organizers
      • Sketching
    • Beginning Techniques
    • Ending Techniques
    ACTIVITY: DEVELOP A GENERAL IDEA Goal Issue Audience   For       Against      
    • Narrow the topic
    STEP 3
  • NARROW THE IDEA Texting while driving lol no im nt bsy im only drving State laws Traffic accidents Teenage drivers
    • Statistics
    • Examples
    • Observations
    • Anecdotes
    • Quotations
    WAYS TO SUPPORT YOUR ARGUMENT
    • Why do you feel the way you do about the issue?
    • What facts, statistics, examples, quotations, anecdotes, or expert opinions support your view?
    • What reasons will convince your readers?
    • What evidence can answer their objections?
    ACTIVITY: ARGUMENTS FOR - AGAINST For Against Statistics Examples Observations Anecdotes Quotations
    • Use emotional appeals wisely. Ask a peer reader which of your reasons are strongest and which are weakest.
    • Underline words or phrases that are so emotionally charged or extreme that they may cause readers to dismiss your entire message.
    • Body parts were strewn across the highway; the remains of the teens were unidentifiable! What fool would text and drive?
    • OR …
    • Two local high school students tragically died this weekend when the driver was distracted by a text message. Clearly, the families are devastated.
    USE SOUND REASONING AND EVIDENCE
    • Single Sentence Syndrome
    • My first car was the best car in the world. My Mustang was bright blue. It was very powerful. All my friends were jealous when they saw it. They wanted to drive it. I told them they couldn’t. I said that they could be passengers or pedestrians. They didn’t want to walk. They always chose to be passengers.
    MINI-LESSON – SENTENCE COMBINING My first car was the best car in the world. My Mustang was bright blue Student sentences Common words Revision #1 My bright blue Mustang was my first car, and the best in the world.
    • Single Sentence Syndrome
    • (1) My first car was the best car in the world. My Mustang was bright blue. (2) It was very powerful. All my friends were jealous when they saw it. They wanted to drive it. (3) I told them they couldn’t. I said that they could be passengers or pedestrians. (4) They didn’t want to walk. They always chose to be passengers.
    • Possible revision
    • My bright blue Mustang was my first car, and the best in the world. All my friends were jealous when they saw it, because it was very powerful and they wanted to drive it. I told them that they could be passengers or pedestrians. Since they didn’t want to walk, they always chose to be passengers.
    ACTIVITY – SENTENCE COMBINING
    • Plan together
    STEP 4
    • A thesis is the claim you are making either FOR or AGAINST the issue.
    • The thesis belong in the introduction.
    • Write a position statement for both sides of an issue.
    ACTIVITY: DEVELOP YOUR THESIS
    • Revisit your cluster diagram.
    • Who might object?
    • Possible objections?
    • My arguments for and against?
    TALK TO YOUR PEER READER Sitting in traffic Reporting accident Witness crime Ability to multitask
    • Shore up your support. Put [brackets] around statements of your ideas.
    • Review each statement. Is it supported with explanations and details? If not, add facts, statistics, expert opinions, or reasons.
    ACTIVITY - ANSWER OPPOSING ARGUMENTS FULLY AND COMPLETELY
    • Illustrate your plan
    STEP 5
    • Now you have a plan!
    • Revise for more persuasive language. Use precise words instead of vague ones such as really and very.
    • Craft a strong ending. You may want to make your point one more time in a brief summary statement.
    ACTIVITY: ILLUSTRATE YOUR PLAN
    • Write!
    STEP 6
    • Finally, it is time to write the first draft.
    • Check your grammar.
    • Do you have different sentence structures?
    • Check that words are spelled correctly.
    WRITE!
    • This assignment could easily be extended into other End Products such as:
    • Speech
    • Advertisement
    • Poster
    • Multi-media presentation
    • One-act play
    • Cartoon
    EXTENSIONS
  • WHAT ABOUT INTENSIVE READING PLUS (IR+)?
  • EXPLORING SENTENCE ELEMENTS
  • MINI-LESSONS When in the writing process do these skills come into play? Composing Literary
    • Strong verbs
    • Descriptive attributes
    • Composing and expanding sentences
    • Specificity - Word choice
    • Comparisons
    • Dialogue
    • Sensory detail
    • Voice
    • Sentence variation
  • SENTENCE ELEMENTS Simple sentence Simple sentence with initial phrase Simple sentence Simple sentence with initial phrase Initial Medial Final 1. The proposal was rejected in spite of its merits. 2. In spite of its merits, the proposal was rejected. 3. I will love her forever and ever.
    • Forever and
    • ever,
    I will love her.
  • WHAT DID YOU NOTICE? Initial Medial Final
    • Josephine
    is inclined to put the cart before the horse.
    • Because she is
    • under the weather,
    Imelda wasn’t interested in shoes. 3. Father Wilson intoned “ To think well is to live well.”
    • “ To think well is to live well”
    intoned Father Wilson.
    • Graph the following fragments in the positions they can occupy.
    • in spite of her behavior
    • Jose was excited
    • in the nick of time
    • because she was exhausted
    • for love or money
    • I will learn
    ACTIVITY – STORY ELEMENTS Initial Position Medial Position Final Position
    • When it comes to language, nothing is more satisfying than to write a good sentence.
    • - Barbara Tuchman
    • Killgallon offers 4 techniques to help students gain practice with mature sentence structures they seldom use.
    • sentence unscrambling
    • sentence imitating
    • sentence combining
    • sentence expanding
    4 SENTENCE-MANIPULATING TECHNIQUES
    • Here’s a list of sentences, all written by professional writers, but with some parts deleted.
    • It went away slowly.
    • The land that lay stretched out before him became of vast significance.
    • However, I looked with a mixture of admiration and awe at Peter.
    • Now compare those sentences with the originals. Notice that the additions account for the distinctiveness of the original sentences. The boldfaced phrases are appositives.
    • 1a. It went away slowly, the feeling of disappointment that came sharply after the thrill that made his shoulders ache .
    • Ernest Hemingway, “Big Two-Hearted River”
    IDENTIFYING THE APPOSITIVE PHRASE 2a. The land that lay stretched out before him became of vast significance, a place peopled by his fancy with a new race of men sprung from himself. Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio 3a. However, I looked with a mixture of admiration and awe at Peter, a boy who could and did imitate a police siren every morning on his way to the showers. Robert Russell, To Catch an Angel
    • Appositives are noun phrases that identify adjacent nouns or pronouns. They can occur as sentence openers, subject-verb splits, or sentence closers.
    CHARACTERISTICS OF THE APPOSITIVE PHRASE A Sentence Opener is any word, phrase, or clause—or mixture of words, phrases, or clauses—at the beginning of a sentence. OPENER , subject – verb. A Subject-Verb Split is any word, phrase, or clause—or mixture of words, phrases, or clauses—between a subject and verb. Subject , SPLIT , verb.  
    • Appositives are noun phrases that identify adjacent nouns or pronouns. They can occur as sentence openers, subject-verb splits, or sentence closers.
    • However, I looked with a mixture of admiration and awe at Peter, a boy who could and did imitate a police siren every morning on his way to the showers.
    • Robert Russell, To Catch an Angel
    CHARACTERISTICS OF THE APPOSITIVE PHRASE Subject – verb , CLOSER. A Sentence Closer is any word, phrase, or clause—or mixture of words, phrases, or clauses—at the ending of a sentence. Subject – verb , CLOSER.
    • OPENER , subject – verb.
    • One of eleven brothers and sisters, Harriet was a moody, willful child.
    • Langston Hughes, “Road to Freedom”
    • Subject , SPLIT , verb.
    • Poppa, a good quiet man , spent the last hours before our parting moving aimlessly about the yard, keeping to himself and avoiding me.
    • Gordon Parks, “My Mother’s Dream for Me”
    ACTIVITY: IDENTIFY THE PATTERN
    • 3. A short, round boy of seven, he took little interest in troublesome things, preferring to remain on good terms with everyone.
    • Mildred D. Taylor, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
    • 4. A man, a weary old pensioner with a bald dirty head and a stained brown corduroy waistcoat , appeared at the door of a small gate lodge.
    • Brian Moore, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne
    ACTIVITY: IDENTIFY THE PATTERN
    • Directions: Each scrambled sentence has one or more appositives. Identify them. Then unscramble the sentence parts and write out the sentence, punctuating it correctly.
    • 1a. an old, bowlegged
    • fellow in a pale-blue
    • sweater
    • the judge
    • and was reading over some notes he had taken
    • had stopped examining the animals
    • on the back of a dirty envelope
    • Jessamyn West, “The Lesson”
    • 2a . went over to Tom
    • Willy’s saloon
    • in the late afternoon
    • Will Henderson
    • and editor of the
    • Eagle
    • e . owner
    • Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio
    PRACTICE 1 - UNSCRAMBLING
    • Directions: Unscramble both lists of sentence parts to make two sentences that imitate the first model. Then, imitate the same model by writing your own sentence. Finally write imitations of the other models, making all of your sentence parts like those in the model.
    • Scrambled Imitation 1
    • 1a. president and valedictorian of the senior class
    • b. by the podium
    • c. intelligent and composed and smiling
    • e. scholarly Henrietta stood
    • Model: Beside the fireplace old Doctor Winter sat, bearded and simple and benign, historian and physician to the town.
    • John Steinbeck, The Moon Is Down
    • Scrambled Imitation 2
    • 2a. beaming and affectionate and happy
    • b. bride and groom in their finery
    • c. they danced
    • d. under the canopy
    PRACTICE 2 – IMITATING
    • Model: Among the company was a lawyer, a young man of about twenty-five.
    • Anton Chekhov, “The Bet”
    • Sentences to Be Combined
    • She was near the statue
    • She was an obvious tourist.
    • She was an oriental lady.
    • She had a Kodak camera.
    • Imitation
    • Combination
    PRACTICE 3 – COMBINING
    • Directions: At the slash mark, add an appositive phrase. In sentences 1-2, the first few words are provided and the number of words omitted from the original is noted in brackets after the slash mark. Approximate that number in your expanded sentence. In sentences 3-6, add whatever seems appropriate.
    • Out in the distance the fans of windmills twinkled, turning, and about the base of each, about the drink tank, was a speckle of dots, a herd of cattle / [13].
    • Glendon Swarthout , Bless the Beasts and Children
    • Perhaps two or three times a year we would come together at a party, one of those teen-age affairs which last until dawn with singing and dancing and silly games such as “Kiss the Pillow,” or “Post Office,” the game which / [18].
    • Henry Miller , Stand Still Like the Hummingbird
    PRACTICE 4 – EXPANDING
    • What applications do you see in your classroom?
    • What scaffolding needs to occur before you can try some of Killgallon’s techniques?
    • How are you currently teaching more sophisticated composing skills?
    ACTIVITY: DISCUSSION
    • Writing takes many forms. Sometimes an author uses jokes and humor to entertain the reader. Other times, the writer employs idioms, puns, and satire to poke fun.
    • Jesters are stereotypically thought to have worn brightly colored clothes and eccentric hats in a motley pattern. Their hats were especially distinctive; made of cloth they were floppy with three points, each of which had a jingle bell at the end. The three points of the hat represent the donkey’s ears and tail worm by jesters of old.
    • Jesters assumed the role of either a natural fool or a licensed fool to compose nit-witted, moronic performances. Escape now from the hard work of serious composing to laugh, mock and enjoy the many forms of writing.
    • For a few moments, become a jester, a wit-cracker or buffoon as you explore your creative side with mock marotte (prop stick or scepter) in hand.
    WHO SAYS THAT WRITING IN HIGH SCHOOL CAN’T BE FUN?
  • REBUS PUZZLES
  •  
  •  
    • The task is to illustrate differences between males and females.
    • This may take the form of a chart, diagram, illustration , or a how-to-manual.
    G.I.S.T - MALE VS. FEMALE
  • G.I.S.T - MALE VS. FEMALE
  • EATS SHOOTS AND LEAVES
    • Dear Jack
    • I want a man who knows what love is all about you are generous kind thoughtful people who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior you have ruined me for other men I yearn for you I have no feelings whatsoever when we’re apart I can be forever happy will you let me be yours  
    • Jill
    PUNCTUATE THIS LETTER
    • Dear Jack,
    • I want a man who knows what love is all about. You are generous, kind, thoughtful. People who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me for other men. I yearn for you. I have no feelings whatsoever when we’re apart. I can be forever happy – will you let me be yours? Jill
    • Dear Jack,
    • I want a man who knows what love is. All about you are generous, kind, thoughtful people, who are not like you. Admit to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me for other men I yearn. For you I have no feelings whatsoever. When we’re apart I can be forever happy. Will you let me be?
    • Yours,  
    • Jill
    PUNCTUATION CHANGES MEANING.
    • Home Talk – Benjamin
    • Thomas: Hey, brudda. How come you got such got such good grade. Huh?
    • Benjamin: Nah. Nah. Uncle. My grades not that good.
    • Thomas : You betcha. Goo. Jes kidding, man. I know you jes smart. You got da brain, no lie. An you use it too. It not jes restin gaint da bone. When you was a kid, you kind screw round, and junior high, everting was football. Football. Now in high school, you got serious. And dat’s good. But I worry sometime your serious ways get between you and your friends because they still screw ups, you know. Well, not toally, but not school boys. You know what I mean? Is dat trouble?
    • School Talk
    • Directions: Rewrite the dialogue between Benjamin and his Uncle Thomas using a more formal style.
    • Thomas: Hey, brother. I see you got good grades. Nice job!
    • Benjamin:
    • Thomas:
    HOME TALK - VOICE
    • Carnival in Italy
    • nobleman
    • pompous drunk
    • insult, revenge
    • rare wine
    • cold, damp vaults
    • chained
    • “ a very good joke indeed”
    • loud and shrill screams
    • “ may he rest in peace”
    • Ask for 10 volunteers from the class to come forward.
    • Instruct the group to stand in a straight line.
    • Give each student a word or phrase, but not display the entire list before beginning the activity.
    • Begin with the phrase “Carnival in Italy” to create a story beginning.
    • Each participant repeats their original sentence as the next volunteer adds a sentence or two to the story line using the given words/phrases.
    • Encourage as much elaboration as possible.
    STORY IMPRESSIONS
    • This 7 slide PowerPoint was created by a 10 th grader to “advertise” a good book.
    • Right CLICK on the image
    • Scroll to “Present Object”
    • CLICK “Show”
    DIGITAL BOOK TEASER
    • This 60 second digital example was created to show the destructive force of tornadoes.
    • DOUBLE CLICK on the image to start the video.
    DIGITAL STORY TELLING
    • Click on the rectangle to start this 25 second video entitled “Struggling Dinosaurs.
    DIGITAL STORY TELLING
    • Directions:
    • 1. Direct students to create and maintain a portable word wall containing both implicitly and explicitly taught vocabulary.
    • 2. Encourage students to add words to the chart from all content areas (math, science, social studies, health, arts).
    • 3. Students increase fluency when they have enough vocabulary to build oral and written conversations.
    PORTABLE WORD WALL A-B C-D E-F G-H I-J K-L M-N O-P Q-R S-T U-V WXYZ
  • RESPONSIBILITIES SCHOOL-SITE FOLLOW-UP
    • Share the Planning for a Rigorous Middle School Writing Lesson with administrators, Literacy Leadership team, and Language Arts department.
    • Model and implementation the Writing Process with 7 th and 8 th grade teams.
    • Share and plan with grade level peers.
    • Provide support to grade level peers for implementation.
  • DIVISION OF LANGUAGE ARTS/READING
    • Dr. Sharon Scruggs-Williams
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • North & North Central Region
    • Dr. Erin Cuartas
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • South Central & North Central Region
    • Laurie Kaplan
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • South Region
    • 305-995-3122